The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 22. Of Quarting and Volting.

Ma.

My next and last Lesson is called Quarting and Volting, and is to be played off the streight line.

Sch.

I intreat you shew me how this lesson is to be played?

Page  101
Ma.

You must play it after this manner, * you may either only Quart, or Volt, or Quart and Volt immediatly after other, if you only Quart, you must when your Adversary offer∣eth to bind your sword without, immediatly before he touch your sword, give him the thrust, by slipping him, and in the very time you slipp him, throw your left foot behind you off the streight line backwards towards your adversary, & give him the thrust at his breast, by keeping your right legg close and stretched, this is called Dequarting or Quar∣ting off the streight line; see plat: 9. fig: 2. and if you intend to Volt, you may either take the same verie time, or when he is going to Bind you within, but this time is not so safe as the former, or you may Volt after you have Bound his sword, this is a verie good time, but whatsoever time you take, you must Volt, or leap with both your feet in the Air at once, quite by your Adversaries left shoul∣der, and in the time you Volt, Quart your head well, to prevent a Contre-temps, and give him the thrust at his left pap, and Volt quite out of his Measure, and then stand to your Guard again, and remember when you either Quart or Volt, alwayes to make use of your left hand for fear of a Contre-temps. But if you intend to Quart, and Volt immedi∣atly Page  102after other; then you must first quart as I have shewn you, but give not your thrust with your quarting, and afterwards volt, I say you must first quart, and secure his sword within, by binding in the verie time you quart, and immediatly after give him the thrust at his left Pap, by volting as I told you, now the properest time, of Quarting, and volting, immediatly after other, is when your Adversary giveth in a thrust within your Sword, or when he goeth to bind your Sword without, then immedi∣atly you Quart, and with the Quarting secur∣eth and Parieth his thrust as it were, although the Quarting of it self shuneth it sufficiently, yet it is farr surer first to secure his Sword, in the time you Quart, and then with your volt you give the thrust, as I before shew you.

Sch

I see this is a difficult Lesson, and should not be played, but when one hath a verie fair opportunity for in playing of it, a man throweth his body wholly open to his Adversarie.

Ma

Sir your observation is good, and I am glad to see you reflect upon the secu∣rity, and hazard a man may be in when he maketh use of such, and such a lesson, for it is a great signe that you will reap advantage, from what I have at pre∣sent Page  103been teaching you.

Sch.

I pray you if you have a Contrary to this Quarting and Volting, shew me it?

Ma.

There is no other contrary to this Lesson,* but when you perceive that your Adversary is either going to quart, or Volt, to Rebind him without his sword, by making use of the contre caveating Parade, and give him the Thrust streight home, or you may take time and Volt upon him.

Sch.

And are you now Sir at an end with your Lessons?

Ma.

Yes.

Sch.

But have you no more to say, before you go on to the pursuing and defending of the several Guards?

Ma.

No, for although there might be a great deal more said, yet I think what I have taught you, sufficient to make you a Master of this Art, providing you practise it exactly, for the Lessons which I have shewn you, are those upon which this Art depends, so that a Man that can once play them exactlie, in my opinion needeth no other, besides that a Man when once he knoweth the common grounds, may ac∣cording to his own fancy, invent very good Lessons, together with their contraries, for his own practice, for all Lessons that can Page  104be invented, depend upon thir that I have been shewing you.

Sch.

Sir I think there is a great deal of reason for what you say, but now let us go to the several Guards, and see how they must be pursued and defended