The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy

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Title
The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy
Author
Du Moulin, Pierre, 1568-1658.
Publication
London :: Printed by T[homas] S[nodham] for Nathaniel Newbery, and are to be sold at the signe of the Starre vnder Saint Peters Church in Cornehill, and in Popes head Alley,
1620.
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Subject terms
Synod of Dort (1618-1619) -- Early works to 1800.
Arminianism -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A69245.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 23, 2024.

Pages

CHAP. I.

How soberly we are to deale in this Argument.

IF in any other Argument especially in this which we are to treate of, that rule of Saint Paul is to be kept; that no man be wise aboue that he ought, but that he be wise vnto sobriety. For God hath put a great mist ouer the se∣crets of his wisedome, into which it is a sinne to rush, lest while wee search into his Maiesty, we be ouer∣pressed by his glory: It is better to vnderstand things that are safe, then things that are high; and to keepe Gods commandements, then to pry into his counsels. This curiosity hath vndone mankinde. Adam, whilest he would be like God in the knowledge of good and

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euill, lost his good, and learned euill to his losse, be∣ing punished. Hence Heresies haue beene bred, whilest men, violently carried with the itching of their owne wit, runne out beyond the bounds of Gods word. Hence haue proceeded those troubles which Sathan hath stirred vp in this age (which is as fertill of dis∣putes, as it is barren of piety:) hauing vsed therto men, who by their lewd wit and rash presumption, daring to call God to account, and to prescribe lawes to him, haue greatly afflicted the most flourishing Churches of the low-Countries. Most safe therefore it is to fol∣low God as our guide, to vnderstand so much as hee hath made manifest to vs in his word, to command silence to our selues, where God himselfe speaketh not. But we must haue a very great care, least we patronize and maintaine the wisdome and prouidence of God, with the damage of his iustice: and againe, lest while we defend his iustice, wee put out the eyes of his pro∣uidence. God is not to be thought vniust, if hee doe any thing that doth not euery way answere to the rules we haue conceiued in our owne mindes. These two things are seriously to be auoided, as two fatall and dangerous rockes; and yet it is farre worse to set on God the marke of iniustice, then to place limits to his prouidence. For with lesse perill is God made a carelesse spectator and beholder of sinne, then if he be beleeued to be the author and incitor to sinne. Nei∣ther is there any more capitall mischiefe, then to trans∣ferre on God the cause of mans wickednesse. For thus it comes to pass, that men hauing broken their bars, doe scot free commit all riot, as hauing God the pa∣tron and author of their wickednesse.

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And yet to restraine curiositie, and to strike our mindes with a religious feare, the consideration of our owne meanenesse being compared to the diuine maiestie, is much profitable. For if any of vs should crush to death an Ant with his foot, no man would lay to his charge an action of iniustice for it, although the Ant hath not offended him, although he hath not giuen life to the Ant, although he hath destroyed an∣others worke, which cannot be restored by man, and although betweene man and it, there is no infinite in∣equality, but a kinde of certaine and finite proporti∣on. But man hath grieuously offended God, and yet God hath giuen life to man, and there is no proporti∣on betweene God and man, but as infinite a distance, as betweene a finite and infinite thing. If therefore God shall crush those sinfull men, which he is able to saue; if patiently tolerating the vessels of anger, he shall make them the matter of his glory, shall any man ex∣postulate with God, or thinke goodnesse wanting in him, or accuse his iustice?

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