The academy of armory, or, A storehouse of armory and blazon containing the several variety of created beings, and how born in coats of arms, both foreign and domestick : with the instruments used in all trades and sciences, together with their their terms of art : also the etymologies, definitions, and historical observations on the same, explicated and explained according to our modern language : very usefel [sic] for all gentlemen, scholars, divines, and all such as desire any knowledge in arts and sciences
Holme, Randle, 1627-1699.

Terms used by Taylors.

In a Womens Gown there are these several parts, as

  • The Stayes, which is the body of the Gown before the Sleeves are put too, or covered with the outward stuff: which have these peeces in it, and terms used about it
  • The fore Part, or fore Body: which is the Breast part, which hath two peeces in it; as,
    • The Right side of the Fore-body.
    • The Left side of the Fore-body.
  • The two side parts, which are peeces under both Arms on the sides.
  • The Back.
  • The Shoulder heads, or Shoulder straps; are two peeces that come over the Sholders and are fastned to the Forebody: through which the Arms are put.
  • Scoreing, or Strick iines on the Canvice to sow straight.
  • Stitching, is sowing all along the lines with close stitches to keep the Whale-Bone each peece from other.
  • — is the cleaving of the Whale-Bone to what substance or thickness the workman pleaseth.
  • Boning the Stays, is to put the slit Bone into eve∣ry one of the places made for it between each stitched line which makes Stayes or Bodies stiff and strong.
  • Cordy Robe skirts to the Staies, are such Stayes as are cut into Labells at the bottom, like long slender skirts.
  • Lining the Bodies, or Stayes; is covering the inside of the Stayes with Fustian, Linnen, and such like.
  • Binding the Neck, is sowing Galloon, at the edge of the Neck.
  • Eylet holes, or Eiglet holes, little round holes whipt-stitched about, through which laces are drawn to hold one side close to the other.
  • The Waist, is the depth of the Stayes from the Shoul∣ders to the setting on of the skirts: now it is distinguished by the Back Waist, and the fore-body Waist, which is each side of the Stomacher.
  • Side Waisted, is long or deep in the Body.
  • Short Waisted, is short in the Body.
  • The Stomacher, is that peece as lieth under the lacing or binding on of the Body of the Gown, which said body is somtimes in fashion to be.
  • Open before, that is to be laced on the Breast.
  • Open behind, laced on the Back, which fashion hath always a Maid or Woman to dress the wearer.
  • The Peake, is the bottom or point of the Stomacher, whether before or behind.
  • A Busk, it is a strong peece of Wood, or Whale-bone thrust down the middle of the Stomacher, to keep it streight and in compass, that the Breast nor Belly shall not swell too much out. These Buskes are usually made in length according to the necessity of the persons wearing it: if to keep in the fullness of the Breasts, then it extends to the Navel: if to keep the Belly down, then it reacheth to the Honor.
  • A Point.
  • Covering the Bodies or Stayes, is the laying the out∣side stuff upon it, which is sowed on the same after diverse fashious: as,
    • Smooth Covered.
    • Pleated or Wrinkled in the covering.
  • The Wings, are Welts or peeces set over the place on the top of the Shoulders, where the Body and Sleeves are set together: now Wings are of diverse fashi∣ons, some narrow, others broad; some cut in slits, cordy Robe like, others Scalloped.
  • The Sleeves, are those parts of the Gown, as covers the Arms: and in these there is as much variety of fashi∣on, as days in the Year: I shall only give the terms of the most remarkable.
  • The close, or narrow Sleeve; which reacheth from the Shoulder to the Wrist of the Arm, and is not much wider then for the Arm: which were of old turn∣ed up at the Hand, and faced or lined with some other sort of stuff.
  • The Wide, or full Sleeve; is such as are full and long, and stand swelling out: such are tied about the El∣bow close to the Arm with a Ribbon.
  • The open Sleeve, such are open the fore part of the Arm, that their bravery under may be seen whether it be a mock or cheat Waist-coat with Imbrauthery or the like; else their fine L••nens and Laces.
  • Page  95The slasht Sleeve, is when the Sleeve from Shoulder to the Sleeve hands are cut in long slices, or fillets: and are tied together at the Elbow with Ribbons, or such like.
  • The Sleeve and half Sleeve.
  • The Sleeves with hanging Sleeves, is a full Sleeve in any of the fashions aforesaid, with a long hang∣ing Sleeve of a good breadth hanging from under the back part of the Wing down behind, even to the ground; in the greater sorts of Gallants trailing a good length on the ground.
  • The half Sleeves with Hounds Ears, are such as extend to the Elbow and there turn up, and being slit or open hang at the Elbow like Dogs Ears.
  • The Rim of the Sleeve, is that part which is at the Sleeve hand either lined or Edged or Welted: but of these sorts of Sleeves see their figures and shapes, chap. 5. numb. 130.131. &c.
  • The Faceing.
  • The Skirt, or Gown Skirt; is the lower part of the Gown, which extends from the body to the ground: these are made several fashions, as
  • Open Skirts, is open before, that thereby rich and costly Peti-coat may be fully seen.
  • Turned up Skirts, are such as have a draught on the Ground a yard and more long; these is great Per∣sonages are called Trains, whose Honor it is to have them born up by Pages.
  • Bearers, Rowls, Fardingales; are things made purposely to put under the skirts of Gowns at their setting on at the Bodies; which raise up the skirt at that place to what breadth the wearer pleaseth, and as the fashion is.
  • Skirts about the Waist, are either whole in one en∣tire peece with Goares, or else cut into little laps or cordy robe skirts: Gowns with these skirts are called Waistcoat-Gowns.
  • Wastcoat, or Waistcoast; is the outside of a Gown without either stayes or bodies fastned to it; It is an Habit or Garment generally worn by the middle and lower sort of Women, having Goared skirts, and some wear them with Stomachers.
  • Goare, is a Cant or three cornered peece of cloath put into a skirt, to make the bottom wider then the top: so are Goared Peti-coats.
  • Peti-coat, is the skirt of a Gown without its body; but that is generally termed a Peti-coat, which is worn either under a Gown, or without it: in which Garment there are
  • Peating, that is gathering the top part in into Pleats or folding to make it of the same wideness as the Waist of middle of the wearer.
  • Laceing, is setting a Lace of Silk, Silver or Gold a∣bout the bottom of it; which in a Peti-coat is called the Skirt.
  • Bodering, is the lineing of the Peti-coat skirt or bot∣tom in the inner side.
  • Binding, is the sowing of some things (as Ribbon, Galloon or such like) on both sides the Edge of the skirt to keep it from ravelling; sometime it is done by a Hem: the top part of the Peti-coat hath its Binding also; that is, it hath either Incle, Filleting, or Galloon, sowed about the Edges of it, when pleated: which keeps the Pleats in their Pleats, the ends helping to make it fast about the wearers Waist.
  • Hem, is the turning of the Edge of the cloath in; two fould or more, then sowing it up, keeps it from ravelling.
  • Tucking, is to draw up the depth of a Peti-coat be∣ing too side or long, and that is by foulding a part over another
  • Pocket, or Pocket holes; are little Bags set on the inside, with a hole, or slit on the outside; by which any small thing may be carried about, or kept therein.
  • A Mantua, is a kind of loose Coat without any stayes in it, the Body part and Sleeves are of as many fa∣shions as I have mentioned in the Gown Body; but the skirt is sometime no longer then the Knees, others have them down to the Heels. The short skirt is open before, and behind to the middle: this is called,
    • A Semmer, or Samare; have a lose body, and four side laps, or skirs; which entend to the knee, the sleeves short not to the Elbow turned up and faced.
    • The Riding Suite for Women.
    • The Hood.
    • The Cap.
    • The Mantle, it is cut round, which is cast over the Shoulders to preserve from rain or cold.
    • The Safegard, is put about the middle, and so doth secure the Feet from cold, and dirt.
    • The Riding Coat, it is a long Coat buttoned down before like a Mans Jaket, with Pocket holes; and the sleeves turned up and buttons.

In a Mans Suite of cloaths there are these several parts: as

  • The Doublet, it is the whole covering for the upper part of the Man: in which there is these peeces and terms.
  • The two Fore Bodies.
  • The two Back parts.
  • The Waist, is the length form the shoulder to the middle, now in a Doublet it may be the fashion to be
  • Short Waisted.
  • Side Waisted.
  • The Skirts or Laps, because one lieth a little over another, they are distinguished by the fore skirts, side skirts and hinder skirts; sometimes the custom is to have them more or less, big and little: narrow or short, and large or deep.
  • The Collar, is that part as compsseth the Neck.
  • The Belly peeces, the inward stiffning of the Breast of the Doublet.
  • The Linning, is fine Flaxed or Linnen; called the out Lining.
  • The Inner Lining, is Canvice, Buckram, or such like, next to the cloth or stuff, between it and the foresaid Lining.
  • The Waist-band, is a — under the skirts to which the straps are fastned.
  • The Eyes, or Holders; are small Wiers made round through which the Breeches hooks are put, to keep them from falling.
  • Straps, are peeces of Leather fastned to the Waist-band instead of Eyes, or holders.
  • Waistcoat, is a close Garment worn under a Doub∣let, and within the Waist-band of the Breeches.
  • A Pacadile, a thing put about Man or Womans Neck to support and bear up the Band, or Gorget.
  • The Sleeves, are the covers of the Arms and are of Page  96 diverse fashions, as I have set down in Womens sleeves.
  • Sleeve hands, the lowest part of the sleeve next the Wrist.
  • Turn ups, or Cufts; are the turning up of the end of the Doublet next the hand.
  • A Slasht Doublet, is when both sleeves, and back, and fore-body, are cut like unto long slices, or fillets.
  • Button holes, are such long slitt holes whipped a∣bout with a Loop at each end, as are in the left part of the Fore-body, and at the sleeve hands, to receive the Buttons on the right side, and to keep it close together.
  • The Faceing, is to Face the sleeve hands, is to adorn the turn up, with some other sort of Stuff or Silk, then the suit of Cloaths is made off.
  • The Breeches, is that part of cloathing which covers a Man from his Waist to his Knees; of the fashion of them there is many extent, I shall tell of some few.
  • The Spanish Breeches, are those that are stret and close to the Thigh, and are buttoned up the sides from the Knee with about ten or twelve buttons: anciently called Trowses.
  • The Sailers Breeches, are full and gathered both in the Waist and at the Knees; standing full out.
  • The Open Breeches, are such as are full and wide and not gathered at the Knees, but hang loose and open.
  • The Pantiloon Breeches.
  • The Trunk Breeches.
  • The Peticoat Breeches, are short and wide Coats with Waist bands, having no petition, or sowing up be∣tween the Legs; but all open like a short Peticoat, from whence they are named.
  • Triming, is any thing put on, or about the Doublet, or Breeches: whereby they are adorne and made more Gent, whether it be by Ruffles, Laces, Ribons, But∣tons, Loopes, Scalloping, &c.
  • In the Brceches, there are these several parts.
  • The Waistband.
  • The Hookes.
  • The Cottonings, is that with which the cloth or outward stuff of the Breeches are Lined.
  • The Drawers, are Linnen Breeches worn under the Breeches which are tied about the Waist and either a∣bove or under the Knees.
  • The Pockets, are little bags set in the sides of the Breeches to put or carry any small thing in.
  • The Seat, the hinder part on which we sit; also the inner part which is at the Breech.
  • The Out side▪ of the Breeches.
  • The Cod-peece, or open of the Breeches before.
  • The Knees.

Loose Garments usually worn over the Doublet and Breeches are such as these following.

  • A Stret bodied Coat, this is close to the Body and Arms, and is usually worn without a Doublet, having un∣der it a Waistcote with side or deep skirts almost to the Knees. These kind of Waistcoats are called Chates; because they are to be seen rich and gaudy before, when all the back part is no such thing.
  • A Uest, is a kind of wide Garment reaching to the knees open before and turned up with a Faceing of line∣ing, the Sleeves wrought to the Elbows and there were turned up with a round faceing: under it was worn ano∣ther side skirted Coat made fit to the Body after the man∣ner of a Doublet, which was called a Tunick: the sleeves of it were narrow, and rought below the Elbow to the middle of the Arm, where it was all beset with knots of Ribbons: about the middle was worn a Silken Girdle, which was called a Zoan, or Sash: chap. 3. numb. 23.
  • A Iacket, or Iumpe, or loose Coat: It extendeth to the Thighs is open or buttoned down before, open or slit up behind half way: the Sleeves reach to the Wrist having the turn-up sometime round, then with Hounds Ears, and an other time square.
  • A Mandilion, or Madilion, or of old a Mante∣vil: It is a lose Coat without Sleeves it reacheth in the skirt to the seat of the Breeches, and is open before, it hath hanging Sleeves which hang down backwards, al∣most as side as the skirt: chap. 3. numb. 24.
  • A Coat, or Riding Coat; is a full Coat both wide and side with long and wide Sleeves to be drawn over o∣ther kind of Garments.
  • A Coat with a round Cape, is the same as aore hav∣ing a Cape added to the neck part of it.
  • A Mantle, is a round thing made of any stuff, having a round hole in the middle, and so is cut through to the hole, which being put about the neck hangs round about the wearer: which according to the fashion, is large or little, faced or laced &c. chap. 3. numb. 32.
  • A Rocket, is a Cloak without a Cape.
  • A Cloak, is a peece of Cloth or Stuff cut round with a hole in the Center of it as the Mantle, on the back of it, is a Cape placed; some are deepe Capes, some narrow, others loose from the Cloak part at Cape ends: chap. 3. numb. 34.35.