The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

First, Of the Quart Guard with a streight point.

Ma.

I shall begin then with the quart guard with a streight point, for a man that can pur∣sue, or defend well upon that Guard, will easily pursue, or defend, upon any of the rest: Now because I have shewn you already in the beginning of our discourse, in Page 16. and 17. How this Guard was to be keept, I shall not in this place trouble you with the repetition of it, but shall refer you to the Page and Plate wherein it is described. viz. Page 16. and Plat. 2. Fig. 1. or 2. but for my own part I preferr the second figure of the same Plate farr before the first but you may take your choise of either.

Sch.

You say well Sir, but how am I to pur∣sue Page  105this Quart Guard with a streight point?*

Ma.

Before I shew you how to pursue it particularly, you must know that all Guards as well as this, are Generally pursued by ••∣ther, Falsefying, Binding, Bearing, or a Plain Thrust, now if you intend to persue your Adversary, he keeping this Quart Guard, with a streight point, you may first try him with Feints, and if you perceive that he an∣swer your Feints, then you need make use of no other Lesson against him, but if he do not answer your ordinary single, and Double Feints,hen try him with your other Feints, viz, the ingle, and Double Feint at the head, Battery ngle, and Double, or volt-coupe, and if you e that none of those Lessons will have flect; the second pursuit you must make se of, must be by Binding of his sword, for 〈◊〉 you can do that well, you will force Thrusts upon him, whereas by the for∣er, you strive first to deceive him, and en to give him the Thrust, Thirdly you ay pursue him by striking of his sword, ith one, or both your Hands, and either ive him the Thrust with a closs left Foot, 〈◊〉 if you see a fit oppurtunity Pass immedi∣ly after your stroak, & either give him the hrust, or Command him: Fourthly, if he pp you when you are either going to Bind,Page  106or Beat his sword, then immediatly Rebind him by making use of the Contre-caveating-Parade, Fifthly, you may try him with all sorts of Lessons, and what Lessos you find have most effect, those use most frequent∣ly against him, if he Break your Measure, then Redouble your Thrust again, and wha ever Lesson you design to play upon him, by any means remember to have a care that he take not time upon it, you would mind this Rule well, for it is of great importance to a sword Man, I might fill a Volume with the description of Lessons with their contraries together with their contraries, as also with the contraries of those contraries, all which would in a manner signifie nothing to you but to Embarasse your Judgement. There∣fore I think what I have said to you, con∣cerning the Pursuit of this Guard sufficient seing you understand all the Lessons, and may make use of any of them as you think fit.

Sch.

I think Sir you are in the right, f•• if a Man once know the grounds, he may easi•• of himself invent Lessons, to win at, and cros his Adversarie.

Ma.

'Tis very true he may so, and it 〈◊〉 upon that account, I have cut my dis¦course so short, thinking any more con∣cerning Page  107the Pursuit of this Guard altoge∣ther unnecessary.

Sch.

But how am I to defend my self, if my Adversarie should pursue me, I keeping this Guard?

Ma.

You must Defend your self two wayes, either by parieing,* or by using con∣traries to the Lessons your Adversarie playes upon you, if you intend to Defend your self by parieing, which certainlie is the best way, when once a Man is Master of it, then use any of the five Parades I shew you in the Defensive part according to your discretion, and Judgment, but if you intend to use Contraries, then make use of the Contraries which belongeth to the Lessons you Judge your Adversarie is to play upon you, the which Contraries you know, all alongst, I have set down, immediate∣lie after the Lessons they belong to, and therefore, I think a repetition of them in this place, altogether unnecessarie, seing it is but your pains to look back to the pages, where they are set down, and that you may make use of them according to your Judgement, and pleasure.

Sch.

It is so, but which is your next Guard?