The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.

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Title
The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.
Author
Hammond, Henry, 1605-1660.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Royston ...,
1684.
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Subject terms
Devotional exercises.
Cite this Item
"The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A45408.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 23, 2024.

Pages

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Page 129

OF THE HOLY SACRAMENT OF THE Lords Supper, AND THE PREPARATION Before it.

Psal. 116. 12, 13.

What reward shall I render unto the Lord for all his benefits toward me?

I will take the cup of Salvation, and call upon the Name of the Lord.

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Psal. 26. 6.
I will wash my bands in innocen∣cy: so will I compass thine Altar, O Lord.

THere yet remains one princi∣pal piece of Devotion, and that without which there is in∣deed no Devotion; it being the Sacrifice, in the Smoke of which our prayers must ascend up before him that sitteth on the Throne.

Now although God being him∣self a Spirit, desires al∣so to be worshipped in Spirit; and in his own respect cares not for these out∣ward and sensible performances; yet because the minds of men, be∣ing as it were shut up in this pri∣son of the Body, can receive little information or affection but what is conveyed to them by the Sense, it hath pleased him to accommo∣date himself to our imperfection

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and infirmity, and appoint cer∣tain Ceremonies or outward acti∣ons which working immediately upon the Senses, are by them conveyed in unto the Soul, and make on it a more powerful im∣pression of that which is signified by those sensible actions.

Such are Looking up toward Heaven when we speak to God, Kneeling when we pray to him, Standing up when we praise him, and Bowing at the mention of his Sacred Name; such is the dip∣ping in water, and signing with the Cross in the Sacrament of Bap∣tism: and such is the receiving of Bread and Wine in this other, of which we speak.

For though the eating of Bread and drinking of Wine are in them∣selves actions so very ordinary, that they are also very inconside∣rable; yet in this they are made use of to signifie to us the most extraordinary and excellent mer∣cy

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that ever the Great King of Heaven bestowed upon his poor Subjects and Servants here on earth. For,

I. It is the Commemoration of the death of his own only Son for the redemption of lost Mankind; the wounding of his body signified by the breaking of Bread, and the shedding of his Bloud by the pouring out of Wine.

II. Besides this, it is also an Evi∣dence of Gods reconciliation and favour to us, and demonstrati∣on that we are in League and Amity with him, in that we are admitted to his own Table, to eat of his Bread, and drink of his Cup.

III. It is a means and instrument of conveying grace and strength to the Souls of Worthy Receivers.

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IV. It is our Sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving for all his mercies and blessings; particularly tem∣poral, the good things of this World, the fruits of the Earth, which we here offer unto him un∣der these two Principal of Bread and Wine.

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