Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ...

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Title
Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ...
Author
Swammerdam, Jan, 1637-1680.
Publication
London :: Printed for Henry Faithorne and John Kersey ...,
1681.
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Subject terms
Insects -- Anatomy.
Cite this Item
"Ephemeri vita, or, The natural history and anatomy of the Ephemeron, a fly that lives but five hours written originally in Low-Dutch by Jo. Swammerdam ..." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A62018.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 20, 2024.

Pages

The Explanation of the Sixth Table.
Figure 1.

REpresenteth the Figure of the Female Ephemeron, just as it rises out of the water, and hath quitted its Skin, and from a Worm swimming, is be∣come a Flie; and its Skin now shed, may be seen driving on the water; as is represented in the 5 Tab. fig. 2.

I have dryed some of these shed Skins, which represent the Worm so naturally and to the life, as if you saw the Worm alive before you.

Figure 2.

Representeth in some manner how the wings do expand, which to apprehend more clearly, it ought to be known that the wing represented in the first Figure of the third Plate, with the letters, hhh, is there represented with its natural foldings; and is here re∣presented in the manner how it by degrees doth expand, and loseth its neat pleats and folds.

Figure 3.

Representeth the same wing losing first its Snake-like foldings, and then its long folds, which are

Page [unnumbered]

in the manner of a Brabants huik, or Vest, first pleated in the length, and then folded a∣gain cross-wayes.

Figure 4.

Representeth the same Wing almost fully expanded.

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