Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W.

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Title
Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W.
Author
Wallis, John, 1616-1703.
Publication
London :: Printed by Richard Bishop, for Samuel Gellibrand at the Signe of the Brazen Serpent in Pauls Church-yard,
1643.
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Subject terms
Brooke, Robert Greville, -- Baron, 1607-1643. -- Nature of truth.
Truth -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A97067.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 28, 2024.

Pages

CHAP. XV. Whether confusion in the knowledge of Causes be redressed by this Ʋnity.

OF Causes▪ he tells us) there are Two lye open to our view, The Ʋniversall Efficient of all things, God; and the Materia prima, 〈…〉〈…〉 common Essence; Other Causes (saith he) are better known by Name

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then in the Natures of them; (as Efficient, Finall, Materiall, For∣mall, &c.)

We are ignorant, I grant, in the particular causes of divers things; and therefore when we have no other but those two Generals, we must rest there. But if the other appear and Shew themselves; we need not shut our Eyes for fear of Seeing them. It is not like to cost us so dear as Ovid's, or Acton's sight, or as those that saw Medusa's Head.

Till Numeri Platonici (saith he) cease to be a Proverb, in vain shall any undertake to teach him How and Whence it is, that the various Rowlings of the Tongue should send forth so many articulate Voices, and so many severall Languages.

We say already, That the different Articulation of Sounds, ariseth from the diverse Figuration of the Organs. If his Numeri Platonici can give us a better account, I would be glad to heare it.

Till then, he will give no credence to any who promiseth an account of the Estuation of the Sea; Whether from the Moon, &c.

That Numeri Platonici will furnish us with a better reason; I will then beleeve, when I see it. In the mean time I see nothing to hinder us from an Enquiry after a Physicall cause. And I doubt his Lordship will have a hard task to give a reason in Numbers, why the Sea ebbes and lows.

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