Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W.

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Title
Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W.
Author
Wallis, John, 1616-1703.
Publication
London :: Printed by Richard Bishop, for Samuel Gellibrand at the Signe of the Brazen Serpent in Pauls Church-yard,
1643.
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Subject terms
Brooke, Robert Greville, -- Baron, 1607-1643. -- Nature of truth.
Truth -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"Truth tried: or, animadversions on a treatise published by the Right Honorable Robert Lord Brook, entituled, The Nature of Truth, its vnion and vnity with the soule. Which (saith he) is one in its essence, faculties, acts; one with truth. By I. W." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A97067.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 28, 2024.

Pages

Page [unnumbered]

To the Worshipfull, and my Worthy Friend, Henry Darley Esquire.

Worthy Sir,

THe Sad news of so Unhappy a Losse as his Lord∣ships Death, forceth me to give an account of what might else seeme a Soloecisme. The book was newly finished in the presse, before his Lord∣ships death, and expected only to be first presented to his Noble Hands, before it was presented to the World; to whome it was then a going, when that unhappy news stopped it, and some copies were gone abroad. I have suppressed it since, to adde that which you see adjoyned; in testimony of mine own sadnesse for so great a Losse. Which yet can∣not be so fully expressed by a private penne, as by the com∣mon Tears of all those to whome Religion is deare. A sad losse it was, had it been in the Best times, to loose so many excellent Accomplishments in one Noble Breast; but Now most Unhappy, when there is so much work and so few hands; in which, I am confident, None was guided by a more single Eye, with lesse Obliquity to collaterall aimes. Vnhappy then was that accident, that deprived us of one so well worthy to live;

Vnhappy hand! by one sad stroke who shot Religion, Learning, Piety, what not?

Sir, The Treatise penned long since at your request, had once passed in another Character through Yours to his Lordships Hand, not then intended to be made publique,

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nor directed to any other then your own eye; what en∣tertainment it then found (such Candour and Noblenesse dwelt in that Breast) You know as well as I: And now, being oft solicited, as well by you as others, It was a second time Advancing, ambitious again to be made happy by the same Hand; (and indeed I had been extreamly injurious to His Candour, if I should have seemed to decline His Eye and present it to another, who taking liberty sometime to dissent from Others, did with the same freedome allow others to dissent from Him, willing to accept of any Assi∣stance in the search of Truth;) but being there prevented, it is fain to Retreat, and fall back to the same hand where it first lodged, as being, next after his Lordship, due to you; from

Your humble Servant
J. W.

March. 11. 1642
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