The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 2. Of Retireing.

Ma.

My second Lesson is of Retireing.

Sch.

How many wayes can a man Retire?

Ma.

Three wayes.

Sch.

Shew me them?

Ma.

The first is with a single stepp and is done the same way, * as you approach with the single stepp, onely whereas in Approaching with the single stepp, you lift your right foot first, in Retireing with the single stepp you must lift your left foot first, you must observe the rest of the Directions given you in Ap∣proaching with the single stepp.

The second way is with a double stepp;* and is also done the same way as the Advancing with the double stepp, only whereas in Ap∣proaching with the double stepp you throw your lest Foot before your Right in Retiring with the Double stepp, you throw your right foot backwards, behind your let, the rest is to be done, as in Advancing with the double stepp.

Sch.

The Retiring with the Single and Double Stepps, is made use of, upon the same Occasions and in the same Grounds, that the Advancing Page  39with the Single and Double Stepp is, is it not?

Ma.

Yes, that it is, but the Third way of Retireing is done by jumping backwards upon the streight Line: The Reason why I call it the streight Line is, because you Jump streight back from your Adversarie, * as it were in a Streight Line, for there is play which must be played off the Streight Line, called Quarting, and Volting, which shall be taught you in its proper place, I say it is done by Jumping backwards upon the streight Line, with both your feet in the Air at once, but you must lift your Right Foot first, and after your Jump is done, stand to your Guard again, unless you intend to Redouble your Jump, that you may go far∣ther out of your Adversaries Measure.

Sch.

Which is your Third Lesson?