The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy

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Title
The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy
Author
Du Moulin, Pierre, 1568-1658.
Publication
London :: Printed by T[homas] S[nodham] for Nathaniel Newbery, and are to be sold at the signe of the Starre vnder Saint Peters Church in Cornehill, and in Popes head Alley,
1620.
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Subject terms
Synod of Dort (1618-1619) -- Early works to 1800.
Arminianism -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A69245.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 23, 2024.

Pages

CHAP. 2.

That we are not therefore altogether to abstaine from the doctrine of Prouidence and Preestination, although some abuse it to curiosity and impiety. And whereto it is profitable.

THere are some who being weary of the con∣tentions which proceede from the doctrine of Prouidence and Predestination, doe thinke that it is most safe for the peace of the Church and quiet of conscience, not to touch

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these questions, nor to speake any words of them to the people, to be suggested into them: seeing that by these speeches scruples are fastned in mens mindes, doubtings are bred, and the faith of the weake is sha∣ken. Let the people be taught, (say they,) not what God doth or decreeth, but what he would haue to be done by vs: let the doctrine of good Workes be in∣stilled into their minds, and the secrets of Election and Reprobation left to God.

Surely this speech sauoureth more of honesty, then truth. For these men while they make shew of the stu∣dy of piety, and loue of concord; they doe secretly accuse Christ and his Apostles of imprudency and in∣discretion, because they so often beate vpon the do∣ctrine of Election, in the new Testament. And while they are held with a preposterous religion, they are the authors, that the Pastours of the Church cut a∣way a portion from the word of God; neither doe they propound to the people the intire Doctrine of the Gospell. And whilest in a voluntary ignorance they affect the praise of modesty, they require discreti∣on in God himselfe.

And what shall we say to this; that without this Doctrine, due honour cannot be giuen to God, nor our faith made stable? For by the Doctrine of Prede∣stination, that immeasurable heape of the goodnesse and loue of God towards vs, by which he loued vs and respected vs, before the foundations of the world were laid, doth enter into our mindes. Also whatso∣uer light or grace God doth measure to vs, is ac∣knowledged to be a riuer flowing from that eternall loue. By this doctrine mans merits doe fall to the

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ground; and the imaginary faculty of free-will in things pertaining to saluation, doth vanish away. The confidence of our saluation will also stagger, vnlesse it be vpholden by the immutable decree of God, and not by mans free-will. This doctrine also is a great lightning of our sorrowes, and mittigation of all bit∣ternesse: while we consider that all things, euen those that are most grieuous, turne to the good of them, who are called by the purpose of God. Neither is there any more forcible instigation to good workes, then the acknowledgement of that eternall loue, wherewith God, in Christ, hath loued vs before all worlds. Finally, by this doctrine we are taught to search into our selues and to try our owne conscien∣ces, to finde in vs, and to stirre vp the testimonies of our election; knowing that our owne endeauour and care ought to further the election of God, and that by the way of hell, that is, by impenitency and vnbeliefe, it is impossible to come to heauen.

This Doctrine therefore, the Scripture being our guide, may profitably be propounded, so we keepe mediocrity betweene affected ignorance, and rash cu∣riosity; and follow such a moderation, that while we doe auoide things vnlawfull, we doe not abstaine from those that are lawfull.

In this worke we haue to doe with men which of∣fend both wayes, and doe runne vpon either extre∣mity: For if any one, Arminius doth breake into the secrets of God, and doth with a scrupulous curi∣osity cut into peeces the decree of Election; and yet the same man doth extenuate the whole doctrine of Election, as a thing, which if it were not knowne;

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Gods loue by it would not be diminished towards vs, nor any iniury done to his grace: They which denie this election (saith he) denie that which is true, but without any wrong to the grace or mercy of God.

Notes

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