The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy

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Title
The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy
Author
Du Moulin, Pierre, 1568-1658.
Publication
London :: Printed by T[homas] S[nodham] for Nathaniel Newbery, and are to be sold at the signe of the Starre vnder Saint Peters Church in Cornehill, and in Popes head Alley,
1620.
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Subject terms
Synod of Dort (1618-1619) -- Early works to 1800.
Arminianism -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"The anatomy of Arminianisme: or The opening of the controuersies lately handled in the Low-Countryes, concerning the doctrine of prouidence, of predestination, of the death of Christ, of nature and grace. By Peter Moulin, pastor of the church at Paris. Carefully translated out of the originall Latine copy." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A69245.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 23, 2024.

Pages

CHAP. XLVII.

The iudgement of Saint Austin concerning this contro∣uersie.

I. THe certainty of perseuerance may be taken two waies: Either for the certainty of the decree of God, by which God decreed to

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giue perseuerance in faith, to them whom hee elected to saluation: Or for that confidence, by which one doth certainely perswade himselfe, that he shall neuer be forsaken by God. The first certainty is necessari∣ly drawne from that election which is absolute, and is not for faith fore-seene, but not the latter: Because God hath decreed many things concerning vs, whereof hee hath not yet giuen vs the full know∣ledge.

II. The full perswasion of the faithfull doth not rest on any reuelation, whereby God hath laid o∣pen to vs the secrets of his counsels, but on the pro∣mises of the Gospel, and on the inward feeling, where∣by one searching himselfe, doth feele that he doth se∣riously beleeue in Christ, and on the inward testimo∣ny of the spirit, witnessing in our hearts that we are the sonnes of God: Yet there may be many, and those good and godly men, who although they be∣long to the election of God, haue not come to this full confidence.

III. Saint Austin, being beaten in this questi∣on, and exercised in often contentions of the Pelagi∣ans, is a most earnest maintainer of the former certain∣ty; and doth gather from the election of God, accor∣ding to his purpose, that the elect can neuer be forsa∣ken by God, and that grace is giuen which can neuer faile, and by which they shall certainely perseuere. There are many excellent things in his workes to this purpose, but he doth no where speake more plainely then in his booke, de correp. & gratia. which hee writ when he was very old. In the twelfth Chapter hee hath these words: There is giuen to the Saints that are

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predestinated by the grace of God to the kingdome of God, not onely such helpe of grace, but also such a helpe, that perseuerance it selfe is giuen them, not onely that without that gift they could not perseuere, but also that by this gift they cannot but perseuere. For he hath not onely said, without me ye can doe nothing, but he hath also said, yee haue not chosen me, but I haue chosen you, and haue ap∣pointed you that you might goe on, and might beare fruit, and that your fruit might remaine: In which words hee declareth that he hath giuen them not onely righteousnesse, but also perseuerance in righteousnesse. For Christ so ap∣pointing them, that they should goe on and beare fruit, and that their fruit should remaine, who dare say that perhaps it shall not remaine? For the gifts and calling of God, are without repentance, that is, the calling of them who are called according to his purpose. Christ therefore making intercession for these, that their faith should not faile, with∣out doubt it shall not faile to the end, and by this it shall perseuere to the end, and the end of this life shall finde it remaining.

And a little after, The will of them is so much enfla∣med by the holy-Ghost, that they therefore are able, because they so will, and they doe therefore so will, because God worketh in them that they may will: For if in so great in∣firmity of this life (in which, notwithstanding it was neces∣sary that vertue should be wrought for the repressing of pride) mens wills should be left to themselues, that if they would they might remaine in the helpe and assistance of God, without which they could not perseuere, and God should not worke in them that they might will: The will it selfe, by its owne infirmity, would faile among so many and so great temptations, and they could not therefore perse∣uere,

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because failing by their infirmity they could not be willing, or by the infirmity of their will they could not be so willing that they might be able: Therefore the infirmi∣ty of mans will was helped, that by the grace of God it might be driuen vnauoidably, and inseperably; and therefore, although weake, yet it should not faile, nor be ouercome by any aduersitie. Hee suffered and permitted Adam, the strongest man, to doe what he would, but hee hath preserued to the weake, that they should will in∣uincibly, by him that giueth it, and inuincibly should not forsake it.

Obserue the words, vnauoydably, vnseperably, and inuincibly: he vsed not the word irresistibility, which the Iesuites had not yet coyned: But he vsed words which haue no lesse force to set out the power of the most certaine, and finally, insuperable and vnconque∣rable grace of God, in them who are elected accor∣ding to the purpose of God. And yet he doth vse the word resisting, Chap. 14. where he thus speaketh: No free-will of man doth resist, God being willing to saue. For to will or nill, is so in the power of him that willeth or nil∣leth, that it cannot hinder the will of God, nor ouercome his power. Excellently spoken, although Arminius cry out against it.

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