Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ...

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Title
Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ...
Author
Swammerdam, Jan, 1637-1680.
Publication
London :: Printed for Henry Faithorne and John Kersey ...,
1681.
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Subject terms
Insects -- Anatomy.
Cite this Item
"Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ..." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A62018.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 20, 2024.

Pages

The Explanation of the Seventh Table.

THe several appearances of the Ephemeron, shedding or stripping off its Skin, like a ve∣ry thin shift or shirt, are here represented to the life.

Figure 1.

The Male endeavouring to shed its second Skin on land much more leisurely, than it shed its first Skin in rising out of the wa∣ter, which as is before said, hap∣neth in a moment. Here is re∣presented the body half-stript, the head, the breast and the legs, in the manner as we pull our feet out of our Shooes or Boots: but the Wings are in that manner stript, that the inside of the Skin turneth outwards, and the outside inwards; which is wonderfully effected: for the Flie is at that time, like a captiv'd and bound bird; for the Skin thus drawn off, shutteth close to its body, like a strong Swash wound about, which keepeth it as a prisoner, and causeth it to shiver and quake.

Figure 2.

Representeth the Male Ephe∣meron almost uncased, so that the two outermost Wings and the Tails, by a small stripping off the Skin will become wholly freed.

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