The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes.

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Title
The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes.
Author
Burroughs, Jeremiah, 1599-1646.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Dawlman,
1643.
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Subject terms
Ferne, H. -- (Henry), 1602-1662. -- Resolving of conscience.
God -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A30577.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 25, 2024.

Pages

SECT. 1.

IN this Sect. these special things are considerable: 1. What he grants 2. what we grant. 3. What he sayes we grant. He grants we may deny obedience to the King, not onely in things unlawfull by the Law of God, but by the established Laws of the Land. It is well this is granted; Heretofore we know this was the generall Tenet, whatsoever was commanded by the King, yea by any men in authority, if but by a Prelate, except it were against Gods Law, we were bound to obey it; any thing that was not sinne, must be yeelded to and that for conscience sake. The D. in this is ingenuous; he confesseth that not onely Gods Law, but mans Law limits Kings power: This is a great case to many mens consciences to know so much.

And further, if this be true, that all those Scriptures that urge obedience to Kings and men in authority, must be understood with this limitation, that is, if they command according to the Laws of God, and according to the Laws of the countrey over which they are.

1. He sayes, In point of resistance we grant it must be in such a case where there are Omnes ordines regni consentientes, an unanimous consent of the two Houses.

There is no determination that the greater part present of either House a∣grees upon, but is as truly valid and legal, as if there were an unanimous con∣sent of them both. It is so in all bodies where things are carried by vote.

2. He sayes, We yeeld it must be a meere defensive resistance.

If the King should send any to mischiefe us, to say, we must onely defend our¦selves, so as not to offend them, is a contradiction; as for the Kings person, is it not the profession of the Parl. to defend it? therefore we neede not dispute now, about defending our selves against it.

3. He sayes, this likewise is granted that the Prince must first be bent to over∣throw Religion, Liberties, and Laws, and will not discharge his trust, before there must be resistance.

By this he would insinuate that our Arms taken up are unlawfull, because the King hath not declared himselfe thus.

What need we be put to meddle with any thing but this in the case in hand? That a Kingdom seeing it self in imminent danger of enemies to infringe the liberties of it, may stand-up to defend it selfe; yea although they come forth against it in the name of the King: This is our case, and if the D. disputes against any thing but this, he sights with his own shadow.

If this be case as certainly it is, then a great part of the Doctors book is im∣pertinent to the businesse of the Parliaments raising forces: For forces may bee raised upon other grounds then the Kings being bent to overthrow Religion.

Notes

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