The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.

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Title
The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.
Author
Hammond, Henry, 1605-1660.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Royston ...,
1684.
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Subject terms
Devotional exercises.
Cite this Item
"The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A45408.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 26, 2024.

Pages

Of Frequent Receiving.

THis then being a Service so acceptable to God and so beneficial, so necessary for men, it were but reason to expect that all good Christians would shew themselves ready and forward to the performance of it.

And accordingly in the first Age of the Church, when Reli∣gion and Zeal were in their youth and vigour, it was the good cu∣stom to celebrate this Sacrament (if not every day as it is thought,

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yet at least) every Lords day.

But afterward as Piety began to grow more dull, and Love more cold, it was by little and little brought down to once a Month.

And this Order still remains in the Church of God, (though now somewhat disturbed by pre∣vailing Sectaries among us.) And at those times the Supper is ap∣pointed to be made ready, and the Table furnished for all such as can think fit to spare so much time from their worldly business, to come to the Marriage-feast of the great King of Heaven. For herein they are yet left to more liberty, and not necessarily re∣quired to come oftner than thrice a year.

And truly such is the negli∣gence of many (who yet would be accounted Christians) that they are not ashamed to stretch this libetty to the utmost. Yea,

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and it were well if even then they would come meetly provided, and had not more respect to the Shame of the World, than to the Honour of God, or their own Good.

Certainly any sober Christian cannot consider without shame and indignation how much Man∣kind are fallen from their first love.

But that which is ordinarily brought for an excuse, is in it self so unworthy and unreasonable, that it makes this Neglect yet more abominable and intolerable.

And indeed it is somewhat worse than that for which those invited in the Gospel received a severe Cen∣sure. There it was, they were taken up with their several Affairs, one had bought a farm, or a Yoke of oxen; another had married a wife;

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and therefore they could not come. But here one is engaged in such a sin, which he hath no mind to leave yet; another is not in cha∣rity; and in general they are not prepared, and therefore they can∣not, that is, they will not come.

Such is the ridiculous madness of men in this barbarous and bru∣tish Age, that they can think fit to excuse and justifie one fault by pretending more and greater.

But if you are not prepared to meet your Saviour at his Table, to celebrate the memorial of his Mercy how would you appear before him at his Seat of Judg∣ment, to which yet you know not but you may be sooner called?

If therefore you could wish to be always provided for Death, which often comes suddenly, al∣ways uncertainly, think not much to bestow a little time in prepa∣ring your self for this Sacrament, as often as you may have an

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opportunity of receiving it.

And those which in these days of Captivity have not that conve∣nience of receiving from the hands of them who have authority to give it, may yet do well not to omit the Duty of Preparation. Let them do that which they can, and for that which they cannot God will accept the will for the deed.

Notes

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