The vanity of arts and sciences by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Knight ...

About this Item

Title
The vanity of arts and sciences by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Knight ...
Author
Agrippa von Nettesheim, Heinrich Cornelius, 1486?-1535.
Publication
London :: Printed by J.C. for Samuel Speed ...,
1676.
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Subject terms
Agrippa von Nettesheim, Heinrich Cornelius, 1486?-1535.
Learning and scholarship -- Early works to 1800.
Scholasticism.
Science -- Early works to 1800.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A26566.0001.001
Cite this Item
"The vanity of arts and sciences by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Knight ..." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A26566.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed June 16, 2024.

Pages

Page 245

CHAP. LXXVI.

Of Fishing.

TO these we may joyn Fishing and Hunting. The Art of Fishing was so highly esteemed and set by among the Romans, that they were wont to stock the Italian-Sea, and as it were to sow it as men do Grain, with strange Fish, and unknown to those Coasts, brought thither in Ships from far distant parts of the Ocean; besides that they were at great Expences, and vast Costs to make Fish-ponds, and Store-ponds for all the choice sorts of Fish; from whence many Ro∣man Princes have deriv'd their Sur-names, as the Li∣cinii, Murenae, Serii, Oratae; which made Cicero to call Lucius, Philip, and Hortensius Fish mongers, from the great delight they took in Fishponds. We read, that Octavianus Augustus was wont to Angle with a Rod: and Suetonius writes, That Nero Fish'd with a Net wrought with Purple and Scarlet Silk. Ways of Fish∣ing there are but few: for what Fish there are, are ta∣ken either with a Hook, Nets, Weels, Nooses, Jack∣spears, and Darts. But Fishing deserves the less praise, for that Fish are of hard and bad Digestion, neither grateful to the Stomach, nor were they ever accepted in Sacrifices.

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