A history of northern Michigan and its people
Powers, Perry Francis, 1857-1945., Cutler, H. G. (Harry Gardner), b. 1856.

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Page  I A HISTORY OF Northern Michigan AND ITS PEOPLE BY PERRY F. POWERS Assisted by H. G. CUTLER Editor of the Lewis Publishing Company ILLUSTRATED VOLUME III 1912 THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY CHICAGO _..

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Page  965 History of Northern Michigan WILLAM A. SECRIST, M. D.-Few representatives of the medical profession in Michigan have more ably fortified themselves for its exacting demands than has this well known physician and surgeon of Alpena, where he has been engaged in active practice, save for brief intervals, for nearly a quarter of a century. He is an effective exponent of the beneficent Homoeopathic school of medicine and his success in his profession has been on a parity with his recognized ability in the same. He is consistently to be designated as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of northern Michigan and as a citizen he holds high place in popular confidence and esteem, the while he is found arrayed as an earnest supporter of all measures and undertakings projected for the general welfare of the community. It will be recalled that Senator Chauncey M. Depew at one time made the following humorous paraphrase of a familiar quotation: "Some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are born in the state of Ohio." Under the final unit of this classification Dr Secrist finds due gratification in placing himself, as he was born on a farm in Worthington township, Richland county, Ohio, on the 5th of February, 1853. He is a son of George and Mary (Snyder) Secrist, the former of whom was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, of staunch Dutch ancestry, and the latter of whom was born in Richland county, Ohio, in 1828, a representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of that section of the Buckeye state. George Secrist moved to Ohio when a young man and he eventually became one of the substantial farmers and stock-growers of Richland county, where his marriage was solemnized and where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in the year 1894. He was a man of impregnable integrity of character and was ever accorded the most generous measure of popular confidence and esteem in the community that so long 965

Page  966 966 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN represented his home and to the material and social development of which he contributed his quota. He was a staunch Republican in his political proclivities and allied himself with the "grand old party" at the time of its organization. His life was in accord with his professed faith as a member of the Presbyterian church, and of the same religious body his wife has long been a devoted adherent. She now maintains her home in Crestline, Ohio. Of the four children three are living, and Dr. Secrist is the eldest of the four. Like many another who has attained to' marked relative distinction in professional life, Dr. Secrist gained his early experience in connection with the benignant industry of agriculture, and he early began to assist in the work of the home farm. In the meanwhile he attended the district schools, and that his ambition for higher educational advantages was manifested in his youth is evident when it is stated that he supplemented the discipline of the common schools by a course in Greentown Academy, at Perryville, Ohio. Thereafter he prosecuted his studies for a number of years in Northwestern College, at Naperville, Illinois, and finally he decided to prepare himself for the medical profession. With this end in view he entered the medical department of the Western Reserve University, in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, where he continued his technical studies about two years. He was then matriculated in the celebrated Starling Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio, and in this institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1881, duly receiving his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He has never permitted himself to lose touch with the advances made in the sciences.of medicine and surgery, has been an avidious student of its best standard and periodical literature and has availed himself of the advantages of post-graduate study in leading institutions. Thus it may be noted that in 1897 he completed a post-graduate course in the New York Post Graduate Medical College; that two years later he took another effective post-graduate course in the Homeopathic medical department of the University of Michigan; and that in 1901 he completed a special course in Pratt Homeopathic Medical College, at Chicago, Illinois. After his graduation in Starling Medical College, in 1881, Dr. Secrist located at Butler, Richland county, Ohio where he served his professional novitiate and where he continued in practice until 1883, when he removed to the city of Knoxville, Tennessee. After about two years of successful practice in that city he returned to Ohio and engaged in the work of his profession in the thriving litthe city of Canal Dover, Tuscarawas county, which continued to be the field of his endeavors until 1887, when he came to Alpena, Michigan, where he has continued in active general practice during the long intervening years, except for an interim of about two years, 1905-6, when he resided in Denver, Colorado, and held the chair of surgery in the Denver Homeopathic Medical College, where he proved most successful and popular in the educational work of his profession. Dr. Secrist has long retained a large and representative practice in Alpena and is held in affectionate regard by the many families in which he has ministered with all of ability and devotion-ever instant in that abiding human sympathy which transcends mere sentiment to become

Page  967 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 967 an actuating motive for helpfulness. In later years he has made a specialty of the surgical branch of his profession, and he is known as a most skillful operator according to the most approved modern staidards. In 1889 he was elected city health officer and retained the office for two years. In 1901 he was again called to this position, for another term of two years, and in 1910 he was again elected to the office, in which he has done at all times most efficient work in behalf of sanitation and general protection of the health of the community. His present term of office will expire in April, 1911. Dr. Secrist is a member of the American Institute of Homoeopathy, the Michigan State Homoeopathic Medical Society, and the Alpena County Medical Society. In politics he accords unwavering allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and both he and his wife hold membership in the Congregational church. His local fraternal affiliations are here briefly noted: Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons; Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; Alpena Lodge, No. 148, Knights of Pythias; and Alpena Lodge, No. 505, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. On the 6th of April, 1881, Dr. Secrist was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Martha F. McGuire, who, like himself, was born and reared in Richland county, Ohio, and who is a daughter of William and Deborah (Enlow) MeGuire, both of whom were natives of Ohio and members of honored pioneer families of that state, where they continued to reside until their death and where Mr. McGuire was a prosperous farmer and highly esteemed citizen of Richland county at the time of his demise. Of the nine children Mrs. Secrist was the fifth in order of birth and of the number two of her brothers and five of her sisters are now living. Dr. and Mrs. Secrist have two fine sons,-Leo F., who is a member of the class of 1910 in the medical department of the University of Michigan, where he has the distinction also of having been chosen assistant to Professor Stevens, who is incumbent of the chair of dermatology and electrotherapeutics; and Gerald A., who is a member of the class of 1912 in the Alpena high school. GEORGE W. MCCABE.-As a public official and progressive business man Mr. McCabe has secured distinctive prestige as one of the representative citizens of Petoskey, the fair metropolis of Emmet county, and his loyalty and progressive spirit have never lacked tangible exemplification in the supporting of measures and enterprises projected for the general good of the community. He views with satisfaction the status which is his as one of the native sons of northern Michigan, and on his "native heath" it has been given him to gain independence and definite prosperity along normal lines of business enterprise and also the respect and good will of those who know him,-showing that he has admirably met the requirements of the metewand of popular approbation. George W. McCabe was born at East Jordan, Charlevoix county, Michigan, on the 22d of February, 1871, and is the younger of the two surviving children of Thomas M. and Anna (Ryan) McCabe, both of staunch Irish lineage. The father was born in the city of Philadelphia,

Page  968 968 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Pennsylvania, in 1840, and his wife is a native of Ireland, whence she came with her parents to America when a girl, her marriage to Mr. McCabe having been solemnized in Philadelphia. Of the five children two sons are living, and the subject of this review is the younger, as has already been noted. The elder son, Albert, is now a local magistrate in the Philippine Islands, where in the government service, he has thus gained his title of judge. Thomas M. McCabe learned in his youth the trade of stone and brick mason, and he continued to follow the same in Pennsylvania until 1870, when he came to Michigan and located in East Jordan, Charlevoix county, where he remained until 1877, when he returned to his old home in Philadelphia. The attractions of the Wolverine state, however, soon called him back to its hospitable shores, and on his return he secured a tract of land in Emmet county, where he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and developed a valuable farm. On this homestead he continued to reside until 1905, when he sold the property and established his home in Petoskey, where he has since to a large measure retired and where he is a well known and highly esteemed citizen. He is a staunch Democrat in the political adherency and he is now serving as a member of the county board of commissioners for the poor. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church. George W. McCabe was about eight years of age at the time when the family home was established on the farm in Emmet county, to whose public schools he is indebted for his early educational discipline, which was supplemented by an effective course in the Ferris Institute, in the city of Big Rapids. Thereafter he served as assistant postmaster at Petoskey for four years, under the administration of Philip B. Wachtel, and after his retirement from this position he served one term as city clerk. His interest in local affairs has been characterized by marked loyalty and civic progressiveness and he has represented the third ward of the city as a valued member of the board of aldermen for four years, being incumbent of this office at the present time. He is a member of committee appointed to effect a revision of the city charter, and a petition for a new charter is to be submitted at the next session of the state legislature. Mr. McCabe has given most efficient service in promoting the interests of the Emmet County Fair Association, of which he is secretary, and the annual fairs of this organization have done much to further industrial progress in the county and to exploit its resources and attractions. In politics he is aligned as a stalwart in the camp of the Democratic party, and he is well fortified in his convictions as to matters of public import. He is an appreciative and popular member of Petoskey Lodge, No. 629, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, and is one of the alert, reliable and substantial business men of Petoskey, where he has been engaged in the retail hardware and implement business since 1909, as junior member of the firm of Bump & McCabe, in which his coadjutor is Sidney S. Bump. On the 27th of December, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. McCabe to Miss Georgia McKinley, and the great loss and bereavement of his life occurred when his devoted companion and helpmeet was

Page  969 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 969 summoned to the life eternal, in May, 1910. She is survived by three children,-Albert, Alice and Thomas. JOHN SEYMOUR was born in Montreal, province of Quebec, Canada, on the 1st of July, 1848, and is a son of Richard A. and Susan (Reese) Seymour, the former of whom was born in England and the latter in Wales. Richard A. Seymour was educated in the Sanders Military Academy in his native land and as a young man he entered the English army. In England was solemnized his marriage to Miss Susan Reese and of their ten children, three were born in England and seven in Canada, whither the family had immigrated. Location was made in Montreal, province of Quebec, at Three Rivers, where the father was engaged in the lumber business for a number of years, later he moved to the city of Chicago, Illinois, and in 1866 he established the family home in Manistee, Michigan, where he gave most efficient service in the interest of the public as justice of the peace. He was a staunch Democrat in his political adherency. He was finally stricken with paralysis and passed away at the age of seventy-two years, deeply mourned by all who had come within the sphere of his forceful and kindly character. His beloved wife was summoned to the life eternal in about 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour became the parents of ten children-five boys and five girls. John Seymour availed himself of the educational advantages afforded in his boyhood home in Canada, and when the family came to Michigan he became interested with his two brothers, Richard and Frederick, in an ice cream parlor in Manistee. Later they added groceries to the stock of confections and eventually enlarged the store to include a stock of merchandise. He became successful as a merchant and built up a large and lucrative patronage but in 1883 his entire establishment was destroyed by fire. Previously, in 1881, he and Mr. Klein had purchased the steamship "Champlain" with which they carried on a small transportation business. This venture was the beginning of the Northern Michigan Transportation Company, which, with the passage of years, has increased its scope of operations and which now carries on an immense business, making use of seven steamships and employing one thousand men. In 1897 the company was reorganized, Mr. Klein and Mr. Seymour buying out all the rest of the partners and admitting other parties as members of the concern. In addition to the transportation business Mr. Seymour has other financial interests of important order in Northern Michigan. He also owns a coal business at Manistee and holds tracts of timber and farm lands in this section. The old store which burned down, in 1883, was conducted under the firm name of Seymour Brothers and was composed of Richard, John and Fred Seymour. These brothers are all interested in the steamship company. Mr. Seymour commands the respect and confidence of all his business associates by reason of his straightforward methods. At Manistee, on the 13th of July, 1881, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Seymour and Miss Anna L. Warner, who was born and reared at Dexter, Washtenaw county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of L. L. Warner, a prominent agriculturist in that county. Mrs. Seymour was

Page  970 970 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN a popular and successful teacher prior to her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour have five children-three daughters and two sons-Clare, Frederick W., George W., Helen and Gertrude, all of whom were born in Manistee where they are now pursuing their educational training. In politics Mr. Seymour is aligned as a stalwart in the ranks of the Democratic party and while he has never had ambition for political preferment of any description he has always found time to devote his energies to the forwarding of all matters advanced for the general good of the community. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Benevolent Order of Elks and he and his wife are members of the Episcopal church, in whose faith they have reared their children. JAMES MACGILLIS, a successful agriculturist of the vicinity of Harrisville, is one of the later pioneers of Alcona county, Michigan, and one who has done good, faithful and meritorious work for the lasting improvement of his state. He was born in Scotland on the 1st of August, 1835, and is a son of Gillis and Annie (McDougal) MacGillis, both of whom were likewise born in Scotland and who emigrated to Canada about the year 1837, at which time the subject of this review was an infant of but two years of age. Of the twelve children born to Mr. and Mrs. MacGillis four came to the United States. The father was a farmer by vocation and he passed the residue of his life in the province of Ontario, Canada. To the public schools of his home in Canada Mr. James MacGillis is indebted for his educational training and as a youth he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He came to Harrisville, Michigan, in 1873, a few years after Alcona county had been set off from Alpena county, and in Guston township purchased a tract of eighty acres of land, in 1875, paying the state the sum of one hundred dollars for the same. This land was in its wild state and considered dear at the price. However, he and his good wife set to work with a will and in the course of a few years literally hewed out of the wilderness a fine and productive farm. To-day the entire estate is cleared and in the midst of highly cultivated fields are modern and substantial buildings which well indicate the thrift and prosperity of the practical and business-like owner. Politically Mr. MacGillis endorses the cause of the Republican party and since his residence in Alcona county he has been honored with the following offices of public trust: He was justice of the peace for six years and has been highway commissioner and a member of the board of review. In discharging the duties of his public offices he has ever shown great discretion and considerable executive ability. He is a man of high ideals, a fine and alert mentality, and in spite of his venerable age of seventy-five years the splendid physique and vigor of his youth remain practically unmarred. His entire life has been marked by temperate habits and close application to healthy, out-door work, both of which are productive of longevity. In Canada, in the year 1857, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. MacGillis to Miss Esther McGinnis, who was likewise born and reared in Canada, her birth having occurred in 1837. To this well matched and happy union were born twelve children, eleven of whom are living at

Page  971 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 971 the present time, in 1911, namely,-Sarah J., Mary, Susan, Belle, Kate, Etta, William, Lizzie, Robert, Henry R. and Esther. Henry R. is an attorney of note and he is engaged in the active practice of his profession at Mikado, Michigan. He was graduated in the Ann Arbor high school and subsequently was a student at the Northern Indiana Normal University at Valparaiso, Indiana, for a period of three years, at the expiration of which he was matriculated in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, in the law department of which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1910, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Immediately after his graduation he was admitted to the bar of the state and he then located at Mikado, where he is rapidly building up a large and representative clientage and where a brilliant future is in store for him. DAVID A. LINE, the present able incumbent of the office of town clerk of Mancelona township and of the village of Mancelona, has been a resident of Antrim county since 1880 and the years have told the tale of an eminently successful career due to unusual executive ability and tremendous energy. Mr. Line has just reason to be proud of the fact that to his efforts can be traced many a substantial enterprise contributing greatly to the growth and prosperity of this section of the county. In every sense of the word he is a representative citizen and by reason of his exemplary life and unusual devotion to the good of the community in which he resides he is accorded the unalloyed confidence and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. In connection with his other interests he is the owner of a fine farm in Mancelona township, the same being occupied by tenants and run on shares. A native of the fine old Keystone state of the Union, David A. Line was born at Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 5th of February 1856. He is a son of John B. and Margaret Line, both of whom are now deceased. The father established the family home at Fostoria, Ohio, in the year 1863, and there the young David received his preliminary educational training. The father was engaged in the agricultural business during most of his active career and he and his wife became the parents of three children, of whom the subject of this review was the second in order of birth. In the year 1880 David A. Line came to Michigan, locating on a farm in Mancelona township, in Antrim county. This estate, which comprises eighty acres, is still owned by Mr. Line but it is now worked on shares. In 1899 he met with an accident on a railroad crossing, the same having resulted in the loss of a leg. In 1899 removal was made to the village of Mancelona, where he purchased a house and four lots. In the spring of 1900 he was elected to the office of township clerk and by continuous re-election to that office he has remained in tenure thereof during the long intervening years to the present time. In March, 1900, he was made village clerk, another position of which he has been incumbent down to the present. In 1901 he drafted a special act, which was passed by the legislature of Michigan, the same relating to the building of roads in the township of Mancelona. As a result of this amendment the town of Macelona was enabled to build its own roads and thus escape be

Page  972 972 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ing taxed to build roads in other sections. Mr. Line has always been a prominent factor in the introduction of improvements in the village and he has had the satisfaction of seeing a large number of his suggestions adopted, such as water works and the installation of an electric-lighting plant. He is at present secretary and treasurer of the Mancelona Creamery Company, of which he is likewise a director and stockholder. At Fostoria, Ohio, in the year 1879, Mr. Line was united in marriage to Miss Maggie Wyar, who was reared and educated in the close vicinity of Fostoria, where her parents were long engaged in farming operations. Mr. and Mrs. Line have three children, concerning whom the following brief record is here inserted,-Emma Maud is the wife of Fred Besan, of Mancelona; Ida May is now Mrs. Hugh Miller, of this village; and Myrtle Leota is a popular and successful teacher in the public schools of Mancelona. Mrs. Miller is town librarian at Mancelona and she has held that responsible position ever since the establishment of the library here. In their religious faith the Line family are attendants of the Methodist Episcopal church, to whose charities and benevolences they are most liberal contributors. Mr. Line has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in educational affairs and for a number of years past he has been a school director and moderator of the Mancelona township schools. In fraternal circles Mr. Line is a valued and appreciative member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of the Maccabees, being finance keeper of the latter. Mr. Line is a man of fine mentality and broad human sympathy. He thoroughly enjoys home life and takes great pleasure in the society of his family and friends. He is always courteous, kindly and affable, and those who know him personally accord him the highest esteem. Mr. and Mrs. Line's lives have been exemplary in all respects and they have ever supported those interests which are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity, while their own high moral worth is deserving of the highest commendation. CHARLES F. HULL.-For more than ten years engaged in an active general law practice in Onaway, and during the whole of that period manifesting an earnest, practical and helpful interest in the welfare of the community and the advancement and improvement of his town and county, Charles F. Hull has risen on demonstrated merit to a high place in the esteem of the people and force and influence for good among them. He is now one of the leading lawyers in this part of the state and one of the most prominent and progressive citizens of northern Michigan. Mr. Hull was born in Cass county, Michigan, on August 18, 1870. His parents, Francis and Harriet (Fredericks) Hull, were natives, respectively, of Norwalk, Ohio, and Cass county, this state. They were married in Cass county and became the parents of three children, all sons, of whom Charles F. was the first born. The mother is still living and resides at Petoskey, Michigan, where the father was actively engaged in contracting and farming, two interesting lines of enlightened

Page  973 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 973 productive energy, until his death, which occurred in 1906, when he was sixty years of age. At the beginning of the Civil war the father enlisted at Norwalk in the Fifty-fifth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served to the close of the sanguinary and momentous conflict, four years and nine months in all, and took part in several of the leading battles of the war and many skirmishes. After the close of his military service he moved to Cass county, Michigan, and there devoted himself to his chosen occupations of farming and contract work until death ended his useful labors and closed his creditable record. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, a Republican in politics and a wideawake, energetic and successful man in his business. Charles F. Hull obtained his scholastic training in the public schools and his legal preparation in close and laborious study under the direction of gentlemen eminent in the profession. He read law in the office of Messrs. Dart & Dart in Petoskey, this state, and also under the tutelage of Judge Benjamin T. Halstead of that city. On September 12, 1892, after a rigid examination, he was admitted to the bar, and at once began to look around him for a suitable location in which to begin practicing. He took up his residence at Boyne City, Charlevoix county, and remained there seven years. In 1900 he moved to Onaway, and here he has ever since been engaged in a large and exacting general practice, which has increased in volume and value as time has passed, and steadily raised him toward the first rank in the profession and in the esteem of his professional brethren and the public in general. He is capable and careful, omitting nothing required of him to win success and is generally triumphant in his cases. In his career as a lawyer Mr. Hull has played no favorites and followed no specialties. He has devoted himself to general practice and prepared himself for every department and phase of it. As a counselor he is wise, knowing and prudent. As a trial lawyer he is alert, skillful and armed with a wide general knowledge of law and court decisions, and as an advocate he is resourceful, forcible and convincing. His success is the result of extensive attainments and fine natural ability, and he is richly deserving of it and all that he is destined yet to win. On March 11, 1896, Mr. Hull united in marriage with Miss Dtaisy Carson, a native of Salem township, Washtenaw county, Michigan, and a daughter of F. H. and Sarah (Wheelock) Carson, also natives of Michigan and both now deceased. They had seven children, five of whom are living, Mrs. Hull being their youngest daughter. Her father was a merchant, a Democrat in his political connection and one of the leading citizens of his county. Mr. and Mrs. Hull have two children, their daughter Dorothy and their son Burke, both of whom are still living with their parents and attending school. Like their parents, they stand high in public estimation and are valued factors in the social life of their home city and county. The father trains with the Democratic party in national politics and is earnest and effective in its service. In local affairs he looks first to the good of the community, subordinating every other consideration to that. In fraternal life he is a Freemason and belongs to Boyne City Lodge No. 391 in the order. In

Page  974 974 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN the affairs of this organization he also takes an active interest and a serviceable part, and his membership in it is highly valued. WILLIAM DoLsoN.-A native son of Michigan, Mr. William Dolson has passed his entire life thus far in the Wolverine state. As a young man he turned his attention to lumbering and from 1879 to 1903 he was actively identified with agricultural pursuits. In the latter year he settled at Mikado, where he has since been engaged in the general merchandise business, his son, William, Jr., having been a partner in this concern since 1908. At the present time Mr. Dolson is president of the village and formerly he was a member of the board of supervisors and township treasurer. William Dolson was born in Wayne county, Michigan, on the 2d of August, 1844, and he is a son of Isaac E. and Roxey (Williams) Dolson, the former of whom was a native of the state of New York and the latter claimed Canada as the place of her birth. The father was an agriculturist by occupation and of the twelve children born to him and his wife, nine grew to maturity, eight of whom are living at the present time, two being residents of northern Michigan,-Chauncey and William. Both parents are now deceased, the father having passed away in 1877, and the mother about 1866. William Dolson was educated in the common schools of his native county and he initiated his active business career as a lumber man, continuing to be identified with that line of enterprise until 1879, at which time he became interested in farming, locating in Alcona county, in the vicinity of Mikado. Prior to this time he resided at AuSable, whither he removed in 1867, that being the center of his lumber interests. After engaging in the mercantile business Mr. Dolson was for three years in partnership with C. A. Johnson, a representative business man at Mikado, concerning whose career a sketch appears elsewhere in this work. After dissolving the afore-mentioned partnership Mr. Dolson conducted his enterprise for a time individually and in 1908 he took in his son, William, Jr., as a partner, the firm being now known as Dolson & Son. In addition to his other interests Mr. Dolson owns a fine farm of eighty acres in Alcona county, forty acres of which are cleared and in a high state of cultivation. Mr. Dolson is a stanch advocate of the principle of the Republican party in his political proclivities and while he has never manifested aught of ambition for political preferment he has served most creditably as a member of the board of township supervisors and as treasurer of the township. At the present time, in 1911, he is president of the village, in which capacity he is proving an able administrator of the affairs of the town. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with various organizations of a local character and in their religious faith the Dolsons are devout members of the church of the Latter Day Saints, to the furtherance of whose good works they have given liberally of their time and means. Mr. Dolson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Dugan, in 1867, and to this union have been born three children, namely,-Daniel,

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Page  975 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 975 Lizzie and William J., the latter of whom is associated with his father in business, as already noted. FRANCIS MARTIN MORRISSEY.-In all the length and breadth of Clare county it would be impossible to find a man held in more universal honor and confidence than Francis Martin Morrissey, county clerk and register of deeds. A lawyer by profession and previous to that an instructor, his services were thorough and satisfactory in every field, but it is as a public official that he has won highest prestige. He is one of the leading local Republicans and stands high in party councils, although one whose methods are questionable will find no profit in approaching him. Mr. Morrissey is a native son of the state, his birth having occurred at Bath, Clinton county, October 23, 1869. As his name indicates, on the paternal sides he comes of Celtic stock, his father, Martin Morrissey, having been born in Ireland of Irish parents. The elder man left the old associations at Tipperary about the year 1853 and having crossed the Atlantic, located first in Essex county, Canada. Only about nineteen years of age at that time, he remained in Canada until about 1864, and then came to Michigan, settling in Clinton county. He left Clinton county in 1873 to go to Bay City, Michigan, and there he resided for the remainder of his life. His occupation was that of a railroad man, and for an extended period he kept the records of the roadmaster of the Michigan Central railroad at Bay City. His religion was Catholic and his citizenship was of the most loyal and law-abiding sort. More than thirty years have passed since his demise which occurred in 1881, and he was then forty-eight years of age, his birth having occurred at Tipperary in 1833. He subscribed to the policies of the Democratic party and later became a " Greenbacker. " He took for his wife one of the daughters of his adopted land, Esther Jerusha Cramer, born in Eaton county, Michigan, February 29, 1844. Her father was Stephen Cramer who was born in Herkimer county, New York, and her mother was Mary Ann Boyer, of French and German descent. Stephen Cramer was of English parentage. The subject's mother had four brothers in the Union ar. ny during the war of the Rebellion, all being cavalrymen. Francis Martin Morrissey gained his elementary education in the schools of West Bay City, Michigan, being a student in the same until the age of eleven years. Later he studied for a time at Harrison, Clare county, and subsequent to that occasionally attended a term in the country schools of Ionia county, where he worked as a farmer's assistant. Left fatherless at the age of eleven years, he was thrown almost at once upon his own resources and no one is better entitled to the title of self-made than the delicate young lad, who so early learning the bitter lesson that there is no arguing with necessity, bravely set forth to carve out his own fortunes. Very hungry for learning, he made the most of his educational advantages and in 1888 he began teaching school in Clare county, Michigan. He was only eighteen years of age at the time. While engaging in his pedagogical labors the ambitious young fellow, with an eye to the future, read law in spare minutes in the school room and attacked his Blackstone in the offices of Attorneys Brown & Cummins and

Page  976 976 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of William A. Burritt, at Harrison. This diligent campaign lasted from 1890 to 1893, Mr. Morrissey in the latter year being admitted to the bar. He had the usual difficult experience of the indigent young lawyer in getting a start and in the first years he had the additional handicap of poor health. He eked out a living by continuing to teach at intervals and secured the office of justice of peace of the city of Harrison. Even in those days of trial and discouragement he never forgot the immortal counsel, "This above all,-To thine own self be true; And it must follow as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. " His good principles and ability gradually but surely won recognition and in 1895 he was first elected to the office of county clerk and register of deeds, which he holds to-day. This office being also the only abstract of title office he began holding said combined office January 1, 1897, and is still holding it, having been elected for the eighth consecutive term November 8, 1910. Many years ago, in 1891, he was township clerk of Hayes township, Clare county, and other offices with whose duties he has been intrusted (not previously mentioned) are those of circuit court commissioner and deputy county treasurer. He is one of the stanchest of Republicans, having ever given heart and hand to its men and measures since his earliest voting days. Mr. Morrissey is a friend to all churches, but is affiliated with none. However, to all things likely to prove of benefit to his fellow men he gives his heartiest support. He is exceedingly popular in lodge circles, possessing those good qualities which make him a desirable fraternity man. His name is on the rolls of the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Americans and the Modern Woodmen of America, of which latter he is presiding officer. On September 1, 1897, Mr. Morrissey laid the foundations of a happy marriage and congenial life companionship by his union with Miss Martha Maria Rogers, their wedding occurring at Moorestown, Missaukee county, Michigan. Mrs. Morrissey was educated in the Harrison high school and was graduated therefrom. Her parents are Anthony and Elizabeth Jane (Miller) Rogers, the former of whom was a lumberman by occupation and a well-known public official, serving two terms as county treasurer of Missaukee county and for a number of terms as supervisor of Norwich township. Mr. and Mrs. Morrissey share their delightful home with three sons, namely: Burke Cummins, born at Harrison, September 3, 1898; William Everett, born at Harrison, February 7, 1900; and Charles Anthony, born at Harrison, October 7, 1901. Whatever success Mr. Morrissey has attained in life-and those who know him best esteem it by no means as inconsiderable-he attributes to the fact that early in life he adopted the plan of doing with his fellow men and women absolutely as he agreed to do. Added to being square ALL THE TIME, he gives not a little credit to the hard knocks, and he fully agrees with the great American novelist who has said, "To accept the worst that fate can deal and to win courage from it and not despair-that is Success." His motto is this-Be Thorough.

Page  977 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 977 John Morrissey, first cousin to the father of the foregoing gentleman, was, as the subject facetiously puts it, the only prize fighter who ever got into the United States Congress. GEORGE W. CHILDS, JR.-The name of Childs is one well and favorably known in this city, and an admirable representative in the present generation is George W. Childs, manager of Petoskey's leading hostelry, -the Bay View Hotel, over which Mr. Childs' father presided in days gone by. Mr. Childs seems fitted by nature for the hotel business, possessing a genial disposition and kindly spirit, qualities essential to the hotel proprietor, and he has gained a wide reputation for the able manner in which he caters to the public taste. He whose name inaugurates this review is a native of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in Schoharie county, New York, September 29, 1866. He is the son of George W. and Sarah B. (Frisbee) Childs, having received the full patronymic of his honored father. George W. Childs, Sr., was born in the state of Maine early in the nineteenth century and was summoned to his eternal rest in 1907, at the age of seventyeight years. The mother was also a native of New York and still survives, a venerable and much beloved lady. The five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Childs all survive, the subject being the youngest in order of birth. The little family came to Michigan in 1868, when the subject was an infant and they first located in Montcalm county, where the head of the house devoted his energies to lumbering and farming. After residing there for a good many years, the family removed to Boyne City, Michigan, in 1882, and there the father conducted a hotel for about a year. He then came to Petoskey and undertook the management of the Bay View Hotel and in such capacity found financial success and renown as an ideal hotel man, giving general satisfaction to his patrons. He was also prominently identified with public life and acted in the capacities of sheriff for one term and as county clerk, discharging the duties of these offices in highly exemplary manner. He was a remarkably public-spirited man and ever gave heart and hand to the men and measures of the Democratic party. George W. Childs, Jr., the immediate subject of this brief review, received his education in Michigan, attending the schools of the towns in which his parents resided. As a young man he removed to Detroit and was engaged in the banking and manufacturing business in that beautiful city for twenty years. He was associated with the Preston National Bank in the capacity of accountant and was for fifteen years secretary of the Penberthy Injector Company. It was in 1907, that Mr. Childs formed his present business association, the management of the Bay View Hotel at Bay View and the step has been one attended by satisfaction and success. Mr. Childs is independent in his political affiliation, ever bestowing his support upon the man and the measure he believes most likely to prove beneficial to the public at large, irrespective of mere partisanship. Mr. Childs laid the foundation of an ideally happy life companionship, when on August 26, 1890, he was united in marriage to Miss Luella Sherman, daughter of the Rev. George W. and Sarah (Ball) Sher

Page  978 978 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN man, both of whom are living at the present time. Mrs. Childs is a native of Michigan and was living at Traverse City at the time of the solemnization of her marriage. She is one of a family of five children, four of whom survive at the present day. The Rev. and Mrs. Sherman are residents of Los Angeles, California. The union of the subject and his wife has been blessed by the birth of two children: Ruth, wife of James P. Moore, of Los Angeles; and George D., who is living with his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Childs are generally recognized as estimable members of society. JOHN J. MUNGER.-No official or citizen of northern Michigan has given a better account of himself, in view of the years of his service and his age, than John J. Munger, now but fairly entered into his second term as register of deeds of Otsego county. He is a bright, persistent, able young man; a native of Tittabawassee township, Saginaw county, Michigan, born in the year 1868, and reared and educated in the township of his birth. His early life was spent in acquiring an education in the district schools of his neighborhool and a varied training on the farm in the cultivation of industry, perseverance and common sense. But the continuous career of a farmer and a citizen in a rural community were not exactly according to the young man's tastes or talents, and he therefore moved to Gaylord, Otsego county, in January, 1895, and since that time has followed various pursuits, generally of a clerical nature, which have brought him into close contact with a wide circle of acquaintances in the county seat and the county itself; these acquaintances have rapidly been transformed into friends, and they, in turn, into supporters of his qualities for public service. Before assuming the duties of his present office Mr. Munger served as treasurer of Bagley townhip and assessor, for two terms, of the village of Gaylord, commencing his second term as register of deeds January 1, 1911. Mr. Munger is the oldest of the five children born to Wells and Jane McGregor, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Michigan; his brothers and sisters are Marjory J., Emma M., Albert W. and James E. Munger. In 1897 he was happily united in marriage with Miss Ella Mackintosh, and two children have been born into their household, Marjory and J. Clinton. Mrs. Munger is a native of Canada, and is a highly respected and popular lady. WImLUAM KREBS.-Numbered among the representative business men and progressive citizens of the city of Alpena, Mr. Krebs is third vicepresident of the C. Moench & Sons Company, which operates tanneries in Alpena and in Salamanca and Gowanda, New York. He is general manager of the tannery in Alpena, is president of the Alpena Chamber of Commerce and has been an influential factor in promoting the industrial and civic progress of the city in which he maintains his home and in which he has a secure place in popular confidence and esteem. As one of the leading business men of Alpena he is well entitled to recognition in this publication. William Krebs was born in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 30th of September, 1868, and is a son of John J. and Mary (Hahn)

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Page  979 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 979 Krebs, the former of whom was born in the village of Obersophe, Hessen, Germany, on the 20th of May, 1835, and the latter of whom was born in Alsfeld,.in the same province, on the 7th of August, 1835. Both were residents of Cincinnati, Ohio, for many years and there the father died on the 12th of December, 1899, his cherished and devoted wife having been summoned to eternal rest on the 24th of October, 1897. Their marriage was solemnized in New York city on the 3d of May, 1857, and they became the parents of six sons and eight daughters, of whom three sons and five daughters are now living, namely: Louis P., who is a resident of Gowanda, New York; John, who maintains his home in Alpena; Katherine, who is the wife of William Schmitt, of Cincinnati; William, who is the immediate subject of this review and who was the eighth in order of birth of the fourteen children; Anna, who is the wife of John Grendelmeyer, a resident of Cincinnati; Emma, who is the wife of Henry Hoefle, of Cincinnati; Amelia, who is the wife of Ernest Groeneweg, of Cincinnati, and Marie, who is the wife of Nicholas Seuss, of Cincinnati. John J. Krebs was reared and educated in his native land and in 1853, when about eighteen years of age, he sundered the ties that bound him to home and fatherland and set forth to seek his fortunes in America. He made the voyage on a sailing vessel and finally landed in the port of New York city. On shipboard he formed the acquaintance of another young man, whom he befriended and provided with food on the voyage, as the fellow was without money. His kindness met with more than ingratitude, as the man whom he had thus aided stole his money soon after they landed, and he was thus left penniless, a stranger in a strange land. He went without food for several days and then found employment in a tannery in the national metropolis, where he learned the trade in all its details. In his native land he had served an apprenticeship to the trade of wagonmaking, though he had been reared on the farm of his father. In the early '60s John J. Krebs removed with his family to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he soon afterward engaged in the tanning business on his own responsibility. He erected and equipped a tannery and eventually built up a large and prosperous business. He continued to be identified with this line of enterprise until his death, and he gained and retained the confidence and esteem of the community in which he so long maintained his home. He was one of the organizers of the North Cincinnati Turn Verein and held membership in other leading German societies. His political support was given to the Republican party and both he and his wife held membership in the Lutheran church. William Krebs gained his early educational training in the public schools of his native city, where he also completed a course in Nelson's Business College, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1884. He learned the tanner's trade in his father's establishment and continued to be identified therewith until 1894, when he removed to Cattaraugus county, New York, and assumed the position of bookkeeper for the Moench tannery, the interested principals in which were John Christopher Moench and his son Henry L., which formed the Vol III-2

Page  980 980 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN * Company of C. Moench & Sons, which later was incorporated under the present title of the C. AMoench & Sons Company. In 1896 the concern completed the erection of its tannery in Alpena, Michigan, and Mr. Krebs was sent to this city as general manager of the business. In 1899 the company purchased the Gaensslen tanneries in Salamanca and Gowanda, New York, and the three tanneries have since been operated by the company, which was incorporated in 1899. The corporation also has stores in the cities of Boston and Chicago, and an office in the city of St. Louis. Mr. Krebs is a member of the directorate of the Alpena National Bank and in 1909 was elected president of the Alpena Chamber of Commerce, an office of which he is the present efficient and valued incumbent. He has been active in promoting the high civic ideals and practical work of this important organization, through the influence of which the industrial progress of Alpena has been signally advanced, and he is ever ready to give his support to all measures projected for the general good of the city in which his interests are centered. Though never ambitious for public office, Mr. Krebs is found aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he holds membership in the Congregational church, as did also his wife, who is deceased. He was made a Mason in Berean Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons, at Cattaraugus, New York, and from this body was dimitted to Hopper Lodge, No. 386, in Alpena, with which he has since continued in active affiliation. He is also identified with Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; Sagonahkato Council, No. 58, Royal & Select Masters; Alpena Commandery, No. 34, Knights Templars; and he has received the thirty-second degree in Michigan Sovereign Consistory at Detroit, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. In the city of Detroit he holds membership in Moslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. On the 27th of March, 1895, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Krebs to Miss Amelia Louise Moench, who was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, on the 7th of April, 1868, and was summoned to the life eternal on the 17th of December, 1902. She was the daughter of John Christopher and Caroline (Dietrich) Moench, the former of whom was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, on the 22d of June, 1835, and the latter of whom was born at Hamburg, Erie county, New York, on the 2d of January, 1847. They were married at Hamburg, New York, in 1865, and of their eight children three sons and three daughters are living. Mr. Moench came to America in 1853, after having learned the tanner's trade in his native land. He located in Buffalo, New York, whence he later removed to Gowanda, Cattaraugus county, that state, where he was actively engaged in the tanning business until his death. He was the founder of the C. Moench & Sons Company. He was a Republican in politics and both he and his wife were zealous members of the Lutheran church. His death occurred on the 8th of May, 1904, and his wife passed away in August, 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Krebs became the parents of three children, all of whom remain at the paternal home, namely,-Carrie Marie, William H., and Adolph E.

Page  981 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 981 HARRY J. BRIGGS.-A citizen of prominence and influence at Elk Rapids, Michigan, is Harry J. Briggs, who has resided in this city during the major portion of his life thus far. At an early age he became interested in the newspaper business and at the present time, in 1911, he is editor and publisher of the Antrim County News, one of the finest publications of its kind in the entire state. Mr. Briggs has been the popular and efficient incumbent of a number of important offices of public trust and responsibility during the past few years and at the present time is a member of the village council. Harry J. Briggs was born at Coaticook, 'in the province of Quebec, Canada, on the 13th of September, 1865, and he is a son of James J. and Eliza (Barber) Briggs, both of whom are now dead. As a young man the father learned the mason's trade in his native land of Wales, and deciding that he would have better opportunities for advancement in the states he came to Michigan in the year 1867. Locating in Elk Rapids he was here engaged in the work of his trade for a long number of years. In the public schools of Elk Rapids Harry J. Briggs received his rudiamentary educational training. At the age of thirteen years, however, his schooling was suddenly curtailed through the necessity of circumstances. He then entered the printing office of the Progress, a paper of some note in those early days. For nearly thirty years Mr. Briggs continued to work in this office but on the 23d of December, 1909, he decided to launch out into the newspaper world on his own account. Founding the Antrim County News, he has continued to devote his time and energy to the improvement of that paper until it is now renowned for its liberal policies and excellent editorials. On the 26th of November, 1885, Mr. Briggs was united in marriage to Miss Nellie E. McCauley, who was born at St. James, on Beaver Island, and who is a daughter of Peter E. McCauley, a successful farmer and fisherman on Beaver Island. To Mr. and Mrs. Briggs have been born nine children, concerning whom the following brief data are here incorporated,-Lola is deceased; Harry J., Jr., is a chemist at the cement works, at Newaygo, Michigan; Ralph St. C. is likewise a chemist at the cement works; Marie is at home and works in her father's office; and Elizabeth, Lucile, Edwin, Lloyd, Mildred Dorothy and Jack remain at the parental home and are attending school at Elk Rapids. In politics Mr. Briggs is aligned as a stalwart in the ranks of the Republican party. In 1907 he was honored by his fellow citizens with election to the office of president of the village and he served in that capacity with the utmost efficiency for one term. Since 1908 he has been a member of the town council and in that connection is a powerful influence for good in connection with the progress and development of this section of the county. In their religious adherency the Briggs family are devout communicants of the Catholic church, in the different departments of whose work they are most active and zealous factors. As a citizen and business man Mr. Briggs holds a high place in the confidence and regard of his fellow men. He is a man of remarkable executive ability and tremendous vitality, is genial in his associations, courteous in his address and generally popular in all classes of society.

Page  982 982 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN FRED G. HEUMANN.-One of the progressive business men and highly popular citizens of Traverse City is Frederick G. Heumann, who here conducts a large and representative enterprise as a merchant tailor. He is specially prominent in connection with fraternal organizations and his genial personality and sterling attributes of character have won to him a wide circle of valued and loyal friends. Mr. Heumann reverts with definite satisfaction to the circumstance of being able to designate Michigan as the place of his nativity. He was born in Bay City, this state, on the 10th of April, 1863, and is a son of Dr. George and Katherine (Lehr) Heumann, both of whom were born in Germany. Their marriage was solemnized in Michigan and in this state they continued to reside until their death, the father having passed away at the age of sixty-one years and the mother having been about forty-eight years of age at the time of her death. Of their eight children Fred G. was the second in order of birth and of the number six are now living. Dr. Heumann received excellent educational advantages in his native land and duly prepared himself for the medical profession, also in Germany. When a young man he established his home in what is now Bay City, Michigan, and he was one of the early and distinguished representatives of his profession in that section of the state, there he continued in practice until the time of his death. He was a man of fine intellectuality and of the highest integrity in all the relations of life, so that he ever commanded the unqualified confidence and esteem of his fellow men, the while he was influential as a citizen. He was one of the six persons who founded the Evangelical Lutheran church in Bay City and of the same both he and his wife were most zealous and devoteed members. He was well fortified in his opinions as to matters of public polity and gave a staunch allegiance to the Democratic party. Fred G. Heumann is indebted to the public schools of Bay City for his early educational discipline, and at the age of sixteen years he entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of tailor, in which he became an expert workman. At the age of nineteen years he located in Au Sable, Oscoda county, where he engaged in the merchant tailoring business, as senior member of the firm of Heumann & Sempliner. At the expiration of about eighteen months he disposed of his interest in this enterprise and removed to the adjoining city of Oscoda, where he purchased from Robert B. King a half interest in the latters merchanttailoring business. About two years later he sold his interest to his partner and engaged in the same line of business in an individual way, having purchased at this time a store building in Oscoda and having utilized the same for the accommodation of his business. He built up an excellent trade and continued to be numbered among the successful business men of Oscoda until 1892, when he came across to the western part of the state and located in Traverse City, where he has since been engaged in the same line of enterprise and where he holds prestige as the leading merchant tailor of the city. He has a well equipped establishment and the products of the same are invariably of the highest class of workmanship, so that he naturally controls a large and representative patronage, which is augmented by

Page  983 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 983 his personal popularity and his fair and honorable dealings. He is progressive as a citizen and business man and takes a lively interest in all that tends to advance the welfare of his home city. While never an aspirant for public office he is found aligned as a zealous supporter of the cause of the Republican party. He was a member of the Board of education of Traverse City, in 1902. Mr. Heumann has been specially appreciative of the work and associations of leading fraternal organizations and has been prominent in the same. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch iMasons, in which he is now serving his fourth term as high priest; Traverse City Council, No. 61, Royal & Select Masters, of which he was thrice illustrious master from 1905 to 1907, inclusive; Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templar, of which he is past senior warden; DeWitt Clinton Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scotish Rite, in the city of Grand Rapids, in which body he received the thirty-second degree on the 18th of February, 1909. He is also identified with the allied organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in which he is affiliated with Saladin Temple in Grand Rapids. He is also a prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, in which his original affiliation was with Launcelot Lodge, No. 72, at Au Sable, Michigan. He is past chancellor of this lodge, from which he was dimitted to Traverse City Lodge, No. 56, with which he has since been actively identified. In the Uniform Rank of the Knights of Pythias Mr. Heumann has the distinction of being lieutenant colonel of the Second Regiment of the Michigan Brigade and he is district deputy for the order, through appointment by Grand Chancellor Woodward, of the Grand Lodge of the state. On August 5, 1897, Mr. Heumann was united in marriage to Miss Julia D. Harvey, a daughter of Gerome B. and Mary (McFall) Harvey. The father died on the 3d of September, 1902, and the mother is still living. Mrs. Heumann was born at Utica, Michigan and was there educated. Fred G., Jr., the son of Mr. and Mrs. Heumann, is now a clerk in Pennsylvania R. R. Office in Chicago. The daughter Clara died at the age of five years and Frank Faust died at the age of four years. AARON FREDERICK ANDERSON, one of the prosperous and influential citizens of Cadillac, Michigan, was born in far-away Sweden, March 8, 1858, eldest in the family of eight children of August and Lottie Anderson, both natives of that country and both now deceased. His father a farmer, Aaron F., was reared to agricultural pursuits and assisted in the farm work until he was twenty years of age, meanwhile receiving a good education in the common schools, and when not at work in the field learning the shoemaker's trade, at which in due time he became an efficient workman. In the spring of 1878, with the hope of bettering his condition by emigration to America, he borrowed the money with which to pay his passage to this country, and in due time stepped from the S. S. City of Chester on to the landing at New York city. From there he drifted west to Big Rapids, Michigan, where he worked in a lumber yard for a short time, and in the month of June of that same year

Page  984 984 HISTORY OF' NORTHERN MICHIGAN came to Cadillac. Here he found employment in Cobb & Mitchell's saw mill, where he worked during most of the following winter. Then he turned his attention to his trade. Being in debt, as above stated, for the amount necessary to bring him to this country, he had to use rigid economy in order to pay his board and save some money. Later he opened a shop for himself, and still later engaged in the boot and shoe business, which he continued until 1899. In the meantime, in 1896, he embarked in the lumber business in partnership with Paul Johnson, under the firm name of Johnson & Anderson. In 1897 they bought a saw mill at Putnam, near Manton, Michigan, which they operated until 1902, when the business with Mr. Johnson was closed out. In that year Mr. Anderson built a saw mill at South Boardman, and a few years later, in 1903, began the building of a logging railroad from South Boardman into the woods, a distance of ten miles. As his business increased he added to the equipment of his mill, and now he handles principally hardwood, finding a market for his product in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and the Pacific coast. In 1905 he made a trip to the Northwest, visiting Washington, Montana and Oregon, buying, with others, at that time and since extensive tracts of timber land, which at this writing are worth many thousands of dollars. Thus tracing Mr. Anderson's business career for a period of over thirty years in this country, we find that his success is not the result of luck, but rather of honest endeavor backed by sound business judgment. He has worked hard, practiced economy, and put brains into his business. To-day he enjoys a full measure of prosperity and has the confidence and high esteem not only of the citizens of Cadillac but also of all those with whom he has had dealings throughout the middle West and elsewhere. Mr. Anderson was married in Cadillac, September 26, 1882, to Miss Addie Greenburg, and the union has resulted in the birth of six children, as follows: Fred A., Clarence E., Ester E., Ruth F., Helen M. and Rachel D. All are living except Clarence E., who died at the age of twelve years. Mr. Anderson and his family are identified with the Swedish Baptist church of Cadillac. His many excellent traits of character make him popular with all classes, and he has the characteristics which win and hold warm friendships. JAMES R. SNODY.-Beginning the struggle for advancement among men for himself when he was but eighteen years of age, teaching school in winter and clerking in summer for about three years, then turning his attention to mercantile life as a dealer in agricultural implements, and afterwards engaging in various occupations in several different places, James R. Snody, now one of the leading business men of Onaway, has had a varied and very instructive experience. By his present standing in his community and the magnitude and success of his undertakings he shows that its lessons were not lost upon him, and that he profited by them to the fullest extent. Mr. Snody was born in Huron county, Michigan, on October 29, 1864. He is of what may properly be called Yankee extraction, and has exhibited in his career the admirable traits of ingenuity, self-reliance, persistent industry and ready resourcefulness of the people of our

Page  985 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 985 northeastern section, of whom he is a worthy representative. His father, Daniel W. Snody, was born and reared in Dresden township, Washington county, New York, on the shore of Lake Champlain, where his life began on March 12, 1842; and the mother is a native of the state of Vermont. Her maiden name was Elizabeth H. Long. They were married in Huron county, Michigan, on April 15, 1863, and became the parents of four children, two sons and two daughters: James R., the immediate subject of this review; Reuben W., who married Miss Etta Parkinson; Charlotte E., who is the wife of J. H. Trace; and Helen, who is now Mrs. J. D. Riley. The father, Daniel W. Snody, attended school in his native county until he reached the age of twelve years. He then removed with his parents, Daniel and Elizabeth M. (Welch) Snody, to a new home in St. Clair county, this state. His father, Daniel Snody, was born in Dresden township, Washington county, New York, in 1810, and died in Onaway, at the home of his son in 1899. His wife was of the same nativity as himself and died in 1844. They had four children, all sons and all now deceased but Daniel W., the father of James R. Twelve years after the mother died the father got the western fever and came to Michigan, locating in Brockway township, St. Clair county, in 1852. Sometime later he moved to Huron county, where he engaged in farming and lumbering. He was a sailor in early life and never lost his love for the water, always wishing to live near it and always gratifying this desire as far as was possible. Daniel W. Snody attended school at Brockway in St. Clair county and Whiterock in Huron county. The first work he did for the purpose of earning an independent living for himself was making shingles in Huron county. He then engaged in commercial fishing in that county for eighteen years and at Forestville, Sanilac county for a time, and was also occupied in selling agricultural implements in 1879. In 1898 he moved to Onaway and started the drug business in which he is still engaged. He has been active in public affairs from the dawn of his manhood. His first public office was that of township clerk in Whiterock township, Huron county. Since his arrival in Presque Isle county he has been treasurer of Allis township and county commissioner. He is now serving his third term as county drainage commissioner. He was president of Onaway the year the water works were installed, and has been mayor one year since the incorporation of the city. At present (1911) he is a member of the board of public works. In all the offices he has ever held he has discharged his duties with fidelity and ability, with an eye single to the public welfare and greatly to the satisfaction of the people he served. For nearly fifty years he has been connected with the Masonic order and prominent in its councils. He was made a Freemason in Port Hope Lodge No. 128, at Port Hope, Michigan, on April 16, 1864, and on May 28, 1909, became a life member of Onaway Lodge No. 425. He also belongs to the Order of Knights of the Maccabees. In politics he is an old time and straight-forward Democrat, with warm interest

Page  986 986 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN in the welfare of his party and great energy and influence in its service. James R. Snody, having obtained his education in the public schools of his native county felt impelled to return to the county something for its benefaction to him in this way, and after leaving school engaged in teaching for five terms, dispensing to others with a liberal hand the knowledge he had gained in the same system of instruction. He ably conducted a public school during the winter months and occupied himself in clerking during the summers, beginning this dual employment at the age of eighteen. From 1885 to 1890 he dealt in agricultural implements at Ubly in Huron county, and during the next three years was engaged in the drug trade at that place. He then moved to Whittemore in losco county, where he remained until 1898, connected with the cedar lumber trade as superintendent of a large company. While living there he served as postmaster four years and was also a member of the school board. In 1898 he came to Onaway and joined his father in the drug business, also serving as superintendent of the cedar lumber enterprise of W. C. Sterling & Son until 1908. He is now a member of the Executive Committee of the Northeastern Development Bureau of Michigan, and one of the inspiring and controlling forces of its operations. During the whole of his residence in Onaway he has been a leading spirit in all matters of public improvement and given efficient aid to every undertaking designed to promote the advancement of the city and county and the substantial welfare of their people. His political faith and allegiance are given loyally and zealously to the Democratic party, and in its organization he is a very efficient worker. At the time of this writing (1911) he is supervisor of the Third ward of Onaway and one of the influential men in the city government, as he is in connection with all public affairs and educational and social institutions, as well as in business circles. Like his father, he is ardently attached to the Masonic order and has long paid his devotions before its sacred altars. He was made a Master Mason in Lodge No. 384 at Ubly, Huron county, in March, 1888, and is a pastmaster of that lodge. At the formation of Onaway Lodge No. 425 he transferred his membership to it, becoming one of its charter members. At the present time he is the Worshipful Master of this lodge. He was made a Royal Arch Mason in Lebanon Chapter No. 125 at Bad Axe, Huron county, in 1889, but afterward dimitted to Thunder Bay Chapter in Alpena. He is also a Knight of Pythias, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of the Maccabees. On August 25, 1890, Mr. Snody was joined in marriage with Miss Ella M. Armstrong, a native of Canada and daughter of Robert and Margaret (McCloud) Armstrong, the former born in England and the latter in Scotland. The father has died but the mother is living. They had three sons and three daughters. Of the six children four are living. Mrs. Srnody was the third in the order of birth. She and her husband have two children: Henrietta M., who is attending the Agricultural college at Lansing, and Florence E., who is going to school at home.

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Page  987 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 987 PETER LECuYER.-Among the enterprising men whose depth of character and strict adherence to principle excite the admiration of their fellow citizens is Peter Lecuyer who, for the past fifteen years, has been successfully engaged in the general merchandise business at Lincoln, Alcona county, Michigan. His interests, extensive and varied, have ever been of such nature that, while promoting his own individual success, they have also advanced the general prosperity by increasing industrial and commercial activity. Mr. Lecuyer is strictly a self-made man having, through persisting effort and unflinching determination, built the ladder by which he has risen to affluence. Mr. Lecuyer was born in the Province of Ontario, Canada, on March 11, 1860, a son of Baptiste and Josephine (Carrier) Lecuyer, both of whom are now deceased, the former having been called to eter. nal rest about 1862 and the latter having passed away in 1883. To Mr. and Mrs. Baptiste Lecuyer was born but one child, Peter, the immediate subject of this review. He was reared to maturity in his native place, to the public schools of which he is indebted for early educational training. He immigrated to the United States in 1883, locating first at Bay City, where he secured employment -in the offices of the Michigan Central Railroad Company. For a time he maintained his home at Roscommon and in 1885 he removed to Alcona, thence to Mud Junction and finally to Lincoln. During most of this time he was section foreman for the U. D. & M. Railroad. He opened his business in Lincoln in 1896 and in the same has succeeded beyond all his most sanguine expectations. He is a dealer in general merchandise, boots and shoes and farm and forest products. In his political adherency he is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and while he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters of public import, the only public office of which he has been incumbent is that of village treasurer to which he was elected for the years 1907, 1908, 1909. In a fraternal way he is a valued member of the Knights of the Tented Maccabees, and in their religious faith he and his wife believe in the doctrines of the Methodist Episcopal church. In the year 1893 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Lecuyer to Miss Emma Gallagher, a daughter of James and Mary (Crozier) Gallagher of Canada. To this union have been born six children whose names are here recorded in respective order of birth,-Rena, Irving, Howard, Hattie, William, and Walter, all of whom remain at the parental home. The subject was previously married to Miss Luella Hunt at Alcona, her untimely demise occurring March 16, 1890. The children of this union are Raymond, who is in California, and Glenn, who is at his home in Lincoln, Michigan. Louis A. GARDNER.-Crawford county figures as one of the most attractive, progressive and prosperous divisions of the state of Michigan, justly claiming a high order of citizenship and a spirit of enterprise which is certain to conserve consecutive development and marked advancement in the material upbuilding of this section. The county has been and is signally favored in the class of men who have controlled its affairs in official capacity, and in connection with its post

Page  988 988 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN office department the subject of this review deserves representation as he is now serving in the capacity of postmaster of Frederic, Crawford county, to which position he was appointed in 1910. He is also general manager of the mercantile establishment of the C. F. Kelly estate. Louis A. Gardner is a native of St. Lawrence county, New York, born on the 12th of October, 1877. He is a son of Augustus and Alice (McGrane)) Gardner, both of whom were born and reared in Canada, whence they removed to the United States, in 1877, location being made at Cheboygan, Michigan. The father turned his attention to the lumber business after his arrival in this state and he was a most prosperous business man during his life time. To Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Gardner were born three children, namely,-Louis A., Edward and Terrance. Louis A. Gardner received his educational training in the public schools of Cheboygan, in the high school of which place he was graduated as a member of the class of 1894. After leaving school he became a clerk in the C. F. Kelly store at Frederic and he continued to fill various clerical positions until he became manager of the general merchandise store of C. F. Kelly, of which position he has been incumbent for the past three years. In his political convictions le is a stanch advocate of the cause of the Republican party and in 1910 he was appointed, by President Taft, to the position of postmaster of Frederic, in which positon he is acquitting himself most creditably. His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of his duties and his appreciation of the responsibilities that devolve upon him are such as to make him a most acceptable incumbent, and his worth is widely acknowledged, while his record as a business man has been so honorable that he has gained the confidence and trust of all with whom he has been brought in contact. In the year 1907 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Gardner to' Miss Marie O'Brien, a native of Cheboygan, Michigan, and a daughter of Mrs. Daniel O'Brien. To Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have been born three children,-Louis, Jr., Constance and Kyron. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner are devout communicants of the Catholic church, in the different departments of whose work they are zealous factors. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and with the Modern Woodmen of America. JOHN KEEP.-The present able and popular incumbent of the office of register of deeds of Emmet county, Michigan, is John Keep, who has been a prominent and influential citizen at Petoskey for the past thirty-six years. Mr. Keep was county surveyor of this county for a number of years, until January, 1911, when he assumed charge of his new office. A native of Schuyler county, New York, John Keep was born on the 12th of August, 1842, and he is a son of Caleb and Charlotte (Sealey) Keep, both of whom were born in New York, the former on the 25th of December, 1807, and the latter on the 28th of April, 1813. The father was called to eternal rest in 1884 and the mother died in 1887. Of the nine children born to them six are living at the present

Page  989 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 989 time and concerning them the following record is here entered,-John, the immediate subject of this review; Caroline is the wife of C. F. Tabor; Martin maintains his home in the city of Toledo, Ohio; and Herman, Joseph and Chauncey, all reside at Burdett, New York. Caleb Keep was a farmer by occupation and he passed the major portion of his active career in Schuyler county, New York, where he was colonel of a military regiment for many years. He was a great lover of fine horses. He figured prominently in public affairs in his home community, where he was justice of the peace for several terms. He was postmaster at Bennetsburg, New York, for a period of eighteen years. In politics he was originally an oldline Whig but later he transferred his allegiance to the Democratic party. The founder of the Keep family in America was Martin Keep, who emigrated hither from England in the year 1716. John Keep was reared among the healthful influences of the old homestead farm, in the work and management of which he early became associated with his father. He attended the neighboring district schools up to the year 1861, at which time he went to Beloit, Wisconsin, where he lived with an uncle, Judge John M. Keep, and where he attended Beloit high school for a time. Eventually returning to New York, however, he there enlisted in Company K, Third New York Volunteer Infantry, in'October, 1861, for two years' service in the Civil war. He was a gallant and faithful soldier in the Union army during that period, and received his honorable discharge and was mustered out of service at Albany, New York, in 1864. Immediately thereafter he proceeded to Michigan, settling at Grand Rapids, where, in the capacity of civil engineer, he helped to survey the Grand Rapids & Indiana. Railroad. He continued to maintain his home at Grand Rapids up to 1869, at which time he removed to Cedar Springs, working on the line of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad up to 1873. In 1875 he came to Petoskey, where he was identified with railroading and surveying for a number of years. In 1878 he was elected county surveyor of Emmet county and served one term when he was appointed to the office of register of deeds. On the 13th of May, 1876, Mr. Keep was united in marriage to Miss Laura Cook, whose birth occurred in Ontario county, New York.,Mrs. Keep was summoned to eternal rest on the 6th of January, 1901, her loss being deeply mourned by a wide circle of affectionate friends. There were no children born to this union. In politics Mr. Keep is a Republican and in a fraternal way he is affiliated with Petoskey Lodge, No. 629, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. He retains a deep and abiding interest in his old comrades in arms and signifies the same by membership in Lombard Post, No. 170, Grand Army of the Republic. Although Mr. Keep has attained to the venerable age of sixty-eight years he is still enterprising and active. Socially, he is genial and courteous, and the popularity that comes from these qualities, as coupled with the distinction that comes from his achievements, makes him a man among many. A thorough business man, a true friend, a jolly fellow and a gentleman, such will describe the marked characteristics of John Keep, whose sterling in

Page  990 990 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN tegrity and worth command to him the unalloyed confidence and esteem of all who know him. PATRICK NouD.-The natural tendency of the lumber business is to make a man broad; perhaps it is the atmosphere of nature which surrounds it that has this effect upon those who engage in it, or it may be that the leaders in this great business, commercial and industrial field were naturally of the robust, energetic, expansive, enterprising and generous variety of human-kind. However one may account for the fact, the province of varied activities which includes contact with the invigorating forests, with the office, the mill and the stream; with hardy woodsmen, raftmen and millmen, as well as with keen leaders in business and big-brained capitalists-that which is known by the modest term of lumber trade, or lumber business, has always attracted to itself many of the master spirits of northwestern and national development. For half a century northern Michigan has been a great sectional leader in the production of such masterly forces concerned with the progress of the north, the northwest and therefore with the United States as a nation; and prominent among the thorough lumbermen of his section of the country whose interests are not only vast in the Upper Peninsula but have expanded to the Pacific coast is Patrick Noud, of Manistee, president of the State Lumber Company, with all its allied interests, for nearly a quarter of a century and a representative and honored public citizen of his home community. Mr. Noud was born in the lumber country of Upper Canada, January 19, 1845, and he had secured an invaluable experience in the essentials of the business-that is, he knew good lumber when he saw it-by the time he was twenty years of age, when (in 1865) he came to Manistee and commenced work in the dense pineries of the vicinity as a log-cutter and driver. Before long he was foreman of a crew and his second year " over the line" found him in charge of a lumber camp. Like other enterprising young men in his line, his next transition was to commence logging as an independent factor in the business, and from 1873 to 1879 he was thus engaged to the mutual advantage of his finances and his fast-accumulating knowledge and wide practical experience. In the latter year Mr. Noud made another great step toward prominence by becoming a member of the firm of Davis, Blacker and Company in 1879, the year of its organization. When the State Lumber Company was founded in 1887 his standing was such that he was unanimously elected president of the corporation, with R. R. Blacker, secretary and treasurer, and M. Fay, bookkeeper and salesman. Except that Mr. Noud's son, Thomas J., has since become identified with the company as its treasurer, there has been no change in the management of the business, which is, however, in comparison with its original proportions, as a giant to an infant. Some six hundred men are now employed in its numerous activities, about equally divided between the mills and the woods. The company also owns and operates large salt works and an extensive retail lumber yard in St. Helen, conducted

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Page  991 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 991 under the name of the Noud Lumber Company. Of the latter Patrick Noud is also president, while R. P. Noud is vice-president and B. D. Noud, secretary, treasurer and general manager. The senior Mr. Noud is also president of the Noud-Kean Coal Company of Detroit and South Haven, of which J. J. Kean is vice-president and John F. Noud secretary and treasurer. Further, he is head of the affairs of the Manistee Shoe Company, of which J. 0. Nessen is vice-president, George A. Hart, secretary and general manager, and H. W. Marsh, treasurer; president of the Mercantile Company of Wexford county, Michigan; president of the Chicago and South Haven Steamship Company, and largely interested in other local and Michigan enterprises. The Noud-Blacker Timber Company of Portland, Oregon, is also under the management of Patrick Noud as president, Mr. Blacker, vice-president, and Thomas J. Noud, secretary and treasurer. Patrick Noud has served as both mayor and alderman of the city of Manistee, and acquitted himself with characteristic decision and ability. He is a fraternalist of wide acquaintance and influence, being identified with the Knights of Columbus, the Elks and the C. M. B. A. In 1870 he married Miss Susan A. McCurdy, and eight children were born to them-Thomas J.; Mary G., wife of Dr. J. F. Kelley, of Manistee; John F.; Bernard D.; Maud Alice; Walter A. and Arthur, both deceased; and Reuben P., now completing a course at Notre Dame University, Indiana. WATSON F. BISBEE, who is ably filling the office of postmaster of Alvin, Alcona county, Michigan, has been a prominent business man and farmer of losco county for a long period of years and since 1880 he has been a valued resident of AuSable, where he has held various offices of public trust and importance. Mr. Bisbee was born at London, province of Ontario, Canada, the date of his nativity being January 22, 1841. He is a son of Elijah and Sarai (Foster) Bisbee, both of whom were born and reared in the state of Vermont, whence they removed to Canada about the year 1833. The father was a prominent and influential farmer during much of his active business career and he emigrated with his family to Sanilac county, Michigan, in 1845, there engaging in agricultural pursuits and there passing the residue of his life. Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Bisbee became the parents of nine children, of whom six are now living, three being residents of Michigan. The parents were Baptists in their religious adherency and they died in 1857 and 1879 respectively. Seventh in order of birth in a family of nine children, Watson F. Bisbee was five years of age at the time of his parents' removal from Canada to Sanilac county, this state. He completed his earlier educational training in the public schools of Lexington, Sanilac county, and while a youth on the home farm he devoted considerable time to helping his father. When Civil war was precipitated upon a divided nation he showed his intrinsic patriotism to the cause of the Union by enlisting as a soldier in Company D, Tenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, on the 22d of October, 1861. He served as corporal and participated in the following battles: Corinth, Stone's River and Farm

Page  992 992 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ington. In 1863 he was honorably discharged on account of disability and shortly after his return to Michigan he married and turned his energies to farming in losco county, eventually becoming the owner of a splendid estate in Mikado township. In 1880 he removed to AuSable, where he entered the employ of the Land Company and he continued to be actively identified with lumbering interests for a number of years. In politics he accords an unswerving allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponser and he has been honored by his fellow townsmen with many important public offices. He has been justice of the peace and city clerk of AuSable, has been county agent for the state board of corrections and charities for fourteen years, and he is now postmaster of Alvin, Michigan, of which latter office he has been incumbent for the past five years, being first appointed thereto by President Roosevelt. He was superintendent of the poor for fifteen years and for two years was treasurer of Mikado township. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic, the National League Veterans and Sons and the Independent Order of Foresters. His religious faith is in harmony with the tenets of the Baptist church and in all the relations of life his exemplary conduct has won to him the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. He is loyal and public-spirited and his contribution to progress and development has ever been of the most insistent order. In the year 1864 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bisbee to Miss Hannah J. Hamlin, who is a native of Nova Scotia, where she was reared and educated. To this union have been born four children, concerning whom the following brief data are here recorded: Nellie A. is the wife of Robert Rumpartl, who is engaged in the jewelry business at Au Sable; Frances E. married Arthur W. Vennus, of Flint, Michigan; Watson A. is connected with the life saving station; and Elva M. is deceased. BENJAMIN A. CUENY.-With ancestry resident for generations in Switzerland, the land made glorious in song and story by the heroic achievements of William Tell and Arnold Winkelreid, and admired all over the world for the freedom and lofty patriotism of its people, the excellence of its civil institutions and its advanced state of development in the matter of public improvements, Benjamin A. Cueny of Cheboygan has high examples for his inspiration in life. His own excellence and sterling worth as a citizen and his success in business prove that the influence of those examples has not been lost on him, and that, in the full measure of his opportunities and capacity, he is living up to them in all his daily exertions. Mr. Cueny is a native of Cheboygan and has passed the whole of his life to the present time (1911) in that city. He was born on August 6, 1873, and is a son of Joseph J. and Josephine (Goetzmann) Cueny, both of whom were born in Alsace-Loraine, Switzerland, one of the provinces torn from France by Germany in 1871 by the stern arbitrament of war, but just across the boundary line between it and Switzerland. The father died in 1897 at the age of seventy-three years, the mother surviving him until May 13, 1911, when she was called to her final re

Page  993 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 993 ward. They had eight children, four of whom are living: Joseph, the oldest of the four; William F., a sketch of whom appears in this work; Louise, and Benjamin A., the last born of the eight. The father came to the United States in his young manhood and first lived on a farm which he cultivated near the city of Madison, Wisconsin. A few years later he moved to Detroit in this state, where he was married and resided until 1869. In that year he moved his family to Cheboygan, where he passed the remainder of his days. Cheboygan was at the time of his arrival a straggling village, and had just begun to feel the throbbings of a larger and more ambitious life. Mr. Cueny, the elder, opened a grocery store, one of the first ever conducted in the town, and it brought him a thriving business with a large and active trade to the time of his death. He became prominent in the mercantile, political and social life of the community, and was influential in all phases of its activity. His political connection was with the Democratic party and his religious affiliation with the Catholic church. The schools of Cheboygan furnished his son, Benjamin A. Cueny, his education, and its mercantile enterprises provided an opening for his employment when he was but seventeen years old. At that time he took a position in a drug store for the purpose of learning the business, and he has adhered to the drug trade ever since in spite of strong temptations to engage in other business. He has advanced in his chosen line of work until he now owns a fine drug store at 403 North Main street, which is one of the most attractive and completely stocked in this part of the state. Mr. Cueny, like his father, belongs to the Democratic party in political relations, but is a member of it from conviction and not by inheritance. He believes in its principles and does all he consistently can to establish them as the ruling power in the government of his city, county, state and country. He also has strong interest in fraternal organizations and firm faith in their power for good. In consequence of this feeling he is a zealous and appreciated working member of the Cheboygan lodge of Elks, the Cheboygan council of Cheboygan and the order of Knights of Columbus. He was married on September 22, 1909, to Miss Beatrice Galbraith, who was born in Canada, but has been a resident of Michigan for eighteen years. GEORGE W. LACHAPELLE, of Harrisville, Alcona county, Michigan, is a son of one of the earliest pioneers in this section of the state. He is the only man living who has been a continuous resident of Alcona county or of adjacent territory thereto for the period of fifty-five years. Although he has now attained to the venerable age of nearly three score years and ten, he is wonderfully well preserved and looks like a man of fifty. In local politics Mr. LaChapelle has been a most prominent and important factor and it will be interesting to note, in an ensuing paragraph, the trend of his political career and the various offices to which he has been elected. At Monroe, in the county of the same name, Michigan, on the 23d of April, 1844, occurred the birth of George W. LaChapelle. who

Page  994 994 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN is a son of Francis and Margaret (O'Neil) LaChapelle, the former of whom was born in France and the latter in Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Francis LaChapelle became the parents of seven children and of the number one, Joseph by name, died prior to the establishment of the family home in Alcona, Michigan. After their arrival in the United States the parents resided for a time in Cleveland, Ohio, and thence they came to Michigan, in 1855, at which time the father pre-empted a tract of eighty acres of land, to which he subsequently added two hundred and eighty acres more, making in all a farm of three hundred and sixty acres. In addition to the work of improving his holdings he was also interested in the cooperage business, making hundreds of barrels for the packing and shipping of fish. He passed to his reward in 1870 and his wife died in 1884. George W. LaChapelle was the third by birth of the seven children, whose names are here recorded in respective order of birth,-Edward, Francis, George W., Alfred, Peter J., Louis and Joseph. Of the number three are now living, namely,-George W., of this review, Alfred and Peter. George W. was a lad of fifteen years of age at the time of his parents' removal to Michigan and he completed his early educational training in the common schools of Harrisville township, Alcona county. Thereafter he learned the carpenter's trade, with which he was identified for some time. He has resided in this section of the state since 1855 and has resided in his present home at Harrisville for the past forty years. He was one of the first deputy sheriffs of Alpena county and helped to convey the first prisoner to the Alpena jail, which was then located at Saginaw City. In 1870 he was elected the first sheriff of Alcona county, that year marking the division of Alcona from Alpena county. Ie served for two terms as sheriff; was register of deeds for one term; was township treasurer for two terms and justice of the peace for thirty-five years having been re-elected April 3, 1911, for four years more. He was postmaster of Harrisville for four years, being appointed to that position in 1893, and he was incumbent of a similar position at Mud Lake for two years, at the expiration of which time he resigned the office. He was deputy state game and fish warden for two years; was a member of the village council of Harrisville for five years; and after the town was incorporated as a city, in 1905, he was elected a member of the board of aldermen, which office gave him a seat on the board of supervisors; he was highway commissioner six years and is now street commissioner. He was coroner for eight years. This is an enviable political career and it may here be stated that Mr. LaChapelle acquitted himself with all of honor and distinction in each of the above offices. In his political convictions he is a stanch supporter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and he holds prestige as one of the most loyal and public-spirited men in Alcona county. He is deeply beloved by his fellow citizens and his entire career has been characterized by that sincere manliness of spirit so indicative of integrity and honesty of purpose. He is a very capable man and all his dealings have been marked by straightforward and honorable methods.

Page  995 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 995 In 1869 Mr. LaChapelle was united in marriage to Miss Bridget Hogue, who was born and reared in Ireland and who came to this country in 1847, being but four months at the time her father and his family came to America. To this union were born seven children,Adeline, Harriet, William, Arthur, Albert, Winfield and Myrtle. In their religious faith the family are devout members of the Catholic church. DAVID A. TRUMPOUR.-From the earliest authentic history and fishing industry has been one of peculiar and universal interest among men, and those who engage in it on a large scale have always been accounted persons of heroic spirit, willing to brave all danger, endure all hardship and undergo all labor that a most exacting occupation places in their lot, not only in order that they may succeed in a material way in their calling, but also to gratify the soul of daring within them, which is one of the most potential elements of their character, and the ruling genius of their lives. David A. Trumpour of Cheboygan has been connected with this industry from his boyhood, and has found employment in it in a number of places and widely varying circumstances. He was born in Wellington, Ontario, on February 3, 1855, and his parents, Jonathan R. and Mary A. (Murphy) Trumpour, were also natives of that province. Both have been dead for a number of years. They had ten children, of whom David was the third, and six of the ten are now living. The father was a farmer and fisherman, diligent in the pursuit of both occupations, and fairly successful in each. The paternal ancestors of the family were French Huguenots, and the progenitors of the American branch came to the United States et an early date and settled in the Mohawk valley in New York state. The mother's forefathers were of English nativity, and also early arrivals in this country. On each side of the house they bore their part in all the duties pertaining to the settlement, development and improvement of the localities in which they lived, each generation moving farther into the wilderness and helping to reduce it to subjection and productiveness. David A. Trumpour passed his boyhood and youth with his parents, assisting his father in his fishing and farming operations, and attending school in his native place when he could be spared from work for the purpose. In 1878, when he was twenty-three years of age, he engaged in fishing on his own account at Cape Vincent, New York, just where the, rivers of the Great Lakes enter the St. Lawrence river for the last stage of their long journey to the sea. He remained at Cape Vincent, pursuing his avocation with varying degrees of success and prosperity, until 1883, then changed his base of operations to Bay City in this state. For two years he did busines in Bay City, and in 1885 moved to Mackinaw, where he was in the fishery business until 1895. In that year he returned to Bay City, and renewed his fishing operations there, continuing them independently until 1899, when he sold his business to the great house of A. ' Booth & Company, and became manager of its trade in Bay City and surrounding country. He remained in charge of the interests of the company in that locality until October, 1909, then came to Cheboygan as superintendent of its business in this city. Since coming to this city Mr. Vol. III-3

Page  996 996 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Trumpour has reorganized the operations of the Booth Company here, doubling its trade in magnitude, quickening it in pace and strengthening it in the estimation of the business world. He has a large fleet of boats that go out into Lake Huron and up through the waters around the northern islands on regular fishing expeditions and bring in very considerable supplies for the work of the company and its dealings in the markets. During the year 1910 the company caught in these waters and shipped out of Cheboygan one million and a quarter pounds of fish. Mr. Trumpour is a very enthusiastic member of the Masonic order, and has reached the thirty-second round of its mystic ladder of ascending progress. He is a member of Bay City Lodge Free and Accepted Masons, and one of its Past Masters; a member of Blanchard Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; a Past Eminent Commander of Bay City Commandery Knights Templar, and a member of Bay City Consistory, thirty-second degree Masons. He also belongs to Elf Khurafel Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Saginaw Eastern Star. Just at this time (1911) he is the Eminent Commander of the newly organized Cheboygan Commandery of Knights Templar No. 50. In other fraternities he holds membership in the Cheboygan lodges of Odd Fellows and Elks. On February 20, 1877, when he was but twenty-two years old, Mr. Trumpour was married to Miss Hulda Esselstyn, who is a native of Cape Vincent, New York, and the daughter of John B. and Phebe (Anthony) Esselstyn, also natives of New York state, where the mother died a number of years ago and the father is still living. Mrs. Trumpour was the first born of their four children, all of whom are living. She knows her family record back to the time when the founders of the American branch of the family came to this country as emigrants from Holland in early colonial days. Some of her forefathers fought under Washington in the Revolutionary war, and felt the great commander and patriot lean on them firmly for support. This entitles her and her daughter Mae to membership in the organization of Daughters of the American Revolution. Col. John B. Esselstyn was her grandfather, and some of her ancestors were among the first settlers at Cape Vincent, New York. She and her husband are parents of three children, two of whom are living: Mae E., who is a teacher of domestic science and has taught at Asheville, North Carolina, two years, and also in the public schools of Cheboygan; and Harold E., who is now a student in the high school. Another son, named J. Albert, died at the age of two and one-half years. CHARLES A. SWEET, M. D.-Reputed one of the most skillful and able physicians and surgeons of Charlevoix county, Charles A. Sweet, M. D., of East Jordan, has met with distinguished success in his professional career, and has attained a high position not only as a talented and accomplished practitioner, but as one of the most popular and esteemed citizens of his community. He was born, in July, 1860, at Marshall, Michigan, a son of William A. and Mary (Farrar) Sweet, loyal and patriotic people, who had one or more sons that served as soldiers in the Civil war. Having completed the course of study in the schools of Marshall, Charles A. Sweet engaged in business with his brothers in Carson City, Michigan, where he subsequently began the study of medicine with Dr.

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Page  997 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 997 J. Tennant, remaining in his office for two years. In 1883 he entered the Illinois Medical University, at Chicago, where he was graduated in 1887, with an honorable record for good scholarship. Returning to Montcalm county, Dr. Sweet was engaged in the practice of medicine at Crystal for ten years, meeting with success from the start. In 1897 he established himself at East Jordan, where he has met with genuine success as one of the foremost physicians of this part of the state, having an extended and remunerative patronage. Enterprising and progressive, keeping up to the times in regard to the more modern methods of medical and surgical work, Dr. Sweet has one of the finest equipped offices in Charlevoix county, his suite of rooms containing a well-furnished reception hall; an examination room; a laboratory, in which is his prescription case and drug department, the latter being as well filled with drugs as many drug stores; and an operating room, which is equipped with all the modern and most approved appliances used in surgery. The doctor has served as health officer of East Jordan, and as county coroner; he is a member of the United States Pension Board for his district, and has been acting president of the board for six years; he belongs to the Charlevoix County Medical Association, and takes great interest in its affairs. He is liberal in his religious views, and in politics is a Republican. Fraternally the Doctor belongs to the Ancient and Accepted Order of Masons; to the Knights of the Maccabees; to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; to the Modern Woodmen of America; and to the Independent Order of Foresters. His wife is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star; of the Daughters of Rebekah; and of the Royal Neighbors. Dr. Sweet has been twice married. He married first Alta Throop, of Crystal, Michigan, who bore him one child. She died in 1891, in early womanhood. Dr. Sweet married second, in September, 1892, Nellie Scott, of Crystal. She was born in Montcalm county, Michigan, a daughter of Orlando and Ella Scott. The Doctor and Mrs. Sweet have four children, namely: Mildred, born in 1894; Carlton, born in 1900; Elizabeth, born in 1906; and Gordon, whose birth occurred in 1908. WELLINGTON J. CONOVER, M. D.-Although still to be counted among the young physicians, Dr. Wellington J. Conover has found it within his province to attain marked distinction in Evart and the county as an able representative of the profession to which he has elected to devote his life and energies. The birth of this gentleman occurred in Leamington, Ontario, Canada, November 10, 1876, his parents being Albert and June (Selkirk) Conover. The father was a native of New Hampshire, but through his mother Dr. Conover comes into contact with the land of "Hills and Heather," for it was in the historic old town of Edinburg, Scotland, that June (Selkirk) Conover first opened her young eyes. The father died when a comparatively young man at Liverpool, England, but the mother survived until the age of sixty, her death occurring in the year 1905, in Flint, Michigan. She came to this country in 1890. She and her husband were married at Leamington, in 1869. The union of this worthy couple was blessed by the birth of three

Page  998 998 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN sons, one of whom died at the age of about three years. Another, Dr. Thadeous Sidney, is a specialist in nose and throat diseases at Flint, Michigan. Wellington J. Conover is the second son of his parents. He was reared in Canada, where his father was engaged in the occupation of a farmer, and it was while in the old country engaged in traveling that his untimely demise occurred. Shortly after this, when Dr. Conover was a lad of about fourteen years, the family removed from Canada to Tustin, Osceola county, Michigan. He had already received a good common-school education, and he now completed the educational advantages offered by the state, graduating from the Tustin high school. An inclination to adopt the medical profession as his own had meantime taken form, and young Conover went to Detroit, where he enrolled among the students of the Detroit Medical College, studying there for two years. His preparation for his profession was concluded in the Medical College of Milwaukee, his graduation from that institution taking place in the year 1900. Fully equipped for his life work Dr. Conover looked about him for a suitable location and his choice fell upon Evart and here for more than a decade he has engaged in a constantly growing practice, which extends to the surrounding country as well as to the town in which the Doctor's interests are centred. He is identified with several of the organizations calculated to advance the unity of the fraternity, holding membership in the American Medical Association and the Osceola County Medical Society among others, and he is likewise popular in the ranks of the Knights of Pythias. On the first day of September, 1909, Dr. Conover was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Postal, daughter of Frank S. and Ellen (Wright) Postal, further mention of whom is contained on other pages of this work. Mrs. Conover is a native of Michigan. BENJAMIN D. ASHTON, M. D.-For nearly half a century was Dr. Ashton engaged in the active practice of his profession in Ohio and in Traverse City, Michigan, to which place he came in 1862. He retired from professional life in 1900 and afterward lived in the enjoyment of former years of earnest toil and endeavor. He died on the 7th of August, 1908, at the age of seventy-nine years. Dr. Benjamin D. Ashton was born in Clermont county, Ohio, on the 15th of September, 1828, a son of Thomas H. Ashton, whose birth occurred in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1797. The father was a farmer by occupation and when a mere child he accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio, settlement being made in Clermont county. After attaining to years of maturity he married Miss Elizabeth Cramer, who was born in Trenton, New Jersey, in 1800. She came to Clermont county, Ohio, as a child and there was reared and educated. Of the children born to this union but four grew to maturity,-Rachel, who lived to the age of seventy-six years, Benjamin D., the immediate subject of this review; William, who was a gallant soldier in the war of the rebellion, lived to the age of about sixty-eight years but was sorely afflicted with rheumatism for many years prior to his death; and Elizabeth is the widow of George

Page  999 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 999 Brechbill and resides in Nebraska. Thomas H. Ashton was summouned to the life eternal in 1888, at the patriarchial age of ninety-two years, his wife having passed away in 1879, at the age of seventy-nine years. To the common schools of Clermont and Brown counties, Ohio, Dr. Ashton is indebted for his preliminary educational training, which was later supplemented by a course of study in the Franklin Institute, at Felicity, Ohio, in which well ordered school he was graduated with honors. Thereafter he was engaged in teaching school for a number of terms, meanwhile devoting his spare time to the study of medicine. In preparation for his life work he entered the office of Dr. Edenfield, of Fayetteville, Ohio, under whose able preceptorship he made rapid advancement. He next entered the Ohio Medical College, at Cleveland, Ohio, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1855, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. Returning to Fayetteville, he entered into partnership with his former instructor, Dr. Edenfield, but this mutually agreeable alliance lasted only about six months, being terminated by the sudden death of the senior member of the firm. Dr. Ashton then went to Defiance, Ohio, where he built up a large and lucrative practice and where he continued to reside for the ensuing seven years. In 1862, however, he severed his connections at Defiance and immigrated to Michigan, locating in Traverse City, where he lived during the long intervening years to his death. Here he rapidly gained prestige as one of the leading physicians and surgeons in Grand Traverse county, where his eminent success was on a parity with his well directed endeavors. In 1900, feeling the weight of increasing years, he retired from active practice, and afterward did but little in a medical way. Dr. Ashton was originally an old-line Whig in his political proclivities, later he became a Free-soiler and at the time of the organization of the Republican party, in 1858, he transferred his allegiance thereto, ever afterward continuing a staunch advocate of the principles of that party. He held the office of pension examiner almost continuously after the close of the war. In 1887-8 he represented Grand Traverse county in the lower house of the State Legislature, having been elected to that office in 1886. In religious matters he was a devout Christian, but was not formally connected with any religious denomination, although he attended the Methodist Episcopal church. In a fraternal way he affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with which he had been connected since 1850. On the 7th of May, 1856, at Defiance, Ohio, was recorded the marriage of Dr. Ashton to Miss Margaret P. Lackey, a native of Lebanon, Ohio, her birth having occurred January 19, 1839. She was a daughter of John and Mary (Stites) Lackey, who removed to Defiance, Ohio, when Margaret was a child of but five years of age. There she was reared and educated and there occurred her marriage to Dr. Ashton. To John and Mary Lackey were born two children,-Charles P., who was a clerk in a general store at Defiance, Ohio, at the outbeak of the Civil war, entered the Union army as a soldier, served during the war until its close and passed to the life eternal in 1888; and Margaret P., who married Dr. Ashton. Dr. and Mrs. Ashton became parents of three children,-Benjamin F., born April 27, 1857, was married but died without issue, his widow now being a resident of Florida. Charles W., born December 14,

Page  1000 1000 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1857, is chief of the police department at Traverse City, He married Mary A. Haviland and they have four children, Laura E., Charles J., John D. and Herbert. Edwin L., born April 11, 1861, is a prominent dentist in Traverse City. He married Eva Hobbs and they have four children, Benjamin R., Frank E., Seth H. and Clarence. EDWIN L. ASHTON, D. D. S.-The world instinctively pays deference to the man whose success has been worthily achieved and whose prominence is not the less the result of an irreproachable life than of natural talents and acquired ability in the field of his chosen labor. Dr. Ashton occupies a position of distinction as a representative of the dental profession at Traverse City, Grand Traverse county, Michigan, and the best evidence of his capability in his chosen line of work is the large patronage which is accorded him. It is a well known fact that a great percentage of those who enter business life meet with failure or only a limited measure of success. This.is usually due to one or more of several causes-superficial preparation, lack of close application or an unwise choice in selecting a vocation for which one is not fitted. The reverse of all this has entered into the success and prominence which Dr. Ashton has gained. His equipment for the profession was unusually good and he has continually extended the scope of his labors through the added efficiency that comes from keeping in touch with the marked advancement that has been made by the members of the dental fraternity in the last quarter of a century. Dr. Edwin L. Ashton is a native son of the state of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Defiance, that state, on the 11th of April, 1861. He is a son of Dr. Benjamin D. Ashton, who was born and reared in Ohio. Dr. Benjamin D. Ashton married Margaret P. Lackey and this union was prolific of three children, concerning whom the following brief data are here inserted,-Benjamin F. died without issue, in 1887; Charles W. is chief of the police department in Traverse City; and Edwin L. is the subject of this sketch. Concerning the career of Dr. B. D. Ashton a sketch appears elsewhere in this volume, so that further data are not deemed necessary at this point. Dr. Ashton, whose name initiates this review, was an infant at the time of his parents' removal to Michigan, in 1862, and he is indebted to the public schools of Traverse City for his early educational discipline. In 1880 he was matriculated in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and thereafter he entered the Ohio Dental College, at Cincinnati, Ohio, in which he was graduated in 1882, duly receiving the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Immediately after graduation he returned to Traverse City, where he inaugurated the practice of his profession and where he now controls a large and representative patronage. In connection with the work of his profession he is a valued and appreciative member of the Michigan State Dental Society, the Western Michigan Dental Society, and was president of the Northern Michigan Dental Society for two years. He is also affiliated with various fraternal and social organizations of a local character and in his political convictions he is a stalwart in the ranks of the Republican party. While he has never manifested aught of ambition for political preferment of any de

Page  1001 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1001 scription he is alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures projected for the good of the community and he holds a secure vantage ground in the esteem of his fellow men. On the 11th of November, 1885, Dr. Ashton was united in marriage to Miss Eva Hobbs, who was born in Unadilla, Livingston county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Roland and Sarah (Holems) Hobbs. Her parents were both born in England, whence they emigrated to America about the year 1860. The father was a miller by occupation, and he is deceased. His cherished and devoted wife died in 1888. Mrs. Ashton was the third in order of birth of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Roland Hobbs and she grew up in her native place, where she received a liberal public-school education. Dr. and Mrs. Ashton have four children, whose names are here entered in respective order of birth,-Benjamin R., Frank E., Seth H. and Clarence. In her religious faith Mrs. Ashton is a zealous member of the Baptist church, to whose charities and benevolences she has ever been a generous contributor. EDWIN S. PRATT.-He whose name initiates this review may well be designated the dean of the bar of Grand Traverse county, as he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession in Traverse City for more than forty years and has gained recognition as one of the able and versatile lawyers of his native state, with whose annals the family name has been identified since 1837, the year which marked the admission of Michigan to the Union. Mr. Pratt is one of the representative citizens of Traverse City, and has been closely identified with the development and upbuilding of this favored section of the state-a section in which he is numbered among the well known and highly honored pioneer citizens. On the homestead farm of his father in Deerfield township, Livingston county, Michigan, Edward S. Pratt was born on the 23d of April, 1844. He is a son of James and Clarissa (Thompson) Pratt, the former of whom was born in the state of New York, in 1802, and the latter of whom was a native of Maine, where she was born in the year 1810, both having been representatives of families that were founded in New England in the Colonial epoch of our national history. James Pratt passed the closing years of his life in Fentonville, Genesee county, a village located not far distant from his old homestead farm, in the the adjoining county of Livingston, and his death occurred in the year 1881. His widow long survived him and died at Fentonville in 1906, at the very venerable age of ninety-six years. She was undoubtedly the oldest woman in the state at the time when she was summoned to the life eternal, and her memory compassed virtually the entire period of the history of this commonwealth as one of the sovereign states of the Union. Of the four children three are living,-John, who is a resident of Colorado; Edwin S., to whom this sketch is dedicated; and Jay F., who is a representative agriculturist of Genesee county, Michigan. James Pratt was reared to maturity in his native state and as a young man he showed his courage and ambition by numbering himself among the pioneers of Michigan, which was then considered upon the very frontier of civilization. He came to this state in 1837, the year in which it was admitted to the Union, and first located in Washtenaw

Page  1002 1002 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN county, whence he later removed to Deerfield township, Livingston county, where he secured a tract of land and literally hewed out a farm in the midst of the virgin wilds. He and his noble wife endured the full tension of the pioneer epoch and did well their part in connection with the industrial and social development of the state, as both were persons of superior mentality and of sterling character. James Pratt was a leader in thought and action in the pioneer community and was long numbered among the prominent and influential citizens of Livingston county. He brought his farm under effective cultivation and was indefatigable in his efforts, which were directed with excellent judgment and along progressive lines. He was originally a Whig and later a Republican in politics and was called upon to serve in various township offices. He was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his wife was a zealous member of the Congregational church. Edwin S. Pratt was reared to the sturdy discipline of the pioneer farm and in addition to availing himself of the advantages of the district schools he also attended the public schools of the village of Fentonville, now known as Fenton. The arduous labors and monotonous routine of the farm did not satisfy his ambition or predilections, and he thus determined to prepare himself for the legal profession. After preliminary study under private preceptorship he entered the law department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1866, and from which he received his well earned degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was duly admitted to the bar of his native state and on the 22d of May, 1866, he located in Traverse City, which was then a mere lumbering village. Here he has been engaged in the successful practice of his profession during the long intervening years, within which he has been identified with much important litigation in the courts of this section of the state and has retained a clientage of distinctively representative order. In 1877 he entered into a professional partnership with Harry C. Davis, who has continued his able and honored coadjutor during the long interval of more than thirty yearsan alliance cemented by mutual esteem and appreciation. The firm has an extensive and important practice, which extends into the supreme court of the state and also into the United States supreme court. Mr. Pratt has long held a commanding position at the bar of Grand Traverse county and in the earlier years of his practice in this county he served one term as its prosecuting attorney, besides which he held the office of circuit court commissioner for some time. He gave his allegiance to the Republican party until 1872, when he transferred his support to the newly-organized Greenback party, in which he labored effectively in behalf of its presidential candidate, Horace Greeley. He thus showed the courage of his honest convictions, and he has ever been well fortified in his opinions as to matters of economic and political import. After the extinction of the Greenback party he transferred his allegiance to the Democratic cause, of which he has since continued a staunch advocate. In 1880 he was the nominee of the Democratic party for representative of the Ninth district of Michigan in Congress. He made a strenuous and brilliant campaign, in which his opponent was Hon. Jay Hubbell, a man of strength and popularity, but he was unable,

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Page  1003 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1003 as he anticipated, to overcome the large and normal Republican majority in his district, though he greatly reduced the same. At the time' the usual Republican majority in the district was fully ten thousand. The judicial circuit of which Grand Traverse county is a part gives under regular conditions an average Republican majority of about six thousand votes, and on each of the two occasions on which Mr. Pratt has appeared as Democratic candidate for circuit judge he has carried his home county, despite the fact that its normal Republican majority is eight hundred. His personal popularity in his judicial circuit was significantly shown on the occasion of his last campaign for the office of circuit judge, in 1898, when he reduced the Republican majority in the circuit from one thousand to barely two hundred,-a noteworthy testimonial to the public appreciation of his ability and personal integrity. He has exemplified at all times the utmost public spirit and has been exponent of the highest civic ideals, so that his influence and co-operation have naturally been given to those measures and enterprises that have tended to conserve the material and social advancement and prosperity of his home city and county. He finds measurable respite from the cares and exactions of his profession by giving a general supervision to his fine farm of eighty acres, lying adjacent to Traverse City on the west. Here he gives special attention to fruit culture and to the raising of highgrade stock. He has incidentally done much to advance the industry of breeding fine horses and cattle in this section, and has also shown the possibilities for successful culture of fruit, a line of enterprise that now constitutes one of the important industries of Grand Traverse and adjoining counties. Mr. Pratt has been identified with the time-honored Masonic fraternity since 1870 and is one of the charter members of Traverse City Lodge No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons, of which he is a past master, having been one of the first to be called to this office in the lodge. Both he and his wife hold church membership. On the 13th of August, 1869, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Pratt to Miss Ada K. Sprague, who was born in Dexter, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Joseph W. and Mary Elvira (Lyons) Sprague, both of whom were born in New England. They came to Michigan at an early day and the closing years of their lives were passed in Dexter and Traverse City. They are survived by three children,-Elvin L.. who is a representative citizen of Traverse City, and who was the author of a most interesting and valuable history of Grand Traverse and Leelanau counties, Michigan, published in 1903; Esther H., who was the wife of Reuben Hatch, of Grand Rapids, this state; and Ada K., who is the wife of the subject of this review. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt became the parents of these children: Louis A. is in the advertising business, and resides in Detroit; Winifred E. is the wife of Elmer E. White, of Traverse City; and E. Sprague is in Los Angeles, California. RALPH C. SMITH, M. D.-A representative physician and surgeon at Harrisville, Alcona county, Michigan, and one who has, through the means of his profession, been the instigator of much good in both a public and a private way, is Dr. Ralph C. Smith, who has here resided since

Page  1004 1004 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1907. Dr. Smith was born in Saint Clair county, Michigan, on the 27th of June, 1867, and he is a son of Dyransel and Alydia (Crable) Smith, the former of whom was born in New York State and the latter at Algonac, Michigan. The family removed to northern Michigan, in 1869, location being made at Alpena. The father was a lumber-mill man, whose business it was to look after the filing of the saws, a very responsible position, as the output of the mill depends, in large degree, on the condition of the saws. The father did not live long after establishing his home at Alpena, his death having occurred in the same year, 1869. The widow and mother long survived her honored husband and she was summoned to the life eternal, in 1907, at the age of sixty-six years. The only children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dyransel Smith were Ralph C. of this review, and Herbert, who died in infancy. Dr. Smith was reared and educated in Alpena, where he was graduated in the local high school. He received his medical training in the Detroit Medical College, in which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1904, duly receiving his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He began the active practice of his profession at Spruce, Alcona county, where he remained for a period of two years, at the expiration of which, in 1907, he came to Harrisville, where he has ingratiated himself in the hearts of his patrons and where he is recognized as a practitioner of decided ability and excellent equipment. In his political convictions he accords an uncompromising allegiance to the principles of the Republican party and while he has never had time nor desire for political preferment of any description he is always on the qui vive to do all in his power for the advancement of the community. In addition to membership in various professional organizations he is also affiliated with Harrisville Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons, and with the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. His unflagging energy and deep and abiding interest in all departinents of health and sanitation as combined with that broad human sympathy which ever characterizes a stanch devotee of the medical profession has endeared Dr. Smith in the esteem of his fellow citizens. In the year 1905 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Smith to Miss May Collins, who was born and reared at Forestville and who is a daughter of Richard and Mary Collins, long representative citizens of Michigan. Dr. and Mrs. Smith have no children. They are prominent and influential in the best social activities of the community. ROBERT A. RISK, M. D.-A young physician of ability and prominence. Robert A. Risk, M. D., of East Jordan, is fast winning for himself an honorable name in the medical fraternity of Charlevoix county, his wisdom and skill in dealing with difficult cases having gained'for him the confidence of the entire community in which he resides. He was born, February 24, 1881, at Brooke, Lambton county, Ontario, Canada, where his paternal grandparents settled on coming to America from Scotland, in 1811. His parents, John J. and Rebecca J. Risk, were born, reared, and married in Canada, but about 1895 migrated to Michigan, locating at Mackinaw City, where his father continued his occupation of a cheese maker.

Page  1005 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1005 Living in Ontario until fourteen years of age, Robert A. Risk there obtained his rudimentary education. After coming to Michigan, he attended the Mackinaw High School three years, and the Ferris Institute one year. In 1899 he began reading medicine in the office of Dr. Brown, one of the leading physicians of Mackinaw, and in the fall of 1900 entered the Detroit College of Medicine, from which he was graduated with the class of 1904. Locating immediately at Pellston, Michigan, Dr. Risk remained there nearly five years, gaining valuable experience, and meeting with success in his professional work. In July, 1908, the doctor opened an office in East Jordan, and has here established a large practice which occupies his entire time and attention, his office during office hours being one of the busiest places in East Jordan, numerous patients awaiting their turn to consult him. Dr. Risk married, August 10, 1906, Grace E. Owens, who was born at Bellaire, Michigan, August 7, 1883, a daughter of Samuel B. and Dixie (Clark) Owens. Mr. Owens was a travelling salesman in his earlier career, representing a shoe house until his marriage, when he embarked in mercantile pursuits at Bellaire, where he was likewise postmaster during Cleveland's administration. The Doctor and Mrs. Risk have one child, Robert Owen, born October 23, 1907. Dr. Risk is one of the county physicians. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, and to the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Risk is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and of the Pvthian Sisters. CAPT. EDWARD A. BOUCHARD.-This remarkable man, whose late career covers a period of fifty-one years, is an honored citizen of Cheboygan, Michigan, and now occupies the office of justice of the peace. He is a man of very unusual vitality and retentive memory; and one may truly say that he is a natural sailor, as he was born on board the schooner Supply, just off Green Island, in Green bay, on December 1, 1836. Eli Bouchard, his father, was master of the Supply at the time this event occurred, and reached Green bay just before the close of navigation for the season. The father was a native of Nova Scotia, and came to the United States in 1822. He was a ship carpenter and owned and sailed vessels on the Atlantic ocean. On one occasion he had a cargo which the Nova Scotia authorities suspected him of smuggling into their country, and they seized his vessel at night. But Captain Eli Bouchard was not a man who would submit to an injustice tamely. He recaptured his vessel, took it to Quebec, and in that city sold both it and its cargo. He then went to Nantucket, Massachusetts, and shipped from there on a whaling voyage to the Arctic ocean. The vessel in which he shipped was wrecked off the coast of Labrador, and all the members of the crew except Captain Bouchard and one other lost their lives. After wandering about for five days, in which he and his companion suffered great hardships, they arrived at a fort, where their needs were supplied. They then enlisted at Hudson bay in the service of the British North Americai. Fur Company, and during the next five years worked

Page  1006 1006 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN for it as voyagers, trading with the Indians. In this experience they had many thrilling adventures. On leaving the service of the fur company the two wanderers went to Sault Ste. Marie by way of the north shore of Lake Superior, and from there to Mackinac Island. Here they found the schooner Supply in course of construction and completed it, after which Captain Bouchard was appointed master of the schooner. It was at this time that he was married to Miss Josetti Champagne, a native of the island. She died at Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1845, having, during her married life, became the mother of seven children, four of whom are living. In 1836, while sailing the schooner Supply, Captain Eli Bouchard discovered Spectacle reef, and two years later Whaleback reef, in Green bay. He passed about thirty years in the government revenue service as pilot on the Erie, the Ingham and the Issi Tousey and died in 1878 on Long Island, New York, while on a visit to one of his brothers. Six of his seven children were sons, and all of them followed the sea. Simon, the first born, was a lake captain for many years. He is now living retired at Manistique in this state. Eli was also a lake captain for a time, but enlisted in the Union army at the beginning of the Civil war. He was first enrolled in the Fifth Michigan Volunteer Cavalry and afterward transferred to the Seventh regiment in the same branch of the service. While in this regiment, of which General Alger was then the colonel, he was killed at Trevilians Station, Virginia, in October, 1864. Remy was the third son. He, too, commanded many a stately craft on the lakes, but lived retired for a number of years at Naubinway, Michigan, where he died on March 23, 1911. Joseph, the fourth in the order of birth, passed all of his mature years on the lakes as a captain, and died at Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1879. Oliver, the only other son besides Capt. Edward A,. sailed the lakes a few years as commander of vessels. IIe is now living at Naubinway in this state. Mary, the only daughter born in the family, is the wife of Louis Preville, and lives in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Capt. Edward A. Bouchard, the youngest son and child of his parents, received his primary education in the public schools in Mackinac. He continued his scholastic training in a higher institution of learning at Twinsburg, Ohio, and completed it at Hiram College, where our martyred President, James A. Garfield, was a pupil at the same time. While attending college he sailed in the summer months on the schooner Active and the brig Rocky Mountain as forecastle boy, and also on other boats in other positions. He next became second mate on the bark E. C. L. under command of Capt. S. A. Crook, and closed the season of 1858 on the schooner Palmetto, of which he was made second mate the following season. In 1860 he was appointed mate of the schooner Albatross, and when the Civil war began in 1861, enlisted in the three months' service in defense of the Union. On July 7, that year, he joined the United States navy, enlisting in Chicago. He was assigned to the Hartford, the flag-ship of Admiral Farragut, who was in command of the West Gulf squadron, and on that historic vessel participated in the capture of forts Jackson and San Phillippe and the city of New Orleans. In the last of these engagements he was

Page  1007 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1007 one of the squad of seamen who landed to haul down the Confederate flag and hoist Old Glory in its place. After the capture of the city he went with his ship up the Mississippi river in the perilous feat of passing the Confederate batteries, and on August 5, 1864, took part in the battle of Mobile, Alabama. After this he was transferred to the doubleturreted monitor Kickapoo, on which he served to the close of the war. The Kickapoo was in at the capture of Mobile and the Spanish fort, being the first of the Federal vessels to reach the city. She was under the command of Lieutenant Commander Maurice P. Jones, a grand nephew of Admiral John Paul Jones, the great naval hero of the American Revolution. Captain Bouchard was honorably discharged from the navy at New Orleans on July 27, 1865, holding at the time the rank of surgeon's steward in charge. After receiving his discharge he returned to Mackinaw by way of Chicago, and in the spring of 1866 was appointed master of the screw schooner U. S. Grant. During the next three seasons he sailed the schooner Frances Adah, and followed these with three as captain of the steamer Islander trading along the north shore of Lake Michigan and on Georgian and Green bays. In 1873 he sailed the passenger steamer Grace Dormer, which was destroyed by fire on July 3d, her mate losing his life in the disaster. The captain closed this season as master of the Islander. The next spring he was appointed master of the steamer Kittie Reed, in 1875 mate of the lake tug Leviathan, and in 1876 mate and pilot of the steamer Norman running on Lake Superior in the service of Messrs. Leopold and Austrian. In 1877 he was mate and pilot of the steamer Passaic on Green bay, and in 1878 master of the Conisteo on the same line. In 1879, as master of the steamer Mary, he helped to establish the inland water route between Cheboygan and Petoskey. He closed the season on the steamer Van Raalte, on which he remained throughout the two succeeding seasons on the route to Manistique. The next season and the one after it the captain commanded the steamer Messenger running to Manistique and in 1884 to Chicago. In 1885 he again took charge of the Van Raalte, then running between Harbor Springs and Manistique, and during the season of 1886 he was mate of the wrecker Leviathan. In 1887 he was once more master of the steamer Van Raalte, and in 1888 was in command of the Lewis Cummings. By this time the captain desired a more settled home on shore, and, in the year last mentioned, located in Cheboygan. He' was then appointed city marshal, and filled the office two years. During the first year of his incumbency he was shot through the head in an attempt to arrest a notorious malefactor in the city. The villian had a thirtyeight caliber revolver, and Captain Bouchard courageously sprang over the bar of the saloon in which his quarry was standing at bay to disarm him, but in the act the heel of his boot caught on a shelf behind the bar, and he fell to the floor. Before he could rise the desperado put the revolver to his head and sent the bullet crashing through it into the floor. The criminal was finally shot to death, and the captain walked to his home, but for months afterward he lingered between life

Page  1008 1008 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and death. At the end of his term as city marshal in 1890 Captain Bouchard was appointed superintendent of the Cheboygan shipyard, which was engaged principally in repair work, and in the autumn of that year he was made master of the tug Duncan City, which he sailed until 1896. The next spring he became master of the steamer Islander, and kept control of her until July 31, 1897, thus rounding out fiftyone full years of active life on the lakes. In the spring election that year he was elected a justice of the peace on the Republican ticket, being the only candidate on that ticket who was successful. He has been re-elected to this office three times and is now serving his fourth term, having been chosen without opposition at each election. His services in the office have given the people great satisfaction, as his duties have been performed with intelligence and integrity, and with an eye single to the peace and good order of the community and 'the substantial benefit of all its inhabitants. The captain has been long and actively connected with the fraternal and social life of the city and county of Cheboygan. He is a member and Past Commander of Ruddock Post No. 224, Grand Army of the Republic; belongs to Tent No. 69, Knights of the Maccabees; Temple Lodge No. 331, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a Past Noble Grand; and of the Ship Master's Association carrying pennant No. 823. His membership in them is a credit to these fraternal societies, and is highly valued by all their other members and everybody interested in them. Three times has the gallant captain bowed beneath the flowery yoke of Eros. His first marriage was with Miss Mary Taylor, a daughter of James A. and Sarah (Williams) Taylor, and took place on May 9, 1859. Of the four children born of this union only one is living, Emma J., the first born, who is the wife of Joshua Parrein. Cora 0., who was the wife of Hugh Hoban, is deceased. Jessie Mabel died in 1883, and the one son, David Farragut, died in early life. Their mother died in 1878, and in January, 1879, the father was united with Miss Julienne Matevier, who died on March 11, 1887. On January 22, 1890, the captain solemnized his third marriage, which joined him with Miss Carrie Dent. He has eleven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren to perpetuate his name, enshrine his worth and emulate his high and impressive example. His long record of fidelity to duty and ability in the performance of it, of sterling manhood and elevated citizenship, and of faith rigidly kept with conscience throughout his years is the most valuable legacy he could possibly leave when he departs this life. JOHN A. STEWART is a representative lawyer of the younger generation in Harrisville, where he has been engaged in the active practice of his profession since 1908. He is now serving his second term as prosecuting attorney of Alcona county and in this office is giving a most capable and satisfactory administration. In Alcona county, on the 15th of June, 1880, occurred the birth of Mr. Stewart and he is a son of John and Annie (McDonald) Stewart, the former of whom was born and reared in the Dominion of Canada, and the latter of whom is

Page  1009 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1009 a native of Ontario, Canada. The father was an agriculturist by occupation and he came to the state of Michigan in the year 1864. He settled in Alcona county and here was solemnized his marriage to Miss Annie McDonald, in Ontario, Canada, who bore him seven children, namely,-John A., James R., Mrs. Margaret DeTopp, Charles, Teresa, Alice and Helen. Mr. Stewart was summoned to eternal rest in March, 1909, and his widow now resides at Harrisville with her son John A. To the public schools of his native county Mr. Stewart is indebted for his educational training, which was effectively supplemented by a course of study in the Detroit Law College, in which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1908, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar of the state in the same year and he initiated his law practice at Harrisville, where he now holds prestige as a leading member of the Alcona county legal fraternity and where he is extensively recognized for eminent skill in the preparation and handling of his cases. He has appeared in many important litigations in the state and federal courts and is a successful trial lawyer and well fortified counselor. His political adherency is given to the Republican party and in the fall of 1908 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Alcona county, to which office he was re-elected as his own successor in 1910 and of which he is now the able and popular incumbent. Prior to studying law Mr. Stewart taught school in Alcona county for a period of seven years and in 1905-6 he was county school examiner. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Knights of the Maccabees, the Ancient Order of Gleaners and the Alpena Lodge of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, besides which he is also connected with various professional organizations of representative character. On the 6th of January, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Stewart to Miss Maude Carpenter, who was born at Mt. Sterling, Illinois, and who is a daughter of Alexander Carpenter, who is living in Mt. Sterling, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have one child,-Thelma E., whose natal day was the 27th of November, 1910. In their religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Stewart are zealous members of the Catholic church at Harrisville and they are popular in connection with the best social activities of the community. JOHN NoLL.-The son of a Union soldier in our Civil war and born about eighteen months after its close, John Noll of Cheboygan had his childhood regaled with engrossing narratives of the thrilling incidents and adventures of that momentous and sanguinary conflict, which were still fresh in the memories of his father and his companions in arms, and by very force of circumstances developed a strong interest in the welfare of his country, even in his boyhood. This interest has been one of his controlling forces throughout his subsequent years, and he has shown it in every way available to him wherever he has lived. During the twenty-five years of his residence in Cheboygan it has taken form in active and energetic service for the good of the community and the advancement of all its interests. Mr. Noll was born in the city of New York on October 12, 1866,

Page  1010 1010 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN where his parents, Charles and Louise (Schuldice) Noll, were living at the time. The father was born in Berlin, Germany, in 1838 and died in Jackson, Michigan in 1880. He came to the United States at the age of seventeen years, landing in New York in 1855, and retaining his residence there until 1871. Early in the war between the states, or two of the sections of our country, he enlisted in defense of the Union in the Twenty-ninth Regiment of New York Volunteer Infantry, in which he served to the close of the contest. When he was mustered out of the military service he returned to his former home in the Empire City and engaged in business as a merchant tailor. During his military service he saw many parts of the country and acquired a strong liking for the west, of which this state was then a somewhat remote part. His desire to be in it and among its people and the forces of its rapid development grew in intensity until he could no longer withstand it. Accordingly, in 1871 he yielded to the persuasive impulse and came to Michigan, taking up his residence in the city of Jackson. There he resumed his occupation as a merchant tailor and adhered to it until his death at the early age of forty-two. He was a member of the Republican party in political relations and of the German Aid Society in fraternal affiliation. The mother was also born in Germany, and she came to America in her childhood with her parents, and has passed all her subsequent years in this country, living for a time in the city of New York, but cheerfully coming with her husband and children to Michigan in 1871. She is still living in Jackson, this state, where she is one of the most respected and revered of the older women, the force and excellence of her character and the continued usefulness of her life being well known to many of the people there. Her son John received his mental training and scholastic education in the schools of Jackson, being but five years old when his parents located in that city. He was only fourteen years of age when his father died, and was thrown on his own resources soon afterward, his mother being unable to keep him in school and provide for him without his help. His first occupation after leaving school was in a cigar box factory. Leaving there, he associated himself with M. A. G. Loencker of Jackson, Michigan, in the cigar business and here he learned the trade of cigar making, which promised speedy and liberal returns for his labor, but, after working at the trade for a short time, accepted employment with the Barber Furniture Manufacturing Company and spent a brief period in its service. He got knowledge of a good opening for work at cigar making in Saginaw, Michigan, and at once went to that city and secured the place, which occupied him until Cheboygan held out a welcoming hand to him, and he moved to that city. His residence in Cheboygan began in May, 1886, and here he worked at his trade until June 10, 1889, when he started a cigar factory of his own. He has ever since been constant and energetic in his diligence in operating this factory, and by close attention to its business and intelligence in its management has built up its trade to large proportions and given its output a high rank in the markets of his home city and a great number of other places in Michigan and other states. Mr. Noll has not confined his attention to his business, however, but

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Page  1011 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1011 has been very much interested in the public affairs of the city and county in which he lives. He has the spirit of progress and improvement within him, and it has found expression here in energetic action. He served as alderman from the Third ward of Cheboygan in 1892 and 1893, and as city treasurer in 1905 and 1906. In 1908 he was elected mayor, and he has also been treasurer of the school board. The excellence of his services in these different offices has won him high commendation and extensive popularity. He has also taken an earnest interest and a leading part in the fraternal life of the community. He is a prominent member and a Past Exalted Ruler of Cheboygan Lodge of Elks, No. 504, and at the present time (1911) Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler of the state in that fraternity. In addition he is a Past President and the present secretary of Cheboygan Aerie No. 1,282, Fraternal Order of Eagles, and a member of the Grand Lodge of the Order. In politics he is a member of the Democratic party, loyal to its principles, serviceable in its campaigns and zealous in support of its candidates. On June 10, 1890, Mr. Noll married with Miss Katie V. Murphy, a native of Pennsylvania. Of the ten children born to them seven are living: Ruth, Beatrice, John, Jr., Anna, Margaret, Ellen and Frances. They all still reside with their parents and add to the life and attractiveness of the family circle under the parental rooftree. Their home is a social center, radiating light and warmth by the genial companionship and graceful hospitality of its inmates, and a popular resort for their hosts of friends in all walks of life, who are commensurate in number with their acquaintances. FREDERICK LISTER was for many years a leading and influential citizen of Clare, Michigan, and his activity in business affairs, his co-operation in public interests and his zealous support of all objects that he believed would contribute to the material, social or moral improvement of the community kept him in the foremost rank of those to whom the county owes its development along industrial lines. His life was characterized by upright, honorable principles and it also exemplified the truth of the Emersonian philosophy that "the way to win a friend is to be one." His genial, kindly manner won him the high regard and good will of all with whom he came in contact and thus his death was uniformly mourned throughout Clare and the surrounding district. At Cambridge, England, on the 3d of June, 1854, occurred the birth of Frederick Lister and he was summoned to the life eternal on the 24th of October, 1908. His parents were both natives of England and when a child of but nine years of age the young Frederick lost his father. From that time onward he became self-supporting. In 1872, when a youth of nineteen years, he decided to seek his fortunes in America and accordingly emigrated to the United States. He first located at Buffalo, New York, where he remained until 1876 and where his first marriage was solemnized. In the year last mentioned he came with his wife to Clare county, Michigan, and settled on a farm, where he continued to reside for some time after the death of his wife. Thereafter Vol. III- 4

Page  1012 1012 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN he engaged in the lumber and milling business at Clare, being associated in this line of enterprise, first with George S. Archbold, and later with Henry Ort, the latter partnership alliance continuing until 1896. In 1900 Mr. Lister removed with his family, for he had again married, to Millersburg, Presque Isle county, Michigan, where he had purchased a large tract of timber land. He was actively engaged in the milling and lumber business at that point for the ensuing five years and in the same was eminently successful. In 1905, however, he returned to Clare, where he continued to maintain his home until his death. In 1904 he was instrumental in the organization of the Citizens' Bank at Clare and of that substantial, monetary institution he became president. This bank is now one of the strongest and most reliable banking concerns in the county. After his death his widow disposed of his stock in the bank. Although engaged in farming for a time after his arrival in Clare county, Mr. Lister is best known in connection with his extensive industrial interests. As an employer of labor he was always considerate of his men, paying and feeding them well. Having originally been a laboring man himself he could appreciate the point of view of his employes. He was unusually successful in the business world and his success is the more gratifying to contemplate inasmuch as it was the direct result of his own well applied endeavors. Beginning with nothing, he gradually made his ambition and energy count for much, with the result that at the time of his death he was one of the most prosperous and most influential citizens in Clare county. In politics he maintained an independent attitude, preferring to give his support to men and measures meeting with the approval of his judgment. He was too busily engaged with his own private affairs ever to become active in public affairs but although he never held political office he was constantly on the qui vive to do all in his power to promote the general welfare of the community. Mr. Lister was twice married, and the two children by his first wife died in early youth. In 1895 Mr. Lister wedded Miss Anna Belle Stevens, a daughter of Henry Stevens, who came to this county from Eaton county, about the year 1880. Mrs. Lister was graduated in the Clare high school in her girlhood days and she is a woman of rare refinement and culture. Mr. and Mrs. Lister became the parents of four children, one of whom is deceased, Beatrice Bell, who died at the age of nine months. The other children are: Viola, Mary and Grace, all of whom are attending school at Clare. The family home is still maintained at Clare, in the beautiful and spacious residence erected by Mr. Lister prior to his death. Mr. Lister was a man of marked executive ability, extensive information and broad humanitarianism. He ever conducted his life on the highest plane of morality and his entire record will bear the searchlight of fullest investigation. In every sense of the word he was a representative citizen and a self-made man. It was to his inherent force of character and unremitting diligence that he advanced in the business world and made of success not an accident but a logical result.

Page  1013 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1013 His death was deeply mourned by a large circle of friends and his loss was felt not only in Clare but throughout the county as well. FREm R. DAwsoN.-Belonging to the younger generation of American journalists, Fred R. Dawson has already achieved success along professional lines, being now manager of the Central Lake Publishing Company, at Central Lake, Antrim county, Michigan. A son of Luther N. and Catherine (Grubb) Dawson, he was born, June 22, 1887, in Rushville, Illinois, where his father was for many years engaged in the butchering business, an occupation which he had previously followed in New York state. His parents were born and reared in New Jersey, going from there to New York, thence to Illinois, and from there coming to Michigan, and locating at Traverse City, in 1905. Gleaning his first knowledge of books in the common schools of Rushville, Illinois, Fred R. Dawson completed his early education in the Traverse City schools, after the removal of the family to Michigan. His inclinations leading him towards newspaper work, he became printer's devil in the Eagle'office, in his home city, and was there employed for four years, becoming familiar with many of its departments. He was afterwards connected with the Traverse City Record for a time, and for a while worked on different papers in Chicago. In December, 1908, Mr. Dawson came to Central Lake to assume the management of the Central Lake Publishing Company, which now publishes the Central Lake Torch. This paper was founded May 11, 1892, by Mr. C. E. Ramsey, and in 1897 was taken over by the Central Lake Publishing Company, of which George Thurston was manager until the advent of Mr. Dawson, as above mentioned, who has since edited and managed the paper with characteristic ability and success, making it one of the most influential and popular journals of the kind in Antrim county. Mr. Dawson is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternal organization. On October 28, 1907, Mr. Dawson was united in marriage with Winifred Graham, who was born in Omena, Michigan, in December, 1887, a daughter of Eli and Elizabeth Graham, natives of New York state. Her father, who was a lake captain, owning, or having interest in, several lake boats. was drowned off Cat Head Point, his vessel going down in a terrific storm. Mr. and Mrs. Dawson have one child. THOMAS R. WELSH.-Probably there is not in all Reed City a better representative of that type of the successful business man to whom Americans point with pride, the self-made man, than is found in the person of the gentleman whose name stands at the head of this review and the history of whose life and success is here recorded. His achievements are emulating precepts of the great opportunities, the conditions our industrial system open to industry, ability, integrity and a determination to succeed. Thomas R. Welsh, one of Osceola county's prominent lumbermen and also of large milling and planing mill interests, is a native son of the state, his birth having occurred in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in the

Page  1014 1014 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN year 1855, his natal day being shared with the "Father of Our Country." His father, John Welsh, was a native of Canada and came to Michigan when a young man. He likewise was a lumberman and he sawed much of the lumber which figured in the laying of the Plank Road, between Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo. He subsequently located in Grand Rapids, where many of his active years were passed and he was living at Owosso, Shiawassee county, when his career was closed by death at the age of seventy-three years. He was of Irish descent, and his wife, Mary Edington Welsh, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, was of Scotch-Irish parentage. Five children, two of them sons and three daughters, were born to their union, Mr. Welsh being the eldest in the family. The early years of Mr. Welsh were spent in Ottawa county, Michigan, and his education was received in the public schools of the locality. The happiness of the home circle was seriously interfered with by the death of the mother when the subject was a lad about twelve years of age, and as the father was by no means in opulent circumstances, he early began to think of shifting for himself. He was but fourteen when he first faced the serious issues of life, his first position being as a time keeper and clerk in a little store at Burshtown, of which Mr. George R. Condon was proprietor. Having been engaged thus for some time he secured work in a lumber yard, and being faithful in little things was given more and more to do, eventually being advanced to the position of lumber inspector and being stationed at Sand Lake, Kent county, then at Maple Valley, where he was in the service of L. H. Randall, of Grand Rapids, and in 1877 being transferred to Lakeview, Michigan. Not being one of those handicapped by the fear of change he was active in many locations, and the year 1883 found him at Chase, Lake county, as a member of the firm of Frank P. Baughton & Company, lumbermen. Having become thoroughly acquainted with the business in 1889 he concluded to assume a more independent footing in the world of affairs, and removing to Reed City in that year he embarked in the lumber and manufacturing business. He built a large mill (this falling victim to the flames in March, 1910, and being rebuilt upon more improved lines the same year) and he has built up a large and ever-increasing business, his specialty being maple flooring. The concern is known under the caption of the Welsh & Kerry Company, Mr. Charles T. Kerry being associated with him. Mr. Welsh holds the position of president and manager and his son Fredrick is vice-president. Mr. Kerry is a resident of Reed City and is also connected with the firm of the Kerry & Hanson Flooring Company, of Grayling, Michigan. This gentleman is also a partner in the Kerry & May Company of Saginaw, in addition to operating a lumber business at Monroe, Louisiana. The Reed City concern of Messrs. Welsh and Kerry is of wide scope and gives employment to about sixty men. Mr. Welsh was married on the 29th day of October, 1879, the lady to become his wife and the mistress of his household being Miss Ida French, the daughter of Albert S. and Amanda (Bryant) French, the father being the pioneer settler at Lakeview, Montcalm county, Mich

Page  1015 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1015 igan. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Welsh was celebrated at Lake view. They have one son, Frederick R., a traveling salesman for the Welsh & Kerry Company, and an able young business man. The social and fraternal side of the life of the subject has by no means suffered eclipse through the prior demands of business and Michigan has few better known and more popular lodge men than he. He stands high in Masonry, belonging to the Blue Lodge, with membership in the Ancient Arabic Order of the Mystic Shrine and also being entitled to wear the white plume of the Knight Templar. He is a Forester, belongs to the Knighted Order of Tented Maccabees, the Woodmen of the World, the Royal Guard and the Knights of Pythias. Ln the affairs of all of these he is a prominent factor, and through them he is known far beyond the borders of the state in which his interests are centered. Mr. Welsh is of the public-spirited type of citizen, taking an interest in all matters likely to affect the welfare of the community, and in his political convictions he is a stanch Republican, his allegiance being of the active sort. For many years he has been a member of the State Central Committee, and he has given efficient service in many public offices, as a member of the school board, as a city councilman, member of the water board and so forth. FINLEY M. HAMMOND, who is now serving his second term as treasurer of Grand Traverse county, Michigan, is a man of splendid executive ability and one whose loyalty and public spirit have done much to advance the general welfare of this section of the fine old Wolverine state. Mr. Hammond was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of April, 1865, and he is a son of Nelson and Mary C. (LaForce) Hammond, the former of whom was a native of New York, where his birth occurred in July, 1821, and the latter of whom was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, on the 9th of April, 1833. The father was a farmer by occupation during much of his active business career and after residing for a number of years in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, he, with his family, immigrated to Michigan in 1868, location being made in Grand Traverse county. After living for six months in East Bay township removal was made to Garfield township, where a fine farm was reclaimed from the wilderness and where the parents continued to reside until they were summoned to the life eternal. The father died in April, 1901, and the mother, who long survived her honored husband, died in March, 1909. To Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Hammond were born eight children, five of whom are living at the present time, in 1911, namely,-Clinton, Callia, Finley M., Alma and Emma. Those who have passed away are: Hugh, Chancy and John, who died of diphtheria, all within a week, at the respective ages of thirteen, eleven and four years. Finley M. Hammond was a child of but three years of age at the time of his parents' removal from the old Keystone state of the Union to Michigan and he is indebted to the common schools of Grand Traverse county for his preliminary educational training. He passed his boyhood and youth upon the home farm and when not engaged in study he assisted his father in the work and management thereof. After attaining

Page  1016 1016 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN to his legal majority he relieved his father of the responsibility of the farm work and he is now the owner of the old homestead, which consists of one hundred and fifty-three acres of fine land, ninety of which are improved. Mr. Hammond has also been interested in the lumber business, in which he has achieved a fair amount of success. In his political faith he is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party and in 1892 he was elected treasurer of Garfield township, in which office he served with the utmost efficiency. For two terms he was incumbent of the office of highway commissioner and he has also served for two terms as township supervisor. In 1908 he was further honored by his fellow citizens in that he was then elected to the office of county treasurer. In 1910 he was elected as his own successor in this office and in the same he is giving an able administration of the fiscal affairs of the county. Mr. Hammond was a man of prominence and influence in Grand Traverse county and he is highly esteemed by reason of his fair and honorable business dealings and as a result of his intrinsic loyalty to all measures advanced for progress and development. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Foresters, the Knights of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, and with the Grange, and in their religious faith he and his wife are devout members of the Presbyterian church, to whose charities and benevolences they are most liberal contributors. On the 17th of April, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hammond to Miss Bertha Brodhagen, who was born in Pennsylvania on the 3d of January, 1875, and who is a daughter of Henry and Bertha Brodhagen, both of whom are now residing in Traverse City. To Mr. and Mrs. Hammond have been born three children, whose names are here recorded in respective order of birth,-Floyd E., Daisy Mildred and Henry N. DUNCAN A. CAMERON, M. D.-Among the representative members of the medical profession of Northern Michigan, Dr. Duncan A. Cameron, of Alpena, is prominent, his natural gifts and educational equipment being of the highest character. As his name so strongly indicates, he is Scottish in descent, both of his parents having been natives of Caledonia, and a part of the splendid training and enlightened ideals which have placed him head and shoulders above the majority of the members of his calling were secured in that country. Dr. Cameron was born near Strathroy, Canada, May 7, 1863, the son of John and Ann (McTaggart) Cameron. The father's birth occurred on the other side of the Atlantic in the year 1830, and the mother's in 1835, the span of life of the former extending to 1886 and that of the latter only to 1870. To this union were born four children, three of whom survive at the present time, namely: the subject; Kate, wife of 1. Columbus, of Strathroy; and John, a marine engineer. The founder of the family in America came across the seas in 1847 and was one of the pioneer farmers of his part of Canada. Dr. Cameron received his high school education at McGill, Quebec, and having early come to the conclusion to adopt the medical profession as his own, he entered the university at Montreal and was gradu

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Page  1017 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1017 ated from the medical department of that famous institution with the class of 1884. For the ensuing year he had the benefit of practical experience in the general hospital of Montreal and his identification with Alpena dates from July, 1885, when he began his career as a practitioner. His education he by no means deemed concluded with the beginning of his work, and in 1895, after a decade, he began a series of post-graduate courses of study in New York city. In 1898-9 he further fortified himself in a well-known institution in Chicago and in 1900-1 went farther afield to Europe, and in Edinburgh sat at the feet of some of the most learned of the profession in the world. His success has amply justified his devotion to the cause in which he labors, his ability being recognized by laity and profession and his past record giving promise of even greater achievements. He is identified with the organizations tending to the unification of the profession and to its advancement, namely, the County and Michigan Medical Societies and the American Medical Association. His practice is of a general character. Dr. Cameron is almost as prominent in Masonry as he is in the honorable profession of which he is so admirable an exponent. He belongs to Alpena Lodge, No. 199, F. & A. M.; to Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, R. A. M.; to Alpena Commandery, No. 34, Knights Templar; and to Moslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Detroit; and also in that city to the Michigan Sovereign Consistory. He is a thirty-second degree Mason and finds great pleasure in the affairs of the ancient order. He is also one of the most active members of Alpena Commandery, No. 34. Politically he gives his heart and hand to the policies and principles for which the Democratic party stands sponsor. On July 3, 1889, Dr. Cameron laid the foundation of a happy household by his marriage to Miss Kate Morse, a native of Alpena, Michigan, and a daughter of Henry R. and Lucy (Milliken) Morse, both of whom are now deceased. Both of the parents of Mrs. Cameron, who were honored members of society, were born in the state of Maine. The father's occupation was that of a lumberman and his arrival in Alpena was in 1866, in the ensuing years becoming one of the prominent men connected with Michigan's great lumber industry. Originally a Democrat, with the passing of the years he gave his faith to the Republican party. Mrs. Cameron was one of a family of six children, equally divided as to sons and daughters, five of the number surviving at the present day. The union of Dr. Cameron and his wife has been blessed by the birth of one daughter, Jean. Their home is one of the attractive abodes of Alpena and the center of gracious hospitality. CHARLES CONKLIN, who conducts an abstract office and who is a dealer in hardware and farming implements at Harrisville, Alcona county, Michigan, was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, on the 26th of December, 1863, and he is a son of William and Emma (Reeves) Conklin, both of whom were natives of Canada. The Conklin family moved to Greenbush, Michigan, in the year 1866, and there the father was identified with lumbering operations until 1877, in which year he was summoned to eternal rest. Mr. and Mrs. Conklin became the par

Page  1018 1018 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ents of three children,-Charles, of this review; Jessie, who is now the wife of J. L. Walters, and who resides at Harrisville, and William, who is a paper hanger at Harrisville. The mother was called to the life eternal on February 1st, 1897. Mr. Conklin was a child of but three years of age at the time of his parents' removal to the United States and he was a boy of thirteen years of age at the time of his father's death. He availed himself of such advantages as were afforded in the public schools at Greenbush, and as a young man was variously engaged until 1892, when he turned his attention to the hardware business. He has resided in Harrisville since 1878 and here he is recognized as a man of sterling integrity and straightforward and honorable business methods. He controls an extensive patronage in the hardware business and his well equipped establishment contains a stock of the most modern farming implements. He has conducted his abstract office since 1886 and the same has proved of much value to the county in straightening out old land claims and titles. Politically he is a stalwart in the ranks of the Republican party and he has been honored by his fellow men with the office of county treasurer, in which he served with the utmost efficiency for eight years, his last term of office ending in 1906. He has also served as township treasurer and as township clerk. He is a man of marked business enterprise and capability and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. Few men are more prominent or more widely known in Harrisville than is Mr. Conklin. He has long been an important factor in business circles and his popularity is well deserved as in his personality are embraced the characteristics of an unabating energy, unbending integrity and industry that never flags. He is public spirited and thoroughly interested in whatever tends to promote the moral, intellectual and material welfare of this section of the state. Mr. Conklin, in addition to his other interests, is the owner of a large tract of wild land as well as considerable farming property in Alcona county. On the 13th of May, 1890, Mr. Conklin was united in marriage to Miss Minnie LaChapelle, a daughter of Francis LaChapelle, an old pioneer in Michigan, and a veteran of the Civil war. Mrs. Conklin was born at Harrisville on the 11th of May, 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Conklin have been born eight children, whose names are here recorded in respective order of birth,-Austin, Stuart, Lois, Laura, Evert, Forest, Cecil and Alton. In their religious faith the Conklin family are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Harrisville. GEORGE H. JEPSoN.-Decidedly one of the most enterprising and successful of the young citizens of East Jordan, Michigan, is George H. Jepson, who with his mother, Mrs. Florence Jepson, is owner of the East Jordan & Charlevoix Steam Boat Line. Although only recently attained to his majority he can claim a wide acquaintance in Northern Michigan and many admirers of his fine executive capacity and efficiency in the interesting business in which he is engaged. Mr. Jepson was born at Boyne Falls, Charlevoix county, Michigan, October 22, 1889. His parents, George and Florence (Alexander) Jepson, were born in the state of Wisconsin, and came to Manistee, Michigan, in 1885. There the father

Page  1019 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1019 engaged in the produce business, buying produce and shipping by his own boats to Chicago and Milwaukee. When George H. was about four years of age the family removed to Charlevoix, where they remained for about two years, and then took up their residence in East Jordan. In this place the early education of Mr. Jepson was obtained and when he was about thirteen years of age he had his first introduction to the business to which he is now devoting his energies and in which he has achieved such success for one of his years. During the summer vacations he assisted his father on the boat, acting as clerk and ticket man and becoming acquainted with the details of the work in its various departments. In 1905 Mr. Jepson had the misfortune to be deprived of his father by death and the business went into the control of the mother, he being then under legal age. Very soon, however, he took full management, although the law compelled them to employ a captain of legal age. Mr. Jepson is by no means one to be deterred from advancing by fear of making an outward step and progress appears to be his watchword. In the big ideas which it is his ambition to make realities he has the entire sympathy of his mother, who is a most capable and enlightened woman, with business talent surpassing that of most of her sex. In the winter of 1910 mother and son enlarged their boats to greater capacity both as to freight and passengers. Their boats are now sea-worthy and eligible to enter the Great Lakes. During the summer the passengers carried between East Jordan and Charlevoix average six thousand per month, while the freight is of very considerable amount. It is the policy of the Jepsons to carry nothing by the hundred, but everything by the piece. Mr. Jepson is a popular member of the community in which his interests are centered and his fraternal, affiliations extend to the Maccabees. He is a public-spirited young citizen, in sympathy with all good government causes and ever ready to give heart and hand to any cause likely to prove of general benefit. JOHN C. RITTENHOUSE, as a member of the firm of Lombard & Rittenhouse, one of the most enterprising and successful business houses in Cheboygan, which has been in active operation in the city during the last nine years, has shown himself to be a progressive merchant and business man, an energetic and intelligent force in connection with all matters of public improvement in his city and county, and an upright, public spirited and estimable citizen in every way, with reference to both public affairs and private life. While not a native of Michigan, Mr. Rittenhouse has resided and been in business in the state for sixteen years, and is thoroughly familiar with the aspirations, activities and achievements of its people, with all of which he is in close touch and practical sympathy. He was born at Mount Morris, New York, on March 30, 1877, and is a son of John and Mary (McArthur) Rittenhouse, also natives of New York state. The father was born in 1828 and died in 1910. He was a'farmer for many years, but retired from active work in 1892. He was a firm and faithful Democrat in politics and devoted to the welfare of his party at all times. The mother is still living, although far advanced in years. She and

Page  1020 1020 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN her husband were the parents of seven children, three of whom are living, Arthur, Jessie and John C. The last named obtained his education in part in the public schools of his native place, and in part at a manual training school in Chicago. He began his business career as a grocer at Mullett Lake in this county in 1895. Two years later he started a lumber business there which he conducted until 1902 in that town, and then moved the base of his operations to Cheboygan, where the business has been conducted ever since. In this enterprise Mr. Rittenhouse has been associated from the beginning with J. T. Lombard, their firm name being Lombard & Rittenhouse. The firm deals extensively in all kinds of forest products in the way of timber, and makes specialties of cedar ties, posts and poles. Its operations are extensive and cover a considerable extent of territory; its name is widely and favorably known in business circles, and its credit for excellence in material and workmanship in its output and promptness and accuracy in its service to its patrons is unexcelled. As has been intimated, Mr. Rittenhouse has taken great interest and an active part in the progress and development of Cheboygan city and county, and been of considrable service in helping to push forward their advancement. He is a Republican in political faith and attachment, but has never had time or desire for the honors or emoluments of public office. He serves his party effectively as a private citizen, and that is the limit of his political ambition, but he neglects no duty of good citizenship. On November 11, 1902, he united in marriage with Miss Louise Brady, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada. She is a lady of enterprise and spirit, and has been of great service to her husband in all his undertakings since their marriage. But her chief care and industry is the proper rearing of their two children, Nellie and Louise. She takes an earnest interest in all matters that affect the welfare of the community around her, however, and is held in high regard as a serviceable force in connection with the agencies for good at work among its people. Cheboygan has no better citizens than Mr. and Mrs. Rittenhouse, and none whom it appreciates more highly. GEORGE SUTHERLAND is mayor of AuSable, Iosco county, Michigan, and that he is popular and efficient needs no further voucher than that indicated when it is stated that he has held this office, without opposition, from 1895 up to date. He is entitled by virtue of his office as mayor, to a seat on the board of supervisors, of which body he has been the chosen chairman consecutively for eleven years. This is a remarkable reputation. Mr. Sutherland is a staunch Republican in his political proclivities and he has on many occasions stumped the district for his chosen candidate for office. He is eloquent in the presentation of his theme, fluent in his use of words and convincing in his declarations. Mr. Sutherland was born in Brantford. Canada, the date of his nativity being March 2, 1845. His ancestry is of Scotch and English extraction and he is a son of John and Mary A. Sutherland, who removed to the United States in 1849, settling in the state of Wisconsin. They came to Michigan in 1855, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. He disposed of the farm in 1852 and returned to Canada and there was

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Page  1021 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1021 engaged in the confectionery business for one year, at the expiration of which he returned to the United States, settling at Ann Arbor, Michigan. In 1855 removal was made to Saginaw Valley, in Bay county, where he again turned his attention to farming and where the family home was maintained until the respective deaths of the parents, the father passing away in 1905, and the mother in 1909. Mr. and Mrs. John Sutherland became the parents of ten children, eight of whom grew to maturity and five of whom are living, in 1911, namely,-Margaret, William, Alfred, John and George. Mr. George Sutherland received his educational training in the public schools of Canada, Wisconsin and Ann Arbor, Michigan. He removed to AuSable, Iosco county, in 1871, and this place has continued to represent his home from 1871 to the present time, although he was not a steady resident during that time. He traveled extensively on fresh water and on salt water, visiting many ports at home and abroad, and he also traveled considerably overland. In 1890 he returned to let the curtain drop in AuSable, where he has since been a permanent resident. During the early years of his settlement in AuSable he fished with sail boats and with tugs during the open months and during the winters he was was engaged in hunting and trapping deer, bear, wolves and some smaller game. In 1898 he entered the employ of J. M. Lands Sons, with whose extensive real-estate operations he has been variously identified during the long intervening years up to the present time, in 1911. He has filled different positions of important trust and responsibility in connection with the affairs of this concern and he enjoys the full confidence of his employers. He was first elected mayor of this city in 1905 and he has held that office continuously, through successive re-elections to date, and as head administrator of the municipal affairs of AuSable he has proved himself particularly proficient and capable. He stands high in the estimation of the board of supervisors. On one occasion they presented him with a leather rocker and later he was honored with the gift of a beautiful, gold seal ring. Not only does Mr. Sutherland command the high esteem of his colleagues but he is also popular throughout the community at large, where the list of his personal friends is coincident with that of. his acquaintances. Through extensive travel and close observation Mr. Sutherland has broadened and developed his mind and he is regarded as a gentleman of brilliant mental faculties and deep human sympathy. He is connected with various social organizations of representative character. In 1891 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Sutherland to Miss Emily Shipley, whose birth occurred in Canada, and who is a daughter of Solomon Braun. Mr. and Mrs. Sutherland have no children. JOHN R. SANTO.-Persistency and determination are the elements which tend to promote prosperity and they are found among the, salient characteristics of John R. Santo, who is a local agent at Traverse City, Michigan, for twenty-seven different fire insurance companies and who has served the public in various official capacities, having been mayor of the city for one term and president of the board of trade for two terms. Mr. Santo's advancement in the business world has been en

Page  1022 1022 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN tirely through his own efforts and today he is enjoying a richly merited success, while the future is bright with promise. John R. Santo was born in London, Canada, the date of his nativity being June 29, 1865. He is a son of John and Mary (Rendle) Santo, both of whom were born in England, the former in Cornwall and the latter in Devonshire. The father was a lad of fifteen years of age at the time of his emigration to America, in 1845, location being made at London, Canada, where he met and married Mary Rendle. To this union were born eight children, all of whom are living at the present time, in 1911, namely,-Helena, Arthur, William, John R., Esther, Lillie, Albert and Charles. John Santo was a prosperous farmer and stockraiser in Canada and he was a breeder of thoroughbred Durham cattle, of which he made annual shipments to England. He was a man of fine business capacity, was a member of the St. George Aid Society and was a devout communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church. He was summoned to the life eternal at the age of sixty-two years, his death having occurred in 1893. His widow, who still survives him, now maintains her home at London, province of Ontario, Canada. To the public schools of his native place John R. Santo is indebted for his early educational training, the same including a partial course in the London high school. When seventeen years of age the condition of his health made it necessary for him to leave school and in 1883 he removed to Detroit, Michigan, where he secured a position with the Detroit Board of Fire Underwriters, continuing in the employ of that concern for the ensuing four years, during which time he availed himself of every opportunity to familiarize himself with the details of the business. In 1887 the Michigan Inspection Bureau tendered him an attractive position in a similar line of work, which he accepted and of which he continued incumbent for a period of seven years, at the expiration of which, in 1894, he grasped the opportunity of purchasing the W. F. Harsha Fire Insurance Agency at Traverse City. He immediately established his home in this place and has here continued to reside during the intervening years to the present time. He represents twenty-seven different fire insurance companies and has so conducted his business as to make it distinctly profitable. In connection with his insurance enterprise Mr. Santo has had time to take an active part in public affairs and in the same has been a potent influence for progress and development. In his political convictions he is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, in the local councils of which he has long been an active worker. In April, 1903, he was honored by his fellow men with election to the office of mayor of Traverse City, in discharging the duties of which responsible position he acquitted himself most creditably. In 1907 he was elected president of the local Board of Trade, serving for two terms in that capacity. He has been a member of the Board of Education and it may truthfully be said concerning Mr. Santo that no worthy measure advanced for the good of the general welfare fails of a most ardent support on his part. In Grand Rapids, Michigan, on the 12th of May, 1892, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Santo to.Mrs. Frances C. Thompson, who was born in Detroit, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Walter Fin

Page  1023 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1023 ney. Mir. and Mrs. Santo have one child, Gwendolyn, whose natal day is the 4th of December, 1899. Mrs. Santo is a communicant of the Baptist church and they are prominent and popular factors in connection with the best social activities in Traverse City. In a fraternal way Mr. Santo is affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; Traverse City Council, No. 61, Royal & Select Masters; and Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templar, besides which he is a valued and appreciative member of Saladin Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Grand Rapids. In Scottish Rite Masonry he is connected with De Witt Clinton Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, being a Thirty-second degree Mason. He is also affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 323, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, in which he is past exalted ruler; and the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Santo has so directed his efforts as to win prosperity and his entire career has been characterized by an honorable purpose that makes him a notable figure in business circles in northern Michigan. The favorable judgment which the world passed upon him in his earlier years has never been set aside nor in any degree modified, but has on the contrary been emphasized by reason of his straightforward career and upright life. HENRY BARBER of Cheboygan is one of the fruitful agencies in working out the progress and development of the city and county for which they, the state of Michigan and the United States are indebted to the Dominion of Canada, and especially the province of Ontario. He came to the city of his present home in 1886, when he was but twenty-one years of age, and there he has ever since had his residence, devoting himself with fidelity and constancy to the daily duties of life, and working himself up by his well demonstrated merit and ability to high standing and consequence among the people and influence in the public affairs of the region. Mr. Barber was born in Bruce county, Ontario, January 29, 1865. He is a son of Irish parents, who left the inhospitable atmosphere of their native land in early life and sought a new home with a more generous disposition toward people of their class and better opportunities for industry and thrift. Canada opened its arms to receive them, and they found a reasonable degree of comfort and prosperity among its inhabitants. The father was William Barber, a carpenter, who arrived in the Dominion when he was a young man and located in Peterborough, where he worked at his trade for a number of years, and then turned his attention to farming, in which he passed the remainder of the forty-five years of his life. The mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Morrow, also came over when young, and took up her residence in Peterborough. There she and her husband were married and lived for a time. They had nine chifdren, of whom Henry was the fourth. His mother is still living, and has her home at Owen Sound, Ontario, where she is enjoying a comfortable release from all active labor, although still hale and vigorous, and is held in high regard by all who know her worth, her de

Page  1024 1024 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN votion to lofty ideals of womanhood, and the uprightness and usefulness of her life. Her son Henry obtained a limited education in the schools of his native county, the exigencies of the family compelling him to provide for himself at an early age. When he was but sixteen years of age he engaged in business as a meat merchant in Tara, Ontario, continuing his operations there and in that line of trade until 1886. In that year he crossed the line into "the States," and became a resident of Cheboygan. Soon afterward he united with others in organizing the Cheboygan Produce and Cold Storage Company, of which he was made president. Mr. Barber was then variously occupied for a number of years. In 1909 he was elected city treasurer of Cheboygan, and in 1910 was chosen for a second term. He is now (1911) also a member of the city water board, and has been during the last five years. He has given the city good service and its people satisfaction in the performance of his official duties, and is regarded on all sides as a very capable and trustworthy man for any department of the public service, and an excellent citizen in all respects. His life among this people has been clean, upright and useful, and at all times effective for his own advancement and their welfare. His connection with the fraternal life of his community is with the Order of, Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees, in each of which fraternities he holds membership in the branches located and working in Cheboygan, and is one of the most valued members they have. He is also one of the directors of the Cheboygan County Savings Bank. In politics his faith is pledged and his services are given to the Republican party. He takes an active interest and a helpful part in all its campaigns, and stands firmly in defense of its principles at all times. In 1886 Mr. Barber was married to Miss Eliza Young, who was of the same nativity as himself, a daughter of Robert Young, now deceased. Mrs. Barber died in 1906. She was the mother of three children, only one of whom is living, her daughter Selna, who still has her home with her father and is a valuable assistant to him in all his labors, aspirations and social engagements, and a stimulus to her associates in carrying on good work for the benefit of the city and its higher interests in mental and moral departments of community life. JOHN H. COLLINS, of Bellaire, is one of Antrim county's best known hotel men, and as host of the Riverside Hotel he is well and favorably known for his geniality and the excellence of the accommodations he provides for the passing traveler. He is a man of versatile abilities and is well acquainted with the great basic industry of agriculture and the lumber business of the northern portion of the state of Michigan. He is a native of the state, his birth having occurred at Three Oaks, on the 18th day of November, 1857. His parents were John H. and Mary Collins, and the subject was the youngest of a family of five children. The boyhood and youth of Mr. Collins were passed in Berrien county, where his parents had settled and his education was of a limited character, partly owing to the fact that the head of the house died

Page  1025 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1025 when John H. was only thirteen years of age. He found it expedient to look about him for employment very shortly after that and his first position was in a heading mill, where the manager had promised him that after he had worked for a little while he should receive thirteen dollars a month and his board. When he had worked faithfully for more than three months and felt that he was entitled to compensation for most of that time, he was informed that he would not receive over ten dollars for his quarter's labor. He was of course sorely disappointed, but later came to look upon it in a more philosophical light. He concluded to seek new fields and set out for Ohio, where he secured work upon a farm and as he had no board to pay and could save almost all of his wages, he remained there for some time, and found himself at last with quite a savings account. He then returned to southern Michigan and for a time worked in a mill and in the spring of 1883 he came on to the northern part of the state,-a momentous step since it was to prove his permanent abiding place. He stopped at Mancelona upon first coming to Antrim county and immediately took steps to become a useful factor in the life of the town, buying a team and becoming a teamster. He became identified with the lumbering business, which is so important in this section, buying standing timber and cutting and placing logs at the mill. He subsequently removed to what is now Bellaire village in this county and has ever since been identified with the many-sided life of the place. November 14, 1883, Mr. Collins laid the foundation of a happy life companionship, Miss Sarah Foreman of Kalkaska becoming his wife Mrs. Collins was born at Lakeside, Michigan, the daughter of John W. and Sophia Foreman. Their union has been further cemented by the birth of four children, three of the number surviving at the present day. Bertine and Bertha are twins. Bertha married Edward Reed, of Wheaton, Illinois; and Bertine is at home. Basil is a clerk in his father's hotel. Shortly after his marriage Mr. Collins bought a farm near Bellaire; a portion of this he cleared and followed the vocation of a lumberer in the winter and that of an agriculturist in the summer. Later he sold his farm and purchased property in Bellaire. He finally decided to make a venture of the hotel business and renting his residence, he secured control of the Forest Home House and maintained it for a time, but later found it expedient to sell out. In 1908 he again engaged in the hotel business and is meeting with no small amount of success in his operations in that line. The Riverside House was founded in the year 1908 by Mr. Collins and is one of the well-known hostelries in this part of the state. Under the management of Mr. Collins and his estimable wife it enjoys an enthusiastic patronage. Mr. Collins is interested in public matters, as must be every intelligent voter, and has ever given faithful allegiance to the man and measures for which the Republican party stands sponsor. He is liberal in his religious views and, in short, stands as a representative of an excellent type of citizenship.

Page  1026 1026 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN HENRY G. REEK.-The efficient and popular prosecuting attorney of Mason county is recognized as one of the representative members of the bar of northern Michigan and has maintained his home in Mason county since his childhood days. He is thus a scion of one of the well known pioneer families of this section of the state, and that he is not without honor in his own country is vouchsafed by his present official preferment. Henry G. Reek, of Ludington, was born at Defiance, Ohio, on the 25th of October, 1867, and is a son of William and Ann (Rigel) Reek, the former of whom was born in Germany and the latter in the state of Ohio. The devoted mother was summoned to the life eternal in 1875, when the subject of this review was but seven years of age, and who was the eldest in a family of four children left without her care. William Reek was reared and educated in his native land and upon coming to America he first settled in Defiance county, Ohio, where he continued to maintain his residence until 1869, when he removed with his family to Mason county, Michigan, and numbered himself among the pioneers of Sherman township, where he reclaimed a productive farm from a virtual wilderness and where he continued to be actively identified with agricultural pursuits for many years: Now venerable in years, he is living retired in the city of Ludington, and he is held in unqualified esteem in the county that has so long represented his home and to the industrial and social advancement of which he has contributed his due quota. He is independent in politics. The present prosecuting attorney of Mason county was about one year old at the time when the family home was here established, and he was reared to maturity under the sturdy discipline of the homestead farm, the while he duly availed himself of the advantages of the local schools. That he made good use of the opportunities thus afforded him is shown by the fact that when but sixteen years of age he proved himself eligible for pedagogic honors and engaged in teaching in the district schools. Under these conditions he carried forward his own studies and prepared himself for entrance to college. When eighteen years of age he became a matriculant in the Central Normal College of Indiana, and in this institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1889. In the meanwhile he had formulated definite plans for his future career, in which connection he determined to prepare himself for the legal profession. With this end in view, utilizing the funds earned by teaching, he entered the law department of the University of Michigan, in which he completed the prescribed technical course and was graduated as a member of the class of 1895, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was simultaneously admitted to the bar of the state and forthwith opened an office in Ludington, where he has since continued in the active and successful practice of his profession, in which he has gained marked prestige as a strong and versatile trial lawyer and well fortified counselor. Ever according a stanch allegiance to the Republican party and taking a loyal interest in public affairs of a local order, Mr. Reek has been a valued factor in connection with the manoeuvering of political forces in his home county. He served for two terms as circuit-court

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Page  1027 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1027 commissioner of Mason county and in addition to giving effective service as a member of the board of school examiners for the county he has also been a valued member of the board of education in his home city, in which connection he was a director of this school district for a period of three years. In 1908 was given distinctive recognition of the professional ability and personal popularity of Mr. Reek, as he was then elected prosecuting attorney for Mason county. His administration of the affairs of this important office was marked by most scrupulous care and fidelity and at the expiration of his first term he was elected as his own successor, in November, 1910, for a second term of two years. The majority accorded him in this election was most gratifying, especially in view of the somewhat negative success of the Republican party in other states of the Union at this election. Mr. Reek is earnest and loyal in his attitude as a citizen, and his fearlessness and activity as prosecutor has resulted in giving Ludington a reputation as a clean city. He is a stockholder in the State Bank of Ludington and is the owner of valuable real estate in his home city. In the Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with Pere Marquette Lodge, No. 299, Free and Accepted Masons; Ludington Chapter No. 92, Royal Arch Masons; and Apollo Commandery, No. 31, Knights Templar, besides which he is also identified with the local organizations of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees. In their church relations he is a Presbyterian and his wife is a Congregationalist. Mr. Reek has been twice married. In 1897 he wedded Miss Theressa M. Barnes, who was born and reared in Mason county, and who died in 1904, leaving no children. On the 17th of June, 1908, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Daisy M. Marsh, daughter of Mrs. Anna R. Marsh, of Ludington, and they have one daughter, Anna D. Louis N. GAGNIER.-Among the representative citizens of Oscoda, losco county, Michigan, is Louis Napoleon Gagnier, who is a man of fine mental ken and broad information. He received an excellent education in his youth and during his entire life has made the most of opportunities whereby he could further broaden his mind. He is well versed in various fields-languages, psychology and theology-in fact he often officiates as clergyman in the Baptist church when no ordained minister can be procured. His present business, for which he is particularly well prepared and equipped, is that of embalmer and undertaker. Mr. Gagnier was born in the province of Quebec, Canada, on the 16th of July, 1853, and he is a son of Remi and Matilda (Gauleir) Gagnier, both of whom were likewise born and reared in the Dominion of Canada, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1866. Location was made in the city of Detroit, Michigan, where the father followed the work of his trade, that of ship carpenter. To Mr. and Mrs. Gagnier were born six children and of the number but two are living in 1911,-Louis N., of this review; and Mary, who resides at West Detroit, and who married Charles Yeorn. Remi Gagnier lived to the age Vol. III-5

Page  1028 1028 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of fifty-seven years, his death having occurred in 1893, and his wife, who died in 1902, was a woman of sixty years of age. Louis Napoleon Gagnier received his primary education in his native land and he was a lad of thirteen years of age at the time of his parents' removal to the United States. In his youth he received thorough training in the French language and he spent three years as a student in St. Rock College, in the city of Quebec. Subsequently he pursued an English course in St. John's College at Quebec. In 1878 he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oscoda, where he secured employment as a painter for the firm of Pack, Woods & Company. In 1882 he accepted a position as carpenter in the Osceola lumber mill and later he secured work as a millwright. Subsequently, in conjunction with his father, he engaged in the grocery business, continuing to be identified with that line of enterprise for about two and a half years in Detroit, Michigan. In 1893 he began to work for the Land Company as ship carpenter, but this business was short-lived and in six months he engaged in the undertaking business with J. G. Chevrier. In 1895 he purchased his partner's share of the business and since that year he has been adding to his stock and experience until he now controls a large territory in his business. For three years he was incumbent of the office of coroner, for four years justice of the peace and for eight years notary public. Mr. Gagnier is a first-class embalmer, is a graduate of Champion College of Embalming and also a graduate of the Chicago School of Psychology. Politically he is a staunch adherent of the principles of the Republican party and he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters projected for the good of the community. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellbws, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees, in the latter of which he is finance keeper in the local lodge. He and his wife are devout members of the Baptist church, to the advancement of whose welfare they have contributed in generous measure. Mr. Gagnier is well qualified, through education and research in theological questions, to deliver a good sermon in the absence of a regular minister. He is a well read man, liberal in thought and action and his charity knows only the bounds of his opportunities. He is one of the prominent and influential citizens in Iosco county and is held in high esteem by his fellow men. In the year 1875 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gagnier to Miss Mary Monahan, who was born and reared at Boston Corner, New York, and who is a daughter of James Monahan, who was engaged in the lumber business during most of his active career. To Mr. and Mrs. Gagnier have been born five children, concerning whom the following brief data are here incorporated,-Rev. James H. was graduated in the theological department of the University of Chicago and is now pastor of the Baptist church at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin; Louis E. is a funeral director and maintains his home at Santa Barbara, California; George A., who was a chemist by occupation, is deceased, as is also Mary C.; and Nellie E. remains at the parental home.

Page  1029 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1029 JAMES D. MUNSON, M. D.-A native son of Michigan and a scion of a family whose name has been indissolubly linked with the annals of the state since the pioneer days, Dr. Munson has long held distinctive prestige as one of the able representatives of the medical profession and he has accomplished a splendid work in connection with the administration of the affairs of the Northern Michigan Asylum for the Insane in Traverse City, of which he has been medical superintendent from the time of its foundation in 1885. His prominence in this connection, as well as a distinguished member of his profession, specially entitles him to recognition in this publication. He is a man of scholarship and professional talent and his sterling attributes of character have given him secure place in the respect and confidence of those with whom he has come in contact in the various relations of life. Dr. James Decker Munson was born at Independence, Oakland county, Michigan, on the 8th of June, 1848, and is a son of Saron B. and Harriet (Decker) Munson. Dr. Munson is indebted to the common schools of his native county for his early educational discipline, and in 1868-9 he was a student in the high school in the city of Pontiac, that county. He then began the work of preparing himself for the profession in which he has attained to so notable distinction. He entered the medical department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1873 and from which he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine. He made an especially excellent record as an undergraduate and thus came forth admirably equipped for the work of his chosen vocation. Soon after his graduation Dr. Munson located in the city of Detroit, where he engaged in general practice and also became a demonstrator in the Detroit College of Medicine. He thus continued until 1878, when he removed to the city of Pontiac, and served as assistant physician of the Eastern Michigan Asylum until 1885. In September, 1885, he came to Traverse City and assumed the office of medical superintendent of the newly founded Northern Michigan Asylum for the Insane, with which noble institution he has since continued to be thus identified and to the development of which to its present high standard he has contributed in a most beneficent way, the while he has gained wide reputation for his ability in the treatment of mental disorders and in the administration of the great asylum or hospital to which he has given practically his undivided time and attention for more than a quarter of a century. He is an authority in meintal diseases and their treatment, and since 1900 has been lecturer on insanity in his alma mater, the medical department of the University of Michigan, which conferred upon him the honorary degree of Master of Arts in 1904. Dr. Munson has shown in his work not only a broad and effective grasp upon the learning and application of the sciences of medicine and surgery but in his present responsible office he has shown particularly that abiding human sympathy which transcends mere emotion to become an actuating motive for helpfulness. He is an active and valued member of the American Medical Association, the American Psychological Association, the Michigan State Medical Society, the Grand Traverse County Medical Society and the National Association

Page  1030 1030 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN for the Prevention of Tuberculosis. He has been a frequent and valuable contributor to the leading periodicals of his profession, as well as to its standard literature, and he has presented before the various medical organizations with which he is connected a number of papers touching insanity and asylum administration. He has ever been a close student of both branches of his profession and his original research and investigations have been extensive and practical. In politics, while never active or a seeker of office, he accords stanch allegiance to the Republican party, but all extraneous matters are subordinated to the demands of his professional and executive work. On the 27th of April, 1880, Dr. Munson was united in marriage to Miss Mary S. Munson. She was born in New Jersey, where she was reared to maturity. She was summoned to the life eternal on the 4th of July, 1902, and is survived by one son, Dr. James F. Munson, who was graduated in the literary and medical departments of the University of Michigan as a member of the class of 1904 and who is now a member of the faculty of Craig Colony at Sonyea, New York. On the 23d of March, 1904, Dr. Munson contracted a second marriage, having then been united to Mrs. Marian M. Ward, who was born and reared in the city of Manistee, Michigan, where her father, the late Charles Secor, was for many years a representative citizen and business man. Mrs. Munson is active in connection with the leading social affairs of Traverse City and is a woman of most gracious personality. JAMES H. MONROE is a leading and influential citizen of Traverse City and his activity in business affairs, his co-operation in public interests and his zealous support of all objects that he believes will contribute to the material, social or moral improvement of the community keeps him in the foremost rank of those to whom the city owes its development and present position as one of the leading metropolitan centers of Michigan. His life is characterized by upright, honorable principles and it also exemplifies the truth of the Emersonian philosophy that "The way to win a friend is to be one." His genial, kindly manner has won him the regard and good will of all with whom he comes in contact and as a citizen his loyalty and public spirit have ever been of the most insistent order. He is prominent in the local councils of the Republican party and has been incumbent of many important offices of public trust and responsibility, including that of treasurer of Grand Traverse county. At the present time, in 1911, he is engaged in the fire insurance business, with offices in the Wilhelm building in Traverse City. In Steuben county, New York, on the 5th of August, 1847, occurred the birth of James H. Monroe, who is a son of William and Nellie (LaRue) Monroe, both of whom were likewise born in the state of New York, where their marriage was solemnized and whence they removed to Michigan in 1856. Location was first made in Kent county, where they resided for a period of three years, at the expiration of which the family home was established on a farm in Grand Traverse county. In those early days this district was one dense wilderness and the father literally hewed out a farm for himself. The journey from New

Page  1031 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1031 York was made by boat and in order to reach the land on which they located it was necessary to make a journey of twelve miles through the woods. Six miles of the distance had been partially cut but the remainder of the journey was accomplished only after they had literally carved their way through the forest with the aid of axes. After clearing a piece of ground a small log house was erected and this rude structure continued to be the place of their abode for a number of years. To Mr. and Mrs. William Monroe were born three children, namely,-Mark L., who lost his life as the result of injuries received in a runaway in 1899; Theodore A., employed in the starch factory at Traverse City, is married and has one son; and James H. is the immediate subject of this review. The father was summoned to the life eternal at the age of sixty-nine years, and the mother passed to her reward at the age of forty-five years. Mr. Monroe of this review received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of Grand Traverse county and he has since supplemented the same by extensive study in science, literature, history and law. He is a man of brilliant intellect and is wonderfully well informed on almost every subject. After attaining to his legal majority Mr. Monroe inaugurated his active business career as a farmer on a tract of two hundred acres of unimproved land presented him by his father, the same being located in Blair township, this county. For the ensuing several years Mr. Monroe devoted his entire time and attention to the clearing and improving of his land and to-day this tract is one of the finest in the county. He continued to reside upon his farm until 1888, at which time his official duties required his removal to Traverse City and since which time he has given an active supervision to the management of the farm. In his political adherency Mr. Monroe is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party, in which he has long been one of the active leaders in northern Michigan. In the county convention of 1888 he was accorded the nomination for the office of county treasurer, to which he was elected in the ensuing campaign. In 1890 he was re-elected to that office and in 1892 he was honored by his fellow citizens with the office of probate judge, which he held for a period of eight years, during which time he discharged his duties with the utmost efficiency. In 1900, upon relinquishing his place upon the bench ol the probate court, Mr. ionroe engaged in the fire insurance business, to which line of enterprise he has devoted considerable attention to the present time. He has been eminently successful in this business and his well equipped offices are located in the Wilhelm building. In 1902 he was elected to represent Grand Traverse county in the state legislature and in the same was a member of many important committees. He was re-elected representative twice and during his incumbency of the office was a powerful influence among his colleagues. He has been chairman of the Republican county committee for the past sixteen years and in a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Grange. In their religious faith he and his wife are devout members of the Christian Science church

Page  1032 1032 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and they hold a high place in the confidence and esteem of their fellow citizens. In October, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Monroe to ITiss DeEtta Monroe, of Blair township. Although the family name of each is the same Mr. and Mrs. Monroe are unrelated except as man and wife. To this union were born two children,-Grace and Nellie. The latter died at the age of five years and 'Grace is now financial clerk in the House of Representatives, having previously been a clerk in the House for four sessions and, as her father expresses it, is indeed quite a politician. GEORGE W. MINCHIN.-The present editor and publisher of the Evart Review at Evart, Osceola county, Michigan, is a man of fine business capacity and strong initiative power. He has resided in Evart for nearly three decades and during that period he has held practically all the offices of trust and responsibility that the town could confer upon him. He was born at Pontiac, Michigan, the date of his nativity having been August 3, 1854. His father, Thomas Minchin, was a native of England, whence he came to America in 1850, when a young man. After his arrival in this country he proceeded immediately to Michigan and initiated operations as a farmer in Oakland county, in the vicinity of Pontiac. He married Elizabeth Noyes, who was likewise born in England and who came to America as a young girl. Both lived to the age of sixty years and they reared a family of three children, of whom Mrs. M. C. Williams is a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota, where her husband is a prominent manufacturer and business man; Jesse T. is deceased; and George W. is the immediate subject of this review. Jesse T. AMinchin was connected with the press during his lifetime and was former editor of the Reed City Clarion and of the Evart Review. He came to Osceola county in 1878 and his death occurred in 1904, at Pontiac, this state. He held many offices of public trust during his life time and at the time of his death was in the mail service. George W. Minchin was the eldest of the three children and his boyhood and youth were passed at Pontiac, in whose public schools he was graduated. At an early age he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade, learning the same in the office of Nisbett & Vial, at Pontiac. In 1872, then eighteen years of age, he accompanied Mr. W. B. Cole to Ludington, Mr. Cole having relinquished the publication of the Pontiac Jacksonian for the purpose of establishing the Appeal at Ludington. There Mr. Minchin remained for the ensuing two years, at the expiration of which he removed to Reed City, where he became local editor of the Reed City Clarion. In the fall of 1874 he severed his connection with the last mentioned paper and went to Tolede, Ohio, where he was identified with newspaper work until 1878, in which year he and his brother Jesse T. purchased the Reed City Clarion, which they continued to publish with all of success until December, 1879, when they disposed of it to Charles E. Barnes. Subsequently they bought the Evart Review, which they began to publish in January, 1880, and which they continued together until 1884, when

Page  1033 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1033 (George W. became the sole proprietor. When a resident of Reed City MIr. Minchin was also in the railway mail service, delivering the first mail from Mackinaw City to Petoskey. In politics Mr. Minchin accords a loyal allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, and at no time during his thirty years' residence in Evart has he failed to respond to the call of his fellow citizens to public office. He has been president of the village and since 1898 has given most efficient service as postmaster. In the local councils of the Republican party he has been a most influential and prominent factor and no one commands a higher degree of confidence and esteem in the community than does he. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity he is a valued and appreciative member of the Blue Lodge, No. 320, Free and Accepted Masons; Evart Chapter, No. 95, Royal Arch Masons; and Pilgrim Commandery, No. 23, Knights Templars. He is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are devoted members of the Presbyterian church in Evart. On the 14th of September, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Minchin to Miss Alice M. Bennett, of Ludington, she being a daughter of L. W. and Florilla (Edwards) Bennett. To this union have been born nine children, whose names are here entered in respective order of birth,-Nydia E., Flora Min, Hattie E., Carrie S. (deceased), Jessie H., Alice L., Margaret B., Josephine L. (deceased) and Katherine. HENRY RICHARDI.-One of the largest and most important of the industrial institutions of Antrim county was the Bellaire Wooden Ware Company, at whose head stood Henry Richardi. one of the best-known citizens of this part of the state. This concern before it was destroyed by fire in 1905 furnished employment to between seventy and ninety men, utilizing three and four million feet of lumber annually and doing an annual business of $100,000. It was one of the most potent factors in the progress and advancement of Bellaire, and Mr. Richardi, while winning a great measure of personal success, has, like all enterprising citizens of the best character, contributed at the same time to the material interests of the community in which his own interests are centered. He has labored efficiently for the improvement of the water and electric lighting facilities of the place and in many ways has helped to make possible it standing as one of the most up-to-date and progressive of Michigan towns. By the circumstance of birth Mr. Richardi is a native of the state of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Williamsport on the 8th day of May, 1863. The names of his parents are Robert and Louisa Richardi. When he was a small child his father and mother moved from the Keystone state to Louisiana, Missouri, and in that place he received his education. He early exhibited that business acumen and executive capacity which have contributed so generously to his success, and while a youth he learned the details of the manufacturing of wooden ware as an employee in his father's factory. When sufficiently trained he became superintendent of the same and served for several years in such capacity. In the early '80s the elder Mr. Richardi concluded that Michi

Page  1034 1034 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN gan presented a favorable field for an enterprise such as his and thither the family removed, locating at Bellaire, where the head of the house established the Bellaire Wooden Ware Company under the firm name of Richardi & Bechtold. That was in the year 1881, and in the twenty-five years ensuing the best of fortunes attended the concern. It was the successor of the similar business conducted at Louisiana, Missouri. The reason the scene of the business was changed was owing to the fact that Mr. Richardi, the elder, was drawn to Michigan by what was at that time talked of as an inexhaustable supply of lumber. When looking over northern Michigan for a location the water force at Bellaire, then undeveloped, led him to choose this place in preference to all others similarly adjacent to lumber supply. Mr. Bechtold came into business association in the year 1881. In 1895 Mr. Robert Richardi sold his interests to his son Henry, the immediate subject of this review, he for years.having had charge of its mechanical and operative department, as well as having had in his hands the important matter of the disposal of the goods. His father removed to Plainwell, Allegan county, where his remarkable initiative and executive gifts were again made manifest for the good of that community, for he there established an electric lighting and power plant. But later he transferred his activities to southern environs, locating at Richmond, Virginia, where he again brought into being an electric plant and one of much larger capacity than the ones organized in Michigan. To return to the earlier history of the Bellaire Wooden Ware Company, Mr. Richardi, the father, and Mr. Bechtold, developed the water power at Bellaire and utilized the same in their plant. In the earlier days of the history of tie concern employment was given to about forty men. In 1900 a stock company was formed with a paid in capital of $15,000. The growth of the company was steady and in a short time it was increased to $25,000. By the year 1905 the assets of the company approximated $50,000, an eloquent testimony as to the good management of the manufactory, which had been advertised by the excellence of its wares over a wide territory, comprising a great many of the states of the Union. The officers were as follows: Henry Richardi, president; Frederick W. Bechtold, secretary; Osborn D. Tiffany, treasurer; and William G. Phelps, superintendent, which personnel was unchanged at the time of the fire, which wiped out the business. As previously mentioned the company employed nearly one hundred men and one of its most important functions was in its furnishing a source of livelihood for so many families. There was manufactured a wide variety of wooden ware specialties. The water power utilized by the plant of the Wooden Ware Company and primarily devised for it, likewise furnished a means for the operation of the custom saw mill owned by Messrs. Richardi & Bechtold and for the planing mill owned by the former. It was also the motive power for an independent wooden ware plant owned by the subject. The manufacture of these specialties had no connection with the main plant and did not conflict with it in any way. Here employment is given to about thirty persons. Among Mr. Richardi's many achievements was the installation of an electric lighting plant for his works and in 1906 he erected a large electric lighting and power

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Page  1035 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1035 plant, which provides with light and power Charlevoix and also those buildings, stores, residences and hotels of which he is the owner at Bellaire. In 1890 Mr. Robert Richardi organized a small stock company for the purpose of bringing into being a water works system for the general protection of the village. This has from time to time been enlarged until the whole village is now protected from fire and the water is also used by many for domestic purposes. The stock of the water works has now practically passed into the hands of Henry Richardi. In November, 1905, as above stated, fire destroyed the plant of the Bellaire Wooden Ware Company, and it was not rebuilt. Besides the vast interests above noted Mr. Richardi controls several other enterprises of scope and importance. He is the owner of valuable timber land situated in northern Michigan and he is developing a farm of several hundred acres, of which he has two hundred and fifty acres under cultivation. He is one of the largest real estate owners in the section and also deals in real estate, ever keeping in mind, even above personal interests, the success and prosperity of Bellaire and ever ready to contribute to any object worthy of support and consideration. In short, he is one of the most successful of men, considered from any viewpoint. Success in any line of business or profession commands the attention of the public and when it has been achieved through legitimate channels and in honorable, straightforward ways, it not only comands the attention but also the respect of the public in general, for it means that unusual ability, zeal and enterprise have been brought to bear on all things undertaken by the subject. It should be particularly gratifying to Mr. Richardi that he had it within his power to play a role so greatly beneficial and to assist in the solving of the problem of existence for so great a number of people as found employment of pleasant and substantial character in his plants. Bellaire was indeed fortunate when he took up his abode within her gates and began those vast operations which a man of lesser ability would have found impossible. Since his earliest voting days Mr. Richardi has in the main given his heart and hand to the principles and policies of the Republican party, but he is progressive in his outlook and does not irrevocably bind himself to the articles of faith of any party. He is one of Michigan's most prominent members of the time-honored Masonic order, having attained to the thirty-second degree and being as noted a member of the order in all its branches as conferred in America. He is a bachelor. GEORGE E. REYCRAFT, M. D.-As general manager of the Petoskey hospital and as a physician and surgeon of admirable talent and practical ability, Dr. Reycraft merits definite recognition in this work as one of the honored and successful representatives of his profession in northern Michigan, where by his character and services he has lent honor to his chosen vocation and gained secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. In the ownership and operation of the finely equipped private hospital he is associated with his brother, Dr. John J. Reycraft, and incidentally it may be stated that in the sketch of the

Page  1036 1036 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ~ career of the former, appearing on other pages of this work, are given adequate data concerning the family history, so that a repetition of the record is not demanded in the present connection. Dr. George Edwin Reycraft was born at Highgate, Kent county, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 7th of August, 1874, and to the public schools of that province he is indebted for his preliminary educational discipline, which included a course in the high school at Ridgetown. Thereafter he was a student for one year in the literary or academic department of McGill University, in the city of Montreal, after leaving which he continued his studies for one year in the University of Michigan. In securing to himself the best possible advantages in fitting himself for the medical profession, Dr. Reycraft entered the Detroit College of Medicine, one of the most splendid educational.institutions of the Michigan metropolis, and in the same he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Like his elder brother, Dr. John J., who was likewise graduated in this college, Dr. Reycraft found it expedient to further his technical training by post-graduate work in the best of European institutions. Thus he gained valuable clinical experience in the leading hospitals of London, Berlin and Paris, and after a sojourn of about six months abroad he returned to Michigan, where he soon afterward became associated in active practice with his brother John J., in Petoskey, which has since been the stage of his earnest and effective labors. The demands of the well ordered hospital of which he has been manager since its establishing, in 1907, now monopolize a large part of his time and attention and he has done much to bring the institution to its present high standing and marked popularity. The doctor holds membership in the Emmet County Medical Society, the Michigan State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He continues a close student of his profession and avails himself of the.best of its standard and periodical literature. He anticipated his brother, Dr. John J. Reycraft, in being chosen chief executive of the municipal government of his home city, as he was elected mayor of Petoskey in 1902, when but twenty-eight years of age. He served one term and gave an admirable administration, through which he further fortified an already strong hold upon popular confidence and esteem. His brother's first election to the same office was compassed in 1909. He himself. was again called to this position in 1904 and 1905, and it thus appears that their popularity has given a virtual, if temporary, power to the two progressive citizens and honored physicians who have thus shown their deep interest in all that touches the welfare of their home community. Dr. Reycraft is city health officer at the time of this writing and his services are far from being perfunctory, as he spares neither time nor pains in safeguarding the city along modern sanitary lines. The doctor is a staunch Democrat in his political proclivities and is one of the valued and publicspirited citizens who are doing much to further the civic and material advancement of the beautiful city of Petoskey, whose charms as a summer resort are not to be considered paramount to its claims for industrial and commercial thrift and prosperity. He is affiliated with

Page  1037 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1037 the following lodges: Masons, Elks, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen, Foresters and Maccabees. The doctor is a bachelor. CLARK J. MACARTHUR.-The men who do and dare in connection with the ordinary pursuits of life, making the most of their opportunities for themselves, and of the resources available to them for the benefit of those around them, furnish the real vital and impelling force of our activities and keep in motion for the good of the whole people the currents of industry and trade, and all the multiform expressions of life and energy which attend or grow out of these. If such men do not actually mold the public sentiment of the country and control its destiny, they contribute largely to this. And, in any event, they supply a considerable measure of the motive power which causes the continuous advancement of our civilization and institutions. Clark J. MacArthur is prominent among the men of this character and class who have called the city of Cheboygan into being and given it and the country around it the high tides of their present prosperity, progress and industrial and commercial power. His activity in the community during the many years of his residence among its people has been varied in form but fruitful for good in every field of endeavor in which it has been employed and has been under requisition ever since he became mature enough to work. Mr. MacArthur's life began in Chemung, McHenry county, Illinois, on March 7, 1866. He is a son of Ward and Jessie (Stewart) MacArthur, he and his brother Horatio being the only ones living of their six children. The father was born in Schenectady, New York, in 1820, and died in Cheboygan, Michigan, in 1879. The mother came into being in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1840, and lived until 1902, when she, too, passed away in Cheboygan. She was Mr. MacArthur's second wife, whom he married a number of years after the death of his first wife, Miss Isabella McDonald. She became the mother of three children, all now deceased as their mother has been for many years. The father located in Chemung, Illinois, when he was yet a young man. At the age of eleven death robbed him of his father, and from boyhood he was obliged to make his own way in the world. He soon became established as a prosperous merchant in Chemung, and continued merchandising there until 1868. In that year he moved to Cheboygan and founded an extensive saw mill and lumber business, being one of the pioneers in that line of trade in this part of the state. He formed a partnership in the business With other gentlemen, the firm name being MacArthur, Smith & Co. A few years later two of his cousins secured a controlling interest in the establishment, and incorporated the business under the name of the W. & A. MacArthur Co., Limited. He was prominent and influential in the business, political, fraternal and social life of the city and county, and one of the most potential forces in promoting the progress of the section in its earlier history. His political connection was with the Republican party, in which he was an energetic and effective worker, and his fraternal affiliation was with the Masonic order, of which he was for many years a zealous and very serviceable member, true to its tenets and obedient to its teachings. His son Clark was but two years old when the family moved to Che

Page  1038 1038 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN boygan, and grew to manhood and began his education in that city. He completed his scholastic training in higher schools at Orchard Lake and Ann Arbor. His first employment in the way of making a livelihood for himself was in tallying logs for MacArthur, Smith & Co., and his next was as bookkeeper. Life on the water presented stronger attractions to him than a humdrum clerical position on land, and he secured employment as purser on one of the steamers running between Mullet lake and Mackinac island. He afterward served in the same capacity on other steamboats for about two years, at the end of which he started a hardware business, which he conducted from the fall of 1887 to the corresponding season in 1897, his store being located in St. Ignace, but his strong interest in Cheboygan and all that pertained to it being maintained in a healthy and vigorous condition, and always with a view to returning to that city. From 1897 to the fall of 1901 he was again purser on a steamboat, then, in the year last mentioned, he once more located in Cheboygan and turned his attention to flour milling on a scale of some magnitude. On April 17, 1905, the Cheboygan Flour itill Company was organized with M.r. MacArthur as one of the incorporators and the secretary and treasurer of the company, in which important office he has served it ever since. The company was incorporated with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. Its history and productive power are set forth in detail in a sketch of Franklin S. Ritter, the vice president of the company, which appears elsewhere in this volume. During his residence in St. Ignace Mr. 1IacArthur served one term as alderman, and was otherwise prominent among the people of that city. He is now a member of the Cheboygan Chamber of Commerece, and also belongs to the lodges of Elks and Knights of Pythias there. Always, wherever he has been, he has allied himself with all the lines of useful energy at work for the advancement of his community and the welfare of its people. His political faith and allegiance are given to the Republican party, of which he is a consistent member. Mr. MacArthur was united in marriage with Miss Edith Ramsey on January 31, 1888. She was born in Springfield, Illinois, and is a daughter of Charles S. and Catherine (Winger) Ramsey, being the second of their six children, five of whom are living. She and her husband have four children, Gladys, William, Catherine and Arthur. They are all still living in the parental household and admired members of its family circle. Throughout the county of their home and wherever else knowledge of them is found, all the members of the family stand high in the regard of the people, as ornaments to the social life around them and estimable exemplars of Michigan 's best and most serviceable citizenship. FREDERICK C. WESTON is one of the noble examples of keen business ability, well balanced judgment and perseverance, the combination of which qualities inevitably lead to success. He has been interested in the hardware business for the past twenty years and since 1902 has been located at Oscoda, Iosco county, Michigan, where in 1908 he engaged in the hardware business on his own account. He now has a well stocked establishment and he caters to the best trade in this vicinity. He was

Page  1039 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1039 born in Macomb county, this state, on the 10th of February, 1874, a son of Harrison C. and Mattie A. (Ketchum) Weston, the former of whom is now deceased and the latter of whom is living and who maintains her home at Au Sable. The father was born in Michigan and the mother claims New York as the place of her nativity. Mr. and Mrs. Weston became the parents of two children,-Frank C. and Frederick C., twins. Frank C. Weston is a machinist in the city of Detroit, Michigan, whither he removed in 1895. Harrison C. Weston was identified with the manufacturing line of enterprise during the greater part of his active business career and he was summoned to the life eternal in 1910. Frederick C. Weston was educated in the schools of his native place and in the high school at Au Sable. Immediately after leaving school he entered upon an apprenticeship at the tin-smith's trade, with which he has since been identified in connection with the hardware business. For about twenty years he was in the employ of others but in 1908 he launched out in the business world for himself by opening his present well-stocked and commodious store on Main street. His business headquarters are in a fine building some twenty-four by fifty feet in lateral dimensions, in addition to which he utilizes a spacious store-room, where his agricultural implements are kept. Attached to his store is a well equipped repair shop which receives a great deal of popular patronage by the citizens of Oscoda and the neighboring farmers. Mr. Weston's stock consists of a full line of hardware, paints, oils, sporting goods, stoves and farming implements. He caters to a large trade and is recognized as one of the most progressive and energetic business men in the community. Mr. Weston has been a resident of Oscoda since 1902 and here he holds a high place in the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles of the Republican party and while he has never been ambitious for political preferment of any description he is alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all enterprises advanced for the general good. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a devout communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which he is a most active and zealous worker. In the year 1903 Mr. Weston was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie McCoy, a daughter of George and Elizabeth McCoy. Mrs. Weston was born at Bay City and reared in Oscoda, and she is a woman of the utmost graciousness and sincerity. Mr. and Mrs. Weston have one daughter Grace, whose birth occurred on the 17th of October, 1905. GEORGE N. CAsE.-Tracing his American ancestry back to some of the earliest settlers in this country, and with their descendants located in many portions of it, George N. Case of Cheboygan finds his family name inscribed in letters of credit in the chronicles of many states and in a great variety of human occupations. Family connections of his have dignified and adorned all the different walks of life in American citizenship in peace and war, and have contributed essentially and substantially to the progress and development of the country in several different latitudes and longitudes.

Page  1040 1040 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN He has himself been a useful citizen of Cheboygan during his residence of nearly forty years among its people, with temporary absences, and is held in high regard for what he has done for the advancement of the city and county, and the fine example of elevated citizenship he has given them. He is a native of Michigan, and was born in Flint, Genesee county, on May 20, 1844, a son of Milton and Sarah C. (Miles) Case. The parents were natives of New York state, the father's life having begun at Mount Morris in Livingston county, and the mother's at Homer in Cortland county. The father was a carpenter and in 1835 came to this state and located at Flint. There he was prominent in the religious, fraternal and social life of the community until his death, which occurred when he was but thirty-five years of age. He was one of the founders of the Episcopal church in Flint and a leading member of the Odd Fellows' lodge there. His widow died in the eighty-fifth year of her age. Their son George was their third child and is the only one of the seven born to them who is now living. George N. Case began his education in the public schools of Flint and completed it at the State Agricultural College in 1863. His first employment after leaving school was in a saw mill at Flint, and his next in a planing mill in the same city. In 1870 he came to Cheboygan to live, and during the first three summers of his residence here was engaged in surveying and locating land. He also passed two winters in the city employed in various occupations. In February, 1874, he went to Little Rock, Arkansas, and for five years thereafter was busily occupied in lumbering in that city. In the autumn of 1879 he returned to Flint and passed a few months in the employment of the Begole & Fox Lumber Company. In 1880 he again became a resident of Cheboygan, and here he has ever since made his home. On his return to Cheboygan he secured employment in the civil engineering department of the Michigan Central Railroad, and worked for it until 1883. During the next seven years he was connected with the drug trade in a prominent way in Cheboygan, and at the end of that period took a position in connection with the planing mill work of the Thompson Smith's Sons Company. In 1902 Mr. Case was appointed city clerk of Cheboygan, and this position he has filled ever since his first appointment, giving the city and its people excellent service and winning universal approval and commendation for himself by his able, upright and intelligent performance of his official duties. He knows the city and its needs and is sedulous and faithful in looking after the interests committed to his care. He also has a proper spirit of consideration for everybody who has business with his office, and treats all comers with due courtesy and attention. These requisites of first class official service have made him very popular as city clerk, and his genuine manhood has given him the esteem and confidence of all men as a citizen and force for good in the community. Mr. Case is a Republican, firmly believing in the principles of his party and loyal in his support of its candidates in all elections. He has also been a potential addition to the fraternal life around him as a mem

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Page  1041 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1041 ber of the Masonic order, the Order of Foresters, and the Order of Loyal Guards. His membership in these benevolent organizations has been of great service to them and a source of benefit and enjoyment to him. It is highly appreciated in each of the fraternities he is connected with. In November, 1873, he was united in marriage with Mrs. Alvera (Basner) Colover. They have had two children, both of whom have died, but Mrs. Case has one child born of her former marriage, her daughter Olive Colover, who is living. Mrs. Case and her husband are regarded as valuable assistants in all worthy undertakings designed for the improvement of their city and county, and as practical and stimulating adjuncts in the work of all commendable agencies for the moral, mental and social betterment of their people. They are never backward in doing their part for the general weal, and are esteemed for their worth and usefulness in full measure. THOMAS T. ALLEN is one of the active and wide-awake business men of AuSable, where for fully a score of years he has been engaged in the lumber industry. His principal business is that of lumber inspecting but at the present time, in 1911, he is also extensively interested in real estate operations. He has resided at AuSable, Iosco county, Michigan, since 1880, and here is recognized as a loyal and public-spirited citizen and as one who ever has the best interests of the community at heart. Mr. Allen was born in Sanilac county, Michigan, on the 4th of February, 1864, and he is a son of William S. and Rebecca (Long) Allen, the former of whom was a native of Canada, and the latter of whom was born and reared in Manchester, England. The father was engaged in the great basic industry of agriculture during his active business career and he came to the United States in the early '40s, settling in Sanilac county, Michigan, where he reclaimed a fine farm. The mother emigrated to America in a sailing vessel in the early '40s, and her marriage to Mr. Allen was solemnized in this state at Detroit. Mr. and Mrs. Allen became the parents of seven children, namely,-Eliza, Emily, Ella D., Amanda, Benjamin F., Thomas T., and William. Mr. Allen was called from the scene of his mortal endeavors in 1896, and his wife passed away in 1898. Both were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Allen of this review was the sixth in order of birth of the above mentioned children and he early availed himself of the advantages afforded in the district schools of his native county. As a youth he assisted his father in the work and management of the home farm and in 1879, when fifteen years of age, he left the paternal home and went to Alpena, Michigan, in which place he resided for a period of one year, at the expiration of which he removed to AuSable, where he has maintained his home continuously up to the present time, in 1911. For three years Mr. Allen was an interested principal in a lumber concern at Detroit, his partner being C. W. Kotcher, and together they handled some thirty million feet of lumber. Thereafter Mr. Allen became interested in the inspection of lumber, as middleman, but he now devotes most of his attention to the real-estate business. At one time he was the owner of as much as ten thousand acres of land but he allowed all

Page  1042 10412 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN but one thousand acres to revert to.the state. As a business man he is generally renowned for his fair and honorable methods and as a citizen he is essentially loyal and public-spirited. His interest in political questions is deep and sincere and he gives an earnest support to Republican principles, believing that the platform of the party contains the best elements of good government. Since his residence in AuSable Mr. Allen has served on the school board for ten years and is now, in 1911, a member of the board of supervisors. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. On the 5th of October, 1890, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Allen to Miss Rosemond M. Dunn, a daughter of Lyman H. Dunn, of Harrisville, Michigan. To this union have been born six children,Russell A., Ruth E., Richard, Ethan, Roscoe D. and Esther R. CHARLES A. BAUMBERGER, editor of the Northport Leader, and manager for Roach & Sears, dealers in seeds, is but one generation removed from Switzerland, which has long been recognized as one of the most valuable of America's sources of immigration. His father, Frederick Baumberger, was born in Berne, Switzerland, in 1844, and came to America with his parents in 1852 when a lad of twelve years, reflecting in his character some of the ennobling influences of the scenes of beauty and grandeur in which his earliest years had been passed. Upon arriving in the land of opportunity the Baumberger family located in the state of New York, living for a time in the city of Buffalo where the head of the house engaged in the occupation of a millwright. Subsequently the father removed his family to Rochester, New York, where he earned a livelihood in the capacity of a farmer and painter. They remained in the Empire state somewhat more than a decade and then concluded to come on to Kalamazoo where they located some time in the '60s. There Frederick learned the shoe-maker's trade and in 1868, when about twenty-four years of age he abandoned that occupation and coming to Northport, bought a saw-mill which he operated successfully, subsequently buying a farm and devoting his energies to the agricultural profession. He married Mary E. Inwood in the year 1870, she being a daughter of A. H. Inwood and a native of Indiana. He whose name initiates this review was the first in order of birth in a family of nine children, he having two brothers and six sisters. His early schooling was secured at the district school and was completed by a short term in the school at Northport. Thinking to engage in a commercial life he attended the Detroit Business University and obtained a sound business training. After the completion of his course here he accepted a position as book-keeper in the city of Detroit and then returned to his father's farm where for one year he operated it on shares. His next venture was to buy a saw mill near Northport and this he managed for a time, and although he found some profit in it, he ultimately sold out and rented his father's farm for the ensuing ten years. His agricultural methods are of the most enlightened and scientific character and it is needless to say that they have ever been crowned with success. He has made a specialty of fruit. I\r. Baumberger's identification with the Roach & Sears Company

Page  1043 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1043 dates from the year 1905, when he made arrangements to furnish seed to the farmers on contract. This venture has been crowned with success and his business is constantly increasing. The headquarters of the Roach & Sears Company is at Northport. Mr. Baumberger became a recruit to the ranks of the Benedicts when on February, 12, 1907, Miss Irene Munro, of Northfield, Michigan, became his wife. Mrs. Baumberger is a Canadian by birth, Chatham, Ontario, having been the place of her nativity. Her parents are Augustus and Margaret (Mathers) Munro. Her mother is of Scotch descent and traces her lineage to British nobility, while her grandfather Munro was one of Michigan's doughty pioneers. It was he who built the first dam at East Jordan and the first Big Mill there. Mr. and Mrs. Baumberger have two little daughters,-Margaret E. and Genevieve. Mr. Baumberger is one to which public duty is instinctively entrusted and he has given efficient and faithful service in several public offices, among them town clerk, village assessor, and school director. He is one of the most valiant of Republicans and standing high in party councils and both he and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church to whose good causes they give zealous support. The subject is one of the worthy exponents of the Fourth Estate in this part of Michigan and the columns of his breezy and well conducted paper are devoted to the promulgation of all good and public-spirited causes. He purchased the Northport Leader May 1, 1909, and a great part of his time and energy has since been devoted to its management. The Leader, which is a weekly paper, was founded in 1899, by Wilbur Campbell. Mr. Baumberger is a member of the following lodges: —Free and Accepted Masons, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of the Modern Maccabees. ELLERY C. CANNON. —For thirty-nine years has Hon. Ellery C. Cannon been a resident of the village of Evart, Osceola county, Michigan, and the years have told the story of a successful business career, due to splendid executive ability and persistency of purpose. Since 1872 he has been continuously incumbent of some office of public trust, among them being representative and state senator, and it may be said that in all his positions he has acquitted himself most creditably. He was born in Shelby township, McComb county, Michigan, on the 28th of December, 1842, and is a son of Rev. John Cannon, a pioneer minister in McComb county. He was a native of New York and his father was born in the state of Vermont, whence he emigrated to New York at an early day. Rev. John Cannon spent the greater portion of his life in McComb county and there he was summoned to the life eternal at the age of eighty-five years. He married Miss Sallie Cook, of New York, and to that union were born seven children, all of whom grew to maturity, the first death in the family having been that of John Cannon, who was editor of the Oxford Globe in Oakland county, Michigan. He was sixty-five years of age when he died. The mother lived to the age of seventy-eight years. Ellery C. Cannon was the fifth in order of birth of the three sons and four daughters and his boyhood days were passed in Shelby township, to whose public schools he is indebted for his early educational Vol. III-6

Page  1044 1044 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN training. The Cannon family is of English extraction, members of the family having come to America from England in the early Colonial epoch. At the time of the inception of the Civil war his boyish enthusiasm prompted Ellery C. to tender his services in defense of the Union, and in August, 1862, he enlisted as a soldier in Company B, Twentysecond Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He gave most efficient service as a private until the close of the war and he participated in many important conflicts during that sanguinary struggle. When peace had again been established he returned to his native county, where he remained on his. father's farm until 1871, in which year he came to Osceola county, locating at Evart. Here he engaged in the general merchandise business and he continued to be identified with that line of enterprise until 1906, in which year he retired from active participation in business affairs. He has taken an active part in local politics and he has ever accorded a staunch allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. His first office was that of treasurer of the village of Evart, and he has since been president of the village and was a member of the board of supervisors from 1882 until 1885, in which year he was elected to represent Osceola district in the state legislature. He was elected as his own successor in that capacity in 1887. In 1900 and in 1903 he was chosen state senator and since 1905 he has been incumbent of the office of president of Evart. In educational affairs he has ever manifested a deep and abiding interest and has served as a member of the school board. He is vice-president of the Evart Savings Bank and is developing a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres, eligibly located some three and a half miles distant from Evart, on the banks of the Muskegon river. Mr. Cannon has been twice married. On the 28th of December, 1868, he wedded Miss Harriet Sybrandt, a native of New York. She passed away in 1902 and is survived by one child, Emma, who is the wife of Richard M. Dively, of Grand Rapids, Michigan. On the 26th of January, 1907, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cannon to Juliet Johnson, who was formerly the widow of Mr. Cannon's brother John. He has been a Mason since 1866, first a member of Lodge No. 75, at Utica, McComb county. He is a charter member of Evart Lodge No. 320, and is a member of Chapter No. 97. He also has fraternal relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, No. 16. He was state department commander in 1905 and helped organize the Post at Evart. Mr. and Mrs. Cannon hold a high place in the regard of their fellow citizens. CHARLES I. WRISLEY.-Well and favorably known in Northport and Leelanau county, Michigan, is Charles I. Wrisley, postmaster of the village. No one is more familiar with these scenes in which he has dwelt since youth and he knows every inch of the way between Northport and Traverse City, Michigan, which journey he made hundreds of times while acting as stage driver and mail carrier between these points in the '80s and early '90s. Since that time he has also been identified with several occupations,-the livery business, farming and clerking in mer

Page  1045 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1045 cantile establishments, and at the present time he is the faithful and efficient servant of Uncle Sam. Mr. Wrisley, by the circumstance of birth, is a New Englander, Hartford, Connecticut, having been the scene of his nativity and its date July 1, 1867. His parents were John and Mary Jane (Fox) Wrisley, and he was the youngest in order of birth in a family of three children whose other members were Clara Irene and Charles Henry Wrisley. The Wrisleys have been long in America and trace their descent to three brothers who came to this country in the early colonial epoch. By some branches of the family the name is spelled Risley, which is incorrect, according to the result of investigations of the family in English records. In early life Charles I. Wrisley came to Northport, Michigan, with his uncle, Albert Wrisley, formerly of Hartford, Connecticut. The older man came to trap wild pigeons which were at that time numerous in this part of the state. Young Charles first became an active factor in the busy life of the locality as stage driver and mail carrier between Northport and Traverse City. It took a full day to make the trip one way and it is needless to say that many adventures befell him while thus engaged in an occupation which has ever been characterized by a degree of romance. He first assumed the position in 1886 and continued for two years. He then bought the contract which was to expire in 1890 and continued as driver and custodian of the mails until that date. At the close of his career in the role of Michigan stage driver Mr. Wrisley began looking about him for some congenial occupation and finally engaged in the livery and sales stable business for one year. He then sold out and made a radical change, purchasing a piece of land and devoting his energies to agriculture. He continued as an exponent of the great basic industry until 1898, and in that year engaged with Kehl Brothers as a clerk and remained for one year in their employ. His next adventure in the world of affairs was as an assistant to H. G. Gill, who conducted a general store and was also postmaster, and this association led very directly to Mr. Wrisley's present position. He was made deputy postmaster and continued as such until his own appointment, January 2, 1907. He has given entire satisfaction as the incumbent of the office, having been both faithful and enterprising in the performance of its duties. September 28, 1888, Mr. Wrisley laid the foundation of a happy life companionship and home by his marriage to Miss Louise Gagnon, of Northport. She is a native of the place and her parents are Samuel and Margaret Gagnon. Samuel Gagnon built and now owns the first and only grist mill at Northport, and he is to be numbered among the Leelanau county pioneers. To Mr. and Mrs. Wrisley a family of five children have been born, namely: Lloyd, Muriel, Irwin, Albert, and Roselle. The eldest son, Lloyd, is in attendance at Ferris Institute at Big Rapids, Michigan, where he is pursuing a course in English and clerical work. Muriel is in the post office with her father. Mr. Wrisley is one of Northport's stanchest Republicans, ever giving his heart and hand to the men and measures of the "Grand Old Party" and he has received marks of the confidence in which he is held in the community by his elevation to the office of township treasurer, village

Page  1046 1046 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN treasurer, and councilman, his tenure of office in these three capacities comprising the years 1901-'02, 1904 and 1906 respectively. He and his family attend the Congregational church and give of their sympathy and support to its good causes. FRANK E. BRACKETT.-A native of New England, and inheriting from his parents, who were both born and reared in that section of the country, the salient and serviceable characteristics of its people, Frank E. Brackett of Cheboygan has made a record in the battle of life which is highly creditable to him and reflects commendation on the locality from which he hails and the families from which he sprung. He has discharged with fidelity and intelligence the daily duties of life found ever present before him, and in doing so has given the people of Cheboygan, among whom he has lived and labored for nearly a quarter of a century, an excellent example of high class and useful manhood. Mr. Brackett's life began in Waterville, Kennebec county, Maine, on October 28, 1859. His parents, Oren and Ellen E. (Perry) Brackett, were also natives of Maine, both born in 1837. The father sacrificed his life on the altar of patriotism during our Civil war, dying in 1863 from diseases contracted in the service of his country in the hardships of camp and march and battlefield. The mother lived to a good old age, dying on January 8, 1911. Their offspring numbered three, and two of the three are living, Frank E. and his sister Annie May, who is now the wife of Thomas Dailey of Lewiston, Maine. The father was a steamboat captain and traversed many seas in his career as such. Early in our war between the sections he enlisted in the Union service as a member of the Sixth Regiment of Maine Marine Volunteers, and almost immediately went to the front with his command. The service was exacting, and, in the unprepared state of the country for war at the time, involved hardships and risks which were avoided at a later period in the conflict. Mr. Brackett succumbed to the diseases prevalent among the troops during the early stages of the war, and received an honorable discharge on account of his illness. After his return home he lingered awhile, but he was fatally stricken and died in 1863, while his companions in arms were winning new laurels on the gory fields of the fateful contest. While he was a Democrat in faith and allegiance in politics, he was loyally devoted to the preservation of the Union, and cast aside all party considerations in volunteering to fight in its defense and for its integrity. His son, Frank E. Brackett, began his academic training in the public schools of his native place and completed it at Bowdoin College, which numbers Franklin Pierce, Henry W. Longfellow and Nathaniel Hawthorne among its graduates. After leaving that renowned institution he removed to Providence, Rhode Island, where he acquired a thorough knowledge of the drug business. In 1884 he came to Michigan and located at Whitehall, Muskegon county, where he merchandised in drugs three years. From Whitehall he moved to Cheboygan in 1887, arriving in February, and since that time he has expended his efforts in behalf of this community. He started a drug business here, which he is still conduct

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Page  1047 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1047 ing, with the most complete and extensive stock in the line of his commodities in the city, and at all times has taken an earnest interest and an active part in the affairs of the city, from the time of his advent among its people. He first served as alderman from the Fifth ward two terms, and in 1909 was elected mayor. He was re-elected in 1910, and again in 1911, and is filling the office with great acceptability at this time. In the fraternal life of the community he has taken a great interest as a member of Cheboygan Lodge No. 504, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the Order of Knights of Columbus. In these fraternities his membership has been found very serviceable and is highly appreciated. It makes him ready to do anything he properly can for their good, and gives their members the full benefit of his zeal and activity. In politics he is a pronounced Republican, with loyal devotion to his party and great energy and efficiency in its service. Mr. Brackett was married on February 28, 1881, to Miss Clara Frichette, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada. All of the five children born of their union are living. They are Annie May, Lottie, Frank E., Jr., Ethel and Oren. The father is regarded as one of the leading merchants of Cheboygan and one of its most serviceable and representative citizens. He has dignified and adorned its official life, given character and standing to its domestic institutions and been a radiant sunbeam in its social circles for many years. He has also been a potential force in its progressiveness and efforts at public improvement and development. His wife has been his able and judicious assistant in all his undertakings, and shares fully with him the high esteem of all classes of the people in Cheboygan city and county. EMANUEL WILHELM.-The present mayor of Traverse City is one of the sterling citizens and representative business men of his native county and here the family name has been identified with industrial and social progress and development in a most significant and worthy way, as the parents of Mr. Wilhelm were numbered among the pioneers of Grand Traverse county. Emanuel Wilhelm was born on the homestead farm of his father in Grand Traverse county, Michigan, on the 18th of August, 1862, and is a son of Anthony and Jennie Wilhelm both of whom were born and reared in Bohemia, Germany, where their marriage was solemnized. Immediately after their life destinies were thus joined they emigrated to America and took up their residence in Grand. Traverse county, Michigan, where the father secured a tract of wild land and reclaimed a farm from the virgin forest. Both he and his wife continued to reside in this county until their death. He was summoned to the life eternal at the venerable age of eighty-two years, his cherished and devoted wife having passed away at the age of seventy-six years. They were of sterling integrity and ever commanded the confidence and esteem of those with whom they came in contact. They became the parents of five sons and two daughters, and of the number four are now living, namely: Charles, who is engaged in business in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Anthony J., who is a representative merchant of Tra

Page  1048 1048 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN verse City; Emanuel, whose name initiates this review; and Henry, who is a successful farmer and stock-grower of Grand Traverse county. Emanuel Wilhelm gained his initial experience in connection with the practical duties and responsibilities of life through his association with the work of the old homestead farm on which he was reared to adult age. After availing himself of the advantages of the district schools he continued his studies in the Traverse City high school. When but sixteen years of age, in search of adventure and new experiences, Mr. Wilhelm went to the west, where he remained three years,-in Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico,-and where he was employed on cattle ranches, as a railroad worker and as a miner. At the expiration of the period noted he located in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he held the position of bookkeeper in a wholesale hardware house for the ensuing seven years, within which he gained valuable business experience. He then returned to his native country and established his home in Traverse City, where he entered into partnership with his brother, Anthony J., with whom he was associated in the dry-goods, clothing and carpet business for sixteen years, under the firm name of Wilhelm Brothers. Upon the dissolution of this alliance in 1901 Mr. Wilhelm engaged in the same line of enterprise in an individual way, and he has a finely equipped and essentially modern establishment, the while his reputation for fair and honorable dealings has gained and retained to him a large and appreciative patronage. He has long been numbered among the leading merchants of Traverse City and no citizen has a more secure place in popular confidence and esteem. The progressive ideas and civic pride of Mr. Wilhelm were significantly manifested when, in 1902, he erected the Wilhelm building, at the southwest corner of Front and Union streets. This is one of the finest business buildings in northern Michigan. It is of pleasing architectural design, is substantially constructed of brick and stone and is five stories in height. The ground floor, fifty-four by one hundred feet in dimensions, is utilized as his store, and in the same are handled complete and select lines of dry goods, clothing, carpets, draperies, etc. The other floors of the building are arranged into attractive offices with thoroughly modern appointments and facilities. In other ways Mr. Wilhelm has done much to advance the interests of his home city and he is most loyal and publicspirited, giving his aid and influence in support of all measures tending to advance the material and civic prosperity of Traverse City and Grand Traverse county. His success is the direct result of his own well directed efforts and he is known as an enterprising, reliable and aggressive business man. Though a member of the Democratic party, which is much in the minority in Traverse City, Mr. Wilhelm has so thoroughly fortified himself in the confidence and regard of the people of the community that he has been called upon to serve in offices of public trust, in which his preferment has been compassed without regard to partisan lines. In 1906 he was made representative of the Third ward in the city board of aldermen, and his effective service in this municipal body marked him for higher official honors, as was shown in the election of April, 1910, when he was chosen mayor of Traverse City. He received a majority

Page  1049 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1049 of four hundred and eight votes and carried every ward in the city. He has given a most able and businesslike administration and under his regime many noteworthy public improvements have been made. A sturdy independence and firm and enlightened policy have marked his course as chief executive, and he has not been denied a generous measure of popular support and commendation. Though not an "offensive partisan" he is well fortified in his political opinions and is one of the valued factors in the local councils of the Democratic party. He is affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 73, Knights of Pythias, and with the Elks, and Maccabees. He is a zealous member of the Baptist church, as was his wife during her life, and he has held membership therein for twenty years. On the 1st of January, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mayor Wilhelm to Miss Emma T. Sayler, who likewise was born and reared in Grand Traverse county and who was a daughter of Samuel and Kate (Reynolds) Sayler, honored pioneers of this county, where they continued to reside until their death and where the father reclaimed a farm from the virgin wilds. Mrs. Wilhelm died January 8, 1910. The two children of this union are Hanley A. and Katherine J. Hanley is in his father's store, and Katherine is attending high school. WILLIAM W. BARBER.-The world instinctively pays deference to the man whose success has been worthily achieved and whose prominence is not the less the result of an irreproachable life than of natural talents and acquired ability in the field of his chosen labor. Few men fill more important positions than does the cashier of a bank. He must know men, must be familiar with their financial and moral status. He must be quick to act, slow to offend and always ready to accommoda'te the needy who comply with the laws of banking. He must not seem to have friends but must treat all people alike. For the past eight years has William W. Barber, the immediate subject of this review, been prominently connected with banking interests in Michigan. He is now cashier in the financial concern of George D. McNichol & Company at Oscoda, Iosco county, Michigan. M/r. Barber is a native son of Canada, his birth having occurred in York township, York county, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 12th of January, 1872. He is a son of Ebenezer and Bena (Williams) Barber, who were likewise born and reared in Canada. After completing the curriculum of the district schools of his native place Mr. Barber attended the Orangeville, Canada schools, and afterward pursued a commercial course in the Toronto Business College. In 1901 he accepted a position in a private bank at Grand Valley, which was conducted by A. Richardson, and through the influence of his former employer he secured his present position with the firm of George D. McNichol & Company, in Oscoda, in 1904. For the first two years of his identification with this concern he was assistant cashier but in 1906 he was promoted to the office of cashier. Since the death of Mr. McNichol, in 1910, he has had practically the entire management of the institution. Politically Mr. Barber is a staunch advocate of' the cause of the Republican party, and while he has never manifested aught of ambition

Page  1050 1050 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN for the honors or emoluments of public office of any description he is ever on the qui vive to do all in his power to advance the general welfare. In his religious faith he is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Oscoda and in the same he was superintendent of the Sunday-school for a period of three years. He is connected with different fraternal and social organizations of a local character and as a rising young business man he has gained and retains the respect and confidenceof the entire community in which he resides. Mr. Barber is a bachelor. VET S. MOLONEY.-The service of this wide-awake, enterprising, farseeing and progressive business man to Northern Michigan will be best portrayed by a description of his work, a recital of his aspirations and a record of his achievements, brief and unsatisfactory as such a narrative must necessarily be in a work of this character. But the achievements will speak for themselves, however briefly told, and the record will in all essential respects be its own interpreter, and make itself fully understood. Mr. Moloney is a native of Michigan and was born in the city of Detroit on June 5, 1875. He is a son of James F. and Bridget _(Brown) Moloney, the former of whom is living, but the mother passed away in 1893. James F. is president of the Cheboygan County Savings Bank, a position which he has held from the founding of the institution in 1905, and one in which he has been able to aid very materially in the expansion of its business and the extension of its popularity among the people of all classes in the community in which it operates. The son, Vet S. Moloney, obtained his academic education in the parochial schools of Detroit, and was prepared for business by a special course of training in one of Detroit's business colleges. His first occupation, in the way of earning a living for himself, was clerking in the First National Bank for a period of two years. He next passed one years as bookkeeper for the Cheboygan Brewing and Malting company, and in 1905 went to Alaska during the early excitement over the discovery of gold in that far away land. The conditions and prospects for success in Alaska, as he saw them, did not hold his interest, and in 1896 he returned to Michigan and again took up his residence in Cheboygan. During the next nine years he was manager of the Cheboygan Brewing and Malting company, continuing to serve it faithfully until 1905, when he became a director of the Cheboygan County Savings Bank, which was founded on March 1, that year, and the affairs of which claimed his attention as an assistant to his father, who was elected president of the new financial institution. He is still connected with the bank as a director, but his other and far more extensive business now requires the greater part of his time and attention. In 1906 he also engaged in the real estate and insurance business with gratifying results, and during the postmastership of Arthur Watson served as assistant postmaster for a period of four years and a half. His operations in real estate were conducted for a time under the business name of the Cheboygan Realty Company. Through this he enlarged his undertakings and expanded his business to large proportions.

Page  1051 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1051 Mr. Moloney is also president of the Northeastern Michigan Development Bureau. This enterprise is the one with which his name is most conspicuously connected, and on which his business reputation mainly rests. The Bureau is incorporated under the laws of Michigan in that class of corporations which are "organized not for profit or gain." It is public in its nature, and its directors are appointed by the boards of supervisors of the counties forming the district of northeastern Michigan. Its sole object is to persistently advertise the resources of the portion of the state for which it speaks, earnestly and without exaggeration. In furtherance of the purposes of the Bureau Mr. Moloney has had fitted up in the Paquette block attractive offices for his business and the accommodation of farmers. He has found that people from all sections of the country are looking in the direction of Cheboygan county for homes, and he has put himself in a position to convince all comers that the county has everything they need in the way of present resources and promise of future development and improvement. In making his display of the county's possibilities Mr. Moloney has adopted a method which must appeal to the intelligence and win the approval of all inquirers. He has his walls and show windows adorned with all kinds of grasses, grains and other farm products, and also shows in an attractive way the industrial products of this region. In the rear of the office is a room especially fitted up for the use of farmers who wish to have some convenient place for the transaction of business. This is supplied with writing materials and other appurtenances requisite for its purposes, all of which are for the free use of the patrons of the office. The bureau of which Mr. Moloney is the head has exhaustive literature for distribution in which the resources of northeastern Michigan are set forth in plain, unvarnished language, every fact stated being an actual verification of its truth. Mr. Moloney has taken a very earnest interest and a leading part in the fraternal life of Cheboygan, and been of great service in expanding its usefulness and influence for good among the people. He is a Past Exalted Ruler of Cheboygan Lodge No. 504, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is well known throughout the state for his deep and serviceable interest in the order. He has also been secretary of the Cheboygan Chamber of Commerce, which he served three years in that capacity, greatly to its advantage and that of the Community. In politics he is independent, with primary consideration for.the good of the city and county, and without any restraint in his action on account. of partisan claims of any kind, or personal attachments, however strong they may be. On October 29, 1901, Mr. Moloney was united in marriage with Miss Anna McMullen, a native of Canada and the daughter of Patrick and Mary McMullen, natives of that country and now residents of Alpena, Michigan. Five children have been born of the union, and all of them are living. They are: Raymond S., Lawrence J., Dorothy M., Armond J. and Arthur L. They are all started in the way of securing a good education as soon as they are old enough, there being no asset in human life their parents estimate more highly than good mental development

Page  1052 1052 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and thorough mental training, as a preparation for the exacting duties of modern American life. Mr. Moloney is held to be one of the most capable, ready and resourceful of Cheboygan county's business men, one of its most agreeable men in social life, and one of its most useful and representative citizens. His wife also stands high in the esteem and good will of the people, and their attractive home is one of the most popular and most highly appreciated social centers in the city. No names stand higher on the list of Cheboygan county's list of most desirable citizens, and none has a better right at the top of the list. This is the universal testimony of the people of both city and county. JOSnPH VALLEY.-The present postmaster of Provemont, Leelanau county, Michigan, is Mr. Joseph Valley, who in addition to his official duties also conducts a general store at this village. He was born in Switzerland on on the 1st of February, 1855, and he was a child of but five years of age at the time of his parents' removal to America. His father, whose name was Frank Valley, was a watchmaker by trade and in 1860 he, in company with his wife and three children, emigrated to America, locating at Dayton, Ohio, where he was identified with the work of his trade for about one year, at the expiration of which the family home was established in the city of Buffalo, New York. Three years later, in the fall of 1863, removal was made to Glen Arbor, Michigan, in the vicinity of which place the father purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of timber land, which he cleared and on which the family continued to reside until 1875, in which year they came to Provemont township, Leelanau county. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Valley are now deceased. Joseph Valley, the immediate subject of this review, was the second in order of birth in a family of three children, and he received his educational training in Buffalo, New York, and in the public schools of Leelanau county, Michigan. Up to 1896 he was identified with farming and in that year he located in the village of Provemont, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, in which he has made of success not an accident but a logical result. On the 1st of August, 1900, he was appointed postmaster of Provemont by President McKinley, and he has continued in tenure of that position to the present time, in 1911. In politics he endorses the cause of the Republican party, and while he has never been anxious for the honors or emoluments of public office he has been honored with the offices of justice of the peace and highway commissioner, in both of which he acquitted himself most creditably. In church matters he and his wife are devout communicants of the Catholic church. In the year 1890 Mr. Valley married Miss Josephine Moshier, of Provemont. She was born at Buffalo, New York, and she came with her parents to Michigan about the year 1866. Her father was an old lake engineer on the Great Lakes and when he came to Michigan he purchased and operated a saw mill for a number of years at Provemont. Mrs. Valley 's grandfather, Antoine Manseau, was the first white settler in Leland. He started from Manistee on the 17th of June, 1853, and with

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Page  1053 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1053 his wife and seven children sailed to South Manitou Island, landing there on the 21st of June, that year. Thence they sailed to Carp river, landing in the vicinity of Leland, where they hurriedly constructed a house. Their boat was called the Lillie and in it Mr. Manseau made a trip to the city of Chicago in order to collect money for sawing done. On the return trip he brought back with him more machinery for the saw mill which he was operating. During their first year in this section they encountered but thirteen white people and one of the inmates of their home was Sleeping Bear, an Indian mail carrier. In 1854 H. S. Buchman came to Leelanau county, examining the timber land, and in 1855 the town of Leland was organized. The first presidential election in the town of Leland was held in 1856, at the home of Antoine Manseau, who was one of the strongest and most potent influences in promoting the progress and development of Leland. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Valley. C. EDSON CHURCHILL.-One of the most enterprising and most widely known representatives of the Fourth Estate in Northern Michigan is C. Edson Churchill, editor and publisher of the Petoskey Evening News, which has been in existence since 1902 and which is the first daily newspaper to be published north of Traverse City. This clean, interesting and up-to-date moulder of public opinion and chronicler of the daily happenings of life in the city came into existence through the efforts of Mr. Churchill and enjoys high prestige in Newspaperdom. Charles Edson Churchill was born in Joliet, Will county, Illinois, September 13, 1858, the son of Charles G. and Jennie (Graves) Churchill. Both parents are now deceased, the father having passed away in 1877, when the subject was a young man. There were three children in the family, a sister, Fannie, the eldest child, having become the wife of Charles J. Garvin of Goshen, Indiana; and a brother, William B., residing at the present time at East Chattanooga, Tennesee. Young Churchill secured his education in the schools of Ohio and as early as the age of eleven years, he entered the ranks of the wage earners, engaging to carry water to the laborers in a brick yard for the sum of one dollar a week. He attended school in the winter, working for his board and in time he became a worker in the brick yard, carrying brick and receiving for his services forty cents a day. In the summer of 1871, he worked on a farm in Richland county, Ohio, and in the winter following he attended school at Galion, Ohio. In 1872 the young fellow made a radical change and one that was to affect his whole subsequent career, for he secured a position in the office of the Gallon Democrat, of which John C. Covert was proprietor, that gentleman being a wellknown journalist of Cleveland, Ohio, who became a prominent public speaker. He remained with this publication until 1875, and in addition to his duties with the Democrat, clerked in the postoffice. In the year mentioned, Mr. Churchill removed to Caledonia, Marion county, Ohio, and accepted a position as foreman of the Argus, but he remained there a comparatively short time, returning to Galion in 1876 and renewing his association with the Galion Democrat. In the fall he worked in the harvest field and if experience counts for aught he might have

Page  1054 1054 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN been a successful farmer. In May, 1877, he removed to Independence, Kansas, and worked on the Kansan, published by W. H. Warner. He worked as a printer in various Kansas towns and did not return home until the fall of 1877, when he received news of his father's death. His career for a time was of a desultory character, acting as a printer and doing such other work as he could find. In 1878, he first became identified with the state of Michigan, locating in Adrian and engaging with Willard Sterns as foreman of that gentleman's paper, The Adrian Press. He continued in this association until 1887, when he removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and secured a position with the job printing department of the Evening Wisconsin. He had during his residence in the Wolverine state become favorably impressed with its advantages and in 1888 he came to Petoskey and accepted a position in the mechanical department of the Independent Democrat of which Charles S. Hampton was editor and publisher. In 1898, Mr. Churchill came to a decision to establish himself upon a more independent footing and started a job printing office which proved a great success. In 1900 with the co-operation of Elmer R. Goldsmith the subject purchased the Independent Democrat and operated that sheet jointly, and upon the death of Mr. Goldsmith in 1905, Mr. Churchill took over his interest and became sole proprietor. This was a weekly publication, but in 1902 the subject established the first daily paper north of Traverse City, this being known as the Petoskey Evening News, and a most successful career and steady growth have been its portion. Mr. Churchill is one of the most prominent of Northern Michigan Masons, holding membership in Durand Lodge, No. 344, Free & Accepted Masons, for seventeen years having acted as secretary of the same. He is also affiliated with Emmet Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; with Petoskey Council, No. 52, Royal & Select Masters. He is also a popular member of Petoskey Lodge, No. 629, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He gives heart and hand to the men and measures of the Democratic party and is influential in bringing into being many beneficial measures. On November 23, 1881, occurred the marriage of Mr. Churchill, his chosen lady being Miss Margaret A. Chicotte, a native of Monroe, Michigan. JAMES R. POSTAL.-The future of Evart and Osceola county lies mainly in the hands of the younger generation, and one of its most promising and enterprising representatives is James R. Postal, cashier of the Evart Savings Bank. Although still in his twenties he has already proved his value and usefulness as a citizen, standing second to none in the estimation of the general public. He is actively interested in all things which may prove conducive to the general welfare of the community, and his support is given to all worthy enterprises. He has already made a name for himself in banking circles and has the distinction of having assumed his present important position probably younger than any of his contemporaries, his years numbering only twenty-two at the time. Mr. Postal is a native son of the place, his birth having occurred

Page  1055 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1055 within the pleasant borders of the same March 5, 1884. He is the son of one of Evart's leading citizens, Frank S. Postal, president of the Evart Savings Bank and identified in the same high capacity with the Champion Tool & Handle Company. The elder Mr. Postal is a native of Michigan, his birthplace having been Utica, and the date October 8, 1843. His mother, whose maiden name was Ella Wright, was born in Canada. His grandfather, Wellington Postal, was one of the pioneers of northern Michigan who redeemed his homestead from the forest, and came to be one of the well-known and highly esteemed citizens of his district. The parents of him whose name initiates this review were married in 1883, and he is the eldest child of their union. The other members of the family are Gertrude E., Spencer and Geneva A. The father's history is treated more in detail on other pages of this work. James R. Postal is indebted for his preliminary education to the public schools of Evart, from whose higher department he was graduated with the class of 1903. He enjoyed the advantages of a higher education, matriculating in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Soon after finishing his collegiate course he accepted a position in the Evart Savings Bank as assistant cashier, this being on October 1, 1904, and in January, 1907, having proved faithful and efficient in lesser matters, he was advanced to the position of cashier, which he now holds. He has given the most efficient and enlightened service and possesses those sterling traits of character which everywhere win respect, confidence and friendship, not to mention admirable social qualities. The Evart Savings Bank was organized by the father in October, 1904, with a capital stock of $30,000, and the personnel of the officers at the head of the flourishing institution are as follows: President, Frank S. Postal; vice-president, E. C. Cannon; cashier, James R. Postal; board of directors: William Latta, William E. Davis, William Monroe, E. C. Cannon, George F. Andrus, Hugh Alexander, David Wolf, of Grand Rapids, and Fred Postal, of Detroit. Like his father, Mr. Postal finds a great amount of pleasure and profit in his lodge relations, for he is a Mason, belonging to the Blue Lodge and the Chapter. He is likewise a Greek letter fraternity man, while at Ann Arbor having joined the Kappa Sigma. On the 15th day of June, 1907, Mr. Postal became a recruit to the ranks of the Benedicts, the young woman to become his wife being Miss Margaret Ide, daughter of LaVerne M. and Catherine (Drew) Ide, of New York city. Mrs. Postal is a native of Detroit, and their marriage was celebrated in that city. The Republican party can claim the allegiance of Mr. Postal, and the interest he takes in public affairs and the furtherance of the general welfare is that of every young citizen of the best type. DAVID RALSTON, M. D., has been a resident of Cadillac, Michigan, for more than twenty-three years, during which time he has been engaged in the practice of his profession and identified with the best interests of the city. Dr. Ralston looks back to the "Keystone state" as the place of his nativity and the home of his ancestry for several generations. He was

Page  1056 1056 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN born July 30, 1850, near Carlisle, in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, son of David and Emma (Washmood) Ralston, both natives of that county; the former, born in 1830, died in 1907, and the latter, born in 1831, died in 1908. Andrew Ralston, the Doctor's great-grandfather, settled in the Cumberland valley of Pennsylvania as early as 1728. He was of Scotch and Irish parentage. Dr. Ralston's grandmother on his father's side, Lacy McCallister, who settled in the same valley in 1736, was a daughter of Archibald McCallister, and the Doctor is of the fifth generation from the tenth son, and is himself the eldest of a family of six children. The McCallisters were prominent Presbyterians, active in the establishment of their church in Pennsylvania. The Ralstons also were Presbyterians. David Ralston, the Doctor's father, was by occupation a merchant, nearly all his life being engaged in the drug business at Carlisle. His early education Dr. Ralston received in the schools of Carlisle. He took a course of study at Dickinson College, and prepared himself for his profession in the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, where he graduated with the degree of M. D. on March 13, 1873. The two years following his graduation were spent in the practice of medicine at Carlisle. In 1875 he moved over into Ohio and took up his residence at Niles, where he remained until 1879. That year he came to Michigan. His first home in this state was at Davison, where he practiced his profession from 1879 until June, 1888, when he took up his residence and opened an office at Cadillac. While conducting a general practice he makes a specialty of children's diseases, in the treatment of which he has been very successful. For years he has been medical examiner for several life insurance companies and benefactory societies. In 1895 he was appointed health officer of Cadillac, which office he has since filled, and since 1898 he has been coroner of Wexford county, having been re-elected from time to time to succeed himself. He is president of the Tri-County Medical Society and a member of the Michigan State Medical Society. Also he has membership in Clam Lake Lodge, No. 331, F. and A. M.; Cadillac Lodge, No. 49, K. of P., the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and other fraternal organizations. Politically he is a Republican. On February 20, 1877, Dr. Ralston and Miss Agnes Stewart were united in marriage, and to them have been given three children, two daughters and a son; Marion, wife of William Cunningham, of New York city, and Hugh S. and Neil S. Mrs. Ralston was born in Salem, Ohio, a daughter of Hugh and Sarah (Galbrath) Stewart, the former a native of Ohio, the latter of Pennsylvania, both now deceased. Mr. Stewart was by occupation a farmer. His religious creed was that of the Presbyterian church, and politically he was a Democrat. He and his wife were the parents of three children, Mrs. Ralston being the youngest. JOSEPH F. SLEPICKA, M. D.-Man's greatest treasure in this world is physical health and vigor: nothing stagnates mental activity so quickly as prolonged sickness,-hence the broad field for human helpfulness afforded in the medical profession. He whose name initiates this article

Page  1057 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1057 is engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Suttons Bay, Leelanau county, Michigan, and he has here maintained his home since 1905. He was born in the city of Chicago, Illinois, on the 12th of March, 1877, and is a son of Frank and Mary (Angel) Slepicka, To the excellent public schools of Chicago Dr. Slepicka is indebted for his early educational training, having been graduated in one of the high schools of that city. In 1898, after completing a preparatory course for entrance into a medical institution, he was matriculated in Rush Medical College, at Chicago, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1902 and from which he received his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. After graduating he entered Cook county and Presbyterian Hospitals, Chicago, where he acted as assistant for one year and where he gained most valuable clinical experience. In 1903 he removed to Michigan and entered upon the active practice of his profession at Traverse City, where he assisted Dr. Holiday for a time. In 1903 he went to Leland, where he remained for the ensuing two years, after which he came to Suttons Bay, where he has since been identified with the work of his profession and where he has built up a large and lucrative patronage. He is well versed in the science and practice of medicine and in the same is making of success not an accident but a logical result. In June, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Slepicka to Miss Harriet Greilick, of Traverse City. She was born and reared at a place near Traverse City, called Greilickville in honor of her father. who had large lumber interests there. Her parents numbered among the first settlers of Grand Traverse county, Michigan. Dr. and Mrs. Slepicka have three children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here entered,-Caroline, September 17, 1906; Charlotte, June 28, 1909, and Josephine, March 30, 1911. Dr. Slepicka accords an uncompromising allegiance to the cause of the Republican party in his political convictions and he and his wife are zealous members of the Congregational church. At the present time, in 1911, he is county coroner and is health officer of the village. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Masonic Order of Knights Templar, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the C. S. P. S., of Traverse City, and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a loyal and public-spirited citizen and is recognized throughout the county of Leelanau for his skill as a physician and surgeon. ARTHUR R. GERow.-Although a native of the province of Ontario, born in Belleville on September 13, 1869, this prominent citizen of Cheboygan and active force in the industrial, mercantile and official life of the city and county, has been a resident of Michigan for twentyeight years, and during the whole of that period has been connected with the state's activities in a useful and productive way. He is therefore thoroughly Americanized and as zealous in behalf of the interests of his adopted country as he ever could have been in promoting those of the land of his birth. Mr. Gerow is a son of James F. and Mary (Fullerton) Gerow, natives of Canada and the parents of one son and four daughters, the

Page  1058 1058 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN son being the first born. The father came to Canada in 1885, and for some years wrought diligent at his trade as a millwright. Twenty years ago he was appointed superintendent of the county poor, and he has filled this office ever since so acceptably that he has seldom had a competitor for the place. He is a Republican in politics and a Freemason and Knight of the Maccabees in fraternal association, holding membership in the Cheboygan organizations of these benevolent societies. The mother died in 1901. Their son Arthur began his education in the schools of his native place, continued it in those of the city of Trenton in the county of Hastings, and completed it in Cheboygan, having come to this city with his parents when he was fourteen years old. After leaving school he secured a position with Thompson Smith & Sons, who operated saw mills and conducted an extensive lumber business, remaining in their employ until the fall of 1895, when their plant was destroyed by fire. During the next few months Mr. Gerow was variously employed, and in 1896 became assistant postmaster of Cheboygan under J. C. Wooster. He filled this office very acceptably to both the head and the patrons of the office for a period of four years, then, in the autumn of 1900, started an enterprise in merchandising which he continued until December, 1910, when he sold the business to take charge of the office of county treasurer, to which he was elected in November 6 of that year, and which he is still holding. This was not, however, his first experience in official life. He had been supervisor of the Second ward in Cheboygan for nine years and a member of the school board for seven. The fitness, capacity and faithful attention to duty he displayed in these offices recommended him for the more elevated and responsible one, and the people acted with cordial approval on the recommendation furnished by his official career. The confidence in his integrity, independence and manliness manifested in his election as treasurer of the county was not misplaced, his record in the office having fully sustained it and fixed him more firmly in the regard of the people of all classes in the county. Wil h an abiding, alert and energetic devotion to the welfare of the locality in which he lives, Mr. Gerow has been a potential force in aid of all undertakings designed to promote public improvements and enhance the importance and influence of his city and county in industrial and commercial circles. He has also given earnest attention and helpful service to all good agencies at work for the betterment of their inhabitants. Looking upon fraternal organizations as among the beneficial institutions of the country, he has been long connected with several of them and done what he could to assist in building them up and extending their power for good, and for the enjoyment of all who are connected with them. He is an active member of Cheboygan Lodge of Master Masons and holds the rank of Past Master in it. He also belongs to Cheboygan Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Cheboygan Commandery, Knights Templar: and Nekahnis Lodge, Knights of Pythias, in the same city. In polities he is an unwavering Republican and an earnest and effective worker for the good of his party at all times. He stands high in

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Page  1059 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1059 its councils and has the confidence of both its leaders and its rank and file. Mr. Gerow was married on June 19, 1895, to Miss Florence M. Strohn, a native of Cheboygan and a daughter of Daniel W. and Frances (Woodward) Strohn. Mr. Strohn was born in Port Huron and is now living at Mullet Lake in this state. His wife is a native of Kingston, Ontario. They have two children living, Mrs. Gerow and her brother Frederick, who is an engineer on the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, and has been so employed for a number of years, serving he company with benefit to it and credit to himself. Their father served in the Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry during the Civil war, and came to Cheboygan to live soon after its close. He was engaged in farming at Mullet Lake until 1908, when he retired from all active pursuits. He is a member of Cheboygan Lodge of Masons and Ruddock Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, stands well in the regard of the people, and is looked upon by all classes as a worthy representative of the best citizenship of the county and state. Mr. and Mrs. Gerow have three children, their daughters Mildred E. and Mary J. and their son Colin A., all of whom are still living under the parental rooftree and adding to the warmth and attractiveness of the family circle and its popularity in the community. WILL Z. SEARLE.-One of the pioneer jewelers at Petoskey, Michigan, Will Z. Searle has been a prominent and influential resident of this place for the past quarter of a century. The years have told the tale of an eminently successful career, due to the possession of energy and a fixed determination to master all difficulties and to succeed against all odds. His loyalty and public spirit have ever been of the most insistent order and his achievements in private and public life make him well worthy of representation in this compilation dedicated to the careers of distinguished and representative citizens of northern Michigan. Will Z. Searle was born in Ingham county, Michigan, the date of his nativity being the 20th of June, 1859. He is a son of Jesse 0. and Frances (DuBois) Searle, both of whom were born in Delaware county, New York, the former on the 17th of June, 1811, and the latter in the year 1832. The father was summoned to eternal rest in 1884 and his cherished and devoted wife passed to her reward in 1876. Dr. and Mrs. Jesse O. Searle became the parents of two children, namely,-Olin L.; and Will Z., the immediate subject of this review. The father was a physician and surgeon by profession and he was engaged in active practice at Leslie, in Ingham county, Michigan, for a period of forty years. He received his medical education in the city of New York and during the period of his residence in Michigan gained distinctive prestige as one of the ablest and most skilled doctors in Ingham county. He was a prominent Mason during his lifetime and in religious matters was a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he accorded a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies promulgated by the Republican party and while he never manifested aught of ambition for the honors and emoluments of public office of any description he Vol. II-7

Page  1060 1060 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN was ever on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises advanced for the good of the general welfare. To the public schools of Leslie, Michigan, Will Z. Searle is indebted for his preliminary educational training, the same including a partial course in the high school of that place. When fifteen years of age he left school and entered upon an apprenticeship at the jeweler's trade. In 1882 he came to Petoskey, where he was engaged for two years as an employe of J. S. Coffman in the jewelry business, at the expiration of which he went to Mason, Michigan, remaining there until 1885. In the latter year he again came to Petoskey, where he has since maintained his home and business headquarters. He was the pioneer jeweler in this city and in connection with his modern and well-equipped establishment he conducts an ophthalmic department, testing eyes and fitting glasses. He was graduated in the Chicago Ophthalmic College as a member of the class of 1895 and hence is particularly well fitted for optical work. In his political convictions he is a staunch Republican and in his religious faith he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, with which he has been officially and actively connected for the past twenty-five years. In the grand old Masonic order he has passed through the circle of the York Rite branch, holding membership in Durand Lodge, No. 344, Free & Accepted Masons; Emmet Chapter, No. 104, Royal Arch Masons; Petoskey Council, No. 52, Royal & Select Masters; and Ivanhoe Commandery, No. 36, Knights Templar. He and his wife are both affiliated with Beulah Chapter, No. 63, Order of the Eastern Star; and with Queen Esther Shrine, No. 15, 0. W. S. of J. In the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine he is a member of Saladin Temple, at Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mr. Searle has been connected with the above orders for the past twenty-six years. He is a man of splendid mental caliber and deep human sympathy and all his acts have been characterized by that inmate kindliness of spirit which indicates a broad and generous outlook on life. In business circles his methods have been of the fair and honorable type and he is everywhere accorded the unalloyed confidence and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. At Mason, in Ingham county, Michigan, on the 14th of April, 1886, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Searle to Miss Carrie Hawley, whose birth occurred at Mason on the 23d of February, 1863, and who is a daughter of Silas R. and Lodeska (Case) Hawley, the former a native of New York, and the latter of Ingham county, Michigan. Mr. Hawley was a painter and decorator by occupation, but is now deceased, having attained to the venerable age of seventy-two years. Mr. and Mrs. Hawley became the parents of two children,-Mrs. Searle and Elmer. Mr. and Mrs. Searle have two children,-Jessie L., whose birth occurred on the 12th of June, 1888; and Granville O., born on the 3d of January, 1890. Both children have been afforded the best of educational advantages and are now at the parental home. REUBEN WADE, a retired farmer and leading citizen of Tawas City, losco county, is a fine example of the northern Michigan man whose life presents a consistent illustration of bravery whether its lines are

Page  1061 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1061 cast in the battlefields of war or amid the strifes of the pioneer. His is also an example of success in material things as well as of civic affairs; and of uninterrupted progress which has never been weighted by mean motives or questionable practices. Mr. Wade is a native of the Wolverine state, born in Macomb county in the year 1846, to James and Betsey Wade, who had come from New York state six years before. His father was a native of New York and his mother, of Massachusetts. James Wade purchased a farm of eighty acres in Lapeer county not long after coming to Michigan, in 1840, and there his son Reuben received most of his education. In his young manhood he identified himself actively with lumbering and farming. On September 1, 1864, then in his nineteenth year, he enlisted in Company K, Eleventh Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, and six days afterward he was at the front to assist in filling up the depleted ranks of that command. He remained in that branch of the service and met every duty and difficulty as a true soldier should until his honorable discharge from the Union army on the 18th of May, 1865. On his return to civic walks Mr. Wade spent some time in Oil City, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in the refining business, and then moved to Tawas township, Michigan. At this time (1867) he also made a radical change in his life plans, and bound himself to the fertile soil, invigorating climate and splendid citizenship of the Wolverine state. He first homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of virgin forest, which he sold and with the proceeds settled in Tawas City with the intention of establishing himself in some kind of business. But the pursuits of agriculture-the healthful and independent life in the open-had the strongest appeal to his manhood, and he therefore abandoned town life and purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres on what is known as Hemlock road, Tawas township. In its wild state this tract cost him two dollars and fifty cents an acre, but its clearance, thorough cultivation and judicious improvement in every particular called for by modern husbandry, has increased its value many-fold until to-day it is one of the banner farms of the township and county. Both in buildings and machinery Mr. Wade has kept abreast with the most enterprising of his fellow agriculturists. When he first located in Tawas township he found as his predecessors only Michael Katterman and William McMullen, and they had been in the locality but a year. Such pioneers as these know the meaning of the real hardships, as well as the rude but satisfying pleasures of frontier life; for at that period northern Michigan was frontier territory as truly as the northern sections of the state of Washington is to-day. If anything, it was more truly a frontier life which they suffered and enjoyed than the Washingtonian of this day with his railroad advantages, his telephones and telegraphs and advanced communities within fairly easy reach, whatever his avocation. But Mr. Wade and his associates were real builders of a new country and have lived to see it advance from rugged, lonely forest to teeming field and prosperous centers of population. In 1907 Mr. Wade sold his farm in Tawas township, purchased a valuable property in the city and retired thither to a fairly-earned

Page  1062 1062 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN repose during the natural decline of life. He still owns about fifteen hundred acres of wild land, which he contemplates bringing under cultivation; so that it is evident that he has no intention of relinquishing permanently those activities which are of physical and mental advantage to the vigorous man of his age. He also takes a deep interest in the public advancement of Tawas City, and before making it his residence was active in the affairs of the township through long and efficient service as justice of the peace, treasurer, commissioner of highways and member of the district school board. In 1868, the year after he located in Tawas township, Mr. Wade married Miss Emma, the daughter of Mrs. R. A. Kelly. Although the eleven children of this union all died in childhood, the longing for parentage found relief in the adoption of a son, Frederick, who, happily, has been the source to the bereaved father and mother of great consolation and comfort. Mrs. Reuben Wade was born in Canada in 1847. It should also be added, as completing a necessary link in the genealogical chair of Mr. Wade's family, that of his parents' seven children only the eldest and the youngest (himself) are living; their names, in natal order, are James E., Elizabeth, Arthur, Olive, Calvin, Luther and Reuben. HON. FRANK SHEPHERD.-One of the able and representative men of the bench and bar of northern Michigan is the Hon. Frank Shepherd, circuit court judge, leader in Republican politics and former representative in the lower house of the state Assembly from Cheboygan county. No one could be more closely identified with the history of the state of Michigan, by birth, ancestral tradition, and personal loyalty than he and the prominent part he plays in the many-sided life of the community is indeed fitting and appropriate. He was born in Dover township, Lenawee county, January 28, 1853. His grandfather, Rev. Paul Shepherd, was a pioneer in Michigan and afterward resided il Kansas where he risked much and labored hard in the cause of freedom. He organized the First Presbyterian church of Topeka and was chaplain of the first Free State legislature. His son, James H. Shepherd, father of the judge, was a farmer living near Adrian, and married Miss Roxanna McMath, a member of families of some prominence in both New York and Michigan, herself a native of the Wolverine state. Both his father and mother's ancestors fought in the Revolutionary war and in the war of 1812 and were principally of Scotch ancestry. The name Shepherd was derived from a Pennsylvanian (German) who anglicized his name Schaeffer. Young Frank Shepherd attended a district school in his native township and later a school in a neighboring village, working as a farm hand during the summer months to earn money for the payment of his tuition and board in the winter. In this way he advanced along the rugged road toward independence. There were four sons in his father's family, and one day he told the household that there was force enough at home without him to till the sixty acre farm, and that he intended to leave it and work out his own way in the world. He secured a teacher's certificate and during the ensuing fall and winter

Page  1063 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1063 taught a country school, returning in the spring to the farm. He became a student at the Ypsilanti Normal School and taught during vacations to earn money for further schooling. He was bent on securing a college education and to gratify this laudable ambition he had to earn the necessary funds, his parents being unable to assist him in the matter. He attended the noted institutions at Adrian, Michigan, and Oberlin, Ohio, and was diligent in the use of the facilities for mental development which they afforded him. After five years of drinking deep at the Pierian spring, Mr. Shepherd secured employment as a clerk in Adrian, and entered the office of Messrs. Stay & Underwood of that city as a law student, remaining with the firm until he was admitted to the bar in 1878. The next year he removed to Cheboygan and devoted himself to the building of a law practice. His was the usual experience, his progress being slow at first. Accepting the worst which Fate had to deal and winning only courage from it, he soon found the success which is the logical outcome of his abilities. He ultimately formed a partnership with C. S. Reilly, under the firm name of Shepherd & Reilly, and this continued until Mr. Shepherd was elected judge in the spring of 1899. He was prosecuting attorney of Cheboygan county from 1880 to 1884, was appointed judge of the probate court in 1886, and was elected probate judge in 1888. In 1890 and 1891 he was a member of the board of control of the Upper Peninsula prison, and in 1896 was elected to the lower house of the state legislature by a majority of six hundred and twelve votes over James F. Maloney, the Democratic-Peoples' Union-Silver candidate. During his first term in the house of representatives he was chairman of the committee on roads and bridges and a member of the judiciary committee. He was re-elected in 1898 and in the ensuing session was appointed chairman of the judiciary committee. In the spring of 1899, while still in attendance at the session of the legislature, he was nominated by the Republican convention of the Thirty-third judicial district as its candidate for judge of the circuit court and in the election which followed, received a majority of over six hundred and fifty votes. Judge Shepherd took his seat on the bench of the circuit court on January 1, 1900, and still occupies it, having been re-elected at every subsequent election. He has always been warmly interested in the progress and improvement of Cheboygan city and county and has ably assisted in promoting their advancement. He was one of the founders of the Cheboygan State Bank and has been its president from the time when it started business in February, 1905, and he is connected in a leading way with other institutions of value to the community. Fraternally he is a prominent member of Cheboygan lodge of Master Masons, Cheboygan Chapter of Royal Arch Masons and Cheboygan Commandery of Knights Templar, taking a leading part in the work of each. He has held high offices in Odd Fellowship, including Grand Patriarch and Grand Representative. The Hon. Mr. Shepherd was married in February, 1879, to Miss Susan McMillan, their nuptials being solemnized at Deerfield, Lenawee

Page  1064 1064 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN county, this state. Of the four children born of the union, two are living. The son, James F. is a lawyer in Cheboygan; the daughter, Mary Ethel, is at home. George Ralph, a promising young man died in 1910, and Katherine died in infancy. Mrs. Shepherd is a lady of culture and force of character and is prominent in the social and benevolent activities of the county, throughout which she is highly esteemed. Mrs. Shepherd is a daughter of James W. and Jenette (Fisher) McMillan, natives of the state of New York. She herself was born in Deerfield, Michigan, November 4, 1854, her ancestry being Scotch and English, the former predominating. ALDEN E. CROSS.-If "biography is the home aspect of history," as Wilmott has expressed it, it is entirely within the province of true history to commemorate and perpetuate the lives and character, the achievements and honor of the illustrious sons of the state. High on the roll of those whose efforts have tended to advance the progress and improvement of Charlevoix county, Michigan, appears the name of Alden E. Cross, who has been a prominent and popular resident of East Jordan since 1905. At the present time, in 1911, Mr. Cross is Michigan superintendent and general manager for the Everett B. Clarke Seed Company, the main headquarters of which concern are at Milford, Connecticut. He is also the present efficient and popular incumbent of the office of president of the village of East Jordan. Alden E. Cross was born in the county of Leeds, Canada, in 1862. He is a native son of Canada, where he was born and reared. The family home was maintained in the Dominion of Canada until the year 1870, at which time removal was made to Central Lake, in Antrim county, Michigan, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. UTnder the invigorating discipline of the home farm in Antrim county Alden E. Cross was reared to maturity, his early educational training consisting of such privileges as were afforded in the neighboring district schools. He remained at home until he had reached his twentyfifth year, at which time he was married. For two years after that important event he was in Grand Traverse county, as superintendent and buyer of seeds and grains for N. B. Keeney, of LeRoy, Neew York. In 1890 he went to Charlevoix as manager for the D. M. Ferry Seed Company, remaining in their employ until 1905. In the latter year he came to East Jordan to assume full charge of the seed business in Michigan for the Everett B. Clarke Company, an extremely large and prosperous seed concern at Milford, Connecticut. While at Central Lake Mr. Cross was a member of the town board and during his residence at Charlevoix he was a member of the common council of the village. When Charlevoix was incorporated as a city Mr. Cross became a member of the board of aldermen and he continued in tenure of that office until his departure for East Jordan. Since his advent in this place he has served two years as a member of the council and in 1911 he was honored by his fellow citizens with election to the office of president of the village. In 1899 he was appointed county commissioner of the poor of Charlevoix county and by continual reappointment to that office has continued incumbent thereof until the

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Page  1065 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1065 present time, his last term expiring in 1912. In the spring of 1911 Mr. Cross was elected county commissioner of schools of Charlevoix county, his term of office to last for a period of four years. In his political convictions Mr. Cross is a stanch advocate of the principles and policies propounded by the Republican party and in a fraternal way he is affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic order. In the year 1887 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cross to Miss Hattie Mudge, who was reared and educated at Central Lake, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Cross have four children, concerning whom the following brief data are here recorded,-Lola is a popular and successful teacher in the public schools at St. Clair, Michigan; Maud B. is engaged in the pedagogic profession at East Jordan; and A. Victor and R. Bruce are at the parental home, being pupils in the public school at East Jordan. In their religious affiliations the Cross family are consistent members of the Presbyterian church, to whose charities and good works he is a most liberal contributor. PETER B. CADE is one of the prominent old pioneers of losco county, Michigan. Coming to Tawas City as early as 1866, he has been connected with the lumber industry in one way or another during most of his life. At the present time, in 1911, he is agent for the Lands Company, in the capacity of settling homeseekers. Mr. Cade was born in the Dominion of Canada, on the 11th of May, 1847, and is a son of Richard and Elizabeth (Bowers) Cade, the former of whom was a native of England and the latter of whom claimed the state of New York as the place of her birth. The parents' marriage was solemnized in Canada and to them were born eight children, five of whom are living and two of whom are residents of Michigan. The Cade family moved to the United States in 1857, location being made at Capae, Saint Clair county, Michigan, where the father was engaged in business and where he and his wife continued to reside until 1870, when they settled at Romeo, Macomb county. They passed to their reward, the father in 1906, and the mother in 1900, both being interred at Capac. To the public schools of his native place Peter B. Cade is indebted for his early educational training and he was a child of but ten years of age at the time of his parents' emigration to Michigan, where he completed his education in the primitive schools of Capac. When a youth of nineteen years he went to Tawas City, where he remained but a short time, going thence to the thickly timbered country farther north. In 1867, in company with his father, who was also in the lumber woods in the winter, he cleared the first farm in that part of the state, the same comprising one hundred acres. It was known as the Tanner farm and was situated in Curtis township, Iosco county. Subsequently he and his father secured a contract to cut down a dozen old pine trees in a clearing by themselves. This work was done for R. A. Alger but as there was no stipulation in regard to removing the felled trees Colonel Alger made an agreement with Peter B. Cade that if he would haul the tops away he would deed him a tract of eighty acres of land. Mr. Cade accepted the terms and in this way became the possessor of a fine

Page  1066 1066 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN farm. This, however, was in the days when land was considered worthless. Mr. Cade made a clearing on the land and later sold it to Julius Simons, it being to-day an exceedingly valuable farm. In 1867 he began lumbering for the firm of Moore & Alger and continued in their employ up to the year 1887, during which time he was engaged in different parts of the country, getting out as much as thirty-five millions of feet of lumber a year; he followed what is called jobbing or contract work. In 1864 he was mustered into the United States service, in company with his brother William, as a member of Company H, Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He continued in service for nearly two years and during that time participated in many of the important struggles marking the close of the war, including the battles of Decatur, Murfreesboro, Whitesburg and the Twenty Days Siege. He was with General Thomas at Franklin and Nashville and while at Decatur was slightly wounded. There were six pair of brothers in Mr. Cade's company and of the number Mr. Cade and his brother were the only pair who lived to return home. They both received their honorable discharge and were mustered out of service in Houston, Texas, in 1866. Mr. Cade has ever retained a deep interest in his old comrades in arms and signifies the same by membership in Captain Hiram Burrows Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in which he has served on several occasions as post commander. He is also a member of Macomb, St. Clair & Sanilac Counties Soldiers & Sailors Association, of which he was president for thirteen consecutive years. In his present position with the Lands Company, at AuSable, Mr. Cade takes care of different sections of land and settles home-seekers on the tracts sold to them. In 1910 his land sales amounted to sixty thousand dollars and he is now agent for the disposal of some one hundred and forty thousand acres, of which he has sole charge. His marvelous success in the land business is largely due to the kindly interest and great courtesy shown to all his customers. In politics Mr. Cade accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies of the Republican party and while he has never shown aught of desire for political preferment he has ever been sincere and earnest in his support of all measures projected for the advancement and fostering of progress and development. He is a man of keen foresight and unusual energy and his varied experiences in connection with the lumber industry and the land business have brought him in close contact with nature and developed in him that quick responsive sympathy which is so characteristic of a manly, moral personality. In fraternal orders he has passed through the circle of York Rite Masonry, holding membership in the Blue Lodge of Macomb, No. 64, Free & Accepted Masons; Romeo Chapter, No. 17, Royal Arch Masons; and commandery No. 6, Knights Templars. He and his wife are zealous members of the Baptist church, in the different departments of which they have ever been interested factors. In the year 1872 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Cade to Miss Elizabeth Read, who is a daughter of Thomas and Ann Read and who was reared and educated in Macomb county. The parents of Mrs. Cade were both natives of England, whence they emigrated to the United

Page  1067 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1067 States about the years 1830 and 1832, settling in Macomb county, Michigan, where Mr. Read purchased a farm of one hundred acres, on which he erected beautiful and substantial buildings and on which he continued to reside until his death in 1895. His wife died in 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Cade lived on the old Read homestead from 1885 until 1900, when they removed to his present comfortable home in Osceola, where he had been in the employ of the state one year, looking after the lands belonging to it. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cade. JOHN R. LADD.-Few men are better known in Osceola county than John R. Ladd, one of the pillars of local Republicanism and a man who, figuring prominently in public life, has proved himself worthy of every trust and very zealous of advancing the interests of the people. In 1908 Mr. Ladd was elected to an important office, thus receiving signal mark of the confidence and approval of the community in which his interests are centered, and so efficient were his services in this office that he was re-elected in the fall of 1910. Mr. Ladd has spent nearly thirty years within the pleasant boundaries of Osceola county, and has witnessed its remarkable growth and advancement, while at the same time contributing in due measure to the same. The treasurer of Osceola county and a resident of Hershey, is a native of the Wolverine state, his birth having occurred in Jackson county October 31, 1844. The Ladd family is one which has been identified in a praiseworthy manner with New England, the cradle of so much of our national history, and it was in Windsor, Connecticut, that John Ladd, father of the subject, first opened his young eyes to the light of day. Less than two years previous to the birth of Mr. Ladd (in March, 1842), the father decided to cast his fortunes with the newly opening state of Michigan, and he chose Jackson county as a desirable location. By occupation a farmer, he entered land and soon came to enjoy the esteem of the community in whose life he played his role. He lived to see many changes and progress which he would have called impossible, for he enjoyed great length of days, being called to his reward when his years numbered ninety-two. His father, John Ladd, was a native of Connecticut, and of English descent. The subject's mother, whose maiden name was Maria D. Lewis, was a native of the state of New York and of Welsh descent. Her death was untimely, for she was but thirty-eight years of age when summoned to her eternal rest. She was the mother of two children, Mr. Ladd being the elder born, and Fredericka, the other. The father married a second time, Sarah Kutz, daughter of Samuel Kutz, and a native of Pennsylvania, coming to preside over his household. As her name indicates she was of German origin and she became the mother of four children, two sons and two daughters, as follows: Sumner R., a farmer; L. F., a physician; Effie M., who married George Gary; and Ina M., a teacher in Chicago. The boyhood of John R. Ladd was passed in Jackson county. To the public schools of the district is he indebted for his preliminary education, and when not otherwise engaged he assisted in the manifold duties to be encountered upon any farm. After leaving the public

Page  1068 1068 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN schools he matriculated in the Adrian, Michigan, College and there spent one term. In his youth his inclinations as to a life work were of rather an indefinite character and he farmed for a time in Jackson county, and also engaged in mercantile business for a time. He made a radical change in 1883 when he decided upon a change of residence and came to Osceola county, locating in Hershey. He has held many local offices and always with the utmost satisfaction to his constituents. He was supervisor for six years of Hershey, and during almost the whole of his residence here he has served on the school board. From his earliest voting days he has given the warmest allegiance to the Republican party, and he is proud to be able to say that he has assisted in electing every Republican president since 1864, having cast his maiden vote for Abraham Lincoln. He is a citizen of great and commendable public spirit, and his personality is genial, which makes his popularity in this quarter easily explained. His election to the office of county treasurer, as previously mentioned, occurred in 1908. On the 24th day of May, 1872, Mr. Ladd laid the foundation of a happy home life by his marriage with Miss Elva Woodward, who was then living in Jackson county, where her father, Samuel Woodward, was engaged in farming, but who was a native of Calhoun county, this state. They have given five young citizens to the state, namely: Howard A., John R., Jr., Wales, Arthur W., and Ruth I. The two oldest are engaged in farming; Wales is a clerk in a dry goods store, and Arthur W. is cashier of the First State Bank of Roscommon, Michigan. Fraternally Mr. Ladd is a Mason and his identification with the ancient and august order covers a period of nearly forty years, his relations with the brotherhood having been productive of much profit and pleasure. He is a member of the Baptist church and gives assistance to those good causes promulgated by the church body. FRED A. DIGGINS, of the firm of Murphy & Diggins, lumber dealers, Cadillac, Michigan, was born in July, 1862, near Harvard, McHenry county, Illinois, and there on a farm he spent his childhood and early life, receiving his education in the public schools. Mr. Diggins remained in his native state until 1879, at which time he left the old home and started out to make his own way in the world. Coming up into Michigan, he stopped first at the town of Hersey in Osceola county. About this time, feeling the need of some special preparation for business life, he entered the Grand Rapids Business College, where from 1880 to 1882 his time was occupied in the pursuance of a course of study. At the end of that time he became bookkeeper for his brother, Delos F. Diggins, with whom he remained until the latter part of 1886. In the autumn of that year he came to Cadillac and entered the employ of the private banking firm of Delos A. Blodgett & Company. He remained with this firm during the ensuing two years, at the end of which time he severed his connection with the bank in order to engage in the lumber business and associated himself with others under the firm name of F. A. Diggins & Company, at Sunny Side. That was in 1888. This company did a prosperous business for several

Page  1069 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1069 years. In 1897, having closed up the affairs of the old company, Mr. Diggins formed a partnership with Joseph Murphy, under the name of Murphy & Diggins, which has since conducted a thriving business on an extensive scale. As joint manager of this large enterprise Mr. Diggins displays fine executive ability and shows familiarity with every detail of the great lumber industry. Politically Mr. Diggins is a Republican, stanch and enthusiastic in party affairs. He has represented the people of Cadillac as a delegate to various nominating conventions. In 1892 he was a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Minneapolis, which nominated Benjamin Harrison for the presidency, and in the spring of the same year was honored by being elected mayor of Cadillac. His service as chief executive of the city was so satisfactory to the people, irrespective of party, that the following year he was re-elected to the office, and when at the end of his second term he retired from the mayorship it was with the good will of all concerned. After the lapse ot two years he was again brought out for the office of mayor, and this time defeated his opponent by a greatly increased majority. By successive re-elections he was retained in office during the next four years, thus rounding out six years of service and making a record that fully justified the citizens of Cadillac in the wisdom of their choice. His mayoralty terminated in 1900, and since that date he has devoted his undivided attention to his extensive and increasing business interests. In 1890 Mr. Diggins married Miss Carrie Cummer, daughter of Jacob Cummer, one of the leading business men of Cadillac. Genial, hospitable, charitable, both Mr. Diggins and his wife exert unlimited influence for good. WILLIAM LATTA.-It is a pleasurable task to record the history of a man who has forged his way to the front by his own unaided efforts, refusing to recognize adverse circumstances, and who by resolute will and determination has won success and high standing in the world of business. Such a man is William Latta, secretary and treasurer of the Champion Tool & Handle Company, to whose sterling ability and worth his fellow citizens liberally testify. During the course of his residence in Evart he has been thoroughly identified with local upbuilding and improvement, taking a commendable interest in whatever promises to be of lasting benefit to the vicinity. Mr. Latta has long been associated in his present capacity with the Champion Tool & Handle Company, which has over forty men in its employ and is, indeed. one of the largest businesses of its kind in the United States. By the circumstance of birth Mr. Latta belongs to Fairfield county, Ohio, the family having for many years been honorably associated with that section of the Buckeye state, the grandfather being one of its pioneers. The eyes of the subject first opened to the light of day in the little city of Lancaster, the date of his nativity being May 8, 1856. Here in the year 1826 his father, also William Latta, had been born. The latter was reared and educated in his native place, his higher education having been received in Athens College in Athens, Ohio. IIe was a land owner and a hardware merchant and he was taken from

Page  1070 1070 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN a community where he was regarded as a valuable factor in the prime of his usefulness, for he was only forty-nine years of age. His father, John Latta, was a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and, as said before, was one of the early settlers of Fairfield county, Ohio. He was a pioneer merchant and of English origin, the first Lattas to identify themselves with America having come from the "right little, tight little island." The first of the maternal ancestors of the subject to come to America was no less famous a personage than Captain John Smith, president of the Virginia colony, whose romance with the Indian maid forms one of the most romantic pages of American tradition. The mother of him whose name initiates this review was Elizabeth Smith, direct descendant of the adventurous captain. This venerable and honored lady is still living, her years numbering eighty-one. Her father was James H. Smith. To her and her husband six children were born, four sons and two daughters, the subject being the third in order of birth. The boyhood days of Mr. Latta were spent in his native Lancaster, to whose excellent public schools he is indebted for his education. At the early age of eighteen years he severed home ties and set forth to make his fortunes, like the proverbial hero of romance. His way was taken through Indiana and Illinois, and he spent three years as a clerk in a mercantile business. This was no doubt important in that it was influential in determining his future field of endeavor. In 1879 he crossed the boundaries of Michigan and came direct to Evart, and here secured a position as agent for the E. & C. Eldred Lumber Company. In 1882 he represented the same company and then went to Minnesota, where he remained until 1884, in which year he returned to Evart. Here he engaged in the mercantile business for three years, but at the end of that time sold out and accepted a position as traveling salesman with the Champion Tool & Handle Company. He traveled for the space of eighteen years in the interests of the above-mentioned important concern, and the results achieved by him were of the highest character. In the meantime he became interested in the company, and proving faithful and efficient in lesser details of the business he was given more and more to do and he was finally honored by the office of secretary and treasurer of the large concern, and he accepted the same. That was in the year 1890, and he has remained in such capacity from that time until the present day. The Champion Tool & Handle Company was organized in 1890 and has enjoyed an uninterrupted course of prosperity. Giving employment as it does to a large number of men and bringing a great amount of business to the town and county, it stands as one of the most important elements of its prosperity, and those who are at its head and conduct its affairs, being, indeed, responsible for its existence, can be looked upon only in the light of benefactors. Mr. Latta has other important interests, being a director in the Evart Savings Bank and in other local enterprises. His identification with the community covers a period of thirty-one years. Mr. Latta has been twice married. His first union was solemnized

Page  1071 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1071 in March, 1880, Miss Sarah Bennett, daughter of William Bennett, becoming his wife. She died that same year, leaving an infant son, James W., who is now a resident of Grand Rapids, where he is engaged in the lumber business. Mr. Latta was married on the 25th day of June, 1883, to Mliss Ellen Stewart, daughter of David Stewart, of Washington, _Macomb county, Michigan. Their one daughter, Alice M., is at home. Mr. Latta is one who takes a great amount of pleasure in his fraternal life. He is one of the prominent Masons of northern Michigan, holding the thirty-second degree and belonging to the Blue Lodge and the Knights Templars. CHARLES B. ACKERMAN.-The substantial and well-to-do citizens of Leelanau county have no more worthy representative than Charles B. Aeckerman, who has for many years been intimately associated with the advancement of the business prosperity of Empire, and has filled the various offices of trust to which he has been elected with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his fellow citizens. He was born in Ohio in 1862, a son of Sanford and Christina (Bunnell) Aekerman, the former of whom was born in America, and the later in Germany. Coming with his family to Michigan about 1868, Sanford Ackerman bought land in Muskegon county, and began the improvement of a farm. Moving from there to the village of Muskegon, he served two terms as sheriff of Muskegon county, and for a number of years was marshal of Muskegon. He subsequently returned to his home farm, but in 1884 came to Leelanau county, and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Empire. Having completed his early education, Charles B. Ackerman entered the employ of the Empire Lumber Company, at Empire, and for five years had charge of the firm's store at Pearl Lake, after which he had for a time full control of the shipping of wood and bark for the company. In 1901, in company with Michael Horen, of whom a brief personal notice is given elsewhere in this work, Mr. Ackerman bought the furniture and undertaking business of George Esch, of Empire, and has continued it successfully until the present time, having carried it on alone since 1906, when he bought out NMr. Horen's interest in the establishment. Genuinely interested in local affairs, Mr. Ackerman has served his constituents ably and acceptably in various offices within the gift of his fellow-citizens, having been supervisor, town clerk, county superintendent of the poor, village president and trustee, and deputy sheriff, a position which he held for some four years under Mr. Harrington. On January 2, 1902, he was made postmaster of Empire, and is now serving his tenth year in that capacity. Politically he supports the principles of the Republican party by voice and vote. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and to the Knights of the Maccabees. Religiously he is a regular attendant of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Ackerman married first, in 1882, Julia F. Laughery, of Ra

Page  1072 1072 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN venna, Michigan, and to them four children were born, namely: Jessie, who lived but twelve brief years; Charlie; Lafe; and Lottie. In 1895 Mrs. Julia F. Ackerman passed to the higher life. Mr. Ackerman subsequently married Frances C. Selby, of Hart, Michigan, and they are the parents of three children, namely: Ruth; and Vera and Verl, twins. NICHOLAS THERRY.-The spirit of determination, reliability and energy, which is so marked a characteristic of the Germans, has made the representatives of that nation valued citizens of every land to which the sons of Germany have gone. He whose name initiates this review was born at Luxemburg, Germany, on the 1st of April, 1842. Coming to this country when he was a child of but ten years of age, he was reared to maturity in the city of Detroij, Michigan, and asb a young man gave concrete evidence of his loyaty to the cause of the country of his adoption by enlisting for service in the Union army in the Civil war. He served with all of valor and distinction throughout that sanguinary struggle and since the close of the war has been variously engaged in his home state of Michigan. He is now living virtually retired at Harbor Springs, that beautiful center of the great northern Michigan resort country. At the present time, in 1911, he is giving most efficient service as president of the village board and during his long and active career he has filled a number of important official positions. He is a man who commands the high regard and unquialified esteem of his fellow citizens and one whose exemplary life serves as lesson and incentive to the younger generation. Nicholas Therry is a son of Theodore and Lucy (Braun) Therry, both of whom were likewise natives of Germany. The father came to America in 1852, and having prepared the way somewhat, the family came the following year. The voyage to this country was made in a sailing ship and after disembarking in New York city the Therry family proceeded directly to Detroit, Michigan, where the father had obtained employment in the work of his trade-that of carpenter, and where he died in 1859, at the comparatively early age of forty-five years. The mother was summoned to eternal rest in 1854, at the age of thirty-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Therry became the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this review was the second in order of birth, and of whom two only are living in 1911. Nicholas Therry received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of Germany a d-later he effectively supplemented that discipline by study -in the excellent schools of Detroit. As a young man he learned the shoemaker's trade and he devoted considerable attention to that particular line of work during the major portion of his early career. When the dark cloud of the Civil war obscured the national horizon he enlisted for three months' service in Company H, Second Michigan Volunteer Infantry, at Detroit, on the 17th of April, 1861. At the expiration of that period he re-enlisted for service in the same company and regiment and served with the utmost efficiency during the remainder of the war. He was a soldier in the Third Army Corps, then the Ninth Army Corps, and he was taken prisoner at Knoxville, Tennesee. While on picket duty at Fort Sanderson he was captured, taken to Lib

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Page  1073 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1073 by prison, transferred thence to Belle Isle and later taken to Andersonville prison. From the latter place he was removed to Savannah and from that city was taken to the Charleston prison. Subsequently, while being sent by freight train from Charleston to Florence, he evaded the guards and escaped to the woods back of Charleston, where he remained in hiding for some length of time. Finally, on the 22d of February, 1865, he managed to get inside the Union lines and he received his honorable discharge and was mustered out of service on the 11th of July, 1865. After the close of the war Mr. Therry learned the mason's trade and in 1865 he located at Lowell, Michigan, where he again turned his attention to shoemaking. In 1871 he established the family home at Ada, in Kent county, Michigan, and there he was likewise engaged in the shoe business for a number of years. In 1877 he removed to Charlevoix county, this state, settling on a homestead some sixteen miles southeast of Petoskey. With the passage of time he managed to raise his farm to a high state of cultivation and at one time he was the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of most arable land in Charlevoix county. He came to Harbor Springs in the fall of 1879 and here he has maintained his home during the intervening years to the present time. He was the first incumbent of the office of night watchman in this village and later served in the capacity of marshal. At one time he was a member of the board of trustees of the township and in March, 1911, he was elected president of the village board, of which latter office he is in tenure at the present time. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Democrat party stands sponsor and he has ever been a prominent and zealous factor in local politics. He retains a deep and abiding interest in his old comrades in arms and signifies the same by membership in O. B. Richardson Post, No. 13, Grand Army of the Republic. He is a man of wide and varied experiences and broad information and in his business career all his dealings have been characterized by fair and honorable methods. At Lowell, on the 9th of April, 1867, Mr. Therry was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Smith, whose birth occurred in the state of New York and who is a daughter of Conrad Smith, long a representative citizen of Lowell, Michigan, whither he removed with his family in the early '50s. Mr. and Mrs. Therry became the parents of four children, concerning whom the following brief data are here incorporated,Edwin A., who is in the west; Amelia is the wife of W. D. Carpenter, a sketch of whose career appears on other pages of this work; and Charles is a resident of Detroit; and one who met death by drowning in the lake. In their religious faith the Therry family are devout members of the Presbyterian church, to whose charitable work they are generous contributors. Although Mr. Therry has almost reached the Psalmist's span of three score years and ten he is still erect and active, retaining in much of their pristine vigor the splendid mental and physical qualities of his prime. JOHN ARMSTRONG, who is successfully engaged in the undertaking and furniture business at Tawas City, losco county, Michigan, was born

Page  1074 1074 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN in Edinboro, Scotland, on the 30th of March, 1875 and he is a son of John and Isabelle (Brown) Armstrong, both of whom were likewise born in the land of hills and heather. The father was identified with railroading until his death, which occurred in 1875, in Scotland. After his demise his widow wedded Rev. W. Lyttiel and with his mother and stepfather John Armstrong emigrated to the United States about the year 1889, at which time he was a youth of fourteen years of age. The mother now resides with her son John. To the public schools of his native land John Armstrong is indebted for his early educational training and he supplemented this discipline by further study after his arrival in the United States. After a short sojourn in New York he came to Michigan and when twenty years of age he became interested in the undertaking business, being employed in an up-to-date establishment in the city of Detroit for a period of eight years, at the expiration of which he removed to Lansing, Michigan, where he spent four years in the concern of I. J. and B. M. Buck, leading undertakers in that city. His early apprenticeship was of much value to Mr. Armstrong and he eagerly availed himself of every opportunity to advance in the profession. During his residence in Lansing he was elected coroner in that city and in discharging the duties of that office he acquitted himself most creditably. Finally deeming it expedient to launch out in the business world for himself Mr. Armstrong decided that Tawas City would be a good place for location and accordingly established his home here in 1903. In connection with his undertaking establishment he conducts a furniture store, which is well stocked with high-grade furniture, sewing-machines, wall-paper, paints, oils, etc. In order better to fit himself for his work, he attended the Chicago Embalming College, in which well ordered institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1910. Mr. Armstrong has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters tending to advance the general welfare and in politics he endorses the cause of the Republican party. Since his arrival in Tawas City, in 1903, he has been incumbent of several important offices of a local character. For two years he was justice of the peace, was a member of the board of aldermen for two years and in 1911 holds the office of county coroner, which position he has held, by successive re-elections, for the past six years. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Masonic order, in the latter of which he and his wife are connected with the Order of the Eastern Star. He and his wife are devout members of the Presbyterian church, in which he is a member of the board of trustees. At Lansing, Michigan, in the year 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Armstrong to Miss Elizabeth Bolter, who was reared and educated in the capital city of the state and who is a daughter of W. A. Bolter, a prominent citizen in that place. Mrs. Armstrong was born in Leslie township, Ingham county, Michigan, and after being graduated in the Lansing high school she was successfully engaged in teaching in the public schools of Ingham county for some two years prior to her

Page  1075 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1075 marriage. To Mr. and MIrs. Armstrong have been born two children, — Robert and Jane E. GEORGE G. BRowN.-Having passed a part of his youth and all of his mature years in the discharge of clerical and administrative duties, some of them involving financial and business affairs of considerable importance, George G. Brown of Cheboygan has been particularly well prepared by the training of experience for the responsible and weighty position he now holds as cashier of the Cheboygan State bank, and to which he was first elected in 1905. Mr. Brown is a native of the province of Ontario in the Dominion of Canada, and was born at Dundas on February 26, 1867. His father, George Brown, was born in Scotland in 1834, and came to Canada at the age of twenty-two. He located at Dundas, where he was one of the pioneer builders of mills under contract. There was great need of his services in that part of the Dominion then, and he found them in constant demand. He built fine mills in Hamilton, Dundas, and various places in western Ontario. His early death in 1879, at the age of forty-five years, cut short his career and his usefulness, and was generally lamented wherever he was known. He was an Odd Fellow in fraternal life and a Presbyterian in religious faith and affiliation. The mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Crawford, was of the same nativity as her son George G. and passed all her years until the death of her husband in her native place. She is now living in Ottawa, Canada. By her marriage she became the mother of eight children, of whom George was the fourth born. Five of the eight are living. They are widely scattered in their residences, but they are all excellent citizens, creditable alike to the careful training they received at the family hearthstone and to the communities in which they live. George G. Brown obtained his scholastic training in the schools of his native town, and began life for himself as a clerk and salesman in a grocery store there. He next passed two years as a clerk in a law office, and after that six or seven years as clerk and bookkeeper in the Bank of Hamilton, Ontario. He came to Michigan in 1890, and for six months found employment with the R. G. Dun Company in Grand Rapids. By the end of the period mentioned he had formed a sufficient acquaintance with the people of the city to secure a position more to his liking, and entered the employ of the Cochren & Miller Furniture Company as bookkeeper. After a time he was made cashier for this company and remained with it three years. He made a good impression in mercantile circles in Grand Rapids by his ability and fidelity, and through this Messrs. Voight & Hereolsheimer, leading dry goods merchants of the city, offered him the post of credit man in their store. He accepted the offer and remained with the firm six years, rendering it satisfactory service and improving his own financial condition and extending his good reputation at the same time by his industry, prudence and faithful attention to his duties. Impelled by the ambition that has always been his inspiration, he left the service of the dry goods company to take a higher rank in the business world as manager of the business of the East Jordan Lumber Company at East Jordan in Charlevoix county. Vol. 111-8

Page  1076 1076 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN In the early part of the year 1905 he came to Cheboygan as one of the founders of the Cheboygan State Bank, which was incorporated on February 25, of that year, and was elected cashier of the new institution by its directors. He has held this position continuously since his first election and been very largely instrumental in making the bank what it is-one of the strongest, most enterprising and most popular financial agencies in operation in this part of the state. Mr. Brown's position and influence as cashier of this energetic and progressive bank has given him exceptional opportunities and facilities for aiding all worthy undertakings for the advanement and improvement of the city and county, and he has employed them in the fullest measure for the general welfare and comfort and convenience of the people, being always foremost in every good work and one of the strongest supporters of all beneficial projects. In the fraternal life of the community he has also taken an active interest and a very helpful part. He is a member and the treasurer of the Cheboygan Masonic lodge, a Royal Arch Mason, a Royal and Select Master and a Knight Templar, belonging to the organizations of these departments of Freemasonry working in his home city. He also belongs to the lodge of Knights of Pythias in Cheboygan. His political faith and allegiance is given to the Republican party, and while he is not an active partisan, he is loyal and serviceable to his political organization. On October 19, 1892, Mr. Brown was married to Miss Margaret E. French, a native of Muir, Ionia county, this state, and a daughter of George W. and Emma (Pelton) French. The former was born in Rutland, Vermont, and died in 1898, aged sixty-five years. The mother is also dead. They had five children, four of whom are living, Mrs. Brown having been the first born. Mr. French married a second time after the death of his first wife, being united in the new nuptials with Miss Jane Pelton, who is also deceased. No children were born of this union. Mr. French had a career full of variety and adventure. He became a resident 'of Grand Rapids in his young manhood, and operated for some years as a contractor and builder. At the beginning of the Civil war he enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, in which he served to the end of the contest, and rose to the rank of captain through valor. in the service. After the war he located at Muir in this state and operated a saw mill in connection with an extensive lumber business until 1890, when his plant was destroyed by fire. He then moved to Johnson City, Tennessee, where he engaged for a time in the manufacture of furniture. Late in life he returned to Michigan and again took up his residence in Muir, where he passed the remainder of his days. He was an active Democrat in politics and a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have one child, their son Carlton H., who is living at home with them, and is like themselves, held in high esteem by the whole community, and is regarded as one of the most promising youths in it. He has inherited good traits of character from both of his parents and is exemplifying in his daily life the careful training they have given him, and living with credit to himself and to them.

Page  1077 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1077 ALBERT E. WILLARD.-Worthy of especial mention in a work of this character is Albert E. Willard, a prominent and highly respected resident of Empire, a man of great integrity and ability, whose word and judgment can always be relied upon in matters of business. A native of New England, he was born at Burke, Caledonia county, Vermont, May 3, 1863. His' father, Dexter Willard, was born in Canada, where his parents settled on coming to this country from England. He married Cynthia Meroa La Bouroeau, who was of French descent, although her father was born and bred in New England, which was likewise the place of her birth. Acquiring his knowledge of books in the public schools of Burke, Vermont, Albert E. Willard began life for himself at the age of sixteen years, entering the employ of Cross & Bradley, bakers and confectioners at Saint Johnsbury, Vermont, for whom he subsequently traveled through Connecticut, New Hampshire and Maine, selling their productions. At the end of two years he made his way to Boston, and the ensuing three years traveled for Franklin E. Snow & Company, of India, T. Wharf, wholesale dealers of fish and other sea products. Wishing to become better acquainted with the western part of our country, he then started for Minnesota and the Dakotas, stopping en route at Chicago and other large cities, in each place filling positions as clerk or bookkeeper while he tarried. Having conceived a liking for Michigan, Mr. Willard, whose health was in a rather precarious condition, located in this state, going, in 1888, into the pine woods in Presque Isle county. Having recovered his former physical vigor, he accepted a position as lumber inspector at Pine Lake, Charlevoix county, where he remained a year and a half. In the fall of 1889 he came to Empire, Leelanau county as bookkeeper for the T. Wilce, or the Empire Lumber Company, a position for which he was well fitted, and which he has filled most acceptably. He has served as secretary of the Empire Land and Improvement Association since its formation, April 8, 1908, and through his energetic ability has done much toward placing it among the leading organizations of the kind in the county. Mr. Willard married, February 28, 1889, Rena Agnes Evans, who was born in Frankfort, Michigan, a daughter of Ramiro and Mary (Ditmer) Evans, both of whom came to Michigan with their parents from New York state when they were children. Mr. and Mrs. Willard have one daughter, Elva Leata Willard, who was born May 12, 1892, and is now attending boarding school at Mount Carroll, Illinois. In his political views Mr. Willard upholds the principles of the Democratic party by voice and vote. He takes great interest in public affairs, and has rendered his fellow-townsmen excellent service in offices of trust and responsibility. He has been supervisor of Empire; was town treasurer a number of terms; and is now not only town treasurer, but is village treasurer, clerk and trustee, and chairman of the Empire Board of Education. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. He is liberal in his religious faith, and is ever ready to lend a helping hand to the needy, and to contribute toward worthy objects.

Page  1078 1078 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN HON. WILLIAM D. C. GERMAINE.-Highly esteemed and respected Im every class of society, William D. C. Germaine, a former mayor of Traverse City, has for some time been a leader in thought and action in the public life of Michigan and his name is inscribed high on the roll of its foremost citizens, his honorable career adding lustre to the history of Grand Traverse county. Perseverance and indefatigable energy will do more to advance a man's interests than wealth or adventitious circumstances. The successful men of the day are they who have planned their own advancement and have accomplished it in spite of many obstacles and with a certainty that could have been attained only through their own efforts. This class has a worthy representative in Mr. Germaine, who is a native son of Traverse City, where he has passed practically his entire life thus far. William D. C. Germaine was born on the 17th of October, 1867, and is a son of Cuyler Germaine, a native of New York, his birth having occurred in Dutchess county on December 22, 1838. He was summoned to the life eternal on the 27th of December, 1886, and from an article which appeared in the Traverse City Herald a short time after his death is taken the following extract concerning his career. "Early in 1851 he came out to Chicago, and shortly afterward to Traverse City, or the spot where Traverse City now stands, in the employ of Mr. Boardman. In the fall of 1851, when Hannah, Lay & Company bought the Boardman interests here, Mr. Germaine entered the employ of the new firm and remained with them continuously until they sold their lumbering interests last year, 1885. Mr. Germaine was the oldest employe in their service, no other man having remained with them through their entire business career here. This fact in itself is sufficient proof of the high esteem in which he was held by Mr. Hannah and the other members of the firm. Mr. Germaine for much of this period held the very responsible position of general outside superintendent of the extensive business of this great house. In the early days of Grand Traverse history no man in the entire region was more widely known than he, and the name 'Cuy,' as he was familiarly called, was a household word throughout all northern Michigan. Early and late he was at his post in and around the mills, on the docks, among the lumber piles, in the shops, on the river, at the boarding house, about the gardens, at the stables, the hay sheds, everywhere where work was to be done there he was and his gruff but kindly salute and his quick, decided, energetic manner came to be a part and parcel of the great business which his watchful eye ever guarded zealously and faithfully." In July, 1860, Cuyler Germaine was united in marriage to Miss Anna M. Kratochivil, the ceremony having been performed at Traverse City. She is a native of St. Andrews, Austria, born January 25, 1843. She was reared to the age of thirteen years in her native land, whence she accompanied her parents to America in the year 1856. The family remained in New York a few weeks, went thence to Chicago, where they sojourned for about three months, at the expiration of which removal was made to Traverse City, Michigan, where a permanent residence was established. In due time the daughter met and married Cuyler Germaine and they became the parents of seven children, all

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Page  1079 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1079 of whom came to years of maturity and all of whom are living at the present time, in 1911. Belle is the wife of Samuel Garland, cashier of the Traverse City State Bank; Rosanna married Leslie Hall, who is an expert accountant and who was for a number of years railroad agent in Traverse City, for the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad; Mary A. is the wife of Ellis Ramsdale, who is engaged in the coal and wood business at Manistee, Michigan; William D. C. is the immediate subject of this review; Frank B. is foreman for the Germaine Bros.; Charles is a partner of W. D. C.; and Katherine is the wife of Ed. Newton, who is in the grocery business at Traverse City. The mother of the above children is now living at 333 West Sixth Street, in a beautiful home which represents the work and love of her husband and children. She has reached the age of sixty-seven years and is a woman of most pleasing personality and one who is deeply beloved by all with whom she has come into contact. Mr. Germaine of this review is indebted to the public schools of Traverse City for his preliminary educational training, the same including a course in the local high school. Thereafter he pursued a regular course of study in the Swensburg's Commercial College, at Grand Rapids, Michigan. After leaving school he secured employment as a bookkeeper in the lumber office of Hannah, Lay & Company. When that concern disposed of its lumbering interests Mr. Germaine secured a position in the bank of the same company and continued incumbent of the position of paying teller for several years. He then embarked in the newspaper business, purchasing an interest in the Traverse City Transcript, a weekly paper, of which he became editor. Hitherto this paper had been run in a very slipshod manner, commanding neither the confidence nor respect of the public or its patrons. It had a small circulation, but meagre advertisement matter and its editorial policy was of an uncertain character. In fact, at the time Mr. Germaine became publisher of the paper it was a mere weakling, rapidly going to the wall, materially and financially. However, a few issues under the new management served to convince the public that an able hand was now at the helm and in the course of three years the Traverse City Transcript became known as one of the best publications in this section of the state. It was a tremendous success in every sense of the word and ere long Mr. Germaine was harassed by purchasers, eager to- get a finger in this great money-making project. Eventually he was prevailed upon to sell it, but the new management, lacking that vital spirit which backs every successful enterprise, made a mess of it with the result that it soon returned to its former state of stagnation and in due time ceased to exist. After disposing of the newspaper business Mr. Germaine invested his capital in the livery business, in which enterprise he had associated himself with his brother Charles, the concern being known as that of Germaine Brothers, with barn and stables located on State street, opposite the Park Place Hotel. They conduct one of the finest livery stables in northern Michigan and in connection therewith run a railroad transfer line, which handles the United States mails. At the present time Mr. Germaine is largely interested in buying and selling

Page  1080 1080 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN horses, holding a sale of horses each week. He also has extensive lumber interests and is the owner of timber lands in northern Michigan. He is a man of remarkable business ability, is alert to every opportunity for advancement and his persistence and determination to forge ahead make him one of the most progressive business men in Grand Traverse county. In his political faith Mr. Germaine accords an unswerving allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and while he has no political career backing him he has a brilliant future in this connection. In 1909 he was elected mayor of Traverse City, by the most overwhelming majority ever received by any candidate for that office in this place, and he is the youngest mayor ever elected in Traverse City. He gave a most admirable administration of the municipal affairs of the city and during his incumbency of the office he did much for progress and development. In his religious faith he is a devout communicant of the Catholic church, as were his parents before him, but his wife attends and gives her support to the Methodist Episcopal church, in whose faith she was reared. Mr. Germaine is a stockholder in the People's Savings Bank and is also a stockholder in the North Assurance Company, of Detroit. In a fraternal way he is an active member of Traverse City Lodge, No. 323, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks; the Knights of Pythias; the Knights of Maccabees; the Eagles; the Woodmen; the C. S. P. S., a Bohemian lodge; and is also affiliated with the We-guetong Club and the Traverse City Driving Park Association, of which latter he is president. At the meeting of the Grand Traverse Soldiers and Sailors' Association, held in this city in September, 1910, Mr. Germaine was made honorary member of the association, the election being by acclamation. This honor was bestowed upon him because of the interest he has always taken in the old soldiers and the efficiency of his services in connection with the plans and arrangements for the reunion. Mr. Germaine has held the difficult post of chairman of the finance committee for several encampments and has more than made good in that capacity. He appreciates this honor more than anything that has ever come to him from his fellow men. At Lakeside, Ohio, on the 27th of July, 1895, was solemnized the marriage of William D. C. Germaine to Miss Ola Hull, who was born and reared in Ohio, the date of her birth being November 2, 1869. She received her educational discipline in the public schools at Wauseon, Ohio, and as she attained to years of maturity she decided upon a musical career. Her studies were pursued in the Boston Conservatory of Music, at Boston, Massachusetts, in which she was an apt and brilliant student. She is very prominent in musical circles in Traverse City and is an active and popular factor in connection with the best social affairs of the place. She is a daughter of Henry S. and Katherine Hull, both natives of Ohio, whence they removed to Michigan in 1883, location being made in Traverse City ten years later. Mr. Hull is president of the Traverse City Oval Wood Dish Company and he is also president of the People's Savings Bank, a most substantial monetary institution in this place.

Page  1081 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1081 GEORGE F. ANDRUS.-To have known Evart when it was nothing but tree stumps, to have seen it grow from a tiny settlement to the thriving and progressive centre it now is, while at the same time contributing in most effective manner to the result, has been the experience of the wellknown and well-beloved gentleman, George F. Andrus, a merchant and an old Michigan settler. He is a native son of the Wolverine state, his birth having occurred in Washington township, Macomb county, August 14, 1847, and he has paid the state the highest compliment within his power by remaining within its borders throughout the course of his life, although familiar with other scenes. The father of the subject was T. R. Andrus, who was a native of New York and who came with his father, Elon Andrus, to Macomb county about the year 1820, he being but a little lad at the time. They virtually settled in the woods, following Indian trails and startling from their haunts beasts and birds who never before had heard the fall of the foot of man. Upon the farm which they redeemed from the forest primeval the mother of George F. Andrus, Mrs. Betsey E. Andrus, died March 8, 1911, a venerable lady some eighty-seven years of age. She was born in England and came to our shores with her parents when seven years old. The names of her father and mother were Jacob and Mary Hotham, and they were pioneers in Michigan, experiencing all the peculiar hardships and joys of the lot of the early settler. The farm of the subject's parents is the present site of the town of Washington. T. R. Andrus died when he was fiftyone years of age, and his family of six sons and one daughter is still preserved intact, namely: Helen, who died in childhood; Edward, who died when about sixty years old; George F., our subject; Fred H., of Detroit; Charles L., who resides on the old homestead; Austin, who died in childhood; and T. R., a resident of Evart. The boyhood days of Mr. Andrus were spent in his native county and behind his desk in the district school he became firmly grounded in the so-called "three R's." In the year 1871, when he was about twentyfour years of age, he came to Evart and assumed a clerkship in the store of E. C. Cannon, a merchant, remaining with this gentleman for the space of five years. In 1876 he settled up a business for L. E. Cone, of Evart, and subsequent to that entered the employ of the Wolf Brothers, dry goods merchants, acting as salesman, clerk, manager, etc., and remaining in this association for seven years. In 1884 he concluded to establish himself upon a more independent footing and to this end he purchased the shoe store of Wolf Brothers and entered upon its management. He made no radical change for a period of twelve years, but in 1896 he branched out, buying the property on the corner of Main and Sixth streets, where he is now located so advantageously, and putting in a stock of dry goods and clothing in addition to shoes. He has been in business on the present large scale for fifteen years and has met with a well-deserved success. Now among the prosperous men of the locality, he has gained the just reward of his labor, his name being untarnished by shadow of wrong. Perhaps Dr. Holland may have been thinking of such as he when he said, "The secret of many a man's success in the world resides in his insight into the moods of men and his tact in dealing with them.' But this is only a part of the secret in the

Page  1082 1082 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN case of Mr. Andrus, for the greater part of it lies in the integrity of his dealings. One of his additional interests is a directorship in the Evart Savings Bank. His executive ability has another important field of operation in the management of his agricultural properties, which are of an extensive character. He owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, situated about four miles south of Marion, has eighty acres near Hartwick, this county, has eighty acres in Sylvan township and one hundred and sixty in Osceola township, thus reaching an aggregate of nearly five hundred acres of the best quality. And with this the tale is not told, for he has a good deal of wild land besides. Mr. Andrus was happily married on the 19th day of December, 1876, his chosen lady being Miss Gretta McBride, daughter of M. and Mary McBride. Mrs. Andrus as is the case with so many of the citizens of this part of Michigan, was born in New York, she being a native of Cattaraugus county. Mr. and Mrs. Andrus have one daughter, Mary E., and two sons, George and Harry, who died young. Among Mr. Andrus' claims to distinction is the fact that he is the first man to have joined the time honored Masonic fraternity in Evart. He stands high in the councils of the order and its affairs are one of his chief interests. He is entitled to wear the white plumed hat of the Knight Templar, and he belongs to the Blue Lodge and the Chapter. He is also a member of the Knights of the Maccabees, having been such from its organization. He belongs to those who pay willing allegiance to the Republican party, supporting its man and measures with unflagging loyalty. Public-spirited to the point which puts the good of the many above personal advantage, he can ever be counted upon to give his right hand to all good measures. Forty years in Evart have made it appear to him one of earth's dearest spots and he has added materially to its prosperity by his own fine business methods, while it has gladly returned the compliment by giving him generous patronage. The Andrus home is one of the most popular in Evart. JAMES JOHNSTON, of Cadillac, Michigan, was born on his father's farm in Grey township, Huron county, Ontario, Canada, April 20, 1865, the son of Scotch parents, John and Katherine (Raeper) Johnston. John Johnston was a native of Banff, Scotland, born in 1829; he died at his home in Canada in 1881. His wife, born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1834, died in Canada in 1880. They were married at Whitby, Ontario, and were the parents of six children, of whom James was the fourth born and is the only one now living. It was in 1854 that John Johnston came to America. His first location was at Whitby, where, as above stated he was married. Then he pioneered in the wilderness of Grey township, Huron county, where he cleared a tract of land and developed it into a fine farm. Here James Johnston spent the first eighteen years of his life and received his early education. The greater part of his education, however, has been gained in the broad school of practical experience. In 1883, at the age of eighteen years, Mr. Johnston came over into "the States" and at Cadillac, Michigan, went to work in a grocery store. In 1894 he engaged in the grocery business with William Kaiser, under

Page  1083 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1083 the firm name of Johnston & Kaiser, and they conducted a prosperous business until 1911, when Mr. Johnston opened an independent grocery business of his own. Mr. Johnston has for years been prominently identified with the municipal affairs of Cadillac. In 1898 he was elected supervisor from the second ward. He succeeded himself in this office, and served three terms. He served three years as a member of the Cadillac Board of Education, having been elected in 1901. In 1904, and again in 1905, he was elected mayor of Cadillac, and filled the city's chief executive office two terms. And for two years he was a member of the Police and Fire Board, having been appointed to this position in 1907. August 25, 1887, James Johnston and Elizabeth Kaiser were united in marriage, and to them has been given one son, Rae E., at this writing a student in the State University of Michigan. Mrs. Johnston is a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Long) Kaiser and, like her husband, is a native of Grey township, Huron county, Ontario. Her father, born near Toronto, Canada, died October 10, 1910; her mother, a native of Germany, is still living. In their family were ten children, of whom Mrs. Johnston was the fourth born and is one of the seven now living. Mr. Kaiser was engaged in farming in Grey township until 1885, when he came to Cadillac, Michigan. Here he farmed two years, and in 1887 entered the employ of Cobb & Mitchell, with whom he remained for a period of twenty years, until a short time before his death. For a number of years Mr. Johnston has been actively associated with both the Masons and the Odd Fellows. He is Past Master and at this writing secretary of Clam Lake Lodge, No. 331, Free and Accepted Masons; is secretary of Cadillac Chapter, No. 103, Royal Arch Masons, and has membership in Cadillac Council, No. 70, DeWitt Clinton Consistory and Saladin Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of Viola Lodge, No. 259, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is Past Chief Patriarch of Cadillac Encampment, No. 93, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the Grand Encampment of Michigan he is Grand High Priest. Politically, Mr. Johnston is a Republican. JOHN C. HOUGHTON, who is the present able and popular incumbent of the office of sheriff of Osceola county, Michigan, is a prominent and influential resident of the village of Hersey, which is the county seat. He was born in Ionia county, Michigan, on the 25th of April, 1870, and is a son of Colonel M. B. Houghton, a native of the state of New York, whence he came to Michigan in the early pioneer period of its history, when a youth of eighteen years. He located at Saranac, Ionia county, where he was long identified with his trade as a mason. He was the second sheriff of Osceola county and during the war of the Rebellion gave most efficient service as a soldier for a period of five years and three months. He married Mary E. Keith, who was likewise born in the state of New York, and to this union were born two sons and one daughter, all of whom are living, John C. being the youngest in the family. Colonel Houghton was summoned to the life eternal when in his sixty-ninth year.

Page  1084 1084 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN To the public schools of Osceola county is John C. Houghton indebted for his early educational privileges and he was a child of but ten months at the time of his parents' removal from Ionia county to this county. He supplemented his preliminary training by a four years' course in the Poucher Business College, at Ionia, and for one year was office manager and bookkeeper for a business house and later was identified with the cigar business for two years. Thereafter he was in Grand Rapids for one year and from 1893 to 1908 he was engaged in the cigar business at Tustin. In politics he has ever accorded a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, and was elected sheriff of Osceola county. He then disposed of his other business and established his home at Hersey, where he assumed the responsibilities of his position. For nine years prior to his election as sheriff he was incumbent of the position of justice of the peace. He was constable for one year and was a member of the board of trustees of the village of Tustin for four years. On the 14th of July, 1897, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Houghton to Miss Lulu M. Bradley, a daughter of James and Laura (Bostwick) Bradley, both of whom are deceased. To this union have been born two children-a boy and a girl,-Morris B. and Jerrine. Fraternally Mr. Houghton is a member of the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Brotherhood of America and he and his wife are affiliated with the Order of the Eastern Star. ERASTUS R. DAILEY.-A man of broad capabilities, resourceful and quick to seize and utilize opportunities, Erastus R. Dailey has for many years been prominently identified with the highest interests of Empire, Leelanau county, and through his persistent energy and perseverance has done much to further the improvements of this thriving village. He was born, October 13, 1854, at Crown Point, New York, and there spent the first four years of his life. John Dailey, his father, was born in Vermont, of New England ancestry. He married Polly Pierce, a native of New York state, where he was engaged in lumbering until 1858. Coming then with his wife and three children to Michigan, he continued operations as a lumberman in Frankfort for a while. Going thence to Portage Lake, now known as Onekama, he operated a muley-saw in a mill a short time, after which he entered the employ of Hannah, Lay & Company, lumber dealers. Subsequently embarking in the lumber business on his own account, he carried it on successfully until his death, in 1887. He did considerable pioneer work in northern Michigan, assisting among other things in surveying and cutting out the first wagon road between Manistee and Traverse City. Receiving a practical common school education in the district schools, Erastus R. Dailey began as soon as old enough to be of use to assist his father in the management of his business, and at the age of eighteen years had sole charge of a lumber camp consisting of from twenty-five to thirty men with their teams. He subsequently started in business for himself as a manufacturer and shipper of lumber, and met with such good success in his undertakings that he decided to broaden his

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Page  1085 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1085 field of work, and embarked in the lumber business in Chicago, where he sold all kinds of forest products. Returning from. that city to Onekama, Michigan, Mr. Dailey was there a lumber manufacturer and dealer until 1888, when he was induced to come to Empire to take charge of the business of the Wilce Company, including the management of its extensive mills. With a natural aptitude for his position as manager, and thoroughly familiar with its requirements, he became a dominant factor in enlarging his employer's operations, and while thus engaged laid out and superintended the building of the logging railroad that is now known as the Empire & Southeastern Railroad. Mr. Dailey has been very active in local affairs. He had the honor of serving as the first president of the village of Empire, and at different times has served as town treasurer. He is now president of the Empire Land & Improvement Company, and has been interested in shipping, owning boats plying upon the lakes. During his residence in this part of northern Michigan, Mr. Dailey has witnessed wondrous changes, one of the most wonderful being the matter of transporting the local mails. When he came into the wilderness the mail was carried on foot, by Indians. As the country was opened up, mail was carried on a sledge drawn by dogs, and these were superseded by ponies with mail bags slung across their backs. As public highways were laid out through this part of the state, wagons were used to carry the mail bags, and as soon as, routes were established between villages and towns the stage coaches took the mails from place to place. The many railways now traversing the country in every direction make mail transportation and communication easy and rapid, bringing every part of our Union in close touch with daily occurrences. Mr. Dailey married, in 1886, Marcella Mane, of Manistee county, Michigan, the daughter of one of Michigan's early pioneers. Fraternally Mr. Dailey is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees, and politically he is a strong Republican. Although he is not connected by membership with any religious organization, he is liberal in his views, and a willing and generous contributor toward all worthy causes. WILLIAM J. MURRAY, of Tawas City, Iosco county, Michigan, is general manager of the branch office of the Michigan Cereal Company, buyers and sellers of all kinds of grain, the main office of which concern is at Port Huron, Michigan. The elevator at Tawas City was constructed in 1908 and its lateral dimensions are thirty by one hundred feet, the same being two stories in height. Mr. Murray was born at East Tawas, Michigan, on the 3d of June, 1876, and he is a son of James and Eliza (Morris) Murray, both of whom were born and reared in the Dominion of Canada, whence they removed to the fine old Wolverine state in their youth. Location was made at East Tawas and there their marriage was solemnized on February 1, 1867. The father was a blacksmith by trade and a good mechanic; he also sold agricultural implements and during his entire life time he was recognized as a man of sterling integrity of character and fine and honorable business principles. He was summoned to the life eternal in 1904, and his widow is living in East Tawas. Both were highly esteemed citizens in the com

Page  1086 1086 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN munity in which they long resided and they were the parents of four children, namely,-Edward, who maintains his home at Buffalo; Janet, who is bookkeeper for the Michigan Cereal Company of Tawas City; William J., to whom this sketch is dedicated; and Weston H., who is deceased. After completing the curriculum of the graded schools of East Tawas William J. Murray attended the local high school. In 1899 he entered the employ of the Michigan Cereal Company in the capacity of buyer and contractor for peas and beans. So satisfactory were his services in that connection that upon the establishment of the branch office at Tawas City he was offered the position as manager thereof. He is a worthy and faithful man of business and enjoys the full confidence of the firm by which he is employed. Politically he endorses the cause of the Republican party and while a resident of East Tawas he was there a member of the village board of aldermen. He is now, in 1911, a member of the village board of supervisors of Tawas City. At Tawas City, in the year 1910, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Murray to Miss Ethel O'Brien, who was born and reared at Detroit. Mr. and Mrs. Murray are popular factors in the best social circles of Tawas City and they are devout members of the Presbyterian church. DANIEL P. McMuLLEN.-Although a native and, during the first sixteen years of his life, a resident of Kent county, Canada, province of Ontario, his residence of forty-three years in this state, thirty-one of them as a citizen of Cheboygan, has engendered in Daniel P. McMullen a thorough devotion to American institutions and a special regard for the state of Michigan and the welfare of its people in every way. He has mingled freely in its social life, taken an active part in its industries, aided in the administration of several important public offices, and for a time given voice to the public opinion of the state as the publisher of a newspaper. In all of these departments of endeavor he has shown himself a true and loyal American citizen, altogether worthy of the confidence and regard of the people of the country, and he has enjoyed this in a marked degree. Mr. McMullen was born on September 8, 1852, and is a son of John A. and Mary Ann (Pegg) McMullen, the former born in Canada in 1811 and the latter in England in 1826. The father was a farmer of industry and skill and a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He died in 1873. The mother is still living. They had seven children, three of whom are living, Daniel being the second born of the seven. He passed his time in his native county until he reached the age of sixteen and obtained his education in the public schools there. In 1868 he came to Michigan and located at Bay City. There he learned his trade as a printer, and in 1871 purchased the Wenona Herald, which was published in what was then known as the town of Wenona but is now West Bay City. In 1872 the paper was moved to Bay City. In the year last mentioned Mr. McMullen left the Herald and engaged in job printing, which he followed for a number of years. He then moved to Alpena and during the next few years published the Alpema Reporter. In the spring of 1881 he took up his residence in

Page  1087 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1087 Cheboygan, and during the succeeding fifteen years he was connected with the Cheboygan Tribune as manager. He proved himself to be careful and capable, and the paper flourished and grew in prosperity and influence under his direction. An impulse within him to have a business of his own, which had been deepening in intensity for several years, induced him, in 1899, to start a job printing establishment, which also deals in stationery and general office supplies, and is known as the McMullen Printing Company. Mr. McMullen is the proprietor of this establishment and its inspiration and controlling force. His business capacity makes it prosperous and steadily expansive in its trade, and his strict integrity and genial manner render it popular with the public, while the completeness of its stock, its excellence in workmanship and superiority in every way give it a strengthening hold on its patronage and a firm footing in business circles. Mr. McMullen has taken a cordial and helpful interest in the public affairs of the city and county of his home, and has long been recognized as a potent force for good in all that concerns them. He served as mayor of Cheboygan in 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893, being the first Republican ever elected to that office. His activity in behalf of his party and the masterly manner in which he discharged his official duties as executive of the city gave him prominence in a larger field in the political world, and in 1898 he was elected state senator from the Twenty-ninth senatorial district of the state. In this office also, his services were highly satisfactory and gave him such strength with the people that he was re-elected in 1900, and the result was hailed with approval all over the state. But he was not destined to serve out his second term. Fate, in the form of the leading men of his party in his home city, destined him for another position of importance. In 1902 he was appointed postmaster of Cheboygan. At the end of his term in 1906 he was re-appointed, and in 1910 was commissioned for a third term. His services in this office have been signal in their value to the patrons of the postoffice, and have won him the highest commendations from all classes of the people. His first consideration in the performance of his duties is always the convenience of the public, and in obedience to it he gives all classes without distinction every facility in postal matters his powers and circumstances will allow. Deeply interested as Mr. McMullen is in every phase of the life of his community, and zealous in behalf of every good agency at work in it, it is a matter of course that he is prominent in fraternal circles. He is a member of Nekahnis Lodge No. 58, Knights of Pythias, and was the order's grand chancellor of the state in 1897 and 1898. He also belongs to Cheboygan Lodge No. 504, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. GEORGE N. P. CARLETON.-Since 1893 George N. P. Carleton has been a prominent and influential resident of East Tawas, Iosco county, Michigan, and since 1903 he has lived virtually retired from active participation in business affairs. He was born in Saint Clair county, Michigan, in December, 1833, a son of Israel and Nancy (Deming) Carleton, both of whom were born in the state of New Hampshire.

Page  1088 1088 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Israel Carleton removed from the state of his birth to Saratoga county, New York, in 1830, and later in the same year he emigrated still further west, locating in Saint Clair county, Michigan, where he followed the trades of tanner and shoemaker. In those early days Saint Clair county was practically a wilderness and it abounded in all kinds of wild game, both large and small. After his arrival in Michigan Israel Carleton entered a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of government land, the same being situated on the banks of the Saint Clair river, in what is now Saint Clair county. He raised his farm to a high state of cultivation and it became known as one of the finest and most fertile estates in Michigan. For years he was a resident of Saint Clair county, but he died, in 1858. To Mr. and Mrs. Israel Carleton were born nine children, two of whom are living in 1911, namely,-George N. P., the immediate subject of this review; and Ezra, who is proprietor of the "Five Gables," of Port Huron, Michigan. The father was summoned to the life eternal in February, 1857, at the age of sixty-nine years and his cherished and devoted wife passed away in 1860. George N. P. Carleton was reared to the invigorating influences of the old pioneer farm and he secured his early education in the district schools of Saint Clair county, later supplementing this trainng by a thorough course of study in the Saint Clair Academy. He assumed the active responsibilities of life by beginning to teach school in his native county. After two years' identification with the pedagogic profession he turned his attention to the grocery business at Marysville and later he entered upon a contract to supply the steamboats with wood. In 1860 he was appointed postmaster and custom-house officer at Marysville, which position he held for a period of four years. He then entered the employ of the American Express Company, on the Huron Shore Line, on boats plying between Detroit and Mackinac. In 1871 he established his home at East Tawas, where he became agent for the Moore & Tanner Lumber Company, retaining that position from 1880 to 1890. He then went to Osceola, where he initiated operations in lumbering on his own account, he and Mr. Tanner, independent of the firm of Moore & Tanner, buying and working timber lands on an extensive scale. He was interested in this line of enterprise for a period of ten years, the firm being known for two years as Tanner, Shein & Carleton. This concern turned out as much as three million feet of lumber a year, while that of Moore & Tanner turned out some twenty million feet per annum. In 1890 Mr. Carleton's lumber operations at Osceola terminated and in 1893 he removed to East Tawas, where he engaged in the coal business. He owned his own docks and furnished coal for the steam boats, handling fully ten thousand tons of coal per year. This business continued up to 1903, when Mr. Carleton disposed of it to the Tawas Sugar Company. He is now living retired, in the full enjoyment of former years of earnest toil and endeavor. He is a grand old man, seventy-seven years of age, hale and hearty, genial and kindly, with a word of good cheer for everyone. Throughout his entire life Mr. Carleton has adhered strictly to the golden rule and it may be said concerning him that the list of his friends is coincident with that of his acquaintances. On the 9th of February, 1865, was solemnized the marriage of Mr.

Page  1089 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1089 Carleton to lMiss Lizzie A. IHuse, who was born and reared in New Hampshire and who is now living, at the age of seventy years. To Mr. and Mrs. Carleton were born three children, but one, Frederick W., died in early youth. Mrs. Susan Richards is living in East Tawas, where her husband is in the hardware business. Charles H. is in business in Port Arthur. Politically Mr. Carleton endorses the cause of the Republican party and during his residence in East Tawas he has been councilman for six years and for four years he was a member of the board of supervisors. He has been a valued and appreciative member of the Knights of the Maccabees since 1882 and is a charter imtember in the lodge in this section of the state. In their religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Carleton are united with the Methodist Episcopal church, to which they have contributed liberally by their time and means. VICTOR D. SPRAGuE. —Like most other leading men of thought and action in our country, in business engagements, in professional work, in military or naval service and in public life, Victor D. Sprague, one of the most prominent lawyers of northern Michigan, was born and reared on a farm, and passed his early years in close and continued communion with Nature. Like others, too, he drew from her vast storehouse of inspiration strong lessons of self-reliance, independence, and ready adaptability to circumstances, with resources available for every requirement or emergency. The force of character he gained and the attributes of useful manhood he developed under the tuition of this master teacher have been of inestimable service to him in all his subsequent life, and are now the essential elements of his makeup as they have been the sources of his success in his interesting career. Mr. Sprague is a native of Vermontville township, Eaton county, Michigan, where his life began on November 21, 1869. He was the last born of the four children'of his parents, Pandora A. and Amanda J. (McNeil) Sprague, the former born in the state of New York in 1829 and the latter in New Jersey. The mother died during the childhood of her son Victor and the father in 1909. He came to Michigan and located in Eaton county with his parents in 1836. They were pioneers in their locality, settling in the wilderness and braving all the hardships and privations of frontier life. Its dangers, also, were great and their situation required fortitude and constant vigilance. Although the mother's spirit was resolute and daring her health was frail, and she did not live long in her new home. But the father persevered in his undertaking, and in course of time transformed his wild land into a valuable and highly productive farm and a comfortable home for himself and his offspring. He lived on it and cultivated it until advancing years admonished him to retire from active pursuits. Hie then moved to the village of Vermontville, where he passed his last days, at rest from arduous labor, free from cankering care and secure in the esteem and good will of the whole county he had done much to develop and improve. He was a man of local prominence and influence, filled a number of township offices, held active membership for many years in the Masonic fraternity, was long an ardent worker in the Methodist

Page  1090 1090 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Episcopal church and always a firm and faithful Republican in politics from the organization of the party, having previous to that been a Whig. Victor D. Sprague lived at home with his father until he was fourteen years old, attending the school in the vienity of his residence and assisting in the labors of the farm. From 1884 to 1888 he was employed in a farm implement establishment, then secured at the high school in Charlotte some degree of more advanced education than the country school of his boyhood could give him. After leaving that institution he attended the law department of the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1892. On January 1, 1893, he located at Cheboygan and began the general practice of his profession in which he is still engaged. He has risen by his ability and skill as a lawyer to the first rank in the profession in this part of the country, and to consequence and influence among his professional brethren and the people generally. He is now president of the Cheboygan County Bar Association, city attorney, attorney for the First National Bank and the Cheboygan County Savings Bank, a director of the Cheboygan Paper Mill Company and a director and the treasurer of the Embury-Martin Lumber Company. His practice is large and constantly increasing in volume and value, and his services are sought in every case of importance that comes up for trial in Cheboygan and the adjoining counties, in both the lower and the higher courts. As a means of improvement in the community and a source of enjoyment for its people the fraternal life around him has appealed forcibly to Mr. Sprague, and he has taken a very active part in it for many years. Ile is a member of the Order of Elks, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Woodmen of the World, and his connection with each is highly valued by its other members. In politics he is an uncompromising and zealous Republican, and holds a leading place in the councils of his party. He was one of the delegates from this state to the National Republican Convention which met in Philadelphia in 1900, and in city, county and state politics he has long been one of the controlling forces. Mr. Sprague was married on October 2, 1894, to Miss Gertrude Davis, who was born in Eaton county, Michigan, and is a daughter of Warren and Eliza (Allen) Davis, natives of New York state and the parents of two children, Mrs. Sprague and her sister, Jessie. The mother died some years ago, but the father is living In Charlotte, Eaton county, and is a prominent citizen and leading farmer of that county. He is a Democrat in politics and has filled a number of township offices. His religious connection is with the United Brethren church. Three children have been born in the Sprague household, Don A., Doris M. and Jessie E. They are all living and still members of the parental family circle. The parents enjoy in a marked degree the esteem of the people of all classes in the city and county. WILLIAM B. KELLY.-The present popular and efficient incumbent of the office of postmaster of Tawas City, losco county, Michigan, is William B. Kelly, who has here resided since 1867. Mr. Kelly was born at Kingston, province of Ontario. Canada, on the 14th of November,

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Page  1091 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1091 1844, a son of William and Mary (Wiley) Kelly, both of whom passed their entire lives in the Dominion of Canada. The father was identified with the building and stone business during the major portion of his active business career and he and his wife reared to maturity a family of four children, two of whom are deceased. Those living are: William B., the immediate subject of this review; and Eliza, who is now the wife of Samuel Hamilton and who resided at Kingston, Ontario. As a young man Mr. Kelly, of this sketch, learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, at which he became an expert workman. His preliminary educational training consisted of such advantages as were afforded in the public schools of his native place. In May, 1865, shortly after he had attained his legal majority, he decided to seek his fortunes in the United States. He first located at Buffalo, New York, where he was engaged in the work of his trade and later he resided for a time in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, coming to Tawas City, Michigan, in the year 1867, since which time he has been a valued citizen of this place. In 1883 Mr. Kelly became interested in the furniture and undertaking business, being the proprietor of a splendid establishment, in connection with which he also handled sewing machines and wall paper. With this line of enterprise he was identified for a period of thirteen years, and in 1897 he became postmaster. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and he has held many important offices of public trust and responsibility. In 1867, just after his arrival in Tawas City, Mr. Kelly was elected to the office of township treasurer and he has also been village clerk and a member of the board of public works, in connection with which latter office he did much to improve the general appearance and to promote the welfare of Tawas City. For seventeen years he was justice of the peace and on the 1st of June, 1897, he assumed the responsibilities of the office of postmaster of this city. He is postmaster now, in 1911, and his continuous service during the long intervening years to the present time are a sufficient indication of his proficiency as a public official. During his tenure of office he has brought the office from fourth to third class and in addition to the mail of Tawas City he has charge of two rural free delivery routes. Mr. Kelly has ever given his support to all measures and enterprises projected for the general good and he has been a co-operant factor in many movements which have been of marked benefit to the township and county. Honored and respected by all, the high position which he occupies in public regard has come to him not alone as the result of his success in business, but also because of the straightforward, honorable policy he has ever followed. Honor and integrity are synonyms with his name, and there is no citizen in Iosco county more highly esteemed than is William B. Kelly. In the year 1870 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kelly to Miss Agnes Smith, who was born and reared at Kingston and who is a daughter of James and Jane (Riche) Smith of Kingston. To this union has been born one daughter, Gertrude, who is now the wife of Will C. Davidson, and who resides at Grand Marais, Michigan. In their religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are devout members of the Presbyterian Vol. m-9

Page  1092 1092 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN church and in a fraternal way he is a member of the time-honored Masonic order of forty-two years standing; and of the Knights of the Maccabees, being a charter member of both orders. THE T. WILCE COMPANY, which is in fact the Empire Lumber Company, was established in Empire, Leelanau county, Michigan, in 1887 by the late Thomas Wilce, when, in that year, he purchased the small saw mill operated by Potter & Struthers. Thomas Wilce was born in Cornwall, England, and while yet a young man, in 1848, emigrated to the United States, locating in Chicago, where his name is still in existence, the head office, and the flooring manufacturing plant, of the T. Wilce Company being located at the corner of Twenty-second and Throop streets. Mr. Wilce died March 2, 1897, and the business is now owned by his sons, E. Harvey Wilce, George Wilce, and Thomas Wilce, Jr., who are conducting its affairs under the firm's original name. Thoroughly trained by their father in business methods and matters, and having had a practical experience in the handling of lumber in all of its forms, the members of the present firm have maintained its supremacy among the leading lumber concerns of Northern Michigan. The present large mill at Empire was built soon after the destruction of the original mill by fire, and has a capacity of from fifteen million to twenty million feet of lumber per year, and keeps many men busily employed. The founder of this firm was a man of great enterprise, keen-sighted and energetic, and in order to facilitate his business operations built, in 1892, the railroad known as the Empire & Southeastern Railway as a logging road, and this was later extended to what is now known as Empire Junction, where connection is made with a branch of the Manistee and Northeastern Railroad. The completion of this road meant much to Empire and its surrounding country, becoming an important factor in the upbuilding and material growth of this part of the state. This firm has large property holdings in Empire and adjoining townships, its timber tracts containing from ten thousand to fifteen thousand acres of woodland, while near the village of Empire it has a farm of several hundred acres which is under cultivation, and ready to be converted into peach and apple orchards. The interest of Messrs. Wilce in the affairs of Empire as regards its best and highest interests is as genuine as that of the native-born citizen. On their holdings they pay at least two-thirds of the village tax, and as public-spirited and liberal-minded men are ever ready to support beneficial projects, and to lend their aid towards the further improvement of the place. E. Harvey Wilce is the only member of the firm residing at Empire, the other brothers having homes in Chicago. On a hill commanding an unobstructed view of Lake Michigan, he has erected a commodious bungalow, which he and his family occupy at least a part of each year. It is a very handsome structure, and with its attractive surroundings is a most delightful place of residence, and an ornament to the community.

Page  1093 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1093 OLIVER L. MILLARD.-In past ages the history of a country was a record of wars and conquests; today it is largely the record of commercial activity, and those whose names are foremost in its annals are the leaders in business circles. Oliver L. Millard is one of the strong and influential men whose lives have become an essential part of the history of IIersey and Osceola county. He has ever made manifest the fact that he is a man of versatile abilities, for beginning life as an agriculturist he eventually entered the hardware business; he has served the public interests as county clerk and in other capacities; and he is now one of the prominent figures in Osceola county banking circles. He is at present connected in the important capacity of president with the Hersey Banking Company. Great executive ability, keen foresight, energy and the ability to make realities out of fine ideas have united in this gentlemen. Mr. Millard is a native son of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in Niagara county, June 26, 1845, and his father, J. A. Millard, also being a native of that state. The elder Mr. Millard was a farmer by occupation, and he came to Michigan in the year 1857, when the subject must have been a lad about twelve years of age. He came to Hillsdale county and being impressed by its advantages concluded to make it his permanent location. This was the scene of his intelligent and successful endeavors as an exponent of the great basic industry and he lived to see the changes and progress of a period of eighty-three years, that being his age at the time he was summoned to the Great Beyond. His father, 0. L. Millard, also claimed New York as his native heath, and glancing back another generation we find the Millards on English soil. The first Millards to come to the "land of the free and the home of the brave" were three brothers, who settled in various sections of the new country, their descendants now being numerous. The mother of him whose name initiates this review was one Narcisse Harann, a daughter of the fair state in which her husband was born, and she was of Scotch descent, thus two of the stanchest and most valuable of national elements entering into the composition of the subject. This worthy woman preceded her husband to the other land, her years numbering sixty-two at the time of her demise. There were three children in the family, two being sons and one a daughter, but the latter died at the age of eleven years. Mr. Millard's brother Bertran Millard, died in Detroit, and this leaves the subject as the only surviving member of his family. Mr. Millard had attended the schools of his native county for several years when the family came to Michigan in search of new fortunes. He continued his educational discipline in the schools of Hillsdale county and knew the various wholesome experiences of the lad who is bred in the country and spends his idle as well as his active moments "near to nature's heart," as the poet has expressed it. When he was a very young man he established a household of his own by marriage, Miss Maria J. Miner, a native of the Wolverine state and a daughter of James H. Miner, becoming his bride. Their happy union was celebrated January 1, 1867, in Hillsdale county. Mr. Millard pursued agricultural activities for some years in the county in which

Page  1094 1094 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN his parents were located, and in March, 1873, made a radical step by removing to Osceola county and locating in Rose Lake township, on a farm which he secured as a government homestead. He cleared up some sixty acres of this fine tract, his energy and courage soon making the "wilderness blossom as the rose," and there he and his wife maintained their home for a matter of nine years. Mr. Millard is a lifelong Republican, a man whose allegiance to the party is of the valuable active type, ever ready to be at any personal sacrifice for the cause of the party he believes capable of bringing the greatest good to the country. In 1882 his unswerving loyalty received unmistakable recognition by his election to the important office of county clerk, and in order to be more centrally located for the performance of the duties of the trust imposed in him, he and his wife removed to Hersey, where they have ever since played a prominent and praiseworthy part in the social and other life of this favored community. In 1886 the subject embarked in the mercantile career, which he was to find adapted to his natural gifts, his particular line being hardware. He continued in this business for well nigh twenty years and he garnered in the fullness of time the generous harvest which is the just recompense of indomitable industry, spotless integrity and remarkable enterprise. He has witnessed the great material advancement of Hersey, while at the same time contributing in fullest measure to this. In 1905 Mr. Millard sold out his hardware interests and since that time has devoted his energies to other matters. Two years preceding the sale of his commercial interests he had organized the Hersey Banking Company, of which he became president and he still retains that honorable position. His interests in banking are not limited to that sound and conservative institution, but he is likewise identified with the First State Savings Bank of Evart and with the Leroy Exchange Bank. His public life has included in addition to his service above referred to a tenure of office as township treasurer. The fraternal affiliations of Mr. Millard are of an important order, for he is one of the prominent Masons of the section, a member of the Royal Arcanum and interested in all the affairs of this ancient and august order. He is public-spirited and his thirty-seven years residence in Osceola county has bred in him a great loyalty to its interests. Mr. and Mrs. Millard have two children. Herbert A. is cashier of the Hersey Bank and Emma L. is the wife of Frank McTntyre, of IIersey. CARROLL E. MILER, M. D., Cadillac, Michigan, was born in Portland, Maine, February 1, 1851, a descendant of Puritan ancestry, the original representative of the Miller family having come to America at a very early day and settled in New England. Through another line Dr. Miller traces his lineage to the famous Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The Doctor's grandfather Miller was a sea captain, whose ship plied the waters of many oceans. His two sons, Charles Carroll and Judson J., were Baptist ministers, the latter having preached in Boston and Worcester, Massachusetts, for more than thirty years; the former, the

Page  1095 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1095 father of the subject of this sketch, having spent his years of ministerial labor in Michigan and Wisconsin. Charles Carroll Miller was born in Kennebunkport, Maine, in 1832, and died at Cadillac, Michigan, in 1908. After finishing his academic education and being ordained for the ministry, he came west to Michigan and settled at Grand Rapids. That was about 1856. After preaching there for a time, he held pastorates at Augusta, Wisconsin, and Stanton, M/ichigan, where his influence for good was deep and farreaching. Politically, he was an active Republican, and frequently stumped the state in the interest of his party. Among his warm personal friends he numbered Abraham Lincoln, Zachariah Chandler and James G. Blaine. His widow, Miriam C. (Dyer) Miller, born in Portland, Maine, in 1833, is now a resident of Cadillac. She bore him six children, all of whom are now living, namely: Carroll E., Frank, Judson, Ashley, Fannie and Jessie. Ashley, following in the footsteps of his father, is a minister of the Baptist church, while Frank is engaged in the practice of law. The elder daughter, Fannie, is the wife of Mr. Frank Ashley. In 1856, at the age of five years, Carroll E. Miller was brought by his parents to Michigan, the family home being at that time established in Grand Rapids. He went through the grade and high schools of Grand Rapids and then took a course in the State Agricultural College at Lansing, where he graduated in 1872, with the degree of Bachelor of Science. From 1872 to 1875 he was superintendent of schools at Neilsville, Wisconsin, following which he entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, of which institution he is a graduate with the class of 1879. From the beginning of his college life he paid his own way, and while at Rush Medical he worked every day in the Chicago Times office from 2 to 6 o'clock A. M. This gave him little time for rest or recreation, but it enabled him to get through college and to get through with honor. Indeed, he had the high honor of being president of his class. In March, 1879, immediately after his graduation, he came to Cadillac, where he has since conducted a general practice, specializing, however, on the treatment of nervous diseases, in which he has been very successful. At one time, by appointment, he served as United States examining surgeon for the pension department. Thoroughly abreast of the times regarding medical matters, Dr. Miller is, of course, identified with various medical organizations, including the Tri-County Medical Society, of which he is an ex-president, the State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. Other fraternal organizations in which he has membership are the Delta Tau Delta, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias and Masons. In the Masonic order he has received the degrees of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery, and has membership in the Traverse City Commandery, Knights Templar. He is Past Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias Lodge. Politically, like his father before him, he is a Republican. January 1, 1875, at Augusta, Wisconsin, Dr. Carroll E. Miller and Miss Alice E. Turner were united in marriage, and to them have been given three children: Devere, a graduate of Rush Medical College. is

Page  1096 1096 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN engaged in practice with his father; Jessie, wife of H. L. Edgerton, and Carroll E., Jr. Mrs. Miller is an accomplished and popular woman, having the honor, at this writing, of being Regent and State Treasurer of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is a native of Auburn, New York, and is the youngest of the four children of the Rev. George W. and Abigail (Judd) Turner, the others being: De Vere, Jessie and Judson. FRANK PROCTOR.-A leading merchant and prominent citizen of Hersey, Osceola county, is Frank Proctor, who is distinctly entitled to representation in this compilation. While as a prosperous business man he has given close attention to his private affairs, he has never forgotten or ignored the bond of common interest which should unite the people of every community, and he has always been ready to promote progress in every line. He is the worthy son of a father who was one of the leading lumber men of this part of Michigan and one of its most estimable citizens. Mr. Proctor was born in Montealm county March 7, 1858, and he has paid the state the sincerest compliment within his power by spending almost his entire life within its borders. His father, Joseph Proctor, is a native of Vermont, and his identification with this state dates from the year 1850. He was a comparatively young man when he came here and located in Ionia county, where he married Miss Mary Smith. They located at Crystal Lake, Montcalm county, and it was about 1872 when he came on to Osceola county, where he engaged in lumbering. His identification with Hersey came about in the year - 1872. The elder Mr. Proctor is still living, a resident of Hersey, his years numbering seventy-seven, and his devoted wife also survives, her years being seventy-eight. This estimable couple became the parents of twelve children, ten of whom were sons and two daughters, and seven of whom survive at this writing. Of the twelve sons and daughters of the Proctor family he whose name initiates this review is the second in order of birth. He was reared and partly educated in his native Montealm county and was about fifteen years of age at the time of the family's removal from that section. He finished his educational discipline in the schools of Hersey and when a very young man adopted the milling business, which he continued to follow until 1886. He then made a radical change by engaging in the grocery business at Hersey, building up a large and enthusiastic trade and eventually branching out further by adding the produce business and the general merchandise business as well. He found a commercial career much to his liking, his natural gifts in this line ever directing him wisely and his upright business methods inspiring confidence in his patrons. He built his present store in 1907. Mr. Proctor assumed marital relations on December 1, 1881, Kate N. Tabor, of Muskegon, Michigan, becoming his wife. At that time Mr. Proctor was engaged in the milling business and was stationed near Muskegon, but they met first at Hersey. They are the parents of three children, two sons and a daughter. The eldest, Earl G., is asso

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Page  1097 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1097 ciated with his father in business; Clarence F. is in attendance at school at Hersey; and Marjorie is also in school. Mr. Proctor is a stanch Democrat, supporting in an effectual manner the men and measures promulgated by that party. He has always taken an active interest in matters political, enjoys the confidence of his associates, and was for some years president of the village. At the present time he is treasurer of the school board and has held this office continuously since engaging in business in Hersey. He is to be numbered among Hersey's substantial citizens, is a considerable property owner, and the Proctor Block is the best and most modern of the business blocks of the place. He is one of those who find pleasure and profit in lodge life and is a prominent Mason, his name being enrolled in the Blue Lodge. He is also a member of the Eastern Star, of which he is worthy patron and holds the office of commander of the Knighted Order of the Modern Maccabees. He has been identified with northern Michigan and its progress for thirty-eight years and that in the happiest possible fashion. Mr. Proctor's mother, whose maiden name was Mary Smith, is a native of Oakland, Michigan. Her father, A.N C. Smith, was one of the prominent men of his locality and held the office of county surveyor of Tonia county. He was, indeed, one of Michigan's earliest settlers. JOHN F. NELSON.-Jennings is a very cosmopolitan town. It is a place in which true merit and ability in any line will surely be appreciated and rewarded. It has drawn its inhabitants from all over the United States and from different parts of the Old Country. Perhaps there are no foreigners who make better American citizens than the Swedish. They are industrious to a fault; they are honest and enterprising; they are ambitious and capable. John F. Nelson, the general merchant at Jennings, Michigan, is possessed of all of these characteristics and a great many more that go to make up success. He has made his life both happy and useful. He has given of his best and the value of a man's work is gauged by how well he performs it. From the time he first landed in America up to the present time his career has been interesting. He was born in Sweden in 1860, where he attended the public schools. At the age of twenty-two he found himself without any special training along definite lines, with very little money and no prospects. He believed that in America he would find more opportunity to make his way in the world than in his native country. He, therefore, embarked on an emigrant boat and crossed the Atlantic, landing in Boston. He went at once to Chicago and found himself alone in the city with very little money. He sought and found temporary work, but soon moved on to Leland, Michigan. After staying there a short time he went to Mancelona, where he secured work as a furnace hand. He only took the job as he needed money and at the time could not get any other work, but as a matter of fact he did not care for that kind of work. As soon as he had a little money ahead again he went to Cadillac, Michigan, and from there to a little lumber town called Round Lake at that time. He secured work around a general store, doing anything

Page  1098 1098 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN that was required of him and thus gaining an insight into all branches of the business. After a short time he went to Manton and later to Jennings, where the Patrons of Industry had a store. He had by this time shown his ability as a business man and he was placed in charge of the store, which position he occupied until 1893. At that time he felt that he did not want to keep on working for others, but he wanted to reap the rewards of his labors himself. He, therefore, opened a store of his own, carrying a line of groceries only at first. By degrees he added other lines to his stock and made additions to his building to accommodate the increased goods. Now he carries a large stock of general merchandise and he has prospered beyond his expectations. In 1891, while he was living in Jennings, he married Miss Emily Brink, of Manton, a young lady of Swedish birth, who came to America with her parents when she was a little child. Her family located in Manton, where they lived until their death. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have four children, as follows,-John Leonard, born in 1892; Nellie Marie, born in 1897; Anna Fredericka, born in 1899; Clara Elvira, born in 1901. Mr. Nelson is a member of two fraternal orders, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Maccabees. He has identified himself with America and is greatly interested in all matters pertaining to the affairs of the nation. He was formerly a Democrat and was appointed to the office of post master under Cleveland's administration. He held this office for seven years, in connection with his store. He has been town clerk and town treasurer. He was one of the organizers of the Jennings high school board, on which he holds the position of secretary. He is greatly interested in all educational matters, not only because of his own children, but for the sake of the future of the country. Mr. Nelson does not now tie himself down to the platform of any political party, as he has seen the evils of party spirit. He rather considers the man himself and will vote for the one he considers best suited to the office, regardless of the party he represents. Since his arrival in America Mr. Nelson has not only made a good living for himself and his family, but he has won the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens and has done much for the good of his adopted country. DAYTON D. SELBY.-A wide-awake, brainy and enterprising man, Dayton D. Selby, of Empire, Michigan, is well known in Leelanau county as editor of the Empire Journal, a bright and newsy sheet, which he has developed into a good-paying newspaper proposition, it being probably one of the best-known journals of the county. A native of Michigan, he was born, July 13, 1877, in Allegan county, at Diamond Springs. Mr. Selby's father, Frank C. Selby, was born and reared in New York state. At the beginning of the Civil war he enlisted as a soldier in a Michigan regiment, in which he served until the close of the conflict. He was afterwards located in various parts of Michigan, including Ottawa, Muskegon, Newaygo and Mason counties. His wife, whose maiden name was Mattie Platt, was a native of Ohio. As a boy Dayton D. Selby lived in different parts of the state, and

Page  1099 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1099 while in Newaygo county, began his school life. The family removing from there to Hart, Michigan, he continued his studies there until sixteen years old when another removal of his parents found him in Scottville, where he completed a full course in the high school. There Mr. Selby began his newspaper career in the printing office of the Scottville Enterprise, and while serving an apprenticeship at the printer's trade eked out his scanty income by teaching two winter terms of school in Kasson township. Then, after spending a year at his trade in Luther, Michigan, Mr. Selby came to Empire, locating here in 1899, and has since been numbered among the esteemed and valued residents of this thriving city. The Empire Journal, of which he is editor and publisher, was founded December 6, 1900, succeeding the Empire Leader, its publisher having been Wilbur Campbell. Under its present management this paper stands high as a reliable paper of the day, and its influence for good is felt throughout the county, whether it be exerted in the matter of establishing beneficial projects, advancing the educational status of town and county, or in the adjustment of political affairs. On August 26, 1901, Mr. Selby married Winifred Comstock, of Empire, a daughter of Peter A. and Della (La Rue) Comstock. Her grandfather, John La Rue, had the distinction of being the first white man to locate upon the present site of the village of Empire. After locating the property, he platted a part of the village, and did much of the pioneer labor of clearing the land. Mrs. Selby was born and educated at Sand Lake, Michigan, the date of her birth being December 18, 1885. Mr. and Mrs. Selby have two children, namely: I. Douglas, born September 26, 1903; and Gerald H., born January 3, 1906. A stanch Republican in his political relations, Mr. Selby never shirks his duty as a citizen, and has served his fellow-men in various capacities. He was village president one year; village clerk four years; trustee of the village two years; and for three years was township clerk. Fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Knights of the Maccabees. Religiously he attends the Methodist Episcopal church. GEORGE P. HuMPHREY.-Contributing to the welfare of his country by his energy and success in various lines of productive usefulness in different places, and by faithful public service in war and peace, George P. Humphrey of Cheboygan has made a record highly to his credit, and given abundant proofs of the elevated character and genuineness of his citizenship. He might, if his modesty did not forbid the act, review his career with solid pleasure, for there is no part of it that has not been worthy of commendation and of real and substantial service to the people. Mr. Humphrey is a native of Wyoming county, New York, and was born in the city of Perry on May 14, 1843. His parents were Thomas and Sarah (Sherman) Humphrey, the former born in Hull, England, in 1804 and the latter in Utica, New York, in 1805. The father died in 1872 and the mother in 1880. They had two children, George and

Page  1100 1100 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN his brother Watts S. The latter is a prominent lawyer in Saginaw, Michigan. The father came to the United States in 1822, when he was but eighteen years old. He had obtained a good education in his native land, and after his arrival in this country taught school near Canandaigua, New York, and in other localities for a number of years. In 1840 he moved to Richmond, Virginia, where he engaged in merchandising for a time, then returned to New York state. In 1846 he came to Michigan and located at Pine Lake, where he was employed in looking after the Henry Cleveland land interests which were extensive. In 1863 he yielded to "the call of the wild," taking up his residence near the village of Okemos, Ingham county, this state, in a region then altogether unsettled and rich in the exuberant growth of ages and its undeveloped resources. He took up a tract of land in the wilderness, and by assiduous industry converted it into a valuable and well improved farm, making it his home to the end of his days. He was prominent and influential in that then new country, and helped to give the section governmental form and start it on its way as a political entity. He filled acceptably a number of township offices, and was looked up to by the people around him for guidance and counsel in all their public affairs. In early life and until its death he was a zealous member of the Whig party, and after the demise of that once vigorous and militant organization became a Republican. To the end of his life he was a warm admirer of Henry Clay, and an earnest advocate of all his political theories and policies. His religious connection was with the Church of England. George P. Humphrey began his education in the public schools and completed it in the Agricultural College at Lansing in this state. In 1862 he enlisted in the Union army, being enrolled in Company A, Twentieth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, at Lansing. His regiment saw much active service in the field, and he took part in all its engagements until he was taken prisoner at Poplar Springs Church farm in Virginia on September 30, 1864. He was then kept in confinement at Salisbury, North Carolina, until March 20, 1865, when he was paroled at Wilmington in the same state. After being paroled he proceeded to Washington, where he participated in the grand review of the federal army at the close of the war and received an honorable discharge from the army on May 30, 1865. He was mustered out of the service at Jackson, Michigan, on June 9, following his discharge. He then went back to Lansing and soon afterward secured employment in the office of the register of deeds at Mason in Ingham county. In 1870 he came to Cheboygan looking for land, and, finding this locality suited to his taste, determined to make his home in it. He was elected county surveyor in 1876, and from 1878 to 1880 was agent for the Northern Michigan Transportation Steamboat Company at Cheboygan. In 1882 he was appointed postmaster of the city by President Arthur, and in August, 1886 gave up the office and turned his whole attention to the management of an extensive insurance business which

Page  1101 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1101 he had purchased of A. W. Westgate, and in which he has ever since been occupied energetically and successfully. Mr. Humphrey was appointed postmaster a second time in 1889, receiving his commission from President Harrison, and continued in the discharge of his duties as such until April 1, 1894. One month later he was elected mayor of Cheboygan, and at the end of his term in 1896 was elected supervisor from the Third ward. This office he filled for four years, and was city treasurer during 1903 and 1904. He was again elected mayor in 1905, 1906 and 1907, and in 1909 was chosen justice of the peace to fill a vacancy. Taking an earnest interest and an active part in whatever contributes to the welfare of his community and the enjoyment of its people, Mr. Humphrey has long been prominent in its fraternal life as a member of the Masonic order and the Order of Eiks. In the former he is a past master of his lodge, a high priest and the present secretary of his chapter of Royal Arch Masons and the recorder of his council of Royal and Select Masters. He keeps alive the memories of his military service by active membership in Ruddock Post No. 224, Grand Army of the Republic, of which he'has been commander five or six years and is now adjutant. Mr. Humphrey's marriage occurred on September 4, 1873, and united him with Miss Mary Redmond, a native of Ireland. They had five children, three of whom are living: Sarah, the wife of Frank Rust of New York city; Laura, who is living with her father, and Carrie, who is teaching school in Cheboygan and also makes her home with her father. Their mother died in 1903, after thirty years of wedded life during which she was faithful to her family, serviceable to her community, and genuine in her worth in every relation of life. She enjoyed in a marked degree the esteem of the residents of Cheboygan county, and of every other place in which she was known. For the full period of forty-one years this estimable man, George P. Humphrey, has been a resident of Cheboygan, and now there is not a man or woman in the county that does not do him reverence. His life among this people has been an open book, and not a page of the record is stained by an unworthy motive or an unmanly act. He has never withheld his hand from any good he could do, nor restrained his ardor in behalf of any public undertaking of merit. In every respect he has exemplified in his daily life at all times the best attributes of elevated American citizenship, and he has the unusual good fortune of having his worth appreciated in full measure and by all classes of his fellows while he lives and is still energetic in the active affairs of life. MILO EASTMAN.-It may be said without fear of contradiction that there is no other man in Michigan who understands railroading in all its varied workings from the gravel pit to the superintendents chair more thoroughly than does Milo Eastman. He is authority on any department of a road, either in construction or the practical working of a completed system. He is now connected with the Detroit & Mackinac Railroad in the capacity of conductor. Mr. Eastman was born in

Page  1102 1102 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Littleton, New Hampshire, on the 14th of March, 1839, and he is a son of Henry and Anna (Blake) Eastman, both of whom are now deceased. During the greater portion of his active business career the father was identified with the milling business, being the owner and operator of a mill at Lisbon, New Hampshire. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman became the parents of eight children, of whom Milo was the fifth in order of birth. Milo Eastman was two years of age at the time of the family removal from Littleton, New Hampshire, to Lisbon, in the same state, in the latter of which place he received his preliminary educational training. As a youth he became familiar with and expert in the handling of tools and subsequently he showed himself to be a natural genius in his knowledge of machinery. In 1856, when seventeen.years of age, he decided to go west and accordingly set out for the city of Chicago, where he entered the employ of the Galena & Chicago River Company, now a part of the Chicago & Northwestern Company. His first work was in the gravel pits in connection with construction work, where he had the general superintendence of a gang of workmen. Hlere he received his incipient knowledge of railroading through his contact with the gravel trains. In 1859 he became brakeman and on the 17th of March, 1860, he was promoted to the position of conductor. In 1862, however, he became fired with enthusiasm for the Union cause in the Civil war then raging and he gave evidence of his patriotic zeal and intrinsic loyalty to the country by enlisting as a soldier in the Eighty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was a faithful and gallant soldier for a period of six months, at the expiration of which he was discharged for disability. After the close of his military career he returned to civil life and again assumed the duties and responsibilities of his old position on the Chicago & Northwestern road in Chicago. He was soon placed on the passenger train on the Iowa division, retaining that position until 1876, at which time he removed to Detroit, Michigan, where he became identified with the Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railroad. With the latter concern he had charge of a construction train until 1881 and from the latter year until 1883 he was road master. In 1883 he went to Tawas City and there began construction on the Detroit Bay & Alpena Railroad, which was being built by the Detroit Bay & Central Railroad Company from Alger to AuSable and thence to the Black River Road, the latter branch being built in 1885. In 1886 he was identified with the extension work to Alpena and subsequently he extended the Mud Lake branch twenty-six miles and the Rose City branch twenty-four miles. He changed all the tracks in the above branches from narrow gauge to standard gauge. He continued to be superintendent of the Bay City & Alpena Railroad up to August, 1892, at which time he turned his attention to lumber interests. He continued to be extensively identified with the lumber industry in northern Michigan until 1902, when he again became interested in railroading, returning in that year to the Detroit & Mackinac Railroad, of which he is now a conductor. On the 6th of December, 1865, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Eastman to Miss Marian E. Farmer, who was born and reared in the

Page  1103 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1103 city of Chicago, she being a daughter of H. E. Farmer, who was there engaged in the drug business. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have one daughter, Lillian, who was born on the 19th of November, 1880, and who remains at home. In politics Mr. Eastman is aligned as a stalwart in the ranks of the Democratic party and while he has never manifested aught of ambition for the honors or emoluments of public office of any description he is ever on the qui vive to do all in his power to advance the general welfare of the community and of the state at large. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman are members of the Episcopal church and contribute liberally both of time and means for its advancement. In the time-honored Masonic order Mr. Eastman has passed through the circle of the Scottish Rite, having attained to the thirty-second degree. Although he has passed the scriptural age of three score years and ten he is still hale and hearty and he retains in much of their pristine vigor the fine physical and mental qualities of his youth. After a long life devoted to hard work and persistent effort Mr. Eastman has risen to affluence and he is now enjoying the luxuries for which he had no time in his younger days. Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have resided at East Tawas since 1883 and here they are accorded the highest regard of their fellow citizens. All Mr. Eastman's business dealings have been characterized by honorable and straightforward methods and in all the relations of life his record will bear the searchlight of fullest investigation. ARTHUR H. VANCE.-A prominent architect and builder at East Jordan, in Charlevoix county, Michigan, is Arthur H. Vance, who has here resided for a number of years and who commands the unalloyed confidence and esteem of his fellow men by reason of his fair and honorable business dealings and by reason of his intrinsic loyalty and public spirit, which have been so important in the upbuilding and improvement of this section of the state. Mr. Vance was born at Echo, Michigan, on the 26th of June, 1884, and he is a son of Henry and Amanda (Barkley) Vance, the former of whom was a native of Canada, and the latter claimed the state of New York as the place of her nativity. The father was identified with agricultural operations during the major portion of his active career and he and his wife now live in California. The Vance family removed to East Jordan when Arthur H. was a child of but one year and here they continued to reside until 1904. In that year they moved to California. After availing himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of East Jordan, Arthur H. Vance began to learn the carpenter's trade. Subsequently he pursued a course of study in architecture in a correspondence school and in 1909 he launched forth into the business world as a contractor and builder. His first job was the construction of the dry kilns of East Jordan Cooperage Company, which were erected at a cost of twenty-five hundred dollars. Soon thereafter he was employed to put up Haight's Cooperage, at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. In 1910 he contracted with the Land Improvement Company for the erection of eleven houses from six to eight rooms each, to cost, completed, from six to twenty-eight hundred dollars. During the year of 1910 he built seventeen other

Page  1104 1104 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN houses for private parties, the same being valued at from six hundred to twenty-eight hundred dollars apiece. In addition thereto he also built an addition to Taylor's Inn, the same consisting of eleven sleeping rooms, a kitchen, twelve feet by twenty-four; a dining room, twentyfour by thirty feet, and a vestibule entrance. At the present time he has under contract seven thousand dollars worth of buildings. The best proof of Mr. Vance's ability and popularity as a builder lies in the extraordinary demand for his services. Ever since he first hung out his shingle as an architect and builder, he has been overwhelmed with orders. On the 18th of August, 1902, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Vance to Miss Fannie Martinak, who was born and reared in Germany, whence she accompanied her parents on their emigration to this country in the year 1892. Location was made by the Martinak family on a farm near East Jordan, where the parents are residing at the present time, in 1911. Mr. and Mrs. Vance are the parents of four childrenChester, Margaret, Amelia, and Dorothy. In politics Mr. Vance is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies promulgated by the Prohibition party, in the local councils of which he is an active worker. In their religious adherency the Vance family are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church and they are prominent and popular factors in connection with the best social activities of their home community. In fraternal channels Mr. Vance is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World and with the Mystic Workers. JACOB J. POST.-Having been a resident of Cheboygan continuously during the last thirty-nine years, and throughout the whole period connected with its mercantile and financial agencies and activities in a leading way, Jacob J. Post has rendered the community excellent service in his business connections, and has also contributed to the advantage of the people in commendable official life and by the elevation of his citizenship and the fine example it has furnished for the stimulus and guidance of others. Mr. Post's life began in Livingstone county, New York, on February 20, 1839. His parents, William and Ida (Post) Post, were also natives and life-long residents of that state, where their remains were buried after long lives filled with usefulness to the people around them and, in a general way, to the community in which they lived as a whole. They were farmers and moderately prosperous in their industry, and the father lived to the age of eighty-two years. He and his wife were the parents of three children, of whom Jacob J. was the last born. In politics the father was first a Whig and afterward a Republican. Jacob J. Post passed his boyhood and youth on his father's farm, acquiring habits of useful industry and a good knowledge of agricultural pursuits through his share of the work done on it. He obtained his education in the schools of his native county, and after completing their course of instruction, worked with his father until the beginning of the Civil war. Being ardently attached to the Union, he was early

Page  1105 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1105 in the field as a volunteer to aid in defending it against dismemberment, enlisting in Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth New York Infantry in 1862. His regiment was soon at the front in the midst of the hostilities, and he participated in all the battles and skirmishes in which it was engaged until July, 1863, when he was shot through his left leg in one of the deadly contests on the fateful field of Gettysburg. This wound disabled him for further service, and he was discharged from the army on account of it, being mustered out in New York city. After recovering from his wound Mr. Post was employed as a clerk and salesman in a general store in his native county for a number of years. In 1872 he came to Cheboygan and started a hardware store, the first of the kind in the city, and this he has conducted ever since. He has fine business ability and has always been very attentive to his trade, studying the needs of the community and doing everything in his power to give his patrons the utmost satisfaction in every way. His store has from its start been a favorite with the public because of the completeness and excellence of its stock, the strict integrity of its proprietor and the uniform courtesy and consideration toward the public that has distinguished everybody connected with it. His success in his business is therefore easy to account for, and it has been considerable. The welfare of his city and county have at all times deeply interested Mr. Post, and he has been assiduous in his efforts to advance their development and improvement. He was one of the founders of the First National Bank and its first vice president. He occupied this office in its directorate until May 2, 1911, when he was elected president. He is the bank's oldest living official, and has been one of the most important forces in promoting its progress and extending its popularity. His politcal adherence is given to the Republican party and in its service he is ever active and energetic. He has served as city treasurer and treasurer of the school board, but has never been enamored of public station and has never sought office of any kind on his own motion or desire, preferring always to be of service in the honorable domain of private citizenship and in the ranks of the people. The fraternal life of his community has been a source of much enjoyment to him, and he has taken an active part in it for many years as a member of Cheboygan Lodge No. 504 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He has also been warmly interested in ill agencies for good at work among the people, and has given them Lis practical and material aid in every way open to him without regard to political, sectarian or race considerations, and unrestrained by conditional limitations of any kind. Mr. Post was married on October 16, 1867, to Miss Cornelia McArthur, who is, like himself, a native of the state of New York, where they were married. She is a daughter of John R. and Mary (Miller) MeArthur, and the seventh born of their ten children, which numbered five sons and five daughters. The father was a farmer and lumber merchant, and a man of force and influence in his locality.

Page  1106 1106 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN The interesting subject of this brief review has already passed the limit of human life as fixed by the sacred writer, but he is still vigorous, active and full of spirit. He reminds the men and women who know him well, all of whom esteem him highly, of some genial year, proceeding to its close undoubtedly, but with much of its warmth and fruitfulness and beauty still remaining to cheer and brighten and enrich the world. No man in Cheboygan county stands higher in the estimation of the people, and none is more worthy of public confidence, regard and good will. CHARLES S. COLLIER.-The present popular incumbent of the office of postmaster of the village of Frankfort, Benzie county, Michigan, Charles S. Collier, has long been connected with the public affairs of Frankfort, having come hither in 1868, since which time he has held various important offices of public trust and responsibility. IHe was born at Claremont, Sullivan county, New Hampshire, on the 29th of August, 1835. His father, whose name was also Charles S. Claremont, was a carriage manufacturer by vocation and he was the patentee of the Concord Buggy. In 1854 the Collier family, consisting of the father, mother and eight children, moved to the state of Michigan, locating on a farm in Oakland county, where the parents continued to reside until their death, which occurred in 1856 and 1898. Of their children three are now living. Charles S. Collier, the immediate subject of this review, availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of his native county and he was nineteen years of age at the time of the family removal to the Wolverine state. In 1859, imbued with the spirit of adventure and the prospect of making a fortune in the western mines, he set forth on the arduous trip across the plains to California. The party of which he was a member set out from St. Joseph, Missouri, with an ox team and prairie schooner and an interesting but strenuous journey of one hundred and twenty days ensued, the travelers eventually settling on Feather river, in Butte county, California. After prospecting for a time in the Golden west Mr. Collier, in 1861, returned to New York, via the water route, and thence he proceeded to Pontiac, Michigan, where was solemnized his marriage. Up to 1868 he was identified with the farming business and in that year he came to Frankfort, where he was placed in charge of harbor improvement along the eastern coast of Lake Michigan, being thus engaged for the ensuing twenty-four years. In 1892 he was made superintendent of the lifesaving stations along the eastern coast of the lake and this position he held until 1899, at which time he was appointed postmaster of Frankfort, remaining in tenure of that office to the present time, in 1911. In politics Mr. Collier endorses the principles of the Republican party and during his residence in Frankfort he has been honored with many official positions of importance. For five years he was a member of the board of supervisors; for four years he held the office of town treasurer; and he was incumbent of the office of justice of the peace for eight years. All his public service has been characterized by stanch devotion to duty, integrity of purpose and proficiency. As a

Page  1107 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1107 citizen he has ever manifested that public-spirited loyalty which counts much for the good of the community and it has ever been his desire to promote the general progress and development. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order, and the Knights of the Maccabees. Mrs. Collier is a valued and appreciative member of the Order of the Eastern Star. Both are devout supporters of the Congregational church, in the various departments of whose work they have long been active and interested factors. At Pontiac, Michigan, on the 24th of June, 1858, Mr. Collier was united in marriage to Miss Emma Francis, who was born and reared at Troy, Michigan, and who is a daughter of E. M. and Filey (Martin) Francis, both of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, whence they came to Michigan in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Collier became the parents of four children, the two eldest of whom were born at Pontiac and the younger two at Frankfort, namely,-Charles F., Etheline, Harry and Berney, Charles F. is a contractor and builder at Frankfort; Etheline is the wife of R. A. Bigford, of Saginaw, Michigan; Harry is engaged in the plumbing business at Frankfort; and Berney is a dealer in hardware at Frankfort. FRANK MCINTYRE.-Among the representative citizens of Osceola county, Michigan, who have always done everything in their power to advance the general welfare of northern Michigan is Frank McIntyre, whose identification with the industrial interests of this section of the state has been of prominent order and who has taken an active part in public affairs for many years past. He has resided in this county for thirty-two years and during that time has gained and retained the confidence and esteem of his fellow men, being honored with many offices of public trust and responsibility. Mr. McIntyre was born in Allegan county, Michigan, on the 22d of June, 1865, and is a son of Alanson McIntyre, who was born and reared in the state of New York, whence he came as a young man to Michigan, locating in Allegan county, about the year 1864, and identifying himself with the great basic art of agriculture. In 1878, when Frank was a youth of about thirteen years of age, the family removed to Osceola county, where the father procured a farm in Rose Lake township. He married Olive Harvey, likewise a native of the Empire state, and they became the parents of six children, all of whom grew to maturity and only one of whom is now deceased. The devoted mother and wife was summoned to the life eternal at the age of forty-eight years and her husband lived to the venerable age of seventy-two years. Frank McIntyre was the third in order of birth and the second son of the above mentioned children and his early educational training was obtained in the public schools of Allegan county. After the family removal to Osceola county he completed his education in that section and he remained on the home farm, assisting his father in the work and management thereof, until 1888, in which year he went to Marion, this county, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, carrying a complete line of haberdashery and groceries. Five years after his arrival in Marion he was elected sheriff of the county and then Vol III-10

Page  1108 1108 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN established his home at Hersey, the judicial center of the county. He was incumbent of the office of sheriff for the ensuing four years, at the expiration of which he again turned his attention to business affairs. He purchased the milling property and water power plant of J. L. Edwards and conducted the same with eminent success until 1903, when the mill was destroyed by fire. He immediately built his present fine mill, which is thirty-two by sixty feet in lateral dimensions and which has a daily capacity of one hundred barrels. It is four stories in height and is a roller and feed mill, one of the best of its size in Michigan. In 1907 Mr. IMcntyre erected an electrical plant on his mill property and he now supplies the village of Hersey with a fine lighting syster. The plant is run by water power and the same service is given as that furnished in Detroit, Hersey being the only town in Osceola county to have such cosmopolitan advantages. The plant is owned and controlled by Mr. McIntyre, and in addition to his other interests he is the owner of much valuable property, holding as much as ninety acres of land within the corporate limits of Hersey. For the past eight years he has held the office of postmaster of Hersey and he is chairman of the school board. His political support is given to the Republican party, in whose ranks he has long figured prominently and influentially. He is one of the most popular citizens in this section of northern Michigan, and this is due largely to the deep interest he has ever manifested in all matters projected for the good of the community. Socially he is connected with the Blue Lodge, Free & Accepted Masons, and with the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are zealous members of the Congregational church and they are prominent in the best social activities of the village. Mr. McIntyre has been twice married. In 1891 he wedded Miss Grace Snyder, of Saginaw, Michigan. She was summoned to the life eternal in 1903 and is survived by three children, namely,-Jessie, Asenath and Cashus. For his second wife Mr. McIntyre married Miss Emma Millard, a daughter of O. L. and Marie Millard, the ceremony having been performed on the 30th of November, 1905. The one child of this union died in infancy. ELDON L. METHEANY, agent for the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, Cadillac, Michigan, has been identified with this place as a business man and public official for a period of more than thirty years. Mr. Metheany is a native of Ohio. He was born at Lima, that state, December 5, 1850, a son of Richard and Esta (Levering) Metheany, and ninth in order of birth of their twelve children, six sons and six daughters. Richard Metheany was born in Ohio in 1804, and from 1834 until the time of his death in 1879 was a resident of Allen county. He was one of the pioneer merchants of Lima, and for several terms filled the office of mayor of that town. Also for many years he was auditor of Allen county. Politically, first he was a Whig and later he was a Republican. His good wife, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1819, died in 1909. Until he reached the age of eighteen Eldon L. Metheany attended the

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Page  1109 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1109 public schools of his native town. Then in 1868 he began his railroad career, as ticket agent for the C. H. & D. Railroad at Lima. Leaving Ohio in 1877, he came to Michigan and settled at what was then Clam Lake, now Cadillac, and here on February 14 of that year he took charge of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway station, which position he has since filled. Soon after his removal to this place he was pressed into public service and here he has been continuously in public office since 1879. He has been a member of the school board for the past twenty years, and for twenty-five years has been on the board of Cemetery Trustees. In the spring of 1881 he was elected alderman at large on the Republican ticket. Four times he was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of mayor of Cadillac, and three times to the same office on the Citizens' ticket, his first election being in 1883 and his whole service covering seven terms. In 1895 he was appointed on the Fire and Police Committee, and served two years. His last election as mayor was in 1909. Central Park, one of the chief attractions of Cadillac at the present time, was swamp land and covered with brush when Mr. Metheany came here, and for some years afterward, but under his supervision, it has assumed a different appearance. Only one native tree is now standing in the park, the others having been planted, most of them hard maples. On June 20, 1878, Eldon L. Metheany and Miss Louisa Welker were united in marriage, and they are the parents of two children, a son and a daughter, Eldon Rolliston, proprietor of the depot eating station, and Elizabeth Rachel, at home. Mr. Metheany is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias at Cadillac, and he also belongs to the Elks and Red Men. MORGAN L. STEELE.-The Leelanau News is one of the most popular publications in Leelanau county, Michigan, and it exercises a broad influence in connection with the development and improvement of this section of the state. Its editor, Morgan- L. Steele, is a young man of splendid ability and he has had charge of this paper since the 15th of October, 1909, at which time he came to Sutton's Bay. He was born at Northport, Michigan, on the 12th of October, 1889, and is a son of William H. and Sarah (Sanborn) Steele, the former of whom was born in Michigan and the latter in the Dominion of Canada. The father is engaged in the produce business, handling by contract and direct purchase the entire production of orchards and shipping all kinds of farm produce to markets throughout the country. Mr. and Mrs. William H. Steele, who now. maintain their home at Northport, have four children and of the number he whose name initiates this review is the firstborn. The other children are,-Eugene, born in 1891; Ida, born in 1892; and Albert, born in 1893. All of the children were born at Northport. The Steele family traces its ancestry back to staunch English stock and the Sanborns are of German origin. Morgan L. Steele received his early educational training in the public schools of Northport and when twelve years of age he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in the office of W. E. Campbell,

Page  1110 1110 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of Northport. It has been said with truth that a termjf service in a newspaper office is equal to a liberal education and fits one for most any line of enterprise. After three years of service as an apprentice Mr. Steele worked for some time as a journeyman and in 1907 he edited and published for a time the Northport Leader. On the 15th of October, however, he purchased the Leelanau News, at Suttons Bay, which was formerly published by A. W. Gunn. This paper was first known as the Bazoo and later as the Sentinel. Mr. Gunn changed the title to that of the Leelanau News, by which it has since been known. In connection with the publication of the paper Mr. Steele has the assistance of his sister, Miss Ida Steele. In politics Mr. Steele accords an uncompromising allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and he manifests a sincere interest and wholesome enthusiasm in all matters projected for the good of the community. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Brotherhood of America. He and his sister are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church and both are most popular factors in connection with the best social activities of the community. DR. FRANK J. LARUE, who is a prominent physician and surgeon of South Frankfort, Benzie county, Michigan, has been engaged in practice here for fully five years and has risen to high favor among the citizens, enjoying a representative and high-class patronage. He has lived in Michigan nearly all his life and is thoroughly imbued with the progressive spirit and advanced thought of the present day. He is thoroughly equipped for his profession and up-to-date in his methods of practice and research. Dr. LaRue was born at Empire, Leelanau county, Michigan, on the 24th of February, 1872, and is a son of John and Sophia (Lacker) LaRue, both of whom were born in the state of New York, whence they came to Michigan in the early '40s, locating on government land in the vicinity of the present village of Empire. John LaRue platted the land and formed the first settlement of Empire. He and his wife became the parents of five children and of the number three are now living. The father was summoned to the life eternal in 1898 and the mother passed away in 1903. Both were influential citizens and they did much to forward the progress and development of Benzie county in the early days. The Doctor remained at home until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, when he went to Traverse City, attending high school at that place for the ensuing two years, at the expiration of which he went to Cadillac, where he pursued a commercial course in a business college, in which he was duly graduated. For six months thereafter he was employed at Cadillac as a bookkeeper and he then returned to Empire, where he entered the postoffice in the capacity of deputy postmaster, being thus engaged for some five years. He then went to Rochester, New York, and entered the office of a famous doctor in that city, under whose able preceptorship he began to prepare himself for the medical profession. In 1893 he was matriculated in the University of Virginia, at Charlottesville, and after a course of two

Page  1111 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1111 years in the medical department of that well known institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately after graduating Dr. LaRue returned to Empire, Michigan, where he was engaged in active practice for the following five years, after which he was a resident practitioner at Johannesburg, Michigan, for two years. He then, in 1903, went to Grand Rapids, where he attended the Grand Rapids Medical College, in which he took a special course and in which he was graduated with the supplemental degree of Doctor of Medicine, in 1906. This year marks the time of his arrival in South Frankfort, where he has since been engaged in practice and where he now enjoys a large and lucrative patronage. His fame as an eminent physician and surgeon is not confined to South Frankfort for he is renowned throughout Benzie county for his skill and practical and scientific knowledge. In 1897 Dr. LaRue was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Baver, of Frankfort, Michigan. She was born in Norway, whence she came to Michigan with her parents, in 1887. Three children have been born to this union and their names and respective dates of birth are here incorporated,-Charlie, 1898; Ansley, 1906; and Alice, 1909. Dr. LaRue maintains an independent attitude in political matters, ever giving his support to men and measures that meet with the approval of his judgment. Although never desirous of the honors or emoluments of public office he gives his aid in support of all movements projected for the good of the community and while at Johannesburg he was incumbent of the office of member of the board of health. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Eagles. He and his wife are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to whose charities and good works they are most liberal contributors. ALBERT W. RAMSAY.-This esteemed citizen, valued force in all agencies employed for the advancement and improvement of the city and county, strong bulwark in the fiscal department of the community's being, and radiant sunbeam in its social life, has been a resident of Cheboygan for more than forty years, and is deeply and continuously interested in the abiding welfare of the city and county of his home and that of all their inhabitants. He has contributed to their progress and improvement to the full measure of his opportunities and capabilities, and his services are valued highly by all the people. Mr. Ramsay is a native of Springfield, Clark county, Ohio, where he was born on December 7, 1862, and where the lives of his parents, Charles S. and Catherine (Winger) Ramsay, also began, the father's on March 12, 1837, and the mother's within a year or two afterward. They were married in the city of their nativity on June 14, 1860, and became the parents of three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living but one, Arthur, their last born child, who died at the age of twenty-two years. The surviving children are: Albert W., the subject of this brief memoir; Edith G., the wife of Clark J. MacArthur, a resident of Cheboygan, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this volume; Dora M., assistant editor of the Cheboygan Tribune; Ross D., and Katharine G.

Page  1112 1112 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN The father is a son of Alexander and Jane (Stephenson) Ramsay, natives of Kentucky who located at Springfield, Ohio, soon after their marriage. The former lived to be sixty-seven years of age and the latter eighty-six. Their offspring numbered ten, five sons and five daughters, and of the whole number five are now living. Charles S. Ramsay was the sixth child in the order of birth. His father was a carpenter and contractor in Springfield for a time, and later became a lumber merchant. He was a Whig in political allegiance and filled with great acceptability a number of public offices, being a prominent and influential citizen and highly esteemed throughout Ohio as a man of probity and superior intelligence. Charles S. Ramsay, the father of Albert, obtained his education in the public schools and his special training for business pursuits in a commercial college. His first regular employment for a salary was as bookkeeper for his father in the lumber business. The military fever caught him at the very beginning of our Civil war, and in 1861 he enlisted in the Forty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a member of the band attached to the regiment, and was discharged in 1862, when all the regimental and other bands connected with the federal army were dispensed with. The returned soldier served for a number of years as bookkeeper for R. W. King of Detroit, Michigan, and in 1871 moved his family to Cheboygan, arriving in May. During the next four years he was extensively occupied in the lumber trade. In 1875, when the publication of the Cheboygan Tribune began, he joined its force as a reporter, and was largely instrumental in helping to get out its first issue. Ten years later he became the proprietor of the paper, and ever since then has been its editor and manager. All the attractiveness and interest of the paper is due in great part to his versatile and graceful pen, and its financial success is the result of his good management and fine business ability. The elder Mr. Ramsay is a very active man in city, county and state politics, and a very helpful agency in the progress and improvement of Cheboygan city and county. He is a firm and faithful Republican, belongs to Ruddock Post No. 224, Grand Army of the Republic, of which he is now commander and serving his fourth term as such, and is also a valued member of Cheboygan Lodge No. 504, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. More than forty years have passed since this venerable citizen and his esteemed wife took up their residence in Cheboygan, and more than fifty-one since they joined their hands and lives in wedlock. On June 14, 1910, they celebrated their golden wedding, and the occasion was a jubilee in fact as well as in name for the chief participants and hundreds of friends who crowded their attractive home when their youthful vows of fidelity were renewed, and flooded them with congratulations, good wishes and testimonials of admiration and good will. At this time also their three weeks' old grandson, Arthur Stuart MacArthur, was given his name and first sacrament in Christian baptism. Albert W. Ramsay obtained his scholastic training in schools in Detroit and Cheboygan. He was first employed after leaving school in a drug store, then for one year as a clerk in the postoffice under postmaster Ford. His next engagement was as a clerk in the freight

Page  1113 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1113 and passenger department of the Michigan Central Railroad, which occupied him about one year. At the end of that period he began clerking for the Baker Dock Company, with which he remained four years. Leaving that company's service, he passed one year as a clerk in the employ of F. S. Tolsma, a wholesale fish merchant of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Ramsay was now about twenty-one years old and desirous of something permanent and promising in the way of a business engagement, and readily accepted a position as bookkeeper and collector in the employ of the First National Bank, which was offered him in 1883. A few years later he was made assistant cashier, and in 1896 was elected cashier. In this capacity he is still serving the bank with much credit to himself and pronounced satisfaction to the officials and patrons of the institution. He is also the treasurer of the school board, and has been for a number of years, during all of which he has been a prominent factor in the work of the board and a substantial force in the cause of public education. The fraternal life of the community has long enlisted Mr. Ramsay's cordial interest and had the benefit of his wisdom in counsel and his energy in practical work for its advancement. He is a member of Cheboygan Lodge of Master Masons, Cheboygan Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, Inverness Council of Royal and Select Masters and Cheboygan Commandery of Knights Templar. In each of these branches of the Masonic order he has filled many important offices, and to all he has given the impulse of his progressive spirit and the benefit of his broad intelligence. In politics he is a Republican with strong attachment to the principles of his party and an effective worker in its behalf. On February 12, 1897, Mr. Ramsay and Miss Helena Guest were united in marriage, and since then have walked life's way together. Mrs. Ramsay is a daughter of Thomas B. and Elizabeth (Lenhen) Guest, and a native of the city of St. Mary's in the province of Ontario, Canada. She is a lady of superior culture and fine public spirit, and is regarded as a valuable assistant in all undertakings for the benefit of the community. She and her husband are held in the highest esteem throughout the county for their genuine worth and the elevation and usefulness of their citizenship, as well as for their rare and radiant social qualities. They are unostentatious in their lives and bearing, but zealous in the performance of every public and private duty. DR. FRANK A. VAN SICKLE, who was engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at South Frankfort, Benzie county, Michigan, died March 10, 1911, and in his demise the community lost a good citizen and an able and conscientious practitioner. Added to his innate talent and acquired ability along the line of one of the most beneficial professions to which a man may devote his energies-the alleviation of human pain and suffering-he possessed a genial and kindly disposition which affected his patients in the best way possible. His courteous sympathy and extensive learning gained to him eminent prestige during the twelve years of his residence in South Frankfort, and his removal in the prime of life was a matter of general regret. Dr. Van Sickle was born at Hamilton, Province of Ontario, Canada,

Page  1114 1114 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN the date of his nativity being December 16, 1864. His parents, James and Martha (Book) Van Sickle, were both natives of Canada, the former having been born at Flambro, Wentworth county, and the latter at Palermo, Halton county. The grandfather Van Sickle was born in the state of Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Canada in 1840, locating in what is now Hamilton and owning at one time a large portion of the townsite of Hamilton. The Van Sickle family removed to Halton county, Canada, when the Doctor was a child of but three years of age. He was the first in order of birth in a family of six children and he received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of Halton county, later supplementing this training with a course in the high school at Waterdown, that county. After being graduated from the high school he entered the Collegiate Institute, at Barrie, Canada, where he pursued a literary course in preparation for entrance to the medical college at Toronto, where he was a student for three years. In 1886 he successfully passed the preparatory examination for entrance to the university at Toronto, in the medical department of which institution he was a student for the ensuing four years and in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1890, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. Thereafter he went to Detroit, Michigan, where he entered the Detroit Medical College, in which he took a post-graduate course which he completed in 1892. In addition to his study at Detroit Dr. Van Sickle was practicing physician in the office of Dr. J. B. Book. After leaving Detroit he went to Benton Harbor, Michigan, where he engaged in active practice until 1896, in which year he went to Williamsburg, Michigan, remaining at the latter place until the fall of 1899, which time marks his advent in South Frankfort, where he was in active practice at the time of his death. At Breedsville, this state, in October, 1894, Dr. Van Sickle was united in marriage to Mrs. Blanche I. Robertson, the widow of Dr. Frank Robertson, of Breedsville. Mrs. Van Sickle, whose maiden name was Blanche I. Bewley, traces her ancestry back to good old Puritan stock and she is a daughter of Helen L. and George W. (Bewley) Bewley, both of whom are now deceased. She is a woman of most pleasing personality and high culture, and is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Dr. Van Sickle left no children. Dr. Van Sickle was a stanch Republican in his political proclivities and he ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters tending to advance the progress and development of this section of the state. He gave efficient service as coroner of Benzie county and he was also a member of the board of health of South Frankfort. Fraternally he was connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. HENRY CURTIS.-It is rather unusual nowadays to find a man who has followed up the same line of business that he engages in when a boy. As a rule a boy changes his mind many times in the process of his development, or if he does not change then, as soon as he launches on the chosen career he finds it not suited to his tastes or capabilities. This has not been the experience of Henry Curtis, superintendent of the lumber plant of Mitchell Brothers at Jennings. Since he was sixteen

Page  1115 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1115 years old Mr. Curtis has been engaged in the lumber business during which time he has been learning more and more in regard to lumber, so that to-day there is no one in the county who is more of an authority on matters pertaining to the lumber trade. Not only does he know his own business, but he attends to it. Probably that is the secret of his success-the fact that he has not made any side excursions and wandered into other paths. He was born in Kent county, Michigan, in 1862, where his parents, Michael and Catherine (Sexton) Curtis, were farmers. Henry did not have the advantage of much schooling. It is true he did attend the district school during the winter, from the time he was old enough to walk from his father's farm to the school house, until he was sixteen. During the summers he worked on the farm and did chores around the house, thereby forming habits of industry which have stood him in good stead all the rest of his life. When he was sixteen he left home and went to Muskegon, Michigan, where he secured a position with the Thayer Lumber Company. He stayed with them for four years, working in the yards and learning about the different woods and their values. He soon became an expert sorter, having an unusual ability to detect flaws and to discriminate between perfect and imperfect lumber. When he was twenty years old he went to Chicago, where he worked for two years with T. D. Stimpson. At the end of that time he went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he worked for one year for a large lumber concern. All of this time he had been employed in localities that were close together; then he went out west, to Bonner, Montana, where the lumber trade was a little different. In 1889 he came back to his native state and located at Jennings, where he took charge of the yard of the Mitchell's Lumber Company, which position he held for eleven years. By the end of that time he had made himself so valuable to the company that he was placed in full charge of the plant as general superintendent. In 1891 he married Miss Ida Bell Bundage, a young lady who was born in Allegan county, Michigan. She was the daughter of Alfred Bundage and his wife Charlotte, who had formerly been Miss Forster. Mr. Bundage was born in Connecticut and was a bridge builder by profession. During the Civil war he was employed by the government as an engineer and mechanic. He was with Company H for four years and was one of the brave followers of Sherman when he made his celebrated march to the sea. He now lives in Jennings, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Curtis have one child, Alfred B., named after his maternal grandfather. He was born March 20, 1901, and is now attending the public school in Jennings. Mr. Curtis is a member of the Catholic church, having been brought up in the Catholic faith. He is a member of four fraternal orders, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, the Maccabees and the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he is a Republican and is always greatly interested in any matter pertaining to the welfare of the country in general and of his native state in particular. He was one of the organizers of the Jennings school board and he holds the office of director. Notwithstanding the fact that he had

Page  1116 1116 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN very little schooling himself-or perhaps because of that very reasonMr. Curtis realizes the importance of a thorough education. He believes it is a capital which every boy and girl should strive to obtain, as it will be of infinite value in after life, no matter in what relations his lot may be cast. Mr. Curtis has taken every opportunity to educate himself by reading and he is today a man of culture as well as natural refinement. He is a man of whom the citizens of Jennings are very proud. LEN J. PATTERSON.-Persistency and well applied ability invariably win their way to prominence. No matter how small and insignificant the beginning may be, the industrious man who exerts his talents and has the tenacity of purpose to persist in the course good judgment dictates never fails of success. Len J. Patterson, the enterprising editor of the Tawas Herald, was born in Cass county, Michigan, on the 8th of January, 1867, and he is a son of James and Mary (Scout) Patterson. both of whom were born and reared in Lenawee county, Michigan. James Patterson died at Tawas City in 1908. They became the parents of four children, of whom Len J., of this review, was the firstborn. Len J. Patterson received his preliminary educational training in the school of Elkhart, Indiana, and later he attended the Cassopolis high school. When thirteen years of age he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in Cass county, on the Vigilant at Cassopolis. It has often been said that thorough familiarity with the ins and outs of a printing office is equivalent to a liberal education and certain it is that Mr. Patterson acquired much valuable information during his apprenticeship. In 1886 he became one of the publishers of the Brighton Citizen, continuing to be identified with that paper for a period of two years, at the expiration of which he became one of the founders of the Northern Democrat at Grayling. In 1893, however, Mr. Patterson severed his connection with that paper and came to Tawas City, where he became editor and publisher of the Tawas City Herald. This paper was founded in 1884 by W. M. Miller, who continued to edit it up to 1891, when he disposed of it to Michael Murphy, under whose management it continued to thrive until 1893, when Mr. Patterson became proprietor. At the beginning circulation was small; it was five, then six and finally seven columns. Its circulation was then three hundred and fifty and it now numbers over nine hundred subscribers. The Herald office is equipped with up-to-date material in the line of machinery and brain force and the product turned out is a clean-cut, newsy paper, the principal object of which is to promote the interests of the town and of its subscribers. The jobbing office does a large and representative business and it compares well with that department in the leading newspapers of northern Michigan. One of the important features of the press room is a modern Chandler Gordon press, which is run by a gasoline engine. In politics Mr. Patterson is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Democratic party and during his residence in Tawas City he has been honored with the office of city clerk, which he held for a period of two years. He has also given most efficient service as a member of the board of supervisors and for five years he was a member of

Page  1117 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1117 the city board of aldermen. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, with the Modern Brotherhood of America and with the Knights of the Maccabees. He and his wife are highly esteemed as loyal and public-spirited citizens. In the year 1897 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Patterson to Miss Ida L. Funk, a daughter of Henry and Nancy Funk. Mrs. Patterson was born at Tawas City on the 11th of April, 1875. To Mr. and Mrs. Patterson have been born four children, whose names are here entered in respective order of birth,-Alfred, Luella, Henry and Ruth. FARWELL A. WILSON.-The life of the late Farwell A. Wilson presents one of the most interesting pages in Michigan pioneer history. He was known far and wide as one of the most important figures in the lumbler business, having become identified with the same in young manhood and remaining thus concerned until the time of his demise. He witnessed the wonderful development of this section and his splendid citizenship made him one of the most valuable of men. Farwell A. Wilson was born on a farm in Vienna township, Genesee county, Michigan, July 18, 1841. His father was Nahum N. Wilson, a pioneer in Genesee county, who came from Thetford, Vermont, and operated the first saw mill in Flint which was run by water power. It was also his distinction to build the first frame building in Flint, in 1834, which at that time was an Indian trading post. Nahum N. Wilson born in Newport, New Hampshire, was a lineal descendant of Alexander Wilson, who because of valiant services rendered in the defense of Londonderry, Ireland, during the siege of that city, was granted a tract of land near Londonderry, New Hampshire, where he located in 1719. This land was exempted from taxation until the Revolutionary war. Mr. Wilson was the son of a farmer and passed his early years upon the farm, divided his energies between its manifold labors and attendance at the district school during the winter months. When he came to more independent years he worked out, doing farm labor and making sap buckets for the maple sugar season. By the exercise of great diligence and thrift he eventually found himself able to purchase the west half of the northwestiquarter section 30, Forest township, the same consisting of eighty acres. Upon this land, which was situated near his father's homestead, he settled down to farming. On March 20, 1865, Mir. Wilson established pleasant domestic relations by his marriage to Ann W. Hoover, daughter of Jacob H. Hoover, of Millington, Michigan, there resulting from this union the following four children: Phalle M. (Mrs. E. A. Corrigan) now living in Saginaw, Michigan, born in Forest township, Genesee county, Michigan, September 28, 1866; Earl F., born in Forest township, Genesee county, Michigan, January 31, 1871, now living in Saginaw, Michigan; Floyd A., born in Vernon township, Isabella county, Michigan, May 27, 1876, now living in Saginaw, Michigan; and Florence A. (Mrs. W. M. Signor) now living in Ann Arbor, Michigan, born in Vernon township, Isabella county, Michigan, May 27, 1876.

Page  1118 1118 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN About January 1, 1866, he and his brother William entered into a contract to cut eighty acres of pine timber for half the profits. They bought a portable saw mill and although the timber was the best that ever grew there was but little profit in the deal as the lumber had to be hauled eleven miles to Mt. Morris on the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad which had just been built. They bought other timber and on January 3, 1868, their cousin, William Henry, who had recently come from Vermont, joined the partnership, and this was the beginning of the well known lumber firm of W. H. & F. A. Wilson, who later operated in Isabella and Clare counties. In 1870, the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad extended its line west toward Ludington. Farwell A., who was the moving spirit in this embryo lumber concern, made arrangements to buy some pine timber from the railroad company and located some in Vernon township, Isabella county, five miles from Farwell, to which point the railroad had just been completed. Accordingly in the summer of 1871 with a crew of men they started to build camps and made a start in the unbroken wilderness of Isabella county. The hardships encountered are typical of those of the pioneer lumberman of that period and are best described in Mr. Wilson's own words: "In May, 1871, my brother William H. and myself, started out in search of some pine timber and finally located nine hundred and sixty acres in the township of Vernon, Isabella county, belonging to the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad Company, which we bought of them, making a small payment down. In the following month of July, W. H. with a crew of men, started to clear the ground, erect a mill frame, build a dam and so on. He remained until November and having trouble with the men, came down for me to go and take charge of them. He arrived at my house at four o'clock in the afternoon and by four o'clock the following morning, November 16, 1871, we had packed my household effects and were on our way to the woods. Our mill site was in a primeval forest fifty-four miles from Saginaw and five miles from the village of Farwell, which was then only a lumber camp. Arriving at our location I found a board house, eighteen by thirty feet with single board floor and sides. The cracks between the unseasoned boards were at least a half inch wide and soon the weather became very cold. My oldest boy Earl was only nine months old and we had hard work to keep him from freezing. It became so cold by December 1, that our millwright left, declaring that the machinery could not be put in until spring, and the other men followed except one James O'Connor, (in 1911, living in Clare, Michigan), and together we made pulleys and installed the remaining machinery so that on January 1, 1872, we started the engine. We ran this mill until October, 1873, when we replaced the muley saw with a Stearns mill having a daily capacity of twenty-five thousand feet. All went well, until October 19, 1874, when we met with a great misfortune. The boiler exploded, entirely wrecking the building and machinery. Our loss was over ten thousand dollars. This event, coming as it did, at the time of the panic of 1874, came near being our ruination. However we succeeded in rebuilding and when ready to run again, were badly in debt. Values were decreasing daily and interest increasing, andc besides there seemed to be

Page  1119 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1119 no demand for lumber and shingles. We purchased eight hundred acres of timber from Gebhart & Estabrook, of Saginaw, to be paid for in lumber,-yearly payments-and this was all that saved us from failing. By working hard early and late, and by perseverance, honesty and economy, we succeeded in getting the better of our debts." In 1879 a site for the new county seat of Clare county was selected in an unbroken pine forest on the banks of Budd Lake located in the geographical center of the county, and to this point the Flint & Pere Marquette Railway projected its line which was built in 1880. Farwell A. Wilson, acting for his firm, made a deal with the railroad company for 1800 acres of pine timber, part of which was located on the present site of Harrison, the county seat, and they built saw, shingle and planing mills in Harrison and continued business there until 1892, being the largest lumber manufacturing concern in the county and among the largest west of Saginaw. They platted an addition to the village of Harrison and gave a beautiful park to the people. In 1882, worn out with the worry and care of looking after the financial end of a business which had now grown to large proportions, Farwell A. Wilson decided to spend the winter in the south. Arriving there and seeing pine timber so cheap that it had no value except for turpentine, he forgot about the object of his visit and soon returned to Michigan with an option on sixty-two thousand acres of the finest timber that grew in the state of Alabama. He then organized the Michigan Land Company composed of David G. Slafter, of Vassar, his uncle; J. and G. K. Wentworth, of Bay City; and Chester G. White, of Lapeer, his own firm retaining a one-third interest. He was one of the very first of the lumbermen of Michigan to forsee the value of southern pine. A certain large lumberman whom he solicited to join the Michigan Land Company, declared that he was crazy to think of investing in southern timber, as it would be fifty years before there would be any demand for it. A fitting commentary on his judgment was the fact that this same lumberman some years later became a very large investor in southern pine, but at a very much advanced price. This was the crowning achievement of a successful business career, although he did not live to see its conclusion. Farwell A. Wilson was a man of undaunted courage and this was one of the principal causes which made him a leader among men. He filled a large place in the community in which he lived. Nature had been generous in his endowment and he would have made his mark in any sphere of action. He was fond of books, a diversified reader and well informed on various subjects. Especially did politics demand his attention and he was honored by the votes of his fellow citizens, who elected him president of the village of Harrison and to the board of supervisors of Clare county. He was also elected to represent the Midland-Clare district in the House of Representatives, where he proved a legislator and statesman of ability and served on several important committees during the session of 1887-8. It was his own lack of early educational advantages that prompted him in 1892 to move his family to Ann Arbor, so that his children might attend the State University. Scarcely had he become nicely located in that interesting college town

Page  1120 1120 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN in a handsome new home, when his health failed and after a lingering illness he died January 22, 1896, at the age of fifty-five years. Thus was cut short a career which should have been blessed with many more fruitful years; nevertheless the influence of his progressiveness, enterprise and unblemished record as a man and a citizen, will long live after him, and although more than a decade has passed since he died, we can still say"Nobly he wrought, strongly he ran; Bravely he fought, fought in the van; Rest hath he sought, he was but man'He shall do well.'" And his memory remains undimmed with those who loved and honored him. BARTLETT H. MCMULLEN, M. D., Cadillac, Michigan, is a native of Canada, and dates his birth in Stratford, September 15, 1857. Iis father, John S. McMullen, was born in 1828, in Kingston, Canada, of Scotch and Irish parents, and is now a resident of Seattle, Washington, to which place he moved some twenty years ago and engaged in the lumber business; while the mother, Margaret (Holland) McMullen, born in Dublin, Ireland, died in 1904, at the age of seventy-five years. In their family of four sons and two daughters the Doctor is the second in order of birth. In 1860, when he was a child of four years, his parents left Canada and came over into Michigan, their settlement being at West Bay City, where he received his elementary education and began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. W. E. Magill. Two years later, in the fall of 1876, he matriculated in the Detroit Medical College; and on March 4, 1879, graduated, receiving the degree of M. D. The two years succeeding his graduation he spent in the hospitals of Detroit, at the same time being associated in practice with Dr. George P. Andrews. From 1881 to 1888, he was engaged in the practice of his profession at Morley, Michigan. Then, desiring a broader field for his labor, he came to Cadillac, where he has since resided. Dr. McMullen makes a specialty of surgery and diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. While he has always been a student, he has from time to time absented himself from his office in order to take a post graduate course. In 1890 he spent several weeks engaged in post graduate work in New York city, in 1899 he took a course in the Polyclinic and largest hospital of New York, where he studied under some of the most scientific and skillful physicians and surgeons of this country, and in 1909 and 1910 he took a special course in surgery from the Mayos, noted surgeons of Rochester, Minnesota. During his practice here he has been employed as surgeon for several large lumber companies, and is division surgeon of the Ann Arbor Railroad. Dr. McMullen is fraternally connected with the Tri-County Medical Society, the State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, of the last named being counselor for the ninth district of Michigan. Also he is a Mason of high rank. He has membership in Clam

Page  1121 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1121 Lake Lodge, No. 331, F. & A. M.; Cadillac Chapter, No. 103, R. A. M.; Cadillac Council, No. 70; and Traverse City Commandery, K. T. Other fraternal organizations with which he is identified are the I. O. F., the K. of P. and the Elks. While Dr. McMullen has never been active politically, he has always maintained a deep interest in local affairs, and in 1907 was elected and served as mayor of Cadillac. On September 7, 1882, Dr. McMullen and Miss Alice M. Sams were united in marriage, and to them have been given three children, namely: Florence, wife of C. A. Jewett, of Cleveland, Ohio; Donald, a student in the Cleveland High School; and Edward. As a pianist and composer of music, Edward is recognized as a prodigy. Mrs. McMullen was born in Kentucky, second in order of birth of the three daughters and one son of George W. and Elizabeth (Adams) Sams, her father being a native of the state of New York and her mother of Illinois. HIRAM 0. ROSE.-" A truly great life," says Webster, "when Heaven vouchsafes so rare a gift, is not a temporary flame, burning bright for a while and then expiring, giving place to returning darkness. It is rather a spark of fervent heat as well as radiant light, with power to enkindle the common mass of human mind; so that when it glimmers in its own decay, and finally goes out in death, no night follows, but it leaves the world all light, all on fire, from the potent contact of its own spirit." Captain Hiram O. Rose, one of the prominent business men and influential citizens of Petoskey, Michigan, at the time of his demise, on the 7th of January, 1911, was long one of the most honored residents of northern Michigan. A native of the fine old Empire state of the Union, Capt. Hiram O. Rose was born in Cambria, New Ybrk, the date of his nativity being the 27th of November, 1830. He was a son of Stephen and Mary Rose, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New York. In the public schools of his native place Captain Rose received his preliminary educational training. When three years old he came to Michigan, locating at Bronson, Michigan, where he set about working diligently for a better education. For a time he worked in a grocery store, studying hard during the winter school term, and eventually he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade. His first work along that line of endeavor was in the printing office of the Coldwater Sentinel, where he was employed for three years, the first year receiving thirty dollars in wages, the second forty dollars, and the third year sixty dollars, in addition to which he also received his board and clothes and the privilege of three months' schooling each year. After he had thoroughly familiarized himself with the ins and outs of the printer's trade he was foreman in the office of the Coldwater Sentinel for one year, at the munificent salary of ten dollars per month. In 1849 he decided to try his fortunes in the far west and in that year went to California, via the Panama route. He remained in the Golden state for two years, at the expiration of which he returned to Michigan. In 1853, learning of the wonderful copper mines of the upper peninsula, he immediately proceeded to that section of the state. En route, he was stormbound on South Manitou Island for ten days, during which

Page  1122 1122 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN time he learned to measure and sell wood. Later, the small schooner, upon which he left the island, touching at Frankfort and Northport, the fine forests and beauty of the surrounding country caused him to enter a tract of government land. Subsequently, going to the land office at Mackinaw, he purchased a tract of eight hundred acres, on which he started a store and boarding house, developing the timber resources of his land very rapidly. In some of his enterprises in the upper peninsula he was associated with Amos Fox, the former companion of his western experiences. For a period of nineteen years Captain Rose remained at Northport, while Mr. Fox handled the business of the firm of Rose & Fox at Charlevoix. When this firm began its fur-trading the Captain made the trip from Northport to Bear Creek, now Petoskey, and Harbor Springs, every February, following along the trail left by Father Marquette and staying with Andrew Porter at the Presbyterian Mission school during his trips. "It was during these early years that the title Captain was given Hiram 0. Rose by his warm friend, J. M. MKatheaney, father of MIrs. Quaintance, and by this title of love and esteem he has always been known. Dr. Little was also one of those early friends and when he built the first hotel here he and his good wife (Mrs. Kirkland) called it the Rose House. Captain Rose and his party spent those first weeks at the home of Chief Petoskey, whose constant friend the Captain always remained." Captain Rose was the first president of the village and it was during his incumbency that the present water works system of Petoskey was planned, although the work thereof was carried to completion by Colonel Toll later. The Captain erected the first electriclighting plant at Petoskey and in due time he disposed of it to the city. He was instrumental in organizing the first lime company, building the opera house and the Arlington hotel, in which important concerns he retained an interest up to just a few years prior to his demise. He also succeeded in getting the first ferry line to ply between Petoskey and Harbor Springs and also between this port and Charlevoix. He was unusually active in obtaining many important improvements for this part of the state and whenever any matter affecting the general welfare was at stake the Captain was called upon to push the good work along. While Captain Rose lived to reach the venerable age of four-score years, he was active and alert to the last, retaining in much of their pristine vigor the splendid mental and physical qualities of his youth. his fine health and great strength can be attributed largely to his out-of-door life. In polities he accorded a stanch allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor and while he never participated actively in politics, other than in local affairs, he was ever ready to give of his aid and influence in support of all matters projected for the good of the general welfare. He was affiliated with a number of representative fraternal and social organizations of a local nature and in all the avenues of life he so conducted himself as to command the unqualified confidence and esteem of all with whom he came in contact. He was a man of wide experience and broad information, was possessed of a deep human sympathy and great kindliness of spirit, and his friends were legion, bound in no sense by

Page  1123 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1123 party lines or religious creeds. A man of splendid executive ability, he succeeded in gaining a high place for himself in the business world of Petoskey and the country normally tributary thereto. He himself built the ladder by which he rose to affluence and inasmuch as his admirable success in life was the outcome of his own well directed endeavors it is the more gratifying to contemplate. At Northport, Michigan, in the year 1854, Captain Rose was united in marriage to Miss Juliet Burbeck, whose birth occurred in Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of James and Abbie (Spencer) Burbeck. This union was prolific of two children,-daughters, Libbie, who became the wife of E. A. Foster and who now maintains her home in California; and Abby, who wedded George Bathrick, of Iowa. Mrs. Bathrick was the constant companion of her parents during their declining years and she now remains with her widowed mother at the old Rose home in Petoskey. Captain Rose is also survived by a grandson, Ralph Bell, and by two nephews, E. L. and Ed Rose. When Captain Rose celebrated his eightieth birthday, on Sunday, November 27, 1910, he and his wife attended church and after the service was over they had a few of their closest friends at their home for dinner. On the following Wednesday Hon. and Mrs. Curtis entertained a number of people at dinner in honor of the Captain. In his religious faith Captain Rose was an attendant of the Episcopal church. IIis funeral was conducted under the auspices of the Knights Templar of the Masonic order, of which Captain Rose was long a valued and appreciative member, and his remains were interred in Greenwood Cemetery. Concerning the high place in which Captain Rose was held in his home community, the following statements are here incorporated, the same being taken from an article which appeared in a local paper just after his demise. "S. H. Peck, of the New Arlington, associated with Captain Rose for many years without, as he says, the very smallest disagreement, is among those who are here to give honor to his dear friend. Captain Rose gave the right of way of the railroad between this city and Bay View and did all in his power to assist in getting it through and the following officials arrived on a special train yesterday morning to show their esteem and respect for the departed: W. B. Stimson, assistant general manager; C. L. Lockwood, general passenger agent; R. R. Matheaney, secretary and auditor; and B. C. Levenworth, general freight agent. "While the honor shown by those in high places is a matter to stir the pride of friends, we believe that the very sincere and heartfelt sorrow of rich and poor, old and young, would be the dearest to Captain Rose who loved his friends in all stations of life with unusual warmth. " ' WInLARD ALBON SMITH.-Northern Michigan seems to be fortunate in possession of a journalism of superior order and one of the most talented and representative members of the Fourth Estate in this section, favored in so many ways, is Willard Albon Smith, editor and publisher of the Charlevoix Sentinel. Mr. Smith is a leader in many Vol. il-11

Page  1124 1124 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ways,-in politics, municipal, fraternity and military affairs and it goes without saying that he is one of the most widely known citizens in this section of the state to whose development he has contributed in no small measure. Mr. Smith was born in Malone, Franklin county, New York, April 14, 1851. When about eleven years of age he came to the state of Michigan, an orphan boy, locating in Calhoun county. When with most boys marbles and fishin' are still the vital issues of life, young Willard Albon had entered upon the career which led very directly to his present important place in journalism, for from 1861, when he was ten years of age until 1865 he was serving an apprenticeship in the office of the Statesman of Marshall, Michigan. This period was identical with the troublous time of the Civil war, and the great events of those years were pondered upon by the boy to the boom of the printing-press and his soul was filled with regret that he was too young to serve. Before he reached his twentieth year, equipped with a practical knowledge of both the mechanical and editorial side of the work; possessed of the liberal education which all members of the craft declare an apprenticeship in an office to amount to; and filled with fine enthusiasm and confidence, Mr. Smith started a paper of his own, the date of this important departure being March, 1869. This paper was the Charlevoix Sentinel and Mr. Smith's captaincy of this now well-known daily is of forty-two years' duration. But one publisher in all Michigan has been longer in service on one paper. The Sentinel met with fair fortunes, as its quality, its cleanness, its interest, its fine, enlightened moulding of public opinion deserve. It has a large circulation and enjoys a reputation of the highest character. Mr. Smith's honors, as before suggested, have by no means been limited to the journalistic field. He has been twice elected president of the town of Charlevoix; he has been county clerk and county treasurer, always giving the highest satisfaction in his performance of the public duties. He has been thirty-five years manager of the Western Union Telegraph at Charlevoix, and he is deputy collector of customs of the port of Charlevoix. As captain on the Brigade Headquarters Staff of the Michigan National Guard he has added to the generous measure of popularity he enjoys. He is a Mason and exemplifies in himself those ideas of moral and social justice and brotherly love for which the order stands. He is also entitled to wear the white-plumed helmet of the Knights Templar, and was for thirteen years master of the local Masonic lodge. In politics he is an uncompromising Republican and since his earliest voting days he has given his support and loyalty to the Grand Old Party. He was for fourteen years postmaster of Charlevoix and as such proved one of the most faithful and able of the servants of Uncle Sam. Mr. Smith was happily married on the 29th day of December, 1871, his chosen lady being Nancy M. Bagley, of Antrim county, Michigan, daughter of S. K. and Eurella Bagley. DWIGHT G. F. WARNER.-For fully a score of years has Hon. Dwight G. F. Warner been a resident of Frankfort, Benzie county, Michigan.

Page  1125 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1125 As an able and versatile attorney and as a prominent and influential public official he has ever done much to advance the general welfare of the northern section of Michigan. In 1908 he was elected to represent Leelanau district in the state legislature and is at the present time speaker of the house. Mr. Warner was born at Gaineston, Orleans county, New York, on the 1st of January, 1861, and is a son of Clavin C. and Melissa O. (Wilder) Warner, both of whom were likewise born in the fine old Empire state of the Union. Mr. Warner is a direct descendant of General Warner of Revolutionary fame. In 1865 the Warner family removed from New York to Michigan, locating on a farm on River road, in Flint township, Benzie county, on the 1st of November of that year. The father was summoned to the life eternal in 1896 but the mother is still living. Mr. Warner, of this review, was the third in order of birth in a family of six children, all of whom are now living. He attended the district schools of Genesee county until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, at which time he entered the Flushing high school, in which he was graduated in 1879. While in high school he taught school for a few terms and in the summer of 1880 he entered the law office of Newton & Howard, at Flint. In the fall of 1881 he was matriculated in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated in March, 1883, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Thereafter he taught school for one term at Clayton Center and in the following autumn opened a law office at Bad Axe, Michigan, being there identified with the work of his profession until the spring of 1884, at which time he became a guard in the Michigan state prison, at Jackson, retaining that position until July, 1889, when he entered the law office of D. P. Sagendorph, of Jackson. In April, 1890, he came to Frankfort, where he has since been engaged in the active practice of his profession and where his success had been on a parity with his well directed endeavors. In politics Mr. Warner accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and in political affairs he has long been a most important factor. Soon after he arrived in Frankfort he was elected village attorney and in the spring of 1891 he was chosen village assessor and township supervisor. In the following autumn he was elected prosecuting attorney of Benzie county, holding that office for eight consecutive years. In 1904 he was again elected prosecuting attorney, serving for a term of four years. In 1908 he was given further mark of the high esteem of his fellow citizens in that he was then elected to represent Leelanau and Benzie districts in the Michigan state legislature. In the session of 1909-10 he introduced the bill known as the Warner-Crampton bill, which dealt with the regulating of the sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage in Michigan. In the fall of 1910 he was elected as his own successor to again represent Leelanau and Benzie districts in the legislature and in the following session he became candidate for the speakership of the house. He has been president of the village for some four years and has been a member of the school board for several years. Fraternally, Mr. Warner is affiliated with the Masonic order and with the Knights of the Maccabees. His

Page  1126 1126 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN wife is a member of the Catholic church and they are known as most liberaf contributors to all charitable and benevolent associations. In 1881 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Warner to Miss Metta A. Phillips, of Flint. One child was born to this union, Eugene F., born on the 6th of July, 1883, and he survives his mother, who died about the time of his birth. Eugene F. was graduated in the mechanical engineering department of the University of Michigan and is employed at the present time, in 1911, by the Western & Mott Company, at Flint. On the Ist of January, 1886, Mr. Warner was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Delehanty, of Jackson, Michigan. Mr. anc4 Mrs. Warner had five children, namely,-Vie 0., Ina M., Earl D., Dwight P. and Mary M., all of whom remain at the parental home. Vie 0. was graduated in the Frankfort high school, after which she pursued a course of study in the Michigan State Normal School. Since 1908 she has been a popular and successful teacher in the public schools of Frankfort. Ina AI. was graduated in the local high school and after completing a course in the Milwaukee-Downer college for girls, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, she obtained a position as a teacher in the schools of South Frankfort. Earl D. was graduated in the Frankfort high school as a member of the class of 1910 and he is now a student in the literary department of the University of Michigan. Dwight P. and Mary M. are both students in the local high school. ROBERT H. PETERSON.-Though newspaper men do not like the word journalist as applied to active workers in the ranks, we are inclined to think the word has the right meaning and dignity if it is conceived to embrace the definition of a man who thoroughly knows the business of making newspapers and who has, also, the higher purpose of making the calling his serious life work. In such a sense Robert H. Peterson, editor and publisher of the Copenvish Progress, is a representative Michigan journalist, ambitious to achieve success in the higher lines of his profession. Mr. Peterson is one of the well known and popular newspaper men of the younger generation and he is rapidly gaining distinction as a citizen whose loyalty and public spirit are of the most insistent order. Robert H. Peterson was born at Croton, Michigan, on the 11th of October, 1877, and is a son of Francis and Edith (Berry) Peterson, the former of whom was born in Canada, whence he came to the Wolverine state, in 1866. Mrs. Peterson was born in Newaygo county, Michigan. Mr. Francis Peterson engaged in farming and the lumber business, owning a farm of eighty acres in Newaygo county and holding various important township offices. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson became the parents of eleven children of whom Robert H., of this sketch, was the first im order of birth. He remained at home until he was ten years, working on the farm and attending the district schools during the winter months. In 1889 the family removed to Howard City, where Robert entered the high school, in which he was a student for two years. Thereafter he went to Lake Ann, this state, where he entered the employ of the Lake Ann Wave. In 1891 the family home was established at Lake Ann, where the father found employment in

Page  1127 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1127 the mills. Robert continued to attend school and to work in the mills until his graduation in the local high school as a member of the class of 1896. In 1897 the family removed to Copemish, MAnistee county, and here Robert H. worked in the mill and in a store until March 5, 1904, at which time he purchased the paper known as the Copemish Progress. The equipment of this paper then consisted of a small hand press and a small quantity of second-hand type. In the fall of 1904 he purchased a paper cutter and in January, 1905, he bought a nine by thirteen press, with which he continued operations until the spring of 1907, when he installed an engine and a four-page, six-column Prouty press. In February, 1910, he installed a ten by fifteen jobber. The circulation when Mr. Peterson procured the paper was about two hundred and fifty, and during the short time he has had possession of it he has increased the circulation to about four hundred. On the 21st of May, 1902, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss Grace M. Hazard, of this city. She was born at Gaylord, Michigan, and is a daughter of Orson Hazard and Olive (Marlow) Hazard,. the former of whom was a native of New York and the latter of whom was born and reared in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Hazard were married in Michigan, where the father was long engaged in the mill and lumber business. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have one child, Laverne H., who was born on the 13th of August, 1905. In politics Mr. Peterson is a stanch adherent of the principles and policies of the Republican party and he gives freely of his aid and influence in support of all measures advanced for the general welfare of the community. He and his wife are popular factors in connection with the best social activities in the city. In a social way Mr. Peterson is affiliated with the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Modern Romans, and Knights of Pythias, while his wife holds membership in the Ladies of the Modern Maccabees and the Royal Neighbors. THOMAS A. MARTIN.-A scion of old Scotch families, and but one generation removed from nativity in the land of Scott and Burns, Thomas A. Martin of Cheboygan, inherited in a forceful measure all the traits of character, in the way of industry, thrift and resourcefulness, which have made the people of that country adaptable to all localities and circumstances, and successful and productive in all walks of life. In his career of useful labor and progressive business he has shown that he is a true Scotchman in knowing how to make the most of his opportunities, and in his loyal devotion to the institutions and interests of this country he has exhibited a high order of commendable American citizenship. But, although of Scotch ancestry and parentage, Mr. Martin is himself a Canadian by birth and rearing. His life began in Strathford, Ontario, on July 18, 1857, and he lived in that province until he was more than thirty years of age. His parents, Alexander and Jane (Armstrong) Martin, were born, reared and married in Scotland. The father was a native of Wigtownshire and the mother of Dumfries in that country. They were married at Gretna Green, on the Scottish side

Page  1128 1128 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of the boundary line between Scotland and England, where Hymen has maintained an altar for Cupid's victims for many generations, and kept its lights always burning. Seven of their eleven children are living. The first two of the eleven were born in Scotland, and Thomas was the first of the others born in the New World. The father was a stone cutter and brought his family to Hamilton, Ontario, in the early '50s. There he found plenty of work and an active demand for his craftsmanship. He was one of the contractors on the work of building the Grand Trunk Railroad, his share of the construction work being the building of abutments for the bridges between Hamilton and Sarnia. He also built the London and St. Mary's bridge for this railroad in 1863, and afterward built the viaduct in St. Clair, and in 1869 was first foreman in charge of the stone work on the international bridge over the Niagara river at the falls. This public spirited man took an earnest interest and an active part in everything that ministered to the welfare of the people whereever he lived. He was a member of the first hand brigade of the Hamilton fire department, and foremost in many other departments of the public service in that city, especially those that required nerve and skill. He died at the age of fifty-eight and his widow when she was sixty-one, their last days being passed on their farm near St. Mary's, Ontario. Their son Thomas secured a limited education in schools in Perth county, Ontario, and earned his first wages at cutting cord wood at fifty cents a cord. Then, after clerking in a hardware store in St. Mary's for a time, he learned the stone cutter's trade, and afterward worked at it for four years. In 1889 he went to Northwestern Ontario, where he passed six months in various occupations and found the outlook for speedy advancement almost hopeless at the time. Returning to St. Mary's, he engaged in contracting and building for awhile, then moved to Saginaw, Michigan, where he followed the same line of work. He also did considerable building under contract in Bay City, alternating between the two busy places in his engagements. Mr. Martin became a resident of Cheboygan in 1895, and soon afterward united with George Annand in organizing the Cheboygan Manufacturing Company. Mr. Annand's record is given in a sketch of his life elsewhere in this volume. The industry founded by him and Mr. Martin has flourished and grown to large consequence and extensive operations. It is one of the firmly established and highly appreciated productive enterprises in the city, turning out large quantities of excellent products, and giving employment to a large number of workmen. Mr. Martin votes with the Republican party in national campaigns, but with reference to local affairs he considers only the welfare of his city and county. He has never sought nor desired a political office, preferring to leave the cares and responsibilities of official life to those who desire to assume them. But he has been diligent and true in performing the duties of citizenship and contributing his share of the force required to express the spirit of progress and improvement which characterizes the city and county of his home in mental, in moral and

Page  1129 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1129 in social affairs, as well as in material development and productive power. He is a member of the Masonic order of the Royal Arch degree in the York and the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite, belonging to Bay City Lodge, Cheboygan Royal Arch Chapter and Bay City Consistory in the fraternity. On August 16, 1888, he was joined in marriage with Miss Maggie Sutherland, who was born in Perth county, Ontario, and is a daughter of William and Maggie Jane (Hisslop) Sutherland. The father was born in the Highlands of Scotland and emigrated to Ontario in his young manhood. During the more active years of his life he served as a sergeant in the Ninety-third Highland Militia in his new home, and was an ornament to the regiment. He passed his last days on his Perth county, Ontario, farm. Mrs. Martin is the fifth of his seven children. She and her husband have been the parents of four: Alexander P., who lost his life by accident in August, 1909, when he was twenty-seven years of age; Jennie, the wife of Blake B. Fralick, bookkeeper for the Cheboygan Manufacturing Company; William G., who is attending college at Big Rapids, Michigan, and Hazel, a student in the high school in Cheboygan. MICHAEL HOREN.-An active, enterprising and well-known citizen of Empire, Michigan, Michael Horen has been prominently connected with various enterprises in the village, town and county, and is now serving as sheriff of Leelanau county, and as deputy postmaster at Empire. A son of Thomas Horen, he was born November 8, 1856, at Remsen, Oneida county, New York, of Irish ancestry. Born and reared in Ireland, Thomas Horen came with his parents to America as a lad of sixteen years, and first lived on a farm in Oneida county. His father afterwards engaged in mercantile business at Florence, New York, from there moving with his family to Saginaw county, Michigan, in 1861. In 1863 Thomas Horen enlisted in the Twenty-ninth Michigan Volunteer Infantry for a term of three years, or until the close of the Civil war. Receiving his honorable discharge from the army at the close of the conflict, he returned to Saginaw county. Subsequently going with his family to Traverse county, he took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres of wild land. Clearing off the lumber, he had no further use for the land, and moved to Ogemaw county, where he was engaged in lumbering until his death. He married Clarissa Valley, the daughter of a pioneer lumberman of Michigan, coming here from New York state, where he had been similarly employed. During the days of his boyhood and youth Michael Horen attended the winter terms of the district schools, assisting his father on the farm during the summer seasons. Under the tuition of his Grandfather Valley he became familiar with lumbering in all its forms, and at the age of sixteen years thought himself capable of driving a team in the woods, and was thus employed a few years, afterwards changing his occupation to that of a driver of logs upon the rivers. Entering the employ of Hannah, Lay & Co., in the spring of 1875, Mr. Horen served first as foreman for their yards, and later as superintendent of the firm's lumher camps. In 1895 he purchased forty acres of wild land, and spent

Page  1130 1130 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN three years in clearing and cultivating his estate. His wife dying on the farm, he came to Farman then to Otter Creek, where he was foreman for T. C. Wright as long as Mr. Wright continued there in business. For eight years thereafter, Mr. Horen was foreman of the Empire lumber company. He has also been associated with other industries, in 1899 having opened a livery stable in Empire, which he still conducts. In 1901 he, with Mr. Ackerman, bought out the furniture and undertaking business of George Esch and continued in that business until 1906, when he sold out his interest to his partner. When the village of Empire was incorporated, Mr. Horen was elected marshal, held that office, and also that of deputy sheriff, until elected sheriff of Leelanau county, in 1908, an office to which he was re-elected in 1910. The office of deputy postmaster to which he was appointed he still retains. He is a stanch Republican in politics, and a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and of the Knights of the Maccabees. Mr. Horen married in 1888, Emma Fillmore, who was born in Hillsdale county, Michigan, and came to the northern part of the state with her parents, who located in Grand Traverse county, there taking up a homestead claim. Mrs. Horen died in August, 1889, leaving three children namely: Frank, of Traverse City; Julius, of Empire, is in the employ of the T. Wilce Company; and Clarisic, wife of Hugh Cook, of Boyne City, Michigan. BENZIE COUNTY PATRIOT.-As editors and publishers of the Benzie County Patriot at Frankfort, Benzie county, Michigan, Carl L. Watson and Claude Lurvey are two of the foremost business men of this section of the state, to whose prosperity they have been most generous contributors in connection with their paper. The Benzie County Patriot was first established on the 1st of January, 1896, by Fred Voiland, who continued to edit it with eminent success until the 28th of June, 1907, at which time its present proprietors purchased it. Carl L. Watson was born at Battle Creek, Michigan, on the 12th of January, 1875, and is a son of Ephraim and Julia (Palmer) Watson, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New York, whence they removed to the state of Michigan about the year 1870. The father served as a gallant soldier in the Civil war and he was a railroad engineer by profession, being identified with that line of business during the major portion of his active business career. The mother died at the age of thirty-seven years, at Battle Creek, Michigan. The father is still living, in 1911. Mr. and Mrs. Watson became the parents of two children and of the number Carl L. was the oldest in order of birth. To the public schools of Battle Creek Carl L. Watson is indebted for his preliminary educational training. At the age of fourteen years he went to work as errand boy in the office of the Review and Herald at Battle Creek. Later he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in the same office, where he was employed in all for a period of ten years. In 1890 he entered the employ of the Ellis Publishing Company, as printer, and two years later he was a journeyman in the office of the Journal at Battle Creek, for one year, at the ex

Page  1131 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1131 piration of which he removed to Bloomington, Illinois, where he was engaged by the Pantograph Printing Company for the ensuing six months. In December, 1900, he returned to Michigan and purchased the Bellaire Sentinel, at Bellaire, continuing to conduct that paper for a period of four years, when he moved the plant to Alba, Michigan, changing the name of the publication to the Antrim County Sentinel. In June, 1907, he became a joint owner of the Benzie County Patriot, as previously noted. He is a man of admirable qualities and marked business capacity and as a newspaper man he is building up a fine future for himself. On the 27th of October, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Watson to Miss Ruby M. Lurvey, of Battle Creek. She was born in that city on the 2d of November, 1877, and is a daughter of Harvey and Mary L. (Reed) Lurvey, prominent and influential citizens at Battle Creek, where the father is a successful and popular business man. One child has been born to this union, Gwynne, born on the 4th of March, 1903. Mr. Watson is affiliated with the Masonic order, the Knights of the MIaccabees, the Grange and the Eagles, of which latter organization he is secretary. In politics he accords a stanch allegiance to the cause of the Republican party. At Hastings, Michigan, on the 7th of October, 1883, occurred the birth of Claude B. Lurvey, who is a son of Harvey and Mary L. (Reed) Lurvey, of Battle Creek, and a sister of the wife of Mr. Watson, mentioned above. Mr. Lurvey was reared and educated in the public schools at Battle Creek and he pursued a commercial course in Krugs Business College, at Battle Creek, and finished the course in 1899. In January, 1901, he went to Bellaire, Michigan, where he entered into a partnership alliance with his brother-in-law, Carl L. Watson, as joint editor of the Bellaire Sentinel. He and Mr. Watson have been associated in business to the present time and his business career is practically that of Mr. Watson's and as details have been given above in that connection further data are not deemed necessary at this point. On the 8th of December, 1905, Mr. Lurvey was united in marriage to Miss Irma P. Ward, of Roscommon, Michigan. She was born on the 9th of December, 1883, and is a daughter of Robert W. and Mary Elizabeth (Leline) Ward. Robert W. Ward was a native of Bay county, and in 1875 he went to Roscommon where he purchased the Roscommon Pioneer, changing the name of that paper to the Roscommon News, under which name it is still being published. He was summoned to the life eternal on the 27th of October, 1910, and at the time of his death was deeply mourned by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Lurvey's grandmother was a dressmaker for Queen Victoria, of England, during her girlhood, having charge of and making dresses for the children of the royal family. When she was married her wedding gown was presented to her by the late queen and that dress was preserved and again worn by her at her golden wedding, which she celebrated in 1881. She also has in her possession a beautiful and unique lace shawl which she received from one of the officials of India. She is still living and in 1911 has attained to the patriarchal age of ninety-five years.

Page  1132 1132 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Mr. Lurvey is a Republican in his political proclivities and while he and Mr. Watson were at Alba, Michigan, he held the office of assistant postmaster for three years. For two years, from 1907 to 1909, Mr. Lurvey had charge of the Roscommon News and while a resident at Roscommon he held the office of village clerk for one year. He is connected with various fraternal and social organizations of representative character and he and his wife are prominent in the best social activities of Frankfort. CHRISTOPHER F. HANKEY.-It is generally acknowledged that one of the most desirable elements which enter into the composition of American citizenship is the German, our nation having everything to gain and nothing to lose from the assimilation of this brainy, honest and generally admirable stock, which has given to the world so many of its greatest geniuses. To the Fatherland is Petoskey indebted for one of the most enterprising, estimable and honored citizens who reside within its borders-Christopher F. Hankey, president of the Hankey Milling Company, incorporated for $85,000, and vice-president of the First National Bank. In addition to his other distinctions, Mr. IIankey is a veteran of the Civil war, his career as a soldier having been unusually gallant, for he participated in many noted engagements and was almost continually on the firing line. Christopher F. Hankey was born in Wilhelmsdorf, Germany, April 15, 1837, and is the son of John M. and Wilhelmina F. (Gumpper) Hankey, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was a machinist by trade and in 1848 he concluded to come with his little family to America of whose richer opportunities and resources he hoped much. He had bought passage on a sailing ship and the family was gathered at Bremen ready to sail when the father fell ill and the mother and children found it necessary to come on alone, as the money paid for passage over could illy be sacrificed. The voyage was made on a threemasted schooner. The family at that time included six children. They landed in New York city and came west to Ann Arbor, Michigan, landing at a little shed of a depot, desolate and poor. The subject was only eleven years of age at the time, but the great question of a livelihood fell in part upon his young shoulders. The father arrived the following year. Neither father or mother lived to old age, the father dying at the age of fifty-six years and the mother at forty-five. While he was still a young man, Christopher F. removed to Grass Lake, Michigan, and while in that village he made an attempt to enlist in the volunteer army, but no more men were needed. Later he drifted to Cairo, Illinois, and the Civil war having become a dread reality, he enlisted on September 2, 1861, in the Tenth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and remained a part of the same throughout the remainder of the conflict. As mentioned in a preceding paragraph he was almost continually on the firing line and participated in all the skirmishes and battles with Sherman on the march to the sea. He was at Island No. 10, Chickamaugua, Missionary Ridge, took part in the Atlanta campaign, was at Bentonville and was in the Grand Review at Washington, D. C., May 24, 1865. He had previously reenlisted January 1, 1864, as a veteran, being orderly sergeant at the time of reenlist

Page  1133 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1133 ment and being mustered out a lieutenant. He was discharged in Chicago, July 4, 1865. After the return of peace, Mr. Hankey went to Danville, Illinois, and engaged in the contracting and building business and steadily advanced up the ladder of life. Desiring to become more a master of the business he went to Indianapolis and studied architecture from A. Ines, a prominent architect, that being in the year 1867. For fifteen years, until 1880, he continued in this business in Danville, achieving much financial success and becoming generally known as a public spirited and influential citizen. In 1880 he made a change of residence and removed to Petoskey, and there engaged in the flour milling business, in which he has continued to the present time. He is also associated with his son-in-law, Thomas Foreman, in important hardwood flooring and saw mill interests in Detroit, and he is vice-president of the Thomas Foreman Company, also of that well known monetary institution, the First National Bank. He has shown marked discrimination in his share of the management of the affairs of the bank which has entered upon a career of growth and prosperity. Mr. Hankey has never severed his association with the comrades of other days and he takes great pleasure in his connection with the Grand Army of the Republic, his membership being with Lombard Post, No. 170. He was made a member of the Danville lodge, Free and Accepted Masons at Danville, Illinois, in the year 1867, but was subsequently dimitted and is now a member of Durand Lodge, No. 344, at Petoskey, Michigan. In his political allegiance Mr. Hankey is Republican, he having given heart and hand to that party and its men and measures since his earliest voting days. On February 3, 1864, Mr. Hankey was united in marriage to Vina E. Remington, who was born in the state of New York, near Niagara Falls. To this union were born five children, namely: Minnie E., wife of Thomas Foreman, of Detroit, Michigan; Nellie; Louis C., vice-president of the Hankey Milling Company; Margaret, wife of Chalmers Curtis; and Guy R., secretary and treasurer of the Hankey Milling Company. The family is one of the best known in the city and each and every member is regarded as a valuable member of society IRVING QUACKENBUSH, manager of the West Branch Flour Manufacturing Company, West Branch, Michigan, has been a resident of this place since 1888 and ranks with its representative citizens. He is a native of Michigan. He was born in Washtenaw county, on his father's farm, in 1850, and was there reared and educated, his educational advantages being limited to the local schools. His father, Levi Quackenbush, was a native of New York state, who came to Michigan in the early history of the state and settled in Washtenaw county. His first land purchase there was eighty acres, seven miles north of Ypsilanti, to which he added by subsequent purchase and at the time of his death was the owner of a large tract. Levi Quackenbush married Mary Packard, also a native of the Empire state. She was brought to Michigan an infant in arms and was reared in a pioneer settlement. Of the six children born to Levi and Mary Quackenbush, the subject of this sketch

Page  1134 1134 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN is the eldest and one of the five now living, the others in order of birth being John, Alice, Edward and Ada M. Irving Quackenbush was engaged in farming for a number of years after reaching manhood, and still owns farm property, having at this writing one hundred and forty acres of cleared land near West Branch. Also he owns a tract of wild land containing about two hundred acres. He came to Ogemaw county in 1879, and since 1888, as already stated, has been a resident of West Branch. The flouring mill of which he has been manager for more than twenty years was built in 1885 by Mr. William Hisey, who operated it five years. It was sold to a company in 1890. In 1898 the company was reorganized and took its present name, the West Branch Flour Manufacturing Company, and has since conducted a prosperous business, having a capacity for turning out seventy barrels a day. During his residence in Ogemaw county Mr. Quackenbush has rendered valued public service. He was president of West Branch when it was a village. He served as treasurer of the village and also of the township, and for fifteen years he was commissioner of the poor. He has been twice married. By his first wife, who was Miss Jane Angel and whom he wedded in 1872, he had two children, Levi C. and Kitty A. In 1906 he married Miss Violet Trask, his present companion. Religiously he has long been actively identified with the Methodist Episcopal church and Sunday-school, having served twenty-two years as Sunday-school superintendent, eleven years consecutively. PROFESSOR T. F. WEST, superintendent of schools at West Branch, Michigan, has been identified with this position since 1907, and during his four years' service here has proved his efficiency as an educator. A native of Michigan, born in 1883, in Mount Pleasant, Isabella county, T. F. West received his early education in the common schools of Mount Pleasant, and pursued a course in the Mount Pleasant Normal School, of which he is a graduate. Subsequently he attended school at Ypsilanti, and in 1906 he began his career in the educational field, as teacher in the schools at Mackinaw, Michigan, from which place he came to his present work. When Professor West took charge of the schools at West Branch the high school enrollment here was forty-eight. To-day it is one hundred and forty-three, and the total school enrollment is seven hundred. An efficient corps of teachers are employed, four of whom are assigned to the high school work, and in its various departments the school system of West Branch is in a flourishing condition. Both by nature and education, Professor West is fitted to fill the important position he occupies, and the success he has already attained warrants the prediction of continued success here or in a larger field. Mr. West owns four-fifths interest in the clothing and mens' furnishing business of West & Alt, an enterprise initiated in 1910, and doing a business of sixteen to twenty thousand dollars annually. Mr. West is a son of William and Mary (Hennessey) West, formerly of Ontario, Canada, but for many years residents of Mount Pleasant, Michigan. He married, in 1906, Miss Hazel Linn, and they are the parents of two children: Thomas W. and Gertrude E.

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Page  1135 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1135 The only fraternal organization with which Mr. West is identified is the Modern Woodmen of America. DR. SCHUYLER BuscH.-There is perhaps no calling in life the success of which depends so much upon a man's own abilities and efforts as in the case of a physician. In the first place only men with the right personality and temperament should ever attempt to become doctors. If a man has fully decided that he has the personality requisite the next thing for him to do is to endeavor to know something about every branch of medicine and everything about some one branch. Dr. Busch, although he did not decide to make the practice of medicine his life work when he first left school, has made up for the time by more strenuous efforts and is probably all the better for the experience he gained during his pedagogical work. He gained then an insight into human character that it would be hard for him to have acquired in any other way. Dr. Busch first saw the light of day on a large plantation near Riehlmond, Virginia. His first recollections center around the old mammy who crooned lullabies to him, the servants' quarters where he heard tales of mystery and horror, such as the colored people delight in. He attended the district school as soon as he was old enough. Later his family moved on to a plantation in West Virginia, and he attended the district school near the plantation. When he was sixteen years old he entered the Valparaiso University, in Indiana, from which he graduated and obtained the degree of Bachelor of Science. Up to this time he had not seriously thought of the career he intended to make, but he had taken the scientific course, as his tastes and abilities were all in that line. After his graduation from the University he went to the Pacific coast and taught school for a while, during which time he decided that he wanted to become a physician. He returned east and entered the University of Michigan, in the medical, department. The years 1898 to 1902 were spent in hard study at Ann Arbor and in 1902 he was graduated and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. After his graduation he took a special course in microscopic work under the noted Dr. Cabot at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He also took a post graduate course in New York, where he remained until 1903. The following year he traveled and learned everything that he could glean in regard to medical work in general and microscopic work in particular. In 1904 he came to Jennings, Michigan, and started to practice. Since that time he has built up a very large practice. He has one of the finest offices in the whole state. It was built especially for his use and according to his own ideas. The office consists of a reception parlor, fitted up with easy chairs and a lounging sofa. In the consultation room is every convenience that can be thought of. The operating room is supplied with all the latest improvements for examination and treatment. His dispensary is very fully supplied and is indeed better equipped than many a city drug store. Dr. Busch is a member of the Masonic Order and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, also of the Sons of Veterans. He is the health officer in Jennings, and is a member of the school board. His own experience in teaching makes him a very valuable member and his wide

Page  1136 1136 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and varied reading and thorough education on general subjects insures his interest in everything that pertains to the training of the young. He is a member of the Tri-County Medical Association and of the American Medical Association. Since Dr. Busch's arrival in Jennings he has made himself almost indispensable both in the town and county. His sphere of usefulness is bounded only by his opportunities and he does not wait for opportunity to knock, but goes out to meet it. He is a man of culture and refinement, a public benefactor, with years of usefulness still before him. PETER JOHNSON, who is well known because of his effective, earnest labors in behalf of public improvement and progress and who has been incumbent of the office of postmaster of Thompsonville, Benzie county, Michigan, since June 1, 1907, was born in Sweden on the 6th of February, 1856, and is a son of Bengt and Mary Johnson, the former of whom came to America in 1869 and the latter of whom was summoned to the life eternal in the old country. Peter was a lad of thirteen years of age at the time of his emigration with his father to this country. Father and son located at Muskegon, Michigan, where the former secured work and where they remained until 1873, in which year they went to Montague, where they resided for two years, at the expiration of which time they removed to Oceana county, where the father engaged in farming in the vicinity of New Era. Peter was associated with his father in agricultural pursuits and they kept bachelor hall until Peter's marriage, in 1878. The father died in Thompsonville in July, 1905. Peter Johnson secured his preliminary educational training in the public schools of his native land and after his arrival in America he supplemented his early discipline with such study as he had time. In 1899 he came to Thompsonville, where he engaged in the feed, hay and grain business for three years. In connection with that line of enterprise he built a warehouse and handled potatoes and apples. In 1901 he purchased eighty acres of wild stump land, which he cleared and improved and on which he makes his home at the present time, in 1911. He disposed of the feed business in 1902. In 1907 he was appointed postmaster at Thompsonville by President Roosevelt, and he assumed the responsibilities of this office on the 1st of June, 1907. In the following year he built a house in town, but in the spring of 1910 he sold the same and moved back to the farm. In politics Mr. Johnson accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and he is ever alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises advanced for the general welfare of the community. Fraternally he is affiliated with the time-honored Masonic order and the Grange. He and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and they are held in high regard by their fellow citizens. In the year 1878 was solemnized the -marriage of Mr. Johnson to Miss Jane Zeek, who was born in New Jersey, whence she came to Whitehall, Michigan, with her brother in 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson became the parents of five children, concerning whom the following brief data are here incorporated,-Gertrude and Grace are twins and the

Page  1137 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1137 former married Norman VanNess, of Newbury, in which place Mr. VanNess has charge of the chemical department of the Iron Works. Grace married Mika Reed, who is a mason by trade, and they reside in Thompsonville. Grace was a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of this place prior to her marriage and she is now a clerk in the postoffice. Edward Marcius entered the Michigan Agricultural School, at Lansing, in 1903, and after graduating from a three years' course he assumed the position of pattern maker at the Lansing Wheel Barrow Works, where he is head of the pattern room. Mary taught school in Thompsonville previously to her marriage to Henry Chadwick, of Muskegon. Mr. Chadwick is a traveling man and they now maintain their home in this city, where Mrs. Chadwick is assistant postmistress. Oscar remains at the parental home. The Johnson family is one of prominence and distinctive popularity in Thompsonville and the various members are active factors in the best social activities in the community. WALTER Louis CHAPELLE.-The editor of a good, newsy paper is an exceedingly busy man. He must be energetic and constantly on the alert for all manner of news and he must exercise the greatest speed and good judgment in the presentation of his editorials and advertisements. The Alcona County Review, which is weekly published by Walter L. Chapelle, is decidedly a popular paper in Harrisville and throughout Alcona county. Mr. Chapelle is a man of brilliant attainments and unusual executive ability and as a citizen he is widely known for his stanch advocacy of all measures advanced for the good of community and county. Mr. Chapelle is a native son of Harrisville where his birth occurred on the 23rd of May, 1871, and he is a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Beever) LaChapelle, the former of whom was born in Canada and the latter in England. The father came to Michigan in the year 1854 and the mother emigrated to America in 1855, settling in this state in the same year. Edward Chapelle (the "la" was dropped by the family after coming to America) was a son of Francis and Margaret (O'Neil) LaChapelle, the former a native of France and the latter a native of Ireland. Francis, after his arrival in America, resided for a time in Canada, whence removal was made to the city of Cleveland, Ohio, and later to Haynes township, Alcona county, at that time a part of Alpena county. He pre-empted eighty acres of land and purchased enough more to make a farm of three hundred and sixty acres. He was one of the first settlers to come to this section of Michigan and in addition to his agricultural pursuits he followed his trade of cooper, making a large number of barrels for the purpose of packing and shipping fish. His family consisted of seven sons, one of whom died prior to the establishment of the family home in the Wolverine state. The sons were: Edward, Francis, George W., to whom a sketch is dedicated on other pages of this work; Alfred; Peter J.; Louis; and Joseph. Francis La Chapelle was summoned to eternal rest in 1870 and his wife passed to her reward in 1884. To Edward and Elizabeth (Beever) LaChapelle were born three sons,-Walter L. of this review; Edward W., who is

Page  1138 1138 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN engaged in the hardware and implement business at Harrisville; and Frederick who is living in Detroit. The father was a civil engineer by profession and was a man of influence and prominence in the region of Alpena. He died in January, 1909, and his wife lives at Harrisville, Michigan. Walter L. Chapelle received his preliminary education in his native town and his youth was not dissimilar to that of other boys in a pioneer country. After leaving school, he was variously employed until he finally became interested in the newspaper business. In 1889 he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade, securing employment in the printing office of his predecessor, the former editor of the Alcona County Review, Mr. George E. Gillam, in whose service he continued for the ensuing eight years. For one year he was employed on the Alpena Pioneer. In 1898 he purchased the Alcona County Review from Mr. Gillam and since that year he has been eminently successful in the editing and publishing of this popular and widely read paper. In politics he endorses the cause of the Republican party and he has been favored by his fellow citizens by election to the offices of village trustee, village treasurer and county register of deeds, of the latter of which he continued incumbent for a period of eight years. In a fraternal way he is connected with Alcona Lodge, No. 292, Free & Accepted Masons and in the Scottish Rite branch he is a thirty-second degree Mason. He is also a valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is unmarried. The Alcona County Review was established by James K. Fairchild, in 1877, at which time it was a small sheet ten by fourteen inches, which was printed on a job press. George Axtell succeeded Mr. Fairchild and he discontinued publication at the end of one year, when G. E. Gillam became proprietor and editor, continuing as such for the ensuing twelve years, at the expiration of which, in 1898, Mr. Chapelle purchased the Review. Under Mr. Chapelle's able management, the paper grew in size, interest and circulation. It is now a seven column paper of eight pages and its subscribers number one thousand. It is a paper of lively interest to wideawake readers and is an influence for good and for progress throughout the county. GEORGE BENNETT, prosecuting attorney of Ogemaw county, Michigan, is one of the selfmade men of this county. While all men are in a measure selfmade, some have greatly superior advantages over others. Mr. Bennett has had to work his way with only meager advantages. He was born in London, England, in 1860, a son of Nathaniel and Mary (Wright.) Bennett, both natives of England, now deceased. By trade the father was a shoe maker. In the family there is six children, Samuel, Amelia, John, Benjamin, George and Thomas, and when George was seven years of age, in 1867, they emigrated to America and came direct to Michigan, where they settled in Ionia county. There George received a common-school education and learned the barber's trade, which he followed for a number of years at Muir. And during his residence at Muir he became popular not only as a barber but also as a citizen, to the extent that he was elected to local office.

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Page  1139 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1139 Four years he served as clerk of the village of Muir, and one term as township treasurer. The latter service was followed by his election to the office of justice of the peace, which he filled for eleven years. All this time he kept up his work in the barber shop. His official duties made it necessary for him to become conversant with the law to a certain extent, and he spent all his leisure time studying Blackstone and other law books, which he either bought -or borrowed. Finally, in 1899, he successfully passed a rigid examination and was admitted to the bar. After his admission to the bar he was elected and served as circuit court commissioner of Ionia county. In 1903 he removed to West Branch, Ogemaw county, where he soon had additional honors thrust upon him. Here also he was elected to the office of circuit court commissioner, which he filled two years. After West Branch was raised from the rank of village to that of city he was given the distinction of being its first city attorney, and in 1910 he was elected to his present office, that of prosecuting attorney of Ogemaw county. By careful management Mr. Bennett has been able to accumulate some property, and is a partner of his brother Benjamin in the ownership of a section of land in a growing portion of the state in which he lives, which promises to become a valuable investment. In 1893 George Bennett and Miss Susie C. Kendall were united in marriage, and to them have been given two children, Eva R. and Ralph N. Mrs. Bennett is a daughter of Henry Kendall. Fraternally Mr. Bennett has membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic Order, in the last named having received the Royal Arch degrees. DR. JOHN F. DOUDNA is one of Lake City's most respected physicians. A professional man, and above all a physician, may always be looked upon as making more or less a sacrifice of himself to aid humanity and the cause of science. He receives less monetary return for his work than a business man, and yet as a general thing, he has expended much more time and money in preparation for his career than the business man. The physician who looks upon his profession as merely a means of livelihood is an utter failure. Monetary considerations had very. little to do with Dr. Doudna's choice of a calling. From the very beginning of his training he has felt that he wanted to learn all that it was possible for him to learn in regard to diseases and their cures. A most profound thinker and reader, every new discovery is hailed with the deepest interest and at any time that he can add anything to the cause of science, he experiences more pleasure than he would in any other way. John F. Doudna was born near Richland Center, Wisconsin, in 1875. His father, Thomas Doudna, was a farmer, a native of Ohio. His mothers' maiden name was Jeannette Fogo, and she was born in Scotland. Soon after the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Doudna they moved to Richland Center, in Richland county. Later the Doctor and three of his brothers moved to Colorado Springs, where they remained several years and where the Doctor began preparations for his life work as a physician. Mr. Thomas Doudna died in September, 1909, in Wisconsin, his wife having passed away in 1882. Vol. III-12

Page  1140 1140 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN John's earliest recollections cluster around the little farm near Richland Center, Richland county, where he first drew breath. Before he was of school age his parents moved to Richland Center where he attended the district school and later the village high school. Before he was graduated from the high school he moved to Colorado Springs, and not wishing to enter another high school, he finished the work at Cutler Academy, Colorado Springs. By that time he had chosen his profession and in 1895 he entered the medical department of the University of Colorado. He remained there for two years and then decided to take his junior and senior work at the Barnes Medical School at St. Louis. He received his diploma and the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1899. In July of that year, the month following his graduation, he came to Sherman, Michigan, and in the fall he took a post graduate course at Detroit Medical College and also a special post graduate course at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. That same year he came to Lake City, where he has built up a large practice and has met with unusual success. For several years he has also been connected with the drug business at Lake City, having formed a partnership with Mr. Roach They did business under the firm name of Roach and Doudna. Later Dr. Abbott purchased Mr. Roach's interest, and the new firm of Doudna & Abbott are now doing a prosperous business. Dr. Doudna is a member of the Tri-County Medical Association and of the American Medical Association. In 1901, two years after his arrival in Lake City, Dr. Doudna married Miss Jessie Ross of Saginaw, Michigan. She was born at Reed City, and her parents were both natives of Scotland. Her father, Alexander Ross, was for thirty-seven years roadmaster for the Flint & Pere Marquette railroad, and is now living a retired life. Dr. and Mrs. Doudna have two children: Dorothy, born in 1903, and Hubert two years later. Dr. Doudna is a Mason and also an Elk. He stands high with both of these fraternal organizations. In politics he is a Republican and is a most enthusiastic supporter of the principles for which his party stands. He takes a great interest in the children of the town and in their training. He is a member of the school board on which he does excellent work. He is also health officer of the village and all unsanitary conditions are soon noticed by his vigilant eyes. Dr. and Mrs. Doudna attend the Methodist Episcopal church and he finds time, in the midst of his busy life, to be of great use to the church in its various undertakings. Since his arrival in Lake City Dr. Doudna has become both respected and liked. He has made money at his drug store and a living at his practice, but he is too philanthropical ever to become a wealthy man. He believes that money is meant to use and not to hoard and he uses his money in the way that he feels will be of the most lasting good not only to himself and his family, but to his fellow beings. He has performed many acts of charity and kindliness of which the world knows nothing, but he is repaid only by the deep feelings of gratitude that remain in the hearts of the recipients of his good works. JAMES C. AND L. VERNA SIMONS, D. O.-Drs. James C. and L. Verna Simons, of Manistee, Michigan, in their professional service have been

Page  1141 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1141 prompted by a laudable ambition for advancement as well as by deep sympathy and humanitarian principles that urge them to put forth their best efforts in the alleviation of pain and suffering. They have gained recognition from the profession as its able representatives and the trust reposed in them by the public is indicated by the liberal patronage awarded them. Dr. James C. Simons was born at Bath, Steuben county, New York, on the 22d of August, 1870, and is a son of James and Jane (Cass) Simons. Dr. Simons passed his boyhood and youth in the place of his nativity, to whose public schools he is indebted for his preliminary educational training. Upon attaining to years of discretion he entered upon the manufacture of machinery at Bath, following this line of enterprise until 1893, when he removed to the city of Buffalo, New York, where he continued to reside until 1899, in which year he went west to Michigan, locating at Muskegon. In the latter city he entered the employ of the Chicago & West Michigan Railroad Company. Subsequently he went to Ionia and then to Detroit, where he became assistant superintendent of the Great Lakes Engineering Company. After retaining the latter position for some time he became ill and in order to regain his health commenced a course of osteopathic treatments. Becoming cured, he made an investigation of the science of osteopathy with the result that he eventually began to think of it as a profession. Accordingly he was matriculated in Still College of Osteopathy, at Des Moines, Iowa, and was graduated in that well ordered institution as a member olf the class of 1910. On the 17th of September, 1901, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Simons to Miss L. Verna Sprague, of Ionia, Michigan. She was born at Saranac, Ionia county, this state, on the 23d of August, 1876, and is a daughter of Henry and Emeline L. Sprague, the former of whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in Michigan. Mrs. Simons gained her early educational training at Ionia, in which place she was a successful and popular teacher for five years prior to her marriage. When her husband became interested in osteopathy she accompanied him to Des Moines and together they worked and studied, both of them graduating and receiving their degrees of D. 0. in 1910. Immediately thereafter they returned to this state and took the examination as practicing physicians at Ann Arbor. Passing the examination they located at Manistee, where they initiated the practice of their profession and where they are rapidly gaining prestige as skilled osteopaths, controlling a large and representative patronage. Dr. James C. Simons is a Republican in politics, warmly advocating the party principles although he is not an active politician. He has devoted himself assiduously to his profession and has not sought political office. As a man he is thoroughly conscientious, of undoubted integrity, affable and courteous in manner and has a host of friends. He is a member of the time-honored Masonic order and his wife holds membership in the adjunct organization, the Order of the Eastern Star. Both are affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church, in which they are most faithful members and to whose charities they are most liberal contributors.

Page  1142 1142 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN RAY F. JENNINGS, county school commissioner of Otsego county, Michigan, has been identified with educational interests in this part of the old Wolverine state for several years and his labors have been contributory in increasing the efficiency of the schools until the educational system is one of which every citizen of the locality has reason to be proud. There is no class of men doing better work for the coming generations than the well trained and conscientious educator. He stands next to the parent in instilling into the young mind those principles and truths which mould and fashion the future useful and loyal citizen. A native son of Michigan, Ray F. Jennings was born in Lake county, the date of his nativity being September 1, 1883. He is a son of John M. and Hattie L. (Sutton) Jennings, the former of whom was born in the state of Pennsylvania and the latter in the state of Maine. The father was an agriculturist by vocation and he came to Michigan about the year 1880, and has ever since resided on a farm in Lake county. To Mr. and Mrs. John M. Jennings were born five children, one of whom is deceased, namely,-Victor. The others are: Ray F., Ella F., Dora, and Vern, all of whom have been successfully engaged in teaching in Michigan. After completing the curriculum of the public schools of Lake county, Professor Jennings attended school for a time at Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, and subsequently he pursued a course of study at Ferris Institute. To this institution and the personal influence of the great man at its head, together with the many sacrificing efforts of his parents in his behalf, is due credit for much of that spirit of devotion to the public good which is so requisite a characteristic in one of his vocation. He initiated operations as a teacher in Lake county, Michigan, in 1900, at the age of seventeen years. In 1902 he became principal of a village school, and in 1909 he was engaged as principal of the schools at Vanderbilt, where he has maintained his home to the present time, in 1911. In 1910 he was appointed commissioner of schools of Otsego county, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Sim J. Lewis, and after acquitting himself creditably in the discharge of the duties of his office he was honored by his fellow citizens with reelection in the spring of 1911. In his political adherency Mr. Jennings is aligned with the. Republican party and he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters projected for the general welfare. In the year 1909 was recorded the marriage of Ray F. Jennings to Miss Reta Schooly, a daughter of Benjamin and Julia Schooly, of Reed City, Michigan. Mrs. Jennings is a woman of innate refinement and gracious personality. She is a member of the United Brethren church and the Women's Christian Temperance Union and holds a high place in the love and esteem of those who know her. They have one child, Lorna, who was born on the 9th of Aug., 1910. Mr. Jennings is a man, original in his individuality, and possessing as dominating elements in his personality a lively human sympathy which, taken in connection with the sterling integrity and honor of his

Page  1143 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1143 character, have naturally gained to him the respect and confidence of men. JOHN F. HuM.-A man of high principles, conscientious and straightforward in his dealings, John F. Hum is justly entitled to an honored position among the more active and popular citizens of Grayling, which has been his home for nearly a score of years. He has filled various offices of trust, and is now rendering efficient service as county treasurer of Crawford county. He was born, May 1, 1851, in Columbiana county, Ohio, being the third child in succession of birth of the nine children born to Jacob and Lucinda (Hisey) Hum, and the only one living in Michigan. His father was born in Ohio, while his mother was a native of Virginia. Brought up and educated in Ohio, Mr. Hum learned the carpenter's trade when young, and was afterward employed as a builder and contractor in his native state for a number of years. Coming to Crawford county in 1876, he continued his chosen occupation for many seasons, some of the more large and important buildings of Grayling and vicinity being monuments to his skill and good taste. Public-spirited and intelligent, taking a deep interest in local matters, Mr. Hum has often been called to offices of trust, in each of which he has given exceptionally good service. From 1882 until 1886, he was sheriff of Crawford county, and for fifteen years was county supervisor. Since 1883 he has been a resident of Grayling, and for four years was village president. He has accumulated a fair share of this world's goods, and in addition to his village property owns a near-by farm of sixty acres, which he utilizes as pasture land. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, in which he has taken the Royal Arch degree. Mr. Hum was united in marriage, in 1880, with Emma Metzler, who was born in Ohio, and died, August 3, 1909, in Grayling, Michigan. Of their union, four children were born, two of whom are living, namely: Harry and Clyde. ELMORE S. NORTHRUP.-Since 1895 has Mr. Elmore S. Northrup been incumbent of the office of justice of the peace of Thompsonville, Benzie county, Michigan, and he has also held various other important offices of public trust. He is a man whose contribution to progress and good government have been of the most insistent order and he is recognized as one of the foremost citizens of this section of the state. Mr. Northrup was born at Bangor, Van Buren county, Michigan, on the 6th of June, 1850, and is a son of John L. and Roxy (Sutton) Northrup, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New York, whence they came to Michigan in 1834. At the time of the inception of the Civil war John L. Northrup tendered his services in defense of the Union and enlisted as a soldier in the Thirteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He went south with his regiment but becoming ill he was discharged for disability after thirteen months' service. He returned to Michigan but never fully recovered his health. In 1882 he established his home at Bay City, where his death occurred in 1884, his cherished and devoted wife having passed away in 1871. During the

Page  1144 1144 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN major portion of his active business career John L. Northrup was engaged in farming. Elmore S. Northrup was reared and educated at Bangor and he remained under the parental roof until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, when he hired out as a farm hand. As he reached man's estate he rented land and in due time purchased a farm in Van Buren county, retaining the same and continuing to be identified with agricultural pursuits until 1891, in which year he disposed of his farm and established his home at Thompsonville. He was engaged in logging for two years but injuries received from an accident obliged him to give up that work and he then moved into the village of Thompsonville. In 1895 he was elected justice of the peace of this place and of this position he has continued incumbent to the present time, in 1911. Mr. Northrup has held the office of supervisor and has been director of the school board for six years. He is state agent for corrections and charities for Benzie county, having care of the delinquent and dependent children of the county. In all his public offices Mr. Northrup has given most efficient service and he has gained a reputation for good judgment, for fair dealing, for truth and for rectitude. He is a man of high ideals and unquestioned integrity and his contribution to the material and civic development of this section of the state has ever been of the most notable order. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies for which the Republician party stands sponsor and in a fraternal way he is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry. He and his family are regular attendants of the Methodist Episcopal church and they take an active interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the church. On the 25th of November, 1885, Mr. Northrup was united in marriage to Miss Cora Jacobs, of Lawrence, Michigan, she being a daughter of Huron and Hulda Jacobs, both of whom were born and reared in New York, coming to Michigan in 1838. The Jacobs family located at Sturgis, Michigan, where the father was identified with farming, until his death, which occurred in 1908. Mrs. Jacobs was summoned to eternal rest in 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Northrup have three children,-John H., who was born at Lawrence, Michigan, in 1886; Earl P., born at Lawrence, in 1888; and Hattie M., born in this place in 1892. All the children remain at the parental home, being identified with various lines of enterprise in Thompsonville. SHERMAN S. TOWNSEND.-There are few men whose lives are crowned with the honor and respect which is universally accorded to Sherman S. Townsend, but through nearly two-score years' connection with the history of northern Michigan his has been an unblemished character. With him success in life has been reached by sterling qualities of mind and a heart true to the highest principles of integrity and generosity. Unwaveringly he has done the right as he has interpreted it, and he has every reason to enjoy the consciousness of having gained for himself by his honorable, straightforward career the confidence and respect of the entire community in which he lives. No man is more popular in Gladwin county than is Sherman S. Townsend, who has held

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Page  1145 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1145 various offices of public trust, in each of which he has acquitted himself with honor and distinction. Mr. Townsend was born in Addison township, Oakland county, Michigan, on the 29th of January, 1841, and is a son of Elnatlian and Eliza (Tedman) Townsend, the former of whom was born in the state of New York, on the 4th of March, 1812, and the latter of whom claimed Connecticut as the place of her birth, she having been born on the 17th of January, 1815. Mr. and Mrs. Townsend were united in marriage on the 30th of December, 1835, and they moved to Michigan at an early date. They became the parents of the following named children,Harriet E., Lucy A., Sherman S., James E., Freeling H., Rufus H., George L., Judson and Rosamond E. Freeling H. was a gallant soldier in the Civil war, having served as a private in the Ninth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. The Townsend family is of English extraction, the original progenitor in America having been one Martin Townsend, who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1644. Others of the name followed later and filled various offices of trust and responsibility in their adopted country, some of them having given valiant service as soldiers in the War of the Revolution. When the Townsend family established their home in Oakland county, Michigan, Elnathan purchased land from the government and in due time became a prominent and prosperous farmer. He was summoned to the life eternal in the year 1883, and his cherished and devoted wife also passed away in 1883. Sherman S. Townsend was the third in order of birth of the above mentioned children and he was reared and educated in Oakland county, to whose district schools he is indebted for his early educational training. His youth was spent on the home farm, in the work and management of which he early began to assist his father. In 1871 he established his home in Gladwin county, where he became one of the pioneer settlers, and in the following year he returned to Oakland county for his wife, whom he had married in 1867. In Gladwin county Mr. Townsend entered a tract of government land, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres, sixty of which he managed to clear and reclaim to cultivation, this being a task of some magnitude considering the busy life of the early settler. In 1878 he was given proof of the high regard of his fellow men in that he was then elected to the offices county clerk and register of deeds, to both of which he was several times re-elected. He continued to live on his farm until he proved up, which took six years, and during that time he filled the offices above mentioned. It was no uncommon thing in the long drives to and from the town to encounter wolves that followed closely behind his team. Wild animals were very plentiful and often dangerous in those days. Mr. Townsend held the office of county clerk for a period of fourteen years, up to December 30, 1902, this being the longest term ever served in that office in Gladwin county. The year after his election to that office he took up his residence in Gladwin, which thrifty town has represented his home during the long intervening years to the present time. In 1874 Mr. Townsend was elected clerk of Gladwin township, which comprised at that time the north half of Gladwin county. In 1875 he was appointed to fill a vacancy as county treasurer; in 1876 he was deputy sheriff, retaining that office for a

Page  1146 1146 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN period of four years; for two years he was justice of the peace of Gladwin; and for three years he gave most efficient service as city clerk of Gladwin. He has also been a director on the school board, was city assessor for two years and a member of the city council for several years. In 1909 he disposed of his farm and he has since lived in virtual retirement in Gladwin. In 1900 Gladwin sustained a great loss by fire, in which Mr. Townsend's home was destroyed. He carried but a small insurance and his loss was heavy. In the year 1867, as previously noted, Mr. Townsend was united in marriage to Miss Anette Morrison, of Oakland county, a daughter of William and Adaline Morrison, both of whom are now deceased, the father dying in 1850 in Colorado, and the mother died in 1881. Mrs. Townsend was born in Shelby township, McComb county, Michigan, in 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Townsend had three children, one of whom, Alva, is deceased. Bessie became the wife of F. E. Sinclair and resides at Burnside, Lapeer county, Michigan, and Floyd is engaged in the hotel business in Gladwin. In politics Mr. Townsend accords a stalwart support to the cause of the Republican party, and he has ever contributed in generous measure to all movements advanced for the general welfare of the community. His loyalty and public-spirit have ever been of the most insistent order and he holds a secure place in the regard of his fellow citizens. His wife is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church. JAMES E. PELTIER, M. D.-The world instinctively pays deference to the man whose success has been worthily achieved and whose prominence is not less the result of an irreproachable life than of natural talents and acquired ability in the field of his chosen labor. Dr. Peltier occupies a position of distinction as a representative of the medical profession in Benzie county, Michigan, and the best evidence of his capability in the line of his chosen work is the large patronage which is accorded him. It is a well known fact that a great percentage of those who enter business life meet with failure or only a limited measure of success. This is usually due to one or more of several causessuperficial preparation, lack of close application or an unwise choice in selecting a vocation for which one is not fitted. The reverse of all this has entered into the success and prominence which Dr. Peltier has attained. His equipment for the profession was unusually good and he has continually extended the scope of his labors through the added efficiency that comes through keeping in touch with the marked advancement that has been made by the members of the medical fraternity in the last quarter of a century. One of Michigan's native sons, Dr. James E. Peltier was born at Bruce on the 25th of February, 1863, his father, Maxcine Peltier, was a Michigan man, and his mother, whose maiden name was Martha Annis Jemerson, was born in the state of New Hampshire. The family moved to Marine City when the Doctor was an infant and at that place the father, who was a master mechanic by profession, engaged in the stave and heading business. The Doctor pursued his early education in the public schools of Marine City, in the high school of which place he was

Page  1147 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1147 graduated as a member of the class of 1882. Thereafter he entered the law office of William Baird, of Saint Clair, where he remained for eighteen months, reading law. He then removed to the city of Detroit, where he entered upon the practice of law and where his success was of most gratifying order. However, the Doctor did not feel that he was exactly satisfied with the law as a life work and in 1891 he became interested in the medical profession. In that year he was matriculated as a student in the Michigan College of Medicine and Surgery, at Detroit, Hal C. Wyman being dean of that institution at the time. He was graduated in 1895 and after receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he initiated the active practice of his profession at Bad Axe, Huron county, Michigan, where he remained for one year, at the expiration of which he took up his residence at Manistee, remaining in that city for four years. Thereafter he was engaged in practice at Bear Lake for a period of three and a half. years and in 1903 he came to Thompsonville, where he has since maintained his home and where his success has been on a parity with his well directed endeavors. In 1908 the Doctor pursued a post graduate course in operative surgery at the Post Graduate Medical and Surgical School, in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Peltier has been thrice married. In 1883 he wedded Miss Elizabeth Jane Richardson, who was born at Manchester, England, whence she came to the United States with her uncle, Thomas Lloyd. She was summoned to eternal rest on the 16th of November, 1896, and in February, 1898, the Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Cora Bell Carey, of Bad Axe, Michigan, who died in 1900. In 1901 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Edith Ella Davis, of Manistee, in which city she was born and reared. At the present time, in 1911, she is a student in the Detroit Homeopathy College, where she is taking a full course in medicine. She is a woman of most gracious personality and marked ability and learning. In politics Dr. Peltier is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and though he has never held any political office, strictly speaking, he was incumbent of the position of health officer while a resident of Bear Lake. He is a member of the Benzie County Medical Society, of which he was president from 1909 to 1911, and is a member of the State Medical Society, and the American MIedical Association. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the time-honored Masonic order and the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, and he and his wife are devout communicants of High church, Protestant Episcopal. Dr. Peltier in his professional service has been prompted by a laudable ambition for advancement as well as by deep sympathy and humanitarian principles that urge him to put forth his best efforts in the alleviation of pain and suffering. He has gained recognition from the profession as one of its able representatives and the trust reposed in him by the public is indicated by the liberal patronage awarded him. JOSHUA MEARUE WARDELL, M. D., 302 East Cass street, Cadillac, Michigan, was born in Elgin county, Ontario, Canada, July 26, 1855. When he was seven years of age his parents, Edward and Melissa (McQueen) Wardell, moved from the farm near St. Thomas on which they

Page  1148 1148 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN had lived for several years into that village, and there he received his high-school education. When young Wardell decided to adopt the medical profession, he entered the office of a local physician and under his preceptorship pursued a course of study, in this way gaining a fundamental knowledge of the profession. Then he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he graduated March 25, 1873. On the 7th of September, that same year, he opened his office at Cadillac, then called Clam Lake, where he has since been engaged in the practice of medicine. For three years he was local surgeon for the Ann Arbor Railroad Company, and since 1876 he has served as local surgeon for the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad. Also for three years he was a member of the Board of Pension Examiners. His practice has been general and he has enjoyed a degree of success that has amply repaid him for his years of earnest preparation and endeavor. Dr. Wardell has membership in the National Association of Railway Surgeons, Wexford County Medical Society, Michigan State Medical Society, Pennsylvania State Medical Association and American Medical Association. A Mason of high rank, he belongs to Clam Lake Lodge, No. 331, F. and A. M.; Cadillac Chapter, No. 103, R. A. M.; Big Rapids Commandery, K. T., at Big Rapids, Michigan, and Grand Rapids Consistory, he having received the Thirty-second degree. While he has never been active in political affairs, he has always been a conscientious voter and has given his support to the Republican party. On July 21, 1890, Dr. Wardell and Miss Arista M. Montgomery were united in marriage, and the fruits of their union are two children: Montgomery M. and Margaret. Mrs. Wardell is a native of Oberlin, Ohio, but for a short time previous to her marriage was living at Cadillac. She is a woman of rare intellectual endowment, highly educated in both literature and music, being especially talented in music and for years having devoted much time to the study and practice of that art. As a musician she has no superior in the state of Michigan. DR. ALEXANDER S. CORNELL, physician and surgeon of Copemish, Manistee county, Michigan, has resided in this city for fully a score of years and has here been engaged in the active practice of his profession for some eighteen years. He has gained high favor among a large and representative clientage, is a practitioner of equipment equal to that of the best, and he has been an ardent devotee of his profession since youth. His broad knowledge of his science and sympathetic manner have given him rank among the most skillful and popular physicians and surgeons in the city. Dr. Cornell was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, on the 12th of March, 1874. His parents, David and Mellsie (Smith) Cornell were Canadian born and they came to Michigan in 1879, locating at Reed City, Osceola county. The father was a druggist by profession but while at Reed City he engaged in the timber and real-estate business. The family came to Copemish in 1890 and here David Cornell directed his attention to the drug business, setting up a fine store and controlling a large patronage, and he is still a resident of this city. Mr. and Mrs.

Page  1149 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1149 Cornell became the parents of five children and of the number the Doctor was the third in order of birth. He received his preliminary educational discipline in the public schools of Reed City and Copemish and he remained at home, clerking in the drug store and attending school until he had attained to the age of eighteen years, at which time he was matriculated in the Detroit Medical School, at Detroit, in which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1894, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately after his graduation he returned to Copemish where he entered upon the active practice of his profession and where he rapidly manifested his ability and built up a representative patronage. Shortly after establishing himself in offices in Copemish he went to New York City, where he pursued a post-graduate course in the eye, ear and throat department of the New York Post-Graduate School, in which he was graduated in 1896, with the supplemental degree of Doctor of Medicine. Since that time he has maintained his home in Copemish, where his services are much in demand and where he has gained prestige as one of the leading physicians and surgeons in Manistee county. At Copemish, in the year 1899, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Cornell to Miss Bina Hickey, who was born and reared in this city and who is a daughter of David and Mary Ann Hickey. Mr. and Mrs. Hickey are natives of the fine old Wolverine state and the father has long been a prominent and influential agriculturist in this section of the state. In a professional way Dr. Cornell is affiliated with various representative organizations and in a social way he is an ardent and appreciative member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Modern Romans. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Democratic party and though he has never manifested aught of desire for the honors or emoluments of public office he gives freely of his aid and influence in support of all measures advanced for the general welfare of the community. Mrs. Cornell is a member of the Catholic church, and they hold a secure place in the high regard of their fellow citizens. The Doctor is a man of strong force of character, of marked individuality, of keen intellectuality and honorable purpose,-qualities which have won for him an eminent degree the respect and regard of many friends throughout the state. CARL A. BIGGE, who is efficiently filling the office of cashier of the Bank of Arcadia, is a native son of Manistee, Michigan, and one of the enterprising young men of Manistee county, deeply interested in public affairs and a co-operant factor in many measures for the general good. He was born on the 20th of August, 1885, and is a son of Louis and Clara (Dietrich) Bigge, the former of whom was born at Hildesheim, province of Hanover, Prussia, and the latter of whom was born at Watertown, Wisconsin, whence she came to Michigan with her parents, who were farmers by occupation. Louis Bigge emigrated to America in 1883, at the age of twenty-seven years, locating at Manistee, where he began sawing cord wood. Later he went to work in the mills and finally

Page  1150 1150 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN he began scaling logs for C. Reitz in Kalkaska county. In 1886 he moved the family to Kalkaska county, he being then foreman for C. Reitz. In 1891 he turned his attention to the great basic industry of agriculture and in 1891 the family home was established in Marilla township, Manistee county, where he purchased a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of timber land. He cleared and improved his land, constructing a fine house and barn and stocking the farm. Later he bought an adjoining forty acres and in 1907 he purchased another tract of one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bigge have six children, of whom Carl A. of this sketch is the second in order of birth. Two of his brothers are engaged in agricultural pursuits; one brother is a teacher and the two sisters are both teachers. Carl A. Bigge has always remained at the parental home, assisting his father in the work and management of the farm and attending and teaching school during the winter months. At the age of fourteen years he graduated from the eighth grade and then his schooling ceased until he had attained the age of twenty years. In 1905 he entered a summer normal school at Bear Lake for six weeks and the winter following he procured a school in District No. 3, Marilla township. In the summer of 1906 he entered the Ferris Institute at Big Rapids, for a six weeks' course, and in the ensuing winter he was a successful and popular teacher in District No. 2, of Marilla township. The summer of 1907 found him again at Big Rapids and in the winter of that year he was employed as a teacher in District No. 1. In the following summer he remained at home helping his father with the farm work and in the winter of 1908 he and his father engaged in lumbering, putting some two hundred thousand feet of lumber to the mill and railroad. He remained on the farm during the summer of 1909 and the winter of that year found him teaching in District No. 4, of Marilla township. On the 2d of May, 1910, the Bank of Arcadia was opened for business, and Mr. Bigge was placed in charge of this substantial financial institution as cashier. The bank was incorporated under the laws of the state with a capital stock of five thousand dollars, with officers as follows: L. A. Larson, president; F. P. French, vice-president; and Carl A. Bigge, cashier. Mr. Bigge has been school inspector and his interest in political questions is deep and sincere. He gives a stanch support to the Democratic party, believing that its platform contains the best elements of good government. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and his religious faith is in harmony with the teachings of the Lutheran church. He is a man of fine natural intelligence and broad human sympathy and it may be said of him that the list of his personal friends is coincident with that of his acquaintances. MILLARD F. STEVER, M. D.-Since 1892 has Dr. Millard F. Stever been engaged in the active practice of his profession at Thompsonville and the years have told the story of a successful career due to the possession of innate talent and acquired ability along the line of one of the most important professions to which many may devote his energies,the alleviation of pain and suffering and the restoration of health, which is man's most cherished and priceless possession. This is an age of prog

Page  1151 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1151 ress in all lines of achievement and Dr. Stever has kept abreast of the advancement that has revolutionized methods of medical and surgical practice, rendering the efforts of physicians of much avail in warding off the inroads of disease. Dr. Stever was born at Williamsville, Erie county, New York, on the 15th of August, 1856, and is a son of David and Catherine (Rice) Stever, the former of whom was a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of whom was born in France, whence she came to America with her parents when a young girl. The father was engaged in speculations during the major portion of his active business career and he was summoned to eternal rest in 1858, his cherished wife passing away in 1892. Young Millard attended the public schools of Williamsville until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, when the family moved to Michigan, where they located at Midland. He secured work in the mills and attended school during the winter months until 1885, in which year he went to Montana where, for eight months he was superintendent of a shingle mill. He returned to Michigan in 1886, and at Muskegon he began the study of medicine under the able preceptorship of Dr. C. J. Dove, a prominent physician in that city. After three years spent in study in his office Dr. Stever was matriculated in the Fort Wayne (Indiana) College of Medicine, in which he pursued a three years' course and in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892, duly receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately after his graduation he returned to Muskegon, where he initiated the practice of his profession and some time later he removed to New Era, whence he removed to Thompsonville, Benzie county, in 1892. The Doctor has built up a large and representative patronage and he has gained distinctive precedence as one of the ablest physicians and surgeons in this section of the fine old Wolverine state. He is affiliated with various professional organizations of representative character and in a fraternal way he is an appreciative member of the time-honored Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles and policies of the Republican party and though he has never had time or desire for the honors or emoluments of public office he has ever done all in his power to advance the general welfare of the community. He is a man of fine mental attainments and broad human sympathy and he holds a secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. In the year 1883 was recorded the marriage of Dr. Stever to Miss Etta Barringer, of Muskegon. Mrs. Stever was born at Marine City, Michigan, and is a daughter of Henry and Melicia (Clark) Barringer, both of whom were natives of Prince Edward county, Canada. Dr. and Mrs. Stever became the parents of five children, four of whom are living, namely,-Vella, Virginia, David and Benjamin, all of whom were born at Muskegon. One child, Etta, died in infancy. None of the children are at home except Benjamin, who is attending the local high school. WALTER J. FISH.-The march of improvement and progress is accelerated day by day and each successive moment seems to demand a

Page  1152 1152 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN man of broader intelligence and a keener discernment than the preceding. The successful men must be live men in this day, active, strong, strong to plan and perform and with a recognition of opportunity that enables them to grasp and utilize the possibilities of the moment. Such a class finds a worthy representative in Walter J. Fish, who is editor and publisher of the Thompsonville News. He was born at Dimondale, Eaton county, Michigan, on the 5th of July, 1876, and is a son of John W. and Electa J. (Schemerhorn) Fish, both of whom were born in Michigan and the former of whom is now deceased. John W. Fish went to Dimondale as a youth, cleared a place, built a home and was also engaged in the well supply business, later in the jewelry line and was also interested in farming. His life was spent there with the exception of three years in the state of Washington, where he was manager of a ranch. He was summoned to the life eternal in 1904, at the age of fifty-six years, and his cherished and devoted wife survives him and resides at Dimondale. Walter J. Fish availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of Dimondale and he was a lad of thirteen years at the time of the family removal to Washington, where they remained for three years. After his return to Dimondale he completed his education, after which he went to Lansing, this state, where he secured employment in the office of the North Lansing Record. He returned to Dimondale and after working in a printing office for one year he went to Mulliken, Eaton county, where he was employed for a time in the office of the News, which paper he eventually purchased, continuing its publication until his advent in Thompsonville on the 1st of July, 1909, in which year he bought the plant of the Thompsonville News from J. W. Saunders. As editor and publisher Mr. Fish exercises a most powerful influence for good in the community and as a citizen he is most loyal and public spirited, ever doing all in his power to advance the general welfare of the county and state at large. In politics he is a stalwart supporter of the Republican party and fraternally he is a prominent Mason and affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of the Maccabees. His wife is a valued and appreciative member of the Royal Neighbors and both are enrolled as devout supporters of the faith of the Congregational church. On the 22d of October, 1902, Mr. Fish was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Crane, who was born and reared at Mulliken, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Oscar and Chrissette Ann (Boyer) Crane, the former of whom was born in Indiana and the latter in New York. Mr. Crane is a contractor and builder by occupation and he and his wife now maintain their home at Mulliken. Mr. and Mrs. Fish have no children. JOHN W. WELDT, superintendent of the Arcadia & Betsey River Railroad, with residence and business headquarters at Arcadia, Manistee county, Michigan, may well be termed a self-made man. Mr. Weldt was born at Batavia, Genesee county, New York, on the 19th of May, 1857, and his parents both dying when he was a small boy, he left Batavia at the age of eight years and went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin,

Page  1153 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1153 where he made his home with an uncle. He remained in that city and attended German school until he had attained to the age of fourteen years. He then went to Manistee, Michigan, working upon the river in the capacity of chore boy and cook's assistant at the camps. He was identified with this line of enterprise until 1871, in which year he came to Arcadia, engaging with Henry Starke as a log scaler. In 1881, when the Arcadia & Betsey River Railroad was completed, he entered the employ of that company as an engineer and some time later he was employed by that concern as land locater and timber estimator. He was thus engaged until 1895, when the railroad was re-organized and he was proffered the position of superintendent, of which office he has been incumbent to the present time, in 1910. On the 29th of September, 1883, Mr. Weldt was united in marriage to Miss Maggie Kearnes, of Manistee. She was born in the Dominion of Canada and is a daughter of John and Ellen Kearnes, the latter of whom is deceased and the former of whom now resides with Mr. and Mrs. Weldt. Mr. and Mrs. Kearnes were both born in Canada and they came to the United States in 1861, locating in Saginaw county, Michigan, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mrs. Kearnes was summoned to the life eternal in 1892 and Mr. Kearnes reached the patriarchal age of ninety-two years on the 17th of August, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Weldt have two children,-George Newton, who was born on the 15th of June, 1889, at Arcadia, is in the office of the Arcadia & Betsey River Railroad Company; and Charles Adolph, who was born in this city on the 28th of June, 1894, is a student at the Ferris Institute, at Big Rapids, where he is preparing himself for college. In politics Mr. Weldt accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and he is ever alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises advanced for the general welfare of the community. He takes a deep interest in educational matters and for twelve years was school assessor. He and his wife are zealous members of the Lutheran church and they hold a high place in popular confidence and esteem. HENRY MAUNTLER.-Enterprise and determination are strong elements in prosperity and they are found among the salient characteristics of Henry Mauntler, president of the Arcadia Furniture Company and a member of the firm of Mauntler, Ebert & Behrens, besides which he is efficiently filling the office of postmaster of Arcadia. He is one of the city's most progressive and capable business men and his advancement in the business world has been through his own efforts, and to-day,he is enjoying a richly merited success, while the future is bright with promise. Mr. Henry Mauntler was born in the great empire of Germany, on the 23d of November, 1850, and he emigrated to this country in 1868, at the age of eighteen years. He first located in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, traveling from 1870 to 1880 for a wholesale liquor house. In connection with his work he became acquainted with Mr. Henry Starke, of Arcadia, who persuaded him to come to this city in July, 1880, as manager of the store, then known as the Henry Starke Lumber

Page  1154 1154 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Company Store, this being practically the first store established at Arcadia. Mr. Mauntler continued as manager of the store until the fall of 1906, when he and the parties now comprising the partnership purchased the Starke interest. In December, 1906, he was appointed to the office of postmaster, which position he now holds. In addition to his other interests he is also president of the Arcadia Furniture Company, which concern controls a large patronage in this city and the surrounding territory. In politics Mr. Mauntler is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party and he has done a great deal toward advancing the general welfare of the community in which he resides. For a number of years he was a member of the board of equalization of Arcadia, Manistee county, and he has also been a valued member of the board of school trustees of Arcadia since its organization. In the year 1873 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mauntler to Miss Mary Behrens, who was born and reared in Germany, whence she came to America as a young girl, locating in the city of Milwaukee, where her marriage was solemnized. This union has been blessed with four children, namely,-Freda, who was born at Milwaukee, is now the wife of Otto Lang and resides in Arcadia; Amanda is the wife of Fred Heffmeyer, who is in the employ of the Pullman Car Company in the capacity of bookkeeper; Hulda married Edward Larson, of Arcadia; and Ida is at home attending the local schools. In a religious way Mr. Mauntler and his family are devout members of the Lutheran church, to whose charities and good works he has been a liberal contributor. Strong in his individuality Mr. Mauntler never lacks the courage of his convictions, but there are, as dominating elements in his personality, a lively human sympathy and an abiding charity which, as taken in connection with the sterling integrity and honor of his character, have naturally gained to him the respect and confidence of his fellow men. JUDGE HENRY H. WOODRUFF, the popular and efficient prosecuting attorney of Roscommon county, Michigan, whose name occupies a conspicuous place on the roll of Michigan's eminent lawyers, during fully three decades connection with the bar of the state, has won and maintained a reputation for ability that has given him pre-eminence among his professional brethren. In the law, as in every other walk of life, success is largely the outcome of resolute purpose and unfaltering industry,-qualities which are possessed in a large degree by Judge Woodruff. He has been honored by his fellow citizens with many important offices of public trust and responsibility, and in all of them he has acquitted himself most creditably. Judge Woodruff was born in Wayne county, Michigan, on the 28th of January, 1841, and he is a son of Henry and Abigail (Hall) Woodruff, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, whence they came to Michigan, in 1835, location being made in Wayne county. To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Woodruff were born ten children, nine of whom grew to maturity and six of whom are living, in 1911. Of the number, the Judge was the third in order of birth and he received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of his native place. Sub

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Page  1155 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1155 sequently he attended school at Saginaw and in 1861 he was prepared in the high school at Ann Arbor for entrance to the University of Michigan, and passed his examinations at the head of his class. At this time the dark cloud of Civil war obscured the national horizon, and Judge Woodruff gave evidence of his intrinsic loyalty to the cause of the Union by enlisting as a member of Company D, Sixteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Early in his military career he was made corporal and he gradually rose through the ranks of sergeant, first sergeant, second lieutenant to the office of first lieutenant. These promotions were the result of meritorious conduct in the face of the enemy. He participated in every battle in which the Army of the Potomac took part, with the exception of the first and second battles of Bull Run. He escaped without a single wound and after serving three years and three months, received his honorable discharge from service. After the close of the war Judge Woodruff returned to Michigan and in due time entered upon the study of law at Roscommon and at Saginaw, being admitted to practice at the bar of the state, in 1878, after a rigid examination in open court, before Judge Hart. He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Roscommon, the county seat of the county of that name, and here built up a large and representative clientage. In addition to his large amount of legal work, Judge Woodruff became deeply interested in the lumber business, owning at one time as much as six thousand acres of valuable timber lands. He now owns something like fifteen hundred acres. He came to Roscommon in 1874 and in December of the following year helped to organize Roscommon county. In 1875 he was elected to the office of register of deeds, later he held the office of county clerk and in 1905 was elected judge of probate. In 1907-8 he was the able incumbent of the office of county treasurer and in disbursement of the finances of the county he showed unusual discretion and good judgment. In politics he gives ardent support to the cause of the Republican party. He was first elected to the office of prosecuting attorney of Roscommon county in 1880, holding that position for eighteen years consecutively. After a brief respite he was again returned to the office, of which he has remained in tenure for a period of twenty-two years. In professional and fraternal organizations he is affiliated with various representative orders, and in his religious faith he is a stanch advocate of the doctrines set forth by the Congregational church, to whose charities he is a most liberal contributor. In the year 1866 was solemnized the marriage of Judge Woodruff to Miss Abigail Elsefer, who was summoned to the life eternal in 1874. There was one child born to this union, who died at birth. In 1877 he was united in marriage to Miss Alicia Moiles and they became the parents of two children, namely,-Mrs. Mary Fuller, who resides at Jennings, Michigan; and Mrs. Elizabeth Pattie, who maintains her home at Roscommon. Judge Woodruff has lived a moral and upright life and no one in Roscommon county holds a higher place in the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens than does he. He has devoted himself assiduously to his profession and to the public offices with which he has been honored. As a man he is thoroughly conscientious, of undoubted integrity, affable Vol. III-13

Page  1156 1156 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and courteous in manner, and he has a host of friends and few, if any, enemies. CARL J. WECHTER.-Among the representative and essentially loyal and public spirited citizens of Bear Lake, Manistee county, Michigan, is Carl J. Wechter, who has held various offices of public trust. He was born at Orange, New Jersey, on the 21st of February, 1861, and is a son of Frank and Amelia (Adams) Wechter, the former of whom was born in the great German empire and the latter of whom claims Yonkers, New York as the place of her nativity. The father came to America as a young man and secured work as a carpenter and builder in New Jersey, where he resided for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wechter became the parents of two children, both yet living, of whom Carl J. was the second in order of birth. Mr. Wechter was summoned to the life eternal in 1879, at Orange, New Jersey, and his wife passed away in 1863. Carl J. Wechter remained at home attending school until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, at which time he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in his home city, in the office of the Orange Chronicle. After completing his apprenticeship he entered the employ of Seabury & Johnson, at Roseville, New Jersey, as a pressman. In 1881 he went west to Omaha, Nebraska, where he worked off and on in the office of the Herald as a journeyman from 1880 to 1889. He was also employed on different papers in cities along the Missouri river. After his marriage, in 1885, he resided in Omaha and in 1889 he and his wife came to Bear Lake, locating upon a farm in this vicinity for a year or so. Thereafter he went to Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he was employed in the work of his trade on the Daily Democrat, continuing to be identified with that paper during the years 1890 to 1891. For several terms he was employed in the state printing office at Lansing and also resided at Ann Arbor later. In 1900, however, he returned to Bear Lake and again directed his attention to farming, but in 1905 his health failed and he was obliged to go to Colorado for a year in order to recuperate. On his return to Bear Lake in the following year he engaged in the drug business, where he is now with the F. W. Richmond Drug Company. At Omaha, on the 4th of July, 1885, Mr. Wechter was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Kilborn, of Bear Lake, Michigan, and who is a daughter of George H. and Adeline Kilborn. George H. Kilborn was a gallant soldier in the Civil war, having entered service as a private and having worked his way up to a captaincy in the First Michigan Gavalry. After the close of the war he was sent west to assist in subduing the uprisings of the Indians. He received his honorable discharge in 1867, after which he returned to Michigan, where he became interested in agricultural pursuits in Manistee county. Mrs. Wechter was a telegraph operator prior to her marriage and she had gone to Omaha in order to accept a position as such. In politics Mr. Wechter is a stanch adherent of the cause of the Republican party and he has been an active factor in local politics. In 1905 he was elected to the office of town treasurer, remaining in tenure

Page  1157 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1157 of that position for one year and for two years he was incumbent of the office of village clerk. In 1907 he was given further mark of the confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow citizens in that he was then elected to the office of justice of the peace of Bear Lake. In all of his public offices he has acquitted himself with honor and distinction and no one in Bear Lake is held in higher esteem than is he. Fraternally he is connected with the time-honored Masonic order, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Modern Romans, while Mrs. Wechter is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. E. GEORGE GRAY, M. D., 'is established in the successful practice of his profession in the city of Ludington and is known as a man of fine technical attainments,-one admirably equipped for the work of his exacting vocation and one whose personality has gained to him the high esteem of the community in which he has elected to maintain his home. As one of the honored and representative members of the medical profession in Mason county he is consistently accorded consideration in this publication. Dr. Gray is a scion of stanch English ancestry, in both the agnatic and maternal lines, and is a native of Huron county, province of Ontario, Canada, where he was born on the 8th of November, 1878. He is a son of Stephen and Mildred (Snell) Gray, both of whom were born and reared in England, whence they came to America before their marriage. The father became one of the prosperous agriculturists of Huron county, Ontario, where he developed a fine farm, and he passed the closing years of his life on this same homestead, where he died at the venerable age of seventy-eight years, his cherished and devoted wife having been fifty-six years of age at the time when she was summoned to the life eternal, and both having been zealous communicants of the Church of England. They became the parents of seven sons and three daughters, all of whom are living except one, John Albert, and of the number Dr. Gray of this review is the youngest. On the old homestead farm in Huron county, Ontario, Dr. Gray passed his boyhood days and in the meanwhile he duly availed himself of the advantages of the public schools. At the age of fifteen years he came to Ludington, Michigan, and here he was graduated in the high school as a member of the class of 1896. For two years thereafter he held a position in connection with the general store and mill of the Stearns Lumber Company, at Stearns Siding, Lake county, and in the autumn of 1898 he was matriculated in the literary department of the University of Michigan, where he remained a student for two years. He then assumed a clerkship in the state land office, in the capital city of Lansing, and after retaining this incumbency for one year he again entered the University of Michigan, in the literary department of which great institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1903, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the meanwhile he had also prosecuted his studies in the medical department of the university, and in the same he was graduated in 1905, duly receiving his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He forthwith engaged in the practice of his profession in Ludington, and his ability and earnest devotion to the work

Page  1158 1158 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of his chosen calling have enabled him to build up a substantial and representative practice, the while he has gained secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. He is a member of the Mason County Medical Society and the Michigan State Medical Society, in the councils and work of each of which he takes a lively interest. He is a close student of his profession and is an able exemplar of its best and most modern theories and practices in both the departments of medicine and surgery. The Doctor is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and other fraternal and social organizations of representative order. His political support is given to the Republican party, and both he and his wife are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church. On the 11th of October, 1905, Dr. Gray was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Grace Raymond, daughter of Joseph and Josephine Raymond, of Lansing, Michigan, and they have three daughters,Josephine M., Georgia A. and Alberta L. ALEXANDER G. FREEMAN, former sheriff of Mason county, and one of the leading Republicans of northern Michigan, was for many years a prosperous farmer in that part of the state and, although he has retired from active agricultural pursuits, is still a large owner of valuable farming property near his home city of Ludington. He is of English ancestry paternally, his father, the late William Freeman, coming from the mother country and settling in Kentucky soon after he had reached his legal majority. Not long afterward he married Miss Frances Simmons, a Baltimore girl, who gave birth to Alexander G. Freeman, of this sketch, on the 8th of May, 1859. The parents resided in Kentucky only a few years, and thence removed to Chicago, where they remained until 1863. In that year they made their home in Mason county, where they resided thereafter as pioneer and honored settlers of northern Michigan. William Freeman had secured a tract of wild land in Freesoil township, a large portion of which he brought to cultivation before selling the property for another farm in Grant township. On this second Michigan homestead they both spent their last years, the mother being fifty-nine years of age at the time of her decease. Of their ten children eight attained to maturity, Mr. Freeman being sixth in order of birth. Alexander G. Freeman was but four years of age at the time of the family removal to Mason county, and there he was reared under the conditions and influences of the pioneer days. The exigencies of time and place were such that his early educational advantages were very limited. His entire schooling did not, in fact, cover a period of more than ten months, and even to gain this limited training he was compelled to walk a distance of three miles, morning and evening, to attend a primitive log school in the woods. But through his association with men and affairs, in later years, he so broadened his scope of practical knowledge-the every-day working tool of the man most useful to society-that he developed into a well-informed, self-reliant and able citizen. Mr. Freeman assisted in the arduous work of the pioneer farm and remained at the parental home until he was twenty-one years of

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Page  1159 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1159 age, after which he was identified with lumbering operations in the great pine woods of northern Michigan for a period of about twelve years. In 1888 he returned to Grant township, Mason county, where he turned his attention to general farming and stock-raising, with which he continued to be actively identified until his election to the shrievalty in November, 1908. Mr. Freeman has been an active and enthusiastic worker in behalf of the Republican cause for many years, and is one of the wheel-horses of the party in Mason county. He served for thirteen years as supervisor of Grant township and proved a progressive and valuable member of the board during the entire period, always throwing his strong influence toward the fostering of the best interests of the community which he specially represented and of the county at large. This record was repeated in the office of school director, of which he was incumbent for fifteen years, besides serving five years as highway commissioner of his township. These various preferments offer adequate voucher for the confidence reposed in him in the county that has represented his home for more than forty years. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife hold membership in the allied organization, the Daughters of Rebekah. In the year 1888 Mr. Freeman was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Watts, and the nine children born to their union have been Harry H., Hattie Hazel, William Archie, Edna Ruth, Nellie May, Minnie Pearl, Mille K., Retha Marie and Thelma Evelyn. CLARENCE J. PHELPS, well known throughout Ogemaw county, where he has filled various local offices and now is deputy state fish, game and forest warden, with headquarters at West Branch, is a native of Michigan. He was born in Atlas township, Genesee county, July 26, 1855, and is of English origin. At an early date in the history of the Colonies his ancestors emigrated to this country and settled in the New England states. When trouble with the mother country culminated in war they took a decided stand on the side of liberty and independence, and for the part they took in the Revolution gained a name in history. Joel Phelps, great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born at Dover, New Jersey, in 1754, and in 1786 married Hannah Berry, by whom he had twelve children: Gilbert, Othniel, Manerva, Martha, Sarah, Joel, Daniel, Mary, Aaron, Lewis, Henry and Stephen. The youngest of this family, Stephen, was shot through the body at the Wyoming massacre and was carried on a litter one hundred miles to Brant Phelps. He lived to be ninety-five years of age. Other members of the family also lived to ripe old ages, and one reached the one hundred and sixth milestone. While some of the family have followed the higher professions in life, most of them have been engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Phelp's parents, Henry C. and Maria J. (Johnson) Phelps, were natives of New York state, but spent the greater part of their lives in Michigan, to which state they were brought when children and where they were married. They had two children-Lottie and Clarence J. Henry C. Phelps, like his ancestors, was imbued with a spirit of patriotism and loyalty. In the dark days of the '60s, when his coun

Page  1160 1160 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN try called for men to defend the integrity of the Union, he cheerfully responded and enrolled himself as a private in Company K, Twentythird Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and after faithful and efficient service was honorably discharged. He died at West Branch, Michigan, in 1899, aged sixty-eight years. His wife preceded him in 1896, aged sixty-five years. In his native county, Clarence J. Phelps spent his early boyhood and received a common school education. Later he attended the Clarkston High School in Oakland county, Michigan. In 1878, in the prime of young hanhood, he came to Ogemaw county, and here he has ever since made his home. On his arrival here he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of plains farm land in Foster township, which he improved and beautified, and on which he made his home for several years, until 1887, when he removed to West Branch. In the meantime and since his location in the county seat, official honors were his, and so efficiently did he perform the duties devolving upon him that his office-holding has been almost continuous and has embraced many important positions. In 1882 he served as supervisor of Foster township. Later he filled the offices of township clerk, highway commissioner and school inspector. In 1897, after his removal to West Branch, he was elected clerk of West Branch township. Later he was city clerk, and still later mayor, and at different times he served as marshal and street commissioner. The most important local office in which he served, however, was that of county sheriff, to which he was three times elected. He filled that office from 1886 to 1888, 1896 to 1898, and from 1904 to 1908. And in 1909 he was appointed to his present position, that of deputy state fish, game and forest warden. The year he disposed of his farm, 1897, Mr. Phelps bought a livery stable, which he equipped with the best stock and the finest turnouts to be found, and this enterprise he conducted until 1901, when he was burned out and sustained a loss of over eight thousand dollars. A portion of his time from 1904 to 1908 he was in the employ of the Ypsilanti Paper Company, his duty being to purchase wood for pulp. In 1877 Clarence J. Phelps and Miss Emma J. Clark were united in marriage, and to them have been given children as follows: Mrs. F. G. Canfield; Ray C., manager of the Hot Springs, (S. D.) Electric Plant, and Gale C., assistant superintendent of a lumber company in Wisconsin. Mrs. Phelps, a daughter of Reuben Clark, of Clarkton, Michigan, died on the thirty-third anniversary of her marriage, in 1910. Mr. Phelps is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Maccabees, Mystic Workers, Knights of the Grip and of the Iowa Traveling Men's Association. FRANK A. FOSTER.-A man who has gradually forged ahead in spite of all obstacles which beset his path and who has made of success not an accident but a logical result is Frank Foster, who is engaged in the insurance business in Ludington, Mason county, Michigan. He was born at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on the 25th of March, 1856, and is a son of Luther Hall Foster, who was born and reared in the state of Maine, whence he came to Wisconsin about the year 1855. He was a lumber

Page  1161 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1161 man by occupation and met his death at the hands of a burglar, who shot him, at Ludington. At the time of his demise, in 1876, he was secretary of the Pere Marquette Lumber Company. He came to Ludington in 1866 and prior to that time he had extensive interests in Muskegon and other lumber towns. He was active in public affairs in this city, being of great assistance in building churches and in promoting the various public utilities. He had charge of platting the village of Pere Marquette, now the city of Ludington, and the naming of all the main streets of Ludington and during his life time was one of the most prominent citizens of this city. He organized the Congregational church, also the Presbyterian church, and was for a time local commissioner under the state land commissioner. He was the prime mover in getting the state road through Ludington and was instrumental in securing to Ludington the county seat. He was a stalwart Republican in his political proclivities and his death occurred in June, 1876. His father was Edward Foster and the Foster genealogy is traced back about twelve generations, representatives of this family having come to America in the year 1700, from England, and different members having served as gallant soldiers in the war of the Revolution. Luther H. Foster married Lucy Amelia Schraam, a native of Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of two sons,-Frank, of this sketch; and Edward C., who is engaged in the lumber business in California. Mrs. Foster is still living, residing now with her son, Frank, she having reached the age of seventy-nine years. Frank Foster was a lad of ten years at the time of his parents' removal to Ludington, to whose public schools he is indebted for his preliminary educational training. The town was called Pere Marquette in those days. He attended the Muskegon schools during the Civil war and after completing the curriculum of the Ludington schools he pursued an academic course in the Lake Forest Academy, at Lake Forest, Illinois, and also attended Olivet College, at Olivet, Michigan. In 1877 he was matriculated in the University of Michigan, as a member of the class of 1881. When he entered the business world he became interested in the lumber industry and in 1880 he purchased a half interest in the Will Farrell Sash, Door & Blind Factory at Ludington, continuing to be identified with that line of enterprise for a period of one and a half years, at the expiration of which time he disposed of his interest to H. B. Smith, who still owns and operates the plant. In 1879 he was engaged in the fire-insurance business and in 1882 he entered into the U. S. postal service as a railway postal clerk, in which connection he was employed until April, 1887, at which time he was elected county treasurer, continuing incumbent of that office for a period of four years, that length of time being the limit of consecutive service. Thereafter he was engaged in the manufacturing business for two years but meeting with misfortunes he was obliged in 1893 to enter the employ of the Pere Marquette Building Association, at the munificent salary of twentyfive dollars a month. In the following April he turned his attention to the fire-insurance business, in which he has been engaged to the present time. In 1900 he was again elected to the office of county treasurer, serving another period of four years, and he was also secretary

Page  1162 1162 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of the Republican County Committee, of which he was afterwards chairman. He served as county supervisor for five years, serving one year as its chairman, and has ever taken an active interest in political affairs of a local nature. He is a stanch advocate of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and his contribution to the progress and development of Mason county has been of the most insistent order. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He also holds membership in the time-honored Masonic order, having been high priest in the chapter, eminent commander of the Knights Templars and attained to the thirtysecond degree of Scottish Rite Masonry. He is a director in the State Savings Bank in Ludington and has other interests of broad scope and importance in Mason county. In the year 1884 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Foster to Miss Charlotte Patterson Wood, who was born and reared at Lyons, New York, and who was summoned to the life eternal in September, 1905. To that union were born two sons,-Luther B. and Edward W. In 1907 Mr. Foster wedded Miss Hattie Tiedemann, a native of Ludington, and they have one son, Wallace. Mr. Foster takes a deep interest in educational matters, having served as treasurer of the school board for some six years, and it seems to be in order here to remark that one of Ludington's school buildings was named after his father, Luther H. Foster, as a mark of respect. This was at the request of the older residents, who remembered with gratefulness his activities in school and church affairs. Mr. and Mrs. Foster are prominent in the best social circles of Ludington and they hold a secure vantage ground in popular confidence and esteem. WILLIAM T. CULVER.-Among the leading industrial concerns that have given emphatic impetus to the commercial and civic progress and prestige of the city of Ludington is the Stearns Salt & Lumber Company, of which important corporation Mr. Culver is vice-president. He is numbered among the liberal and progressive citizens of this section of the fine Wolverine state and thus is specially eligible for representation in this volume. He is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of Michigan and was born on his father's farm, in Lenawee county, this state, on the 18th of August, 1863. He is a son of Alonzo L. and Margaret (Lewis) Culver, the former of whom died when about sixty years of age and the latter of whom still maintains her home in the city of Cadillac, Michigan. The father likewise was a native of Lenawee county, where the family was founded in the early pioneer days, and there he was reared to manhood. He was there identified with agricultural pursuits and lumber operations until 1878, when he removed with his family to Cadillac, Wexford county, where he continued to be actively identified with lumbering enterprises during the remainder of his active business career. He was a man of sterling character and strong individuality, and he ever commanded the implicit confidence and esteem of his fellow men. His political support was given to the Republican party and his religious faith was that of the Congregational

Page  1163 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1163 church, of which his wife also has long been a zealous member. They became the parents of one son and two daughters, all of whom survive the honored father. William T. Culver gained his rudimentary education in the public schools of his native county and was fifteen years of age at the time of the family removal to Cadillac, in 1878. There he was reared to maturity and there he continued his studies in the public schools until he was fourteen years of age. In 1886 he entered the employ of Justus S. Stearns, who has long been numbered among the prominent and influential citizens of northern Michigan and of whom individual mention is made on other pages of this work. In the year mentioned, Mr. Culver assumed charge of his employer's lumber yard at Stearns, Lake county, and he gained rapid promotion by reason of his effective and faithful service, the ultimate result of which was that, in 1898, he was admitted to partnership in the business, which was incorporated about two years later, under the present title of the Stearns Salt & Lumber Company. Of this corporation Mr. Culver has since been vice-president, and as an active executive of the same he has done much to promote the upbuilding of the splendid industrial enterprises controlled by the company. He has other capitalistic interests of important order and has maintained his residence in Ludington since 1886, this city being the headquarters of the company of which he is vice-president. Though he has never had aught of desire to enter the arena of practical politics, Mr. Culver is found aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and he is ever ready to lend his aid and influence in the furtherance of measures projected for the general good of the community. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is distinctively popular in both the business and social circles of his home city. On the 24th of December, 1884, Mr. Culver was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Hardy, who was born and reared at Detroit, and they have four daughters,-Lelah, Vera, Ruth and Elizabeth. Mrs. Culver and her daughters are prominent in connection with the leading social activities of Ludington and the family home is a center of gracious hospitality. FRANK W. HAWLEY.-Incumbent of the office of manager of the Stearns Lighting and Power Company, one of the leading industrial concerns that give commercial prestige to the thriving city of Ludington, Mr. Hawley is properly deserving of classification among the representative business men of Mason county, and in noting the salient points in his career the more interest attaches thereto by reason of the fact that he is a native son of the fine old Wolverine commonwealth, within the borders of which he has found ample scope for productive effort along normal lines of enterprise. A man of alert mentality and pronounced business acumen, he has proved a valuable executive and administrative officer, the while his course has been such as to gain and retain to him the inviolable confidence and esteem of those with whom he has come in contact in the various relations of life.

Page  1164 1164 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Frank W. Hawley was born in the city of Muskegon, Michigan, on the 3d of May, 1870, and is a son of Smith and Gertrude (Shaffer) Hawley, the former of whom was born at Brantford, province of Ontario, Canada, and the latter in Germany, whence her parents immigrated to America, and took up their residence in Clinton county, Michigan, when she was a girl. Smith Hawley was reared and educated in his native province and about the year 1860 he came thence to Michigan. He had learned the trade of millwright and carpenter and found ready requisition for his services in this line. For a number of years he maintained his home in Muskegon, whence he removed to Ludington in 1871. He became one of the pioneer business men of this city, which was then a mere village, and finally he purchased a tract of land in Mason county, about six miles distant from Ludington, in Summit township, where he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in which connection he reclaimed his farm from a practical wilderness. He still resides on his fine homestead and is one of the well known and highly honored citizens of the county that has been his home for forty years and in the development and upbuilding of which he has given effective aid. He has lent his support to such enterprises as have conserved the social and material progress of this favored section of the state and his name merits a place on the roster of the honored pioneers of Mason county. He is a Democrat in his political proclivities. Of their twelve children Frank W. was the second in order of birth, and of the number nine attained to years of maturity, seven sons and two daughters. Frank W. Hawley was about one year old at the time the family came to Ludington and five years later removal was made to the previously mentioned farm in Summit township, where he was reared to adult age, in the meanwhile duly availing himself of the advantages of the district schools. After completing the curriculum in the Ludington high school for one year he was a student in the Grand Rapids Business College. After leaving this last mentioned institution he was employed for two years as clerk in a mercantile establishment in Ludington, and he then assumed the position of bookkeeper for the Ludington Woodenware Company, in the employ of which corporation he continued for ten years, at the expiration of which, in 1900, he assumed a similar incumbency with the Stearns Salt & Lumber Company, with which he has since been actively identified. He has proved a valuable factor in connection with the various interests of Hon. Justus S. Stearns, and the latter has shown his appreciation by giving him successive promotions. He is now manager of the Stearns Lighting & Power Company, purchasing agent of Stearns Salt and Lumber Company, besides which he is manager for the Ludington and Northern Railway, another of the important corporations of Ludington. A resident of Mason county from his infancy to the present day, Mr. Hawley naturally takes deep interest in all that touches its welfare, and his civic loyalty is of the most insistent order. He is affiliated with Ludington Lodge, No. 299, Free & Accepted Masons, of which he is past master; Ludington Lodge, No. 736, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks; and the Knights of Pythias. He enjoys distinctive popularity in

Page  1165 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1165 both business and social circles in his home city and he and his wife are valued factors in its best social activities. On the 6th of June, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hawley to Miss Georgia Milligan, daughter of Captain Duncan MIilligan, a representative citizen of Ludington, and the one child of this union is a winsome little daughter, Hannah. HENRY B. SMITH.-The city of Ludington manifests a due measure of pride in the stability and impregnable integrity of her many prominent citizens, and one of the foremost of these is Henry B. Smith, whose interests in this locality are of no less than thirty-eight years standing. His contribution to progress and development is of no mean order and his identification with the industrial world of northern Michigan has brought prominence to himself and credit to the state. At the present time, in 1911, he is secretary and treasurer of the Ludington Woodenware Company, in the furthering of whose interests he has been a most potent factor. Henry B. Smith was born at Auburn, Geauga county, Ohio, on the 22nd of July, 1848, and is a son of Lathrop and Caroline (Eggleston) Smith, the former of whom was a native of the state of Connecticut and the latter of whom was born at Aurora, Ohio. The father was an early settler in Geauga county, Ohio, and after his marriage, which occurred in Portage county, that state, he located at Chagrin Falls, where he was a teamster between that place and Cleveland. Mr. and Mrs. Lathrop Smith became the parents of two children, namely, —Henry B. of this sketch, and Rumson L., who is a resident of Fort Williams, Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were both summoned to the life eternal in the old Buckeye state, their deaths having occurred on June 5, 1855, and August 7, 1894, respectively. Henry B. is the younger of the two boys and he spent his childhood and early youth at Chagrin Falls, to whose public schools he is indebted for his preliminary educational training. At the age of fifteen years he was fired with boyish enthusiam to serve as a soldier in the Union army during the strenuous period of the Civil war. Accordingly he enlisted in the Ninth Ohio Independent Battery as a soldier in the light artillery, serving until the close of the war and being registered as a private for about nineteen months. After completing his military career he returned to his native state and attended a business college at Poughkeepsie for about one year. In 1866 he removed to Birch Run, Saginaw county, Michigan, where he engaged in the mercantile and mill business for the ensuing two years, at the expiration of which he went to New Mexico. He remained in the southwest 4bout one year and then returned to Michigan, engaging in the hotel business at Flint. In 1872 he came to Ludington, Mason county, where he began to run a passenger boat between Ludington and Pentwater, continuing to be identified with that line of enterprise until 1881, at which time he directed his attention to the planing-mill business. In 1889 he became interested in the Ludington Wooden Ware Company, of which important concern he has since been incumbent of the offices of treasurer and secretary. In this connection he has done much to advance the interests of the company

Page  1166 1166 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and he has gained recognition as a man of unusual business acumen and executive capacity. In the year 1880 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Nellie J. Shackelton, a daughter of Levi and Mary (Tart) Shackelton, of Ludington. Mrs. Smith was born in Grand Haven, Michigan, in 1858, and she is a woman of extensive information and most gracious personality. Four children have been born to this union, one of whom is deceased,-Mabel C., who became the wife of George Abair. She was born on the 1st of January, 1881. The other children are: Howard B., born on the 22nd of May, 1882, is engaged as manager of the different theaters at Ludington; Mary E., born April 27, 1885, is the wife of George Tripp, of this city; and Bessie C., born on the 25th of June, 1887, is the wife of C. B. Kelland, of Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Smith is aligned as a stalwart in the ranks of the Republican party and he has ever manifested a deep interest in public affairs, having acquitted himself with honor and distinction in the various offices of trust with which he has been honored. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the great Masonic order and in the same is a member of Apollo Commandery, No. 31, Knights Templars, besides which he is also a valued and appreciative member of Saladin Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. For nearly two score years has Mr. Smith been a resident of Ludington and during all that time he has so lived and conducted himself as to command the unalloyed esteem and high regard of his fellow citizens. He and his wife are devout members of the Congregational church and it may be said of them that the list of their personal friends is coincident with that of their acquaintances. HENRY J. ANDERSON is a man who honestly lives up to his own beliefs. Most people are consumed with anxiety as to what others will think of their actions and they govern their conduct according to other peoples' ideas. There are other men who are utterly regardless of what people will think and to show their independence they go ahead and do exactly the opposite of the approved, generally accepted standards. There are, however, just a few men who take the pains to find out in their own minds the right course to pursue and they follow that, regardless of everything. Such a man is Mr. Anderson, positive in his views without being headstrong. He was born on a farm in Benona township, Oceana county, Michigan, October 15, 1874. He was the son of Christian and Risa Anderson, who were both born in Norway and there received their education. Mrs. Anderson's maiden name was Solam, and soon after their marriage they came to America, arriving in this country in 1865. They came at once to Michigan, where they took up a homestead, the farm on which Henry was born. The ground was covered with heavy timber and was very valuable. Mr. Anderson died in 1880 and his wife in 1886. Henry spent his boyhood days on the farm, attending the district school as soon as he was old enough to walk there. In the summer he helped with the farm work and in the winter he went to school until he was seventeen years old. He then went to Big Rapids, where he entered

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Page  1167 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1167 the Ferris Institute, taking a general business course. He later took a special course in bookkeeping and became very proficient in that branch. In 1895 he came to Jennings, where he accepted the position of head bookkeeper for Mitchell Brothers. He held this position for ten years, when he was promoted to the position of general manager and buyer for their store. Since that time he has had practically full charge of the store. In June, 1902, he was appointed to the position of postmaster of Jennings, fulfilling the duties required in addition to his work in the store. In 1902 he was married to Miss Rose Wilson, a native of Jennings, Michigan. She is the daughter of John and Rose (McCormick) Wilson and her father is assistant engineer of the mill. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have one child, Dorothy Helen, born in August, 1908. Mr. Anderson is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and also of the Maccabees. He is a Republican in political sympathies and has for years been school inspector, taking a great interest in all matters pertaining to education. Although the family are Lutherans in religious belief, they do not confine their good works to aiding the followers of that faith, but give freely to any and all worthy objects. Both Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are very hospitable and their friends are always sure of a hearty welcome from them both. REV. DENNIS E. MALONE.-Rev. Father Malone, pastor of St. Simon's church at Ludington, is one of the valued members of the Catholic clergy of Michigan. His association with spiritual affairs at this place has been since September, 1910, and it is his ambition to carry to fruition the ideas of that honored and beloved priest, Father Lawrence Haydn, whose death occurred in 1909, and who for sixteen years presided with remarkable wisdom over the spiritual affairs of the church, making all hearts his own and enjoying the admiration and respect of clergy and laity. Father Malone is a native son of the state, his birth having occurred at Dennison, Ottawa county, Michigan, February 5, 1870. His parents were Patrick and Catherine (Goden) Malone, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of the state of New York. He is one of a family of seven children, five of whom are sons and two daughters, and all of whom grew to maturity, the number remaining intact at the present time. He received his preliminary education in the schools of Coopersville, from whose higher department he was graduated in 1886. In preparation for the work of the priesthood he studied for five years in Assumption College, at Sandwich, Province of Ontario, Canada, and for an equal length of time in the theological seminary at Montreal, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1896. In the same year Father Malone was ordained by Rt. Rev. Henry Joseph Richter, and his first pastoral charge was at Midland, Michigan, where for fourteen years he labored for the spiritual and material uplifting of his people. He constructed new churches at Clare and Auburn, a new residence at Vernon and purchased a block centrally located in Midland and moved his church thereon. He then found himself at the head of the parish at Ludington by the removal by death of the former pastor, Fa

Page  1168 1168 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN ther Lawrence Haydn, his installation in St. Simon's church occurring in the September of the year following Father Haydn's lamented demise. The church now numbers about four hundred families, making it one of the most important parishes in the northern part of the state. Father Malone has as his able coadjutor and assistant Rev. Felix Vogt, and in connection with the church is maintained an excellent parochial school which offers a curriculum of the same order as the secular high school. There is a teaching force numbering nine at the present time and some four hundred pupils are enrolled. St. Simon's church of Ludington has the distinction of being the largest English church in northern Michigan. It was established in the year 1870 and has experienced a steady and wholesome growth, and with the additions that Father Malone has planned in school, church and pastorate it will be one of the most complete parishes in north ern Michigan and a credit to Mason county. EUGENE M. BEACH, manager of the Ogemaw Grain and Seed Company, West Branch, Michigan, was born in Saginaw county, this state, in 1879, a son of M. S. Beach, one of the worthy citizens of Saginaw. His early education Eugene M. received in the district schools near his home, and later he attended high school in Genesee county. He began his business career as a clerk, and in that capacity has been employed by different firms. He identified himself with his present business about seven years ago, and the past four years has been manager of the plant at West Branch. This business is owned by a stock company of Saginaw, was established in 1906, and has a plant covering a quarter of an acre, the building being two stories high and forty by sixty feet in dimensions. The company deals extensively in grain, beans, hay, potatoes, seed, wool, etc., which it ships in large quantities, and it also handles coal and builders' supplies, including cement. And under Mr. Beach's careful management the concern is in a flourishing condition. In 1906 Mr. Beach married Miss Anna M. Shuller, by whom he has one son, Russell E. The fraternal organizations with which he is identified are the Maccabees, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Free and Accepted Masons, and in his Masonic lodge he fills the office' of senior warden. FRED H. PRATT.-Worthy of recognition in this publication as one of the representative members of the bar of northern Michigan, Mr. Pratt is incumbent of the office of prosecuting attorney of Grand Traverse county, and his long retention of this position stands as voucher both for his professional ability and personal popularity. He has been engaged in the practice of law in Traverse City since 1895 and has exemplified in most emphatic way the true ethical code of his profession, which he has honored by his effective efforts and sterling integrity of purpose. He is a scion of the third generation of the Pratt family in Michigan, with whose history the name has been identified during practically the entire period since the state was admitted to the Union. Mr. Pratt was born in Deerfield township, Livingston county, Michigan, on the 18th day of May, 1876, and is a son of James A. and Eliza

Page  1169 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1169 beth (McKane) Pratt, the former of whom died in 1907 and the latter of whom still resides at Fenton, Livingston county. The father likewise was born in Deerfield township, that county, in 1841, and there he assisted in reclaiming a farm from the wilderness. He eventually became one of the representative agriculturists of that section of the state and was influential in public affairs of a local order. His entire life was guided and governed by the highest of principles and he ever commanded secure vantage ground in the confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He held various township offices and continued to be actively identified with agricultural pursuits until he was well advanced in years. He finally retired from active labor and passed the closing years of his life in the village of Fenton. He was a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican party and his religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, of which his wife also has long been a devoted member. They became the parents of three children, of whom Fred H., of this review, is the second in order of birth; Edwin is a resident of Howell, where he is engaged in mercantile business; and Clara Belle is the wife of John R. Adams, of Los Angeles, California. James and Claiissa (Thompson) Pratt, grandparents of him whose name initiates this sketch, took up their residence in Deerfield township, Livingston county, Michigan, in 1837, the year of the admission of the state to the Union. The former was a native of the state of New York, where he was born in the year 1802, and the latter was born in Maine, in 1810. James Pratt was one of the vigorous and honored pioneers of Livingston county and was prominently identified with the development and upbuilding of the same. He reclaimed from the forest a productive farm and he passed the latter days of his life in the village of Fentonville, now known as Fenton, located not far distant from his old homestead, and in the adjoining county of Genesee. His widow attained to the remarkable age of ninety-six years and was summoned to the life eternal in 1906, his death having occurred in 1881. Of their four children it may be recorded that John is a resident of the state of Colorado; James A. was the father of the subject of this review; Edwin S. is a representative member of the bar of Grand Traverse county and is individually mentioned on other pages of this work; and Jay F. is a successful farmer of Livingston county. The boyhood days of Fred H. Pratt were passed on the old homestead farm which was the place of his birth, and after completing the curriculum of the public schools of Fenton he attended the State Normal School in that city for three years. In 1892 he came to Traverse City and began reading law under the effective preceptorship of his uncle, Edwin S. Pratt, and finally he entered the law department of the University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of fhe class of 1895 and from which he received his degree of Bachelor of Laws. He had been admitted to the bar of his native state in the preceding year, and immediately after his graduation he engaged in the practice of his profession in Traverse City, where he has since maintained his home and where he has gained indubitable prestige as one of the strong and resourceful advocates and well fortified counselors of the bar of this section of the state. He has been unfaltering in his de

Page  1170 1170 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN votion to the work of his profession and his success has been a logical result. In 1896 he was elected circuit-court commissioner and he retained this position for two years. In 1899 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Grand Traverse county, and the best attestation to the efficiency and acceptability of his administration of the affairs of this exacting office was that accorded by his re-election in 1901. In 1906 he was again called to this office, to which he was re-elected in 1908, and again in the election of November, 1910. As public prosecutor he has made a specially admirable record, and none has been more zealous in the enforcement of law and the conservation of equity and justice through service in this important position. He is deeply appreciative of the dignity and responsibility of his profession and in connection with the same is an exponent of its highest ideals, from which there are all too many lapses on the part of its representatives. In politics Mr. Pratt gives unfaltering allegiance to the Republican party and he has given effective service in behalf of its cause. He is a member of the Traverse City Board of Trade and as a citizen he is essentially progressive and loyal. He holds membership in the Lincoln Club, is affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars; and with the local organizations of the Knights of Pythias and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On the 27th of June, 1900, Mr. Pratt was united in marriage to Miss Rose Leonard, who was born in Deerfield township, Livingston county, this state, and who was a schoolmate of her husband in the village of Fenton. She is a daughter of William and Margaret (Scott) Leonard, who now reside in Fenton, where the father is living virtually retired, after many years of active identification with agricultural pursuits. He is a Republican in his political proclivities and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Pratt have one son, Leonard, who was born on the 23d of January, 1902. FRED POWELL is a conspicuous figure in the business world of Gladwin, Michigan, in which city he has been engaged in the hardware and furniture enterprise since 1897. He formerly conducted an undertaking establishment in connection with his present line of business but abandoned it in 1910. Mr. Powell was born in Orleans county, New York, on the 20th of July, 1863, a son of John B. and Mary (Money) Powell, both of whom were born and reared in England, whence they emigrated to America in 1851, locating in Orleans county, New York. In 1883 John B. Powell moved to the state of Michigan, where he engaged in the agricultural business. He now maintains his home in Gladwin and of his nine children six are still living,-Mrs. W. R. Gunn, Gertrude, Alice, Fred (of this sketch), Archie E. and Irving W. Mr. Powell is indebted to the public schools of Genesee county, Michigan, for his educational training, having there also pursued a course in a business college. That he put his scholastic attainments to good use is evident when it is stated that for thirteen years he was engaged in teaching in various districts in Michigan. In 1892 he became agent for a piano and later a stationery store, with headquarters at Saginaw, and

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Page  1171 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1171 he was a traveling salesman for those concerns for a period of five years prior to his locating in Gladwin. His present place of business consists of a store thirty by eighty feet in lateral dimensions, besides which he also requires the use of two large storehouses. He is now engaged in the erection of a store building forty-five by one hundred and twenty-six feet, two stories high, with basement. He controls a large and lucrative trade and is most popular in this city as a salesman and citizen. He has been a resident of Gladwin county since 1896 and has maintained his home at Gladwin since 1900. Mr. Powell is a Democrat in his political proclivities and he has been a member of the board of education for eight years. In 1908 he was nominated on the Democratic ticket for state senator, but owing to normal political exigencies he met with defeat at the ensuing election. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Powell has been twice married. In 1888 he was united to Miss Carrie Ayers, and they became the parents of one son, Max R., who was born on the 7th of May, 1890. In 1892 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Nellie B. Jones, a daughter of James B. Jones, of Millington, Michigan. No children have been born to the latter union. Essentially progressive and enterprising, Mr. Powell has gradually worked his way upward to a position of prominence in the business world, where he is recognized as a man of impregnable integrity and marked capacity. Courteous and affable in manner, the circle of his friends is constantly broadening and he enjoys the high regard of all with whom he comes in contact. His is one of the finest homes in the city. JAMES FOLEY.-Like many other representative citizens of northern Michigan, Mr. Foley claims the old Empire state of the Union as the place of his nativity, and he is to be designated as one of the pioneer representatives of the great lumbering industry in northern Michigan. He came to Ludington, his present place of abode, when a youth of twenty years, and he has resided in this section of the state for more than forty years, within which he has witnessed and aided in its development from a veritable wilderness to a position of opulent prosperity. Through his own energies and powers he has gained large and worthy success as one of the world's productive workers, and the esteem accorded him indicates adequately the sterling character of the man. Mr. Foley was born in Ontario county, New York, on the 25th of October, 1844, and is a son of James and Ellen (Callahan) Foley, both of whom were born in Ireland, where the former was reared to maturity and whence the latter came with her parents to America when she was a child. James Foley, Sr., was a young man at the time when he left the fair Emerald Isle to seek his fortunes in the United States. He was for a number of years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ontario county, New York, and in 1852 he removed thence with his family to Wisconsin and settled in the vicinity of Watertown, Jefferson county. He became one of the pioneer settlers of that county and there reclaimed a farm from the wilderness. Both he and his wife continued to reside in that county until their death, and were earnest, industrious and )1 Iill — 4

Page  1172 1172 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN God-fearing folk, well meriting the respect and confidence so uniformly accorded to them and both being devout communicants of the Catholic church. Of their thirteen children nine attained to years of maturity and he whose name introduces this article was the fourth in order of birth. James Foley, the immediate subject of this review, was a lad of eight years at the time of the family removal to the wilds of Wisconsin, where he was reared to adult age on the pioneer farm, in the development of which he early began to lend his aid, the while his educational advantages were limited to an irregular attendance in the primitive common schools of the locality and period. At the age of twenty years Mr. Foley severed the home ties and initiated his independent career. He was dependent upon his own resources, and these were summed up in integrity of purpose, industrious habits, ambition and alert mentality. He made his way across Lake Michigan to Ludington and he continued to be employed by the month in the lumber woods of this section of the state until 1871, when he engaged in business for himself, by contracting for the getting out of logs. Good management and close application brought success to him and he eventually became one of the representative factors in connection with the lumbering operations in this section. He continued to be actively identified with this line of enterprise for fully thirty-five years, and, as he himself has stated, he did not permit himself to indulge in a definite vacation during all this time. In 1897, after having accumulated a competency through his well directed endeavors and judicious investments, Mr. Foley retired from the lumber business, and he has since given his attention principally to the supervision of his fine farm, which comprises one hundred and fifty acres and which is eligibly located four miles east of Ludington. Under his personal direction he reclaimed this tract from the wilderness, and through his progressive policy and lively interest in the same he has done much to exploit the natural resources of Mason county since the waning of the lumber industry. He has brought his farm under effective cultivation and the same is devoted to diversified agriculture and to the raising of excellent grades of live stock, while the permanent improvements are of the best order. Mr. Foley is vice-president of the First National Bank of Ludington and has other capitalistic and real-estate interests. His attractive residence property in Ludington has been his home for the past sixteen years, and, with the mental and physical vigor of a man many years his junior he is fully enjoying the gracious rewards of former years of toil and endeavor. He recalls with due appreciation that when he made his advent in Ludington, in 1864, after walking the entire distance from Grand Haven to this point, his cash capital was summed up in the amount of sixty-nine cents, so that he was at that time hardly eligible for the position which he now holds as vice-president of one of the substantial banking institutions of this part of the state. In politics Mr. Foley has ever given a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Democratic party, and as a citizen he is loyal and publicspirited, with well defined views as to matters of political polity. He and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church and he is affili

Page  1173 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1173 ated with the Ludington organizations of the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In the year 1873 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Foley to Miss Lavina Parker, daughter of Miles and Susan Parker, who were sterling pioneers of Ludington. Mr. and Mrs. Foley had the following children: Mabel, deceased; Rose Ellen, the wife of Louis F. Yocky, manager of the American Radiator Company in Brussels, Belgium; and Laura C., now with her sister in Brussels. HENRY C. HUTTON.-It is gratifying to be able to present in this publication specific mention of so many of the representative members of the bar of the section to which the edition is devoted, and in this category a place of distinction may consistently be given to Mr. Hutton, who is engaged in the successful practice of his profession in the city of Ludington and who is recognized as one of the leading members of the bar of Mason county. He is a man of fine professional attainments and his career as a lawyer has been marked by exceptional experience and important work. Since establishing his home in Ludington he has been called upon to serve in various offices of public trust, and this fact sufficiently vouches for the hold which he retains upon popular confidence and esteem. Mr. Hutton claims the old Green Mountain state as the place of his nativity, as he was born at Springfield, Windsor county, Vermont, on the 7th of December, 1859, and he is a son of Henry H. and Helen E. (Whiting) Hutton, the former of whom was born at Brampton, province of Ontario, Canada, and the latter in the city of Boston, Massachusetts, where their marriage was solemnized. Henry H. Hutton was graduated in Syracuse University, in the city of Syracuse, New York, and he became a distinguished representative of the pedagogic profession. In this connection he served as superintendent of the public schools of various cities, and his last incumbency was that of superintendent of schools in Passaic, New Jersey, where he died at the age of seventy-six years. His father was a native of Scotland and upon emigrating to America became a farmer in the vicinity of Brampton, Ontario, where he continued to reside until his death. Mrs. Helen E. (Whiting) Hutton was graduated in a conservatory of music at Lima, New York, and was a successful teacher of music, in which vocation she was engaged in Nova Scotia prior to her marriage. She is a woman of most gracious personality and marked culture and, now venerable in years, she maintains her home at Blairstown, New Jersey. She is a devoted member of the Presbyterian church, as was also her husband. They became the parents of two sons and one daughter, all of whom are living, and of the number the eldest is he whose name introduces this sketch. Miss Gertrude E., who was graduated in the New England Conservatory of Music, in the city of Boston, is a successful and popular teacher of vocal music at Blairstown Academy, and Robert M. is an accountant at Passaic, New Jersey. Henry C. Hutton passed his boyhood days at Waverly, Tioga county, New York, and there he was afforded the advantages of the public schools. After completing the curriculum of the high school he began

Page  1174 1174 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN reading law under the effective preceptorship of Charles A. Clark, a prominent member of the bar of Owego, New York, and by close application he made rapid progress in his studies, with the result that he was admitted to the bar of the old Empire state, at Albany, in February, 1883, upon oral and written examination before the supreme court of the state. Prior to this he has served four years as clerk of the surrogate court of Tioga county, New York, and he retained this position for one year after his admission to the bar. He then secured a position in the office of the celebrated law firm of Goodrich, Deady & Platt, 59 Wall street, New York city, and in this connection he followed the work of his profession for the ensuing two years. He then removed to Kansas and established his residence in Westmoreland, Pottawatomie county, where he maintained his home for eight years. He came to Michigan in 1894, and established his home in Ludington. Here he formed a professional partnership with Hon. R. P. Bishop, and this effective alliance continued until the election of Mr. Bishop to congress, in 1894, since which time Mr. Hutton has conducted an individual practice. He has been identified with much important litigation, is known as a resourceful and versatile trial lawyer and retains a large and representative clientage. He has deep appreciation of the dignity of his profession and has honored the same by his character and services. He has served several years as city attorney of Ludington and is the present incumbent of this office. He was for eight consecutive years circuit-court commissioner for Mason county, and in 1904 he was elected prosecuting attorney of the county, a position which he retained for two years. In politics Mr. Hutton accords an uncompromising allegiance to the Republican party and he has given effective service in behalf of its cause. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife hold membership in the First Congregational church of their home city, where Mrs. Hutton is a popular factor in connection with the best social activities of the community. On the 8th of March, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hutton to Mliss Helen A. Waterman, daughter of the late John B. Waterman, a representative citizen of Salem, Washtenaw county, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Hutton have one son and three daughters,-Ruth E., Kenneth W., Gertrude M. and Harriet E. Mr. Hutton has shown a deep interest in all that has tended to advance the civic and material prosperity of his attractive home city and has given his aid and influence in support of enterprises and measures projected for the general good of the community. He is a valued member of the Ludington Board of Trade and is secretary of the same at the time of this writing. W. ERNEST BLAKE.-America owes much of her progress and advancement to a position foremost among the nations of the world to her newspapers; and in no line has the incidental broadening out of the sphere of usefulness been more marked than in this same line of journalism. Michigan has enlisted in its newspaper field some of the strongest intellects in the nation-men of broad mental grasp, cosmopolitan ideas and notable business sagacity. Prominent among the younger genera

Page  1175 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1175 tion of journalists and one who bids fair to add in no small measure to its prestige is W. Ernest Blake, editor of the Scottville Enterprise. He is bound to this locality by many ties, among them the primary tie of birth, for his eyes first opened to the light of day in Amber township, about five miles west of the town of Scottville, the date of this event being August 21, 1885. The father of the subject is Charles J. Blake, a well-known and highly respected citizen connected with the Lewellyn Produce Company of Scottville. He is a native of Vermont and it was in the Green Mountain state that he was reared and educated and trained to the calling of an agriculturist. When a young man he moved to Michigan and located on a farming property near Scottville and there he engaged in the various departments of farming until he accepted his present position in the year 1893. An exception must be made of a short period in which he was employed as an engineer in the Bowl Mill. The elder Mr. Blake married Flora A. Rice, a native of Michigan and a daughter of Oren Rice. For several years previous to her marriage with the subject's father she had taught in the schools of Amber township. Their union resulted in seven children, two of whom are deceased. He whose name initiates this review is the eldest in order of birth, and the others are Bela, Warren, Stanley and Evelyn. All of these young people can claim Amber township as their birthplace. Mr. Charles J. Blake is a life-long Republican and he is not without experience in public life, being a member of the village council. Fraternally he is a member of the Maccabees and of the Modern Romans and in his church faith his convictions are with the Methodist Episcopal denomination. W. Ernest Blake received his earliest educational discipline in the district schools of his native township and later he attended the Scottville schools. His first employment was as a printer on the Enterprise, but eventually he gratified an ambition to identify himself with the "Fourth Estate," and bought out Mr. Oren Oldt, of the partnership of Oldt & Rinehart, their publishing company then being known as Rinehart & Company. In the course of time Mr. Rinehart sold his interest and Mr. Blake took into association with himself Miss Etta Darke, the present caption of the company being Darke & Blake. Mr. Blake's identification with the Enterprise, which is the only newspaper in Scottville, dates from the year 1898. The Enterprise was established in 1873 by John Bryant, is issued weekly and under its present management is a reliable informant of the current happenings of the locality and a moulder of public opinion. It is Republican in politics, its editor having from the beginning of his career as a voter given his heart and hand to the principles and policies of what its admirers delight in calling "the Grand Old Party." Mr. Blake belongs to the ancient and august Masonic order, in which he is a popular member, and he is also affiliated with the Modern Romans and the Loyal Legion. He is unmarried. DONALD JOHNSON, M. D.-This is an age of progress, and America is the exponent of the spirit of the age. In the beginning of the present century our country was in its infancy, and history shows no parallel

Page  1176 1176 HISTORY O.F NORTHERN MICHIGAN for its growth and achievements. No other country has made as great advancement in the lines of science and mechanical invention and the superiority of her inventions has been widely recognized throughout the civilized world. In this steady growth and development which has characterized the age, the science of medicine and surgery has kept pace with the general progress and one of the progressive and well-known representatives of these professions in northern Michigan is Dr. Donald Johnson, of Marion, Osceola county, Michigan. By the circumstance of birth he is a Canadian, his eyes having first opened to the light of day in Bruce county, Ontario, on June 3, 1862. His father, Gilbert Johnson, was a Canadian farmer and a native of Ontario, and the subject's grandparents were natives of Scotland, so that by all the rights of heritage Dr. Johnson is possessor of those particularly stanch and praiseworthy traits generally accredited to natives of the "land o' cakes," and their descendants. The maiden name of the mother of the subject was Sibella McKay, she being a daughter of Donald and Jane (Douglas) McKay, and a native Canadian, and like her husband she is of Scotch descent. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Johnson became the parents of a family of nine children, all of whom were born in Canada. To enumerate, they are: Gilbert, Katherine (deceased), Donald, James, John, George, William, Jane and Alexander, the latter a druggist at Midland, Michigan. Donald Johnson was reared in Canada, and there received his common school, high school, and medical education. Early having come to a conclusion to adopt the medical profession as his own he matriculated in the Trinity Medical College at Toronto, Ontario, now affiliated with Toronto University, and was graduated from that institution in 1891, with the well-earned degree of doctor of medicine. He also took the examination prescribed by the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons as well as that prescribed by Trinity University. In that same year he came to Osceola county and located at Marion, where he began his medical practice. This was his maiden effort with the exception of about three months previously spent in Ontario. His practice has grown with the years and he enjoys excellent standing both with the profession and the laity. On the 21st of September, 1893, Dr. Johnson assumed marital relations, the lady to become his wife being Miss Jane Thomson, born in Ontario of Scotch-Irish descent, her parents having been James M. and Mary Jane (Murdy) Thomson. This union has been blessed by the birth of six children, all of whom are particularly loyal to Marion, for it was within its boundaries that all of them were born. They are by name: Mary, John, Mark, Frank, Gilbert and Jane. Dr. Johnson gives to politics only the interest of the intelligent voter and subscribes to the articles of faith of the Democratic party. His fraternal affiliations are with the Knights of Pythias and with those organizations whose chief purpose is to bring about the unity and progress of the medical profession,-namely the County, State, and American Medical Associations. CHARLES WOOD.-There is no vocation to which a man may turn his attention which does not require the master mind along that particular

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Page  1177 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1177 line if the work be well executed. Men of genius are not always the men whom we find in cities and within palatial walls. We find them on the farm and in the wilderness far from civilization, yet part of civilization and contributing to its needs and comforts. Charles Wood, whose name introduces this review, is a genius in his line-the lumber business -and to his genius has been added hard work and infinite pains in his calculations. Beginning as a boy in his teens he has followed the lumber camp all his life, and as a result has a perfect knowledge of wood craft in all its various branches. Indeed, there is perhaps no man in northern Michigan so expert in this line as is Mr. Wood. Charles Wood was born in Picts, Nova Scotia, February 20, 1844, sixth in the family of sixteen children of George and Hannah (Weaver) Wood. His early boyhood was spent in Canada, and in 1857 he came over into the United States and became a resident of St. Clair county, Michigan. In 1867-68, he was the youngest lumberman in the Saginaw valley, where he operated a camp of eighteen men and six yoke of oxen, twenty miles from the nearest settlement. A part of the time that year they used horses to tow their boats and provisions up the Saginaw river. For twenty-one years Mr. Wood was foreman of lumber camps, fifteen years of that time in the employ of A. W. Wright. In 1860, when only fourteen years of age, he began making estimates of timber, and in the course of a few years he became so true in his judgment and so accurate in his calculations that he could determine the amount of lumber in a given tract of timber land by merely walking through it. He estimated about two hundred and fifty million feet of lumber in the Upper Peninsula, and it would be impossible to give anything like an accurate amount of the lumber he has estimated in the Lower Penin. sula, as it runs into the billions. He has estimated lumber deals which netted twenty billions feet. To this branch of the business he has for years given his chief attention in the south-west and Canada. Among the firms which have employed him are Frank Perry, Eddy Avery, Eddy Brothers, and P. C. Smally of Bay City; E. D. Foss and A. W. Wright and Henry, of Port Huron, and Hall Munson of Bay Mills. He lumbered on his own account over 400,000,000 feet of lumber. Since 1880 Mr. Wood has been a resident of West Branch, where he owns a handsome residence. On May 18, 1866, he married Miss Ruth A. Wallace, daughter of Joshua Wallace, and to them have been given six children, namely: Sarah, born September 18, 1868; Ida M., May 1, 1870; Arilla, March 2, 1872; Josephine in April, 1875; Ami W., April 10, 1878, died December, 1890; and Maud L., November 3, 1887. Mrs. Wood was born December 31, 1848. Socially Mr. Wood is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has advanced to the Knights Templar degree. GEORGE H. SPENCER.-In an enumeration of the representative citizenship of East Jordan must be mentioned George H. Spencer, a plumbing and heating contractor, and a live, progressive and estimable young man. He is admirably equipped, understanding his business from the ground up and also being a skilled sheet metal worker. He has been

Page  1178 1178 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN established in this place since November, 1904, succeeding William Spencer, who in turn succeeded W. A. Loveday in 1902. Mr. Spencer is a native son of the state of Michigan, his birth having occurred at White Fish Lake, Chippewa county, November 19, 1879. His parents, Charles and Sarah (Plant) Spencer, are also natives of the state. When a small boy, young George went farther afield, his parents removing to Ashton, Dakota, and it was there that his studies were inaugurated. The family returned to Hungerford, Michigan, in course of time, and in that place for three years the subject's studies were continued. At an early age, Mr. Spencer decided to adopt a commercial career and to this end he entered the Ferris Institute at Big Rapids where he secured the advantage of a thorough business course. After coming to East Jordan, Mr. Spencer learned the plumbing and tinner's trade and soon gained no small proficiency in these useful departments. For a season he was employed at Sault Ste. Marie, in his trade, and later he went to Mackinac Island, where he did a part of the fitting in one of the great hotels constructed at the beautiful summer resort. From Mackinac he went to Gaylord, Michigan, where he was engaged for a time. Meantime the charms and advantages of East Jordan had remained vivid with him and he returned to enter into partnership with William Spencer, the subject subsequently buying out that gentleman's interest in the business. His present responsibilities are of the most important character, for he has charge of the village water connections, doing all the estimating for the work and making the connections. This work is such as to render necessary the employment of from six to eight men. Electrical work, such as the wiring of houses and cost estimate of the same, is one of his several fields of usefulness. Mr. Spencer is a popular and prominent lodge man, finding much pleasure and profit in his fraternal relations which extend to the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Woodmen of the World. In his political faith he gives his allegiance to the men and measures of the Republican party, while to all public spirited enterprises he may be counted upon to give his support. ORRIN E. HAWKINS.-It is a matter of keenest pleasure to the publishers of this work to here accord recognition to Orrin E. Hawkins, an old newspaper man in this section of Michigan and the present editor and publisher of the Mancelona Herald, a paper widely renowned for its liberal policies and splendid editorials. Mr. Hawkins has resided in the old Wolverine state during the major portion of his active career and he has ever been on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises advanced for the good of the general welfare. He was born at Sparta, Pennsylvania, on the 22d of February, 1858, and is a son of A. E. Hawkins, who was born in New York. The father established the family home in Monroe county, Michigan, in the year 1862, locating on a farm in the vicinity of Deerfield in the following year. He died in 1877, but the mother is still living. Mr. Hawkins, of this notice, was a child of but four years of age at the time of his parents' removal to Michigan and he received his early

Page  1179 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1179 educational training in the public schools of Deerfield. At the age of fifteen years he went to Dundee, Michigan, where he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printer's trade. He next worked in-a printing office at Adrian, Michigan, and then entered the office of the Raisin Valley Record at Tecumseh, this state, where he remained for a period of two years, at the expiration of which, in 1878, he returned to Deerfield, there founding the Deerfield Record. In 1884 he disposed of his interest in that paper and went to Milan, where he was connected with the Milan Joturnlal for fourteen months. For three years thereafter he operated the Saline Observer and for a period of five years was interested in the Eaton Rapids Herald. He then, in 1894, went to the city of Detroit, where he published the North Side Gazette for two years. Disposing of that publication he next located at Blissfield, Michigan, there becoming publisher and editor of the Blissfield Advance. In 1899 he assumed charge of the Tecumseh News, which he conducted with marked success for some six years, at the end of which, in 1906, he established his home at Mancelona, where he purchased the Mancelona Herald and where he has continued to reside during the intervening years to the present time. This paper was founded in 1879 by Edwards & Slusser, the latter of whom bought out the partnership and finally disposed of his interest to J. S. Hamaker. Mr. Hawkins purchased the paper and its well equipped plant from Mr. Hamaker and he has since been most successfully engaged in the editing and publishing of it. In the year 1888 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hawkins to Miss Mary A. Crolius, of Milan, Michigan. Mrs. Hawkins was born At Oswego, New York, whence she accompanied her parents, James and Louise (Millross) Crolius, to Michigan in 1873. The Crolius family located at Detroit, where the father was traveling salesman for a large concern for a number of years. Mr. Crolius was a gallant and faithful soldier in the Union army in the Civil war, for a period of three years, having been a member of the Eighty-first New York Infantry. During the period of his service he was wounded, was captured and imprisoned in Libby prison and participated in a number of important engagements marking the progress of that sanguinary struggle. He passed to the great beyond at Milan, Michigan, in the year 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins have three children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here entered,-Orrin Vere, October, 1892; Leo Rex, August, 1901; and Minola Vina, January, 1905. In politics Mr. Hawkins is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and while he has never manifested aught of desire for the honors or emoluments of public office of any description he is deeply interested in community affairs and does all in his power to advance the general welfare. He is a man of fine mental caliber, of rare brilliancy and far more than ordinary activity and executive ability. In fraternal circles he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are valued members of the Grange. MAJOR JAMES A. KING.-In a comparison of the relative value to mankind of the various professions and pursuits it is S widely recognized fact that none is so important as the medical profession. From

Page  1180 1180 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN the cradle to the grave human destiny is largely in the hands of the physician. A wrong prescription or an unskillful operation may take from a man what he prizes most-life. One of the ablest representatives of this noble calling in Manistee town and county is Major James A. King, physician and surgeon. Progressive and enlightened, he believes it to be no less than a crime for one of his profession to fail to keep in touch with a constantly advancing science, even though it entail constant vigilance. He is connected with the Salt City General Hospital in the capacity of owner and proprietor. Major King is a native of the great Wolverine state, his eyes having first opened to the light of day in Grand Blanc August 23, 1857. In adopting the profession to which he is so undeniably an ornament he is following in the paternal footsteps, his father Dr. John W. King, now deceased, having been a prominent physician and surgeon. The elder man was born in Homer, Cortland county, New York, April 28, 1804, was there reared and there received his elementary education, being graduated from the Fairfield Medical School in 1832. He came to Michigan very shortly after finishing his professional preparation, locating in Grand Blanc in 1833. After practicing for some thirty years he retired to a farm in Genesee county, where he enjoyed the peace and pleasure of agricultural life for over a decade, his demise occurring November 12, 1876. Before leaving his native state to engage in the practice of his profession he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Brown, a native of the state of New York and a daughter of Dr. William Brown. Their union was celebrated at the town of Mendon, and he whose name initiates this review was the youngest of the six daughters and two sons born to bless the union of these worthy people. The entire family was born in Michigan. Dr. John W. King was an abolitionist and before the Civil war became a terrible reality did all in his power to create a sentiment for the freeing of the negro. He was prominent in the many-sided life of the community and was the kindly friend and doctor of hundreds of families. James A. King was reared in Grand Blanc, to whose schools he is indebted for his early education. Having reaped the full benefit of the public schools he went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he matriculated in the high school and he obtained his medical training in the medical department of the University of Michigan, where in 1884 he secured a well-earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. He hung out his professional shingle at Onekama, Michigan, but did not locate there permanently, one year later removing to Bear Lake, Manistee county. A year after that he came on to Manistee, where he evidently found his ideal place of residence and field of activity, for he has paid it the compliment of ever since remaining here. For a period of twenty-four years, dating from 1886, he has practiced in Manistee, satisfying a long-cherished ambition by building the Salt City General Hospital, which was finished in March of 1910. This is an individual enterprise, Major King being the sole owner of the same, and it has nineteen private rooms. It is a distinct addition to the county and although in its infancy has already given evidence of enlightened methods and big results. On October 12, 1908, Dr. King inaugurated a happy and congenial

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Page  1181 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1181 life companionship by his union with Miss Minnie Billington, who was born in Pine City, Erie county, New York, October 14, 1876. She is the daughter of Giles Billington, a native of London, England, and been reared and educated in that great metropolis. He came to America as a boy, locating first in New York, where he married, and in 1878 coming on to the state of Michigan. Mrs. King spent the greater part of her childhood and girlhood in Cadillac and Holland, and near Grand Haven. She taught in the district schools for a time, and later she accepted a position in the office of Dr. King, being a girl of eighteen years at the time, and she remained in his employ for thirteen years. Her efficiency as an assistant was of the highest character, for she was intelligent, tactful, alert and conscientious, qualities very essential to a physician. She still gives splendid assistance, being quite indispensable, and gracefully playing her role as wife and helper. The Doctor, like the lady who bears his name and shares his honors, is of English descent. Major King is a member of the great Masonic order, belonging to the Blue Lodge, and he is also affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Public spirited and patriotic in no mean measure, he has been often entrusted with public office, having served as mayor of Manistee for three terms, and he has also given most satisfactory service as health officer for a number of years. In all his career he has never failed to yield hearty support and co-operation to any measure that has appealed to him as likely to be conducive to the public good. In office and out of office he has done all that has been within his power to advance the best interests of his fellow citizens and especially as an official has he commended himself by his fidelity and indefatigable devotion to public duty to the good opinion of all who have watched his course with commendation of the past and friendly predictions of success for the future. He belongs to a number of those organizations which have as their primary object the unity and progress of the profession, holding membership in the County, State and American Medical Association. JOHN H. RADEMAKER.-No higher patent of sterling character can be gained than that which designates a man as one of the world's workers,-one whose energies are productive and not parasitic; one who has become conscious of his powers and has properly exercised them; and one who has in the meanwhile maintained a due sense of objective stewardship. Among the captains of industry in northern Michigan is numbered John H. Rademaker, of Manistee, and he has been in the most significant sense the author of his own success, which has been large, though he is still a young man. From early years he has worked conscientiously, and, gaining the broader grasp as he grew, he has gone so far that none can question his ability, sincerity or powers of accomplishment. He has proved himself positive and resourceful and in the city that is the place of his nativity he ha" gained prestige as a representative business man, the while his interests extend far beyond such local limitations. He is identified with various important corporations in Manistee and elsewhere and, advancing from the lowly position of office boy to the plane of large and definite achievement, he has shown himself not

Page  1182 1182 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN lacking in moral fiber or worthy ambition. None who is familiar with his career can doubt that he has used his individual forces to the best ends, and he holds secure place in the confidence and esteem of the community which has represented his home from the time of his birth to the present. Mr. Rademaker has recalled with appreciation the implied counsel given him by a question propounded to him by his honored father many years ago, when he was at the outset of his career. This query was, "Don't you think you ought to earn your money before you spend it??" and he has the wisdom to see the value of the admonition, with the result that he thus early gained a sense of personal responsibility and determined to make ends justify means in all his efforts. He has become one of the prominent factors in connection with the lumber industry in Michigan and other sections of the Union-and his standing in his home community is such as well entitles him to recognition in this history of northern Michigan. John H. Rademaker was born in the city of Manistee, Michigan, on the 17th of November, 1876, and is a son of George and Mary Rademaker, both of whom were born and reared in Germany, whence they came to America when still young folk. They established their home in Manistee, Michigan, many years ago, and here the father was employed at various saw mills for a number of years, and where he became a valued member of the volunteer fire department. When the city procured a steam fire-engine he was made driver for the same, and he continued to be actively identified with the fire department of Manistee for a period of eighteen years. He and his wife now reside on their well improved farm in Bear Lake township, Manistee county, and are numbered among the highly esteemed citizens of the county, which has long been their home. Of their three children, John H. was the second in order of birth; Mrs. Lizzie M. Smith, a widow, the eldest of the number, is a resident of Detroit, Michigan; and Henry H., the youngest, is a resident of Manistee, Michigan. The parents are consistent members of the German Lutheran church, and in politics the father is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. To the excellent schools maintained under the auspices of the German Lutheran church of Manistee, John H. Rademaker is indebted for his early educational discipline, and he also attended the public schools for some time. At the age of fourteen years he secured the position of of office boy in the employ of Charles F. Ruggles, one of the leading lumber operators of Manistee, and through faithful and effective service he won promotion until he gained a position of responsible and confidential order, with incidental personal interest in the business with which he thus became identified when a youth. In 1896 Mr. Rademaker assumed the position of bookkeeper in the establishment of his uncle, Henry Rademaker, who was here engaged in the livery and ice business, and he continued to be thus actively identified with the enterprise for a period of eight years. After the death of his uncle, in compliance with a request previously made by the latter, he assumed charge of the business and closed out the same, bringing about an effective settlement of the estate. Through persistent and well directed energy John H. Rademaker has

Page  1183 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1183 won for himself distinctive prestige in connection with business affairs of broad scope and importance. He is treasurer of the Southern Carolina Lumber Company, which controls and is manufacturing large and valuable tracts of timber in the Carolinas; is manager of the Ruggles Lumber Company, Limited, which is engaged in the manufacture of yellow pine lumber upon an extensive scale; and he is a member of the directorate of each the Buckley & Douglass Lumber Company and the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad Company. He has shown not only marked initiative energy but also exceptional executive ability, and his business associations stand as voucher of his success and also of the estimate placed upon him in commercial and industrial circles. As a citizen he is essentially liberal and progressive and in politics he accords a stanch allegiance to the Republican party, though he has had no predilection for the honors or emoluments of public office. In his home city he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Royal Arcanum, and in the organizations of the first and last mentioned he has passed the various official chairs. His religious views are in harmony with the tenets of the German Lutheran church, in whose faith he was reared and of the various departments of whose work he is a liberal supporter. On the 24th of June, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Rademaker to Miss Harriet Maillot, of Manistee, and she was summoned to the life eternal in 1903, leaving no children. On the 25th of October, 1905, Mr. Rademaker wedded Miss Agnes M. Rasmussen, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, in which city she was born in the year 1880, a daughter of John and Caroline Rasmussen, the former of whom died when she was an infant and the latter of whom now maintains her home in Manistee. Mr. and Mrs. Rademaker have three children,-John C., who was born on the 16th of July, 1906, Emmaline A., who was born on the 8th of April, 1908, and George E., who was born on the 28th of April, 1911. GEORGE N. STRAY.-Although now living virtually retired from active business affairs, George N. Stray, of Ludington, long figured prominently in the industrial and banking world of northern Michigan. He is essentially progressive and public-spirited in his civic attitude and has contributed in generous measure to all movements tending to advance the general welfare of the community. Mr. Stray was born on the 10th of February, 1849, at Evans, Erie county, New York, and he is a son of James S. Stray, a native of the fine old Empire state, and Phebe (Ingols) Stray, who claimed St. Albans, Vermont, as the place of her birth. The father was a country merchant during the major portion of his active business career and he was summoned to the life eternal in 1893, at eighty-one years of age. His cherished and devoted wife passed away in 1904, in her eighty-ninth year. Mr. and Mrs. Stray became the parents of seven children, and mention is made of the following: Josiah W. Stray is retired and maintains his home at Ann Arbor, Michigan; Nettie S. became the wife of Daniel S. Bliss and resides in the city of Chicago, Illinois; Lucinda E. married Mr. L. S. Oatman, of Buffalo, New York; and George N. is the immediate subject of this review.

Page  1184 1184 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN George N. Stray was afforded the advantages of a good commonschool education in his native town in western New York and after familiarizing himself with the general merchandise business through association with his father in his store he was proffered and accepted a position as manager of a general mercantile establishment in Ludington, Mason county, Michigan. Accordingly he removed to this place on the 1st of March, 1870, and entered the employ of the firm of Danaher & Melendy. In 1877 he was appointed, by the United States court, trustee in bankruptcy of the Danaher & Melendy Company. In 1881 the corporation was released from bankruptcy and was reorganized. Mr. Stray continued to be identified with this concern for another year, during which he acted as secretary. In the spring of 1882 he purchased a controlling interest in the Ludington State Bank and became incumbent of the office of cashier of this institution, retaining the position until September of the same year, when the bank was succeeded by the First National Bank of Ludington. He retired from the cashiership in 1894, on account of impaired health. Later he was elected president of the bank and continued as such until November 1, 1909, when he sold his stock and retired from active business. He has been vicepresident of the Butter's Salt & Lumber Company, vice-president of the Custer Wooden Ware Company and president of the Ludington Wooden Ware Company. He is a man of fine mentality and extraordinary executive ability and thorough keen management has obtained a competency. In politics Mr. Stray was originally a Democrat but not agreeing with the party in its views regarding Free Silver in 1896, he transferred his allegiance to the Republican party and has since been aligned as a stanch supporter of its principles and policies. In 1878 he was given mark of popular appreciation in that he was then elected a member of the board of aldermen of the city of Ludington to represent the First Ward. For several years he served as city clerk and in 1882 he was further honored by being chosen mayor of Ludington. He gave a most admirable administration of the municipal affairs of the city and effected many improvements of important order during his regime. He has ever manifested a deep interest in educational matters and for fifteen years has been a member of the board of education. In a fraternal way he has passed through the circle of York Rite Masonry, holding membership in Pere Marquette Lodge, No. 299, Free & Accepted Masons, in which he is past worshipful master; Ludington Chapter, No. 92, Royal Arch Masons, in which he is past high priest; and Apollo Commandery, No. 31, Knights Templar, in which he is past eminent commander. For the past forty years he has been a devout member of the Congregational church of Ludington and he is an ardent church worker. He has traveled extensively, for health and pleasure, having been twice abroad. He and his wife were registered at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco at the time of the great earthquake, but they escaped without injury and without loss of property. In public life Mr. Stray is fair, honorable and outspoken,-in private life he is true, kind and tender at all times, under all circumstances, he is just, loyal, and markedly courteous.

Page  1185 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1185 At Ionia, Michigan, on the 11th of September, 1872, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Stray to Miss Hattie L. Hutchins, who was born and reared in the state of Michigan, and who is a daughter of P. C. and J. L. Hutchins, who were representative citizens of Ionia, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Stray have one son, Walter H., who was born on the 8th of July, 1876, who is engaged in the insurance business at Ludington. EDWARD A. CoAN.-On the roll of capable business men in the city of Gladwin, Michigan, appears the name of Edward A. Coan, who is a member of the firm of Coan & Armstrong, dealers in jewelry, hardware and farm implements. Mr. Coan is a man of extraordinary executive capacity and he has engaged in the general merchandise business for over twenty years. He was born in Elgin county, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 8th of January, 1870, a son of George and Amelia (Swanton) Coan, both of whom were likewise born in Canada, where their deaths occurred when Edward A. was a mere youth. He pursued his education in the public schools of his native county but was thrown upon his own resources at the early age of thirteen. He continued to reside in Canada for the ensuing four years and in 1887 he decided to try his fortune in the States, removing, accordingly, to the state of Michigan, where he resided for a number of years at Edenville. His first work was that of scaling logs, but being possessed of an ambitious nature and desiring to rise higher than an employe he became a clerk in a store, where he received the meager salary of five dollars per month. He soon drifted into the lumber business, however, and in 1894, at the age of twenty-four years, we find him doing an annual business of seventy-five thousand dollars, on borrowed capital. In time he opened a mercantile establishment which he conducted in connection with his lumber business, in order to supply his workmen with the necessities of life. This enterprise was initiated at Nolan, Roscommon county, Michigan, at which place he was incumbent of the office of postmaster for a period of fourteen years. He held all the important offices that the county could confer upon him and in 1896 he located a German colony, consisting of fifteen families, which is in a prosperous condition at the present time, in 1911, and which has done much to advance the general welfare of Roscommon county. In 1906 his supply of timber being exhausted, Mr. Coan took up his abode in Gladwin, where he established a jewelry, hardware and farm-implement business, admitting F. Armstrong as a partner in the business in 1909. A fine trade is now controlled and the firm is doing a business amounting to about thirty-five thousand dollars per annum. They have two large store rooms and a warehouse and the enterprise ranks as one of the most important concerns in the city. In the year 1894 Mr. Coan was united in marriage to Miss Grace Carpenter, and they have become the parents of three children, namely, Bernice, Edaline and Max DeVere. In politics Mr. Coan is a stanch Republican and he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all movements projected for the good of the community. He is a man of deep and abiding sympathy and fine natural intelligence and it may be said of him that the list of his friends is coincident with that

Page  1186 1186 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of his acquaintances. Fraternally he is affiliated with various representative organizations and he and his wife are zealous members of the Episcopal church. WARREN A. CARTIER.-A member of one of the essentially representative families of northern Michigan, Mr. Cartier has marked by distinctive personal accomplishment a place of his own in connection with the economic, industrial and civic affairs of this favored section of the state, and both as a citizen and as a business man he has added distinction to the honored name which he bears. On other pages of this work is dedicated a memoir to his father, the late Antoine E. Cartier, and thus it is not necessary in the present article to offer further resume of the family genealogy or of the career of the father, who was long numbered among the most prominent and influential citizens of Ludington. He whose name introduces this review is identified with large and important industrial and business enterprises in his home city of Ludington, which has been his home since his boyhood days, and such is his status in the community that he is worthy of special recognition in this publication. Warren A. Cartier was born in the city of Manistee, Michigan, on the 12th of January, 1866, and was twelve years of age at the time of the family removal to Ludington. He is indebted to the parochial and public schools for his preliminary educational discipline, which was supplemented by a two years' course in a well ordered commercial college near the city of Montreal, Canada. At the age of eighteen years he was matriculated in the celebrated Notre Dame University, at South Bend, Indiana, where he continued his higher academic studies for four years and where he was graduated as a member of the class of 1887. He then returned to Ludington and identified himself with his father's lumbering operations, and during the intervening years he has continued to be concerned with the various and extensive business interests that were developed and fostered by his father. For the past several years he has been secretary and treasurer, as well as general manager, of the Cartier Lumber Company, and his other important business associations are here briefly indicated. He is vice-president of the State Bank of Ludington; is secretary and treasurer of the Cartier Manufacturing Company and also of the Cartier-Magmer Company; is vice-president of the Bank of Fountain, Mason county; is secretary of the Star Watch Case Company; and vice-president of the Mason County Real Estate Company. All of these are important concerns of Mason county and through them the progress and prosperity of this section of the state have been signally advanced. As a citizen Mr. Cartier has shown the same pronounced loyalty and public spirit that so significantly characterized his honored father, and in politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the cause of the Republican party. He served two years as city recorder of Ludington, and in 1899 he was elected mayor of the city, of which office he was again elected in 1903 and in which his administration was marked by discrimination and progressive policies. He has been an active and efficient worker in behalf of the cause of the Republican party and is a valued factor in its

Page  1187 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1187 local councils. He gave effective service as secretary of the Mason county Republican committee and held this position for two years. In 1908 he represented the Twenty-sixth congressional district of the state as presidential elector on the ticket of his party. He is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, the Royal Arcanum and the Catholic Mutual Benefit Association. In the last mentioned organization he was president of the state association of Michigan for nine years, and is a member of the board of trustees of the same at the present time. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, in which they hold membership in the parish of St. Simon's church in their home city. On the 22d of May, 1888, Mr. Cartier was united in marriage to Miss Kate Dempsey, daughter of Dennis Dempsey, a representative citizen of Madison, Wisconsin, in which state Mrs. Cartier was born and reared. The three children of this union are W. Ray, Morgan E. and Vincent G. ANTOINE E. CARTIER.-A strong and noble character was that of the late Antoine E. Cartier, who exerted an emphatic and beneficent influence in connection with industrial, commercial and civic affairs in northern Michigan during the course of a long and significantly successful career. Here the major part of his life was passed and here he gained definite success through his individual application and ability, the while he ever stood exemplar of that integrity of purpose which figures as the plumb of character and makes for objective valuation in connection with the varied relations of life. His strength was as the number of his days, and he was summoned from the mortal life in the fulness of years and honors, his death having occurred at his beautiful home in the city of Ludington March 1, 1910. As one of the really representative men of Michigan it is most consonant that in this work be entered a tribute to his memory and an appreciative estimate of his labors and services as one of the world's noble army of productive workers. Antoine E. Cartier traced his lineage back to distinguished French origin and was a descendant of the celebrated American explorer of the name. He was born on his father's farm in the county of Maskinonge, province of Quebec, Canada, on the 16th of May, 1836, and his early discipline was that of the arduous work of a pioneer farm, the while his educational advantages were necessarily limited, owing to the conditions and exigencies of time and place. In noting the salient points in his career recourse is taken to an appreciative article published in the Ludington Record-Appeal at the time of his death, and such paraphrase is made as to render the material thus secured in harmony with the scope and purpose of this memoir. Soon after he was sixteen years of age Mr. Cartier severed the home ties and set forth to face the stern battle of life on his own responsibility. In 1852 he made his way to the city of Chicago and prior to May of the following year he came to northern Michigan and numbered himself among the pioneers of the lumbering town of Manistee, and in 1877 he came to Ludington, Vol. m-15

Page  1188 1188 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN where he initiated his efforts at the bottom of the lumber business, which was thenceforth to be his life work and in which he forged his way to the very top. This statement is easily made, but few can appreciate the struggle demanded and the obstacles encountered by the young man who came as a stranger in a strange land, without capitalistic resources or other fortuitous aid, and by very force of his selfreliance, ambition and integrity of purpose made his way forward to the goal of large and worthy success. Working ever upward, in 1873 he became junior partner in the Dempsey-Cartier firm, which purchased and refitted the Green mill in Manistee and prepared to cut their holdings of fine timber: These tracts, largely through Mr. Cartier's judgment and indefatigable industry, were already of appreciable extent and value and were rapidly becoming larger. The firm prospered and the great industry of the same grew apace under the effective management of the interested principals. In 1877 Mr. Cartier removed with his family to Ludington, and here he continued to maintain his home until his death. He came here to organize the local interests of his firm, which already owned considerable timber tributary to this harbor. They purchased the old Stanchfield mill and holdings and also came into possession of a considerable amount of other timberland and local property. They sold their mill in 1882 to the Butter's Company and organized the Cartier Lumber Company. At this time they also effected the purchase, from William Allen, George Goodsell and others, the mill and property, dock and water front where the company's business and property are now located. Mr. Cartier, who owned nearly all the stock, became president of the company at the time of its incorporation and continued incumbent of this office until his demise. Ever taking a vital and generous interest in all that touched the progress and welfare of his home city, Mr. Cartier gave freely and liberally of his time, means and influence in promoting measures and enterprises projected for the general good of the community, along both social and material lines. In 1880-8 he was mayor of Ludington and was thus the founder in a line of succession of mayors of the Cartier name. His sons, Warren A. and Charles E., of whom specific mention is made on other pages of this work have guided the destinies of Ludington as chief executive, each for two years, and another son, George R., has served as mayor of South Bend, Washington, where he owns large lumber interests. The Northern Michigan Transportation Company, which during the latter part of the nineteenth century struggled for a foothold in connection with transportation activities on the Great Lakes, appealed to Mr. Cartier for financial assistance. Believing in the project, he became gradually a large stock-holder in this corporation, of which he was president during the last six years of his life. The final decade in the career of Mr. Cartier was given to the guarding and conservation of his many interests rather than to extending them. The trouble which came to him as the largest stockholder in the Commercial & Savings Bank of Ludington in 1894 and for some years thereafter doubtless dampened his formerly unquenchable optimism and broad business generosity, which had potent influence on the growth and prosperity of his home city. On the failure of the bank, though

Page  1189 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1189 under no personal or financial obligation to take such course, Mr. Cartier determined to pay dollar for dollar to every depositor in the bank at the time of its closing. This he did to the last penny. The true caliber of the man was shown significantly in this connection, and all too few have been such exhibitions of personal honor in relation to business affairs. A definite appreciation is that given in this connection in the editorial from which these data are taken, and the words are worthy of perpetuation: "His life in this city and among us has been of the same quality. Ever solicitous for the town and its good name, he has been generous in his assistance, has financed our bonds, has been a liberal taxpayer and an uncomplaining one, until his name has become a synonym for local pride and patriotism.", In the truest sense Mr. Cartier was a self-made man. Untrained in the culture of the schools, he evolved for himself a training and a culture that were original, manly, self-centered and worthy of all admiration and respect. With manly men he was a man par excellence. To those who knew him best the most prominent quality of his makeup was perhaps his superiority to all adverse and opposing circumstances. His indifference, his calm, unmoved attitude in the face of apparent failure amounted to stoicism. Strong men all have faith in the star of their destiny, but not all hold it in such calmness, such patience. Another prominent trait of character that impressed others as perhaps his strongest quality was his democracy,-his sympathy for those whose lot in life seemed less fortunate than his own amounted to that of brotherhood. The motto, amounting to a business axiom, was his simple sentence, "Pay every working man in cash, and at once when it is due." "No orders, no store truck," was his rule. His sense of justice loomed large and he burned with scorn to a white head for injustice against himself or against others. Such a life, such principles-so centered, so evolved from inner consciousness-could not be other than marked upon any community in which they were lived and developed. Dominated by the highest principles was the course of Mr. Cartier's life in all its relations, and his benevolences and charities were ever unostentatious and admirably placed. He had been reared in the stern school of necessity and knew well the springs of human motive, so that he was kindly and tolerant in his judgment and ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in affliction or distress. In politics, bringing to bear a broad and practical judgment, Mr. Cartier gave his support to the principles and policies of the Democratic party, and while he never sought or desired political preferment his public spirit and civic loyalty were of the most insistent order. Reared in the faith of the Catholic church, he never deviated therefrom and of this great mother church he was an earnest and zealous communicant, the while he was most liberal in the support of the work of the local parish of St. Simon's, of which he was a devoted member. On the 3d of December, 1859, in Manistee, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cartier to Miss Eliza A. Ayers, who was at the time a popular teacher in the public schools of that place. She was born at Burlington, Vermont, and is a daughter of Willis S. Ayers. Mrs. Cartier is a woman of most gracious personality and has long been a prominent

Page  1190 1190 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN factor in the social activities of Ludington. Of the nine children of this union all are living except one daughter, Eliza, who died in infancy. Concerning the others the following brief data are given: Rosa, is the wife of C. W. Spear, of Northampton, Massachusetts; Louis A. is a retired capitalist; Warren A. is individually mentioned on other pages of this work; Ada J. is the wife of William Taylor, of Washington; George R. is a representative business man of South Bend, Washington, as has already been stated in a preceding paragraph; Desire E. and Charles E. are specifically mentioned elsewhere in this volume; William E. is a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he is engaged in business. K. A. HAULTER.-Wide-awake, enterprising and progressive, K. A. Haulter, manufacturing chemist of Grayling, Crawford county, is a splendid representative of the self-made men of northern Michigan, the measure of a man's success depending not upon the heights to which he has attained, but by the depths from which he has climbed. With his dauntless courage, high ambitions, and unflinching determination to succeed, he won the smiles of "Dame Fortune" in his youth, and having carefully measured his own ability has hewn his way straight to the mark thus set, in the parlance of the day having "made good." The eighth child in order of birth of a family of ten children, Mr. Haulter was born in Tiffin, Seneca county, Ohio, a son of Anthony and Mary (Baur) Haulter, who came of German and French ancestry, respectively. Educated in the common schools of Tiffin and at St. Joseph's Roman Catholic School, Mr. Haulter subsequently worked for a few years with his father, who was an extensive contractor and builder, becoming an expert in the use of tools of various kinds. More interested, however, in scientific pursuits, he made a special study of physics, in the course of time obtaining an extensive knowledge of chemistry. In 1903 Mr. Haulter came with his family to Michigan, and since 1906 has been a resident of Grayling, and one of the leading manufacturers of turpentine and its by-products. In 1909 Mr. Haulter established the "Crown Chemical Company," this company is incorporated for two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and Mr. Haulter is general superintendent and chemist. They also have a similar plant at Au Sable, Michigan, one at Kenosha, Wisconsin, another in state of Washington and one in the state of Oregon and they are are putting them in all over the south. In the management of his affairs Mr. Haulter has met with eminent success. His plant contains six retorts, which, combined, are capable of working out three hundred and fifty cords of pine stumps per month, the output per cord being from sixteen to twenty-seven gallons of turpentine, and from forty-five to fifty-five gallons of by-products. By close study, much experimental labor, and many years of experience, Mr. Haulter evolved his present method of obtaining the productions above mentioned, the process being a proper combination of steam and destruction distillation. Besides turpentine, the principal product of his plant, Mr. Haulter turns out thirty-two byproducts which are used in the various processes of manufacture and commerce, his business being extensive and remunerative. Desirous, how

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Page  1191 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1191 ever, of enlarging his operations, he intends, in the near future, to erect similar plants in different parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, Washington, Oregon and the southern parts of the country. The plant in Wisconsin is three times as large as the one in Michigan. Mr. Haulter married, in July 22, 1897, Olive J. Jury, daughter of Henry C. and Julia A. Jury, of Missouri. Fraternally Mr. Haulter is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and all its auxiliary orders, and belongs to Bay City Lodge, No. 88, B. P. 0. B. ORLANDO STEEL.-A native of the province of Ontario in the Dominion of Canada, and at different times a resident of three of the great states of the American Union, trying his hand at various occupations and succeeding measurably in each, Orlando Steel finally found a fruitful field for his enterprise and business capacity in the little but promising city of Onaway and in mercantile life. In all places and through all conditions he has shown himself to be self-reliant and resourceful, ready to accept any chance in life where industry and capacity would count, and able to make the most of everything he undertook. Mr. Steel was born in Elgin county, Ontario, on January 4, 1860, and is a son of Caleb and Sarah Ann (McCall) Steel, like himself, born in Ontario, and both living. Of the six children born to them four are living, of whom Orlando was the second in the order of birth. The parents were in moderate circumstances when they were rearing their offspring, and each of the children was obliged to look out for himself at an early age. But the teaching and examples given all at the family fireside prepared them for usefulness and inspired them with a desire and determination to make as good a career as circumstances would allow, and in every way to live serviceably and acceptably among their fellow men and women. Orlando Steel obtained a limited common school education in his native place and after leaving school learned the trade of blacksmith. In 1880, when he was twenty years of age, he moved to Michigan and worked at his trade in this state for a time. He then yielded to a longing to see the country farther west and went to Colorado. From there he moved back eastward to Minneapolis, Minnesota, with his love for Michigan still strong within him and growing in force from month to month. After a short residence in Minneapolis he moved to Vanderbilt, Otsego county, this state, locating there in 1885 and again engaging in blacksmithing for thirteen years in that town. At the end of the period mentioned he passed one year in Detroit, then moved to Onaway, taking up his residence here in September, 1899, and at once entering into the mercantile activities of the place. He formed a partnership with Charles Fox in the hardware and grocery trade, under the firm name of Fox & Steel, which lasted until August 4, 1905. At that time he bought Mr. Fox's interest in the business, and from then to the present time (1911) he has conducted it alone. His store is one of the largest, most modern and best appointed in the town. It is 50 by 119 feet in dimensions, two stories high, and contains about 10,000 square feet of floor space. Mr. Steel keeps his stock up to the full requirements of his trade at all times, deals with

Page  1192 1192 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN the strictest integrity in every transaction, gives full value for the money paid him by every patron, and does business amounting to forty-five thousand to fifty thousand dollars annually. He is accounted one of the most enterprising, progressive and capable business men of the community, and is universally esteemed as a citizen. At all times Mr. Steel has been warmly interested in the welfare of his city and county and has done his full share of the work required to promote their advancement and development. He served three years as a member of the city board and is at the time of this writing (1911) chairman of the board of public works. In political allegiance and action he is a member of the Democratic party and always zealous in its service. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order, holding membership in Onaway Lodge, No. 425 in the fraternity, and in its affairs, as in those of everything else with which he is connected, he takes an earnest interest and an active and serviceable part. On December 8, 1885, Mr. Steel was united in marriage with Miss Mary McLaughlin, a native of Detroit, Michigan, and a daughter of William and Ann McLaughlin. One child has been born of the union, a son named Prescott, who is still living with his parents and adding to the life, light and comfort of their home. They are held in high esteem throughout the county and in all other places where the people have knowledge of them in a social or business way. Onaway and Presque Isle county have no better citizens and none for whom the people have a more cordial or sincere regard. JULmUS E. GuMM.-Adapted to mercantile life by inheritance and training, and ardently devoted to his calling, it is not surprising that Julius E. Gumm, one of the leading merchants of Onaway, has made a great success of it and is going forward in further progress and expansion of his trade and influence in the business world. He is ambitious in his chosen line of endeavor, and so zealous and assiduous in attention to all its demands that he makes every day tell to his advantage in it, and incidentally to the benefit of the community in which he operates. Mr. Gumm was born in Russia on March 14, 1854. He is a son of Bernard and Rebecca Gumm, also natives of Russia and now both deceased. They were the parents of twelve children, seven of whom are living, Julius being the second in the order of birth. The father was a merchant from his youth to the end of his life, as was his father before him, so that merchandising seems to have been the family vocation by natural design, as three generations have been highly successful in it. Although loyal to his native land while obtaining his education in its schools, it did not meet his requirements in the way of opportunity for advancement, and in 1871, when he was but seventeen years of age, he determined to seek a larger and more open field in the New World. Filled with high hopes of a luminous career in this country, and inspired or sustained with all youth's sublime audacity of faith in his ability to contend with Fate, he turned his back on the associations of his boyhood and bravely dared the heaving ocean and whatever might lie beyond it.

Page  1193 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1193 On his arrival in the United States he came at once to Michigan and to Detroit. Here he engaged in selling goods until 1884, when he moved to Rogers City, this county, where he opened a store of his own in general merchandise, and in 1901 he came to Onaway where he, in partnership with his brother, M. C. Gumm, and under the firm name of Gumm Bros., opened a store with a limited stock of goods which he housed in a small building. The partnership continued until the summer of 1907, when the brother withdrew from the firm, and since then Mr. Gumm of this writing has conducted the business alone. His rule of dealing is to give every patron fair treatment and full value for his money. It is also a cardinal principle of business with him to study the wants of the community in which he trades and keep his stock at all times up to its fullest requirements. Acting faithfully in accordance with these lines of procedure, Mr. Gumm has won his way steadily in the confidence and regard of the people, and in the same ratio his business has expanded and his influence ~in and out of business circles has increased. So rapid, indeed, was the extension of his trade that in 1903 he was obliged to provide more commodious quarters for it, and to do this erected the fine brick store building in the very heart of the city's mercantile life on State street which he now occupies. This store throughout is modern in every respect, no expense having been spared in the installation of conveniences, present-day fixtures and attractive adornments. The store is metropolitan in character and each of its several departments is completely stocked with the best goods the money invested in them can buy, and all purchased direct from the manufacturers. The building, which is two stories high over a basement and 40 by 150 feet in dimensions, is one of the most imposing in the city. In the public affairs of the community Mr. Gumm has always taken an earnest interest and an active part. He has served as township treasurer and president of the village board. He is also a director of the bank and connected with other institutions which are of great value to the industrial and fiscal activities of the town. In fraternal life he is an enthusiastic Free Mason of the thirty-second degree, holding membership in Onaway Lodge, Bay City Consistory of the Scottish Rite and Elf Knurafeh Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In 1890, Mr. Gumm was united in marriage with Miss Jennie Epstine, a native of Utica, New York. They have a daughter and son, Amy and Ira. The parents are prominent in the social life of their community and highly esteemed as among its most congenial and companionable as well as most useful factors. They are zealous in the support of every mental and moral agency at work among the people and exemplify in all the relations of life the best attributes of elevated and progressive American citizenship, the father being as devoted to the welfare and the institutions of the land of his adoption as he ever could have been to those of the land of his birth. He is one of Onaway's best citizens and is held in high regard as such by all classes of its people. JAMES DEMPSEY.-One of the venerable and honored citizens of MTnistee who has been a prominent figure in connection with the great

Page  1194 1194 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN lumber industry in northern Michigan and who is now living virtually retired, is James Dempsey. He has been a resident of this section of the state for more than half a century and has achieved large and worthy success through his own endeavors and has the esteem and good will of his fellow men, through whose instance he has been called upon to serve in various positions of public trust. Mr. Dempsey has earnestly co-operated in those enterprises and undertakings which have aided in the upbuilding of his home city, of which he was the second to serve as postmaster and of which he was mayor for one term. As one of the sterling pioneers of northern Michigan he is entitled to recognition in this volume, and he has been distinctively one of the founders and upbuilders of this now favored section of the Wolverine commonwealth. A scion of the stanchest of Irish stock, James Dempsey finds a mede of satisfaction in reverting to the fair old Emerald Isle as the place of his nativity. He was born in the town of Roscommon, county Roscommon, Ireland, on the 10th of April, 1832, and is a son of Lawrence and Mary (.Ward) Dempsey. His father was identified with agricultural pursuits in Ireland until 1847, when he emigrated with his children to America, his wife having died when the subject of this review was a mere child. The father settled at Scranton, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, where he continued to maintain his home during the remaining decade of his life; he died in 1857, at the age of fifty-nine years, and both he and his wife were devout communicants of the Catholic church. They were survived by two sons and two daughters, of whom James was the second in order of birth. James Dempsey was a lad of fourteen years at the time of the family's removal to the United States, and his rudimentary education had thus been secured in the schools of his native land. For four years he lived in the home of Judge Nathaniel B. Eldred, a representative citizen of Bethany, Wayne county, Pennsylvania. In the meanwhile he attended school at irregular intervals, but the major part of his time and attention were given to productive toil. In August, 1854, at the age of twenty-two years, Mr. Dempsey came to Michigan and made his way to Manistee. During the following winter he gained new and varied experience by working in the lumber camps of the Canfield brothers, and he was finally given charge of one of their camps. He served in the same managerial capacity during the ensuing winter, and in the summer had charge of driving the logs down to the boom. He thus gained an intimate and practical knowledge of the details of the lumber business at a time when the industry was at its height in this section, and he finally initiated independent operations in connection with the same, thus laying the foundation of his present substantial fortune. In 1869 Mr. Dempsey entered into partnership with A. E. Cartier, who later became one of the leading citizens of Ludington and one of the influential lumbermen of 'this part of the state, and the new firm of Dempsey & Cartier assumed the contract for driving, booming and assorting the logs handled through the medium of the Manistee river. An idea of the compass of this contract may be gained when it is stated that at the time the annual aggregate of the product thus transported was about one hundred million feet. In the meanwhile Mr. Dempsey

Page  1195 11ISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1195 continued in charge of the Canfield logging camps during the winter seasons, and he thus had ample demands upon his time as a sturdy worker and also as an executive. Under these conditions operations were continued until 1873, when the firm of Dempsey & Cartier purchased what was known as the Green & Millno property on Manistee lake, the same including a well equipped saw mill. They engaged in the manufacturing of lumber, and they had recourse to the various improvements made for the facilitating of operations, by installing from time to time new machinery in their mill, and thus keeping pace with the march of progress and the demands placed upon them by their constantly expanding business. In 1883 the business was reorganized by the incorporation of the Manistee Lumber Company, and Mr. Dempsey became president of the company, in which the two other stockholders were Mr. Cartier and William Went. With the subsequent installing of new and improved machinery the capacity of the company's mill was increased to the notable daily aggregate of one hundred thousand feet of lumber, besides a large output of shingles. The corporation acquired a large tract of pine land in Kalkaska county and along the course of the Manistee river at various points, and it also established and owned a logging railway fourteen miles in length, by means of which the logs from the camps were transported to the Manistee river. In 1888 the State Lumber Company was organized and incorporated, for the purpose of operating the plant previously known as the Davis & Blacker mill, and the Manistee Lumber Company secured one-third of the stock of the new corporation, in which Mr. Dempsey became the executive representative, through his election to the office of vice-president, a position which he has since retained without interruption. In 1880 Mr. Dempsey also formed a partnership with the late John Brown, of Big Rapids, and they instituted the erection of a large saw mill on the east shore of Manistee lake. Mr. Brown died prior to the completion of the mill and his interest was purchased by Mr. Dempsey and E. B. Simpson, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, whereupon the firm of Dempsey, Simpson & Company was formed. This firm completed the mill and placed the same in effective operation. In 1887 the property was destroyed by fire and as it was not deemed expedient to rebuild the mill the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent. In 1880 Mr. Dempsey also established the Dempsey tug line, which he owned and operated until 1887, when he disposed of the tugs and incidental business. In addition to large holdings of Michigan pine lands in these years Mr. Dempsey also became the owner of about ten thousand acres of excellent long-leaf yellow pine timber in the Pearl river district of the state of Mississippi, and he thus became actively identified with the development of the great lumber resources of that state, in which he still has valuable holdings. He has lived virtually retired since 1905, though he finds ample demands upon his time in the supervision of his financial interests and large real-estate investments. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Manistee and was its first vice-president, a position of which he continued incumbent until 1908, when he declined re-election. As a citizen Mr. Dempsey has exemplified the most earnest loyalty

Page  1196 1196 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and public spirit, and he has ever been found arrayed as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Democratic party. During the earlier years of his residence in Manistee he was a member of the county board of supervisors for about a decade, besides which he served as treasurer of Manistee township for several years. He had the distinction of being the second to receive appointment as postmaster of Manistee, a preferment that was accorded him in 1857, and he continued in service until the close of the administration of President Buchanan, under whose regime the appointment had been made. In 1886 he was again appointed postmaster of Manistee, which was now a thriving city instead of a mere lumbering town, and he continued incumbent of the office during the first administration of President Cleveland. He was elected mayor of Manistee in the early days of his residence here, and has been in past years an active worker in behalf of the cause of his political party. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church. On the 30th of June, 1861, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Dempsey to Miss Mary Mullen, a daughter of Michael Mullen, of Racine, Wisconsin, and the twelve children of this union are as follows: Thomas L., Mary H., Emily M., James W., Henrietta, Cecilia, Estella J., Louis C., John J., Frank M., Neil, and Walter M., all of whom are living except Walter M., who died in childhood. EDWARD BucKLEY.-Among the dominating figures in the lumbering industry in northern Michigan a place of special priority has long been maintained by this well known citizen and representative man of affairs. He has been a resident of the city of Manistee for more than forty years and his advancement to the status of one of the most influential captains of industry in this section of the state has been gained through the application of his own energies and ability. He has had to do with enterprises that have contributed materially to the march of progress and his capital-. istic interests are now extensive and varied. He and his associates had the prescience and wisdom to adopt a careful policy of conserving their timber lands in the earlier days, and the result has been the control of large and very valuable tracts of pine and hardwood lands in northern Michigan at the present time, when the major number of the concerns formerly identified with this important line of enterprise have been compelled to cease operations on account of lack of reserve timber. Mr. Buckley is a man of great capacity for affairs of broad scope and importance, and his success, which is large, has been achieved through his identification with normal and legitimate lines of business enterprise. He is liberal and progressive as a citizen and his standing is such as eminently to entitle him to special recognition in this history of the section of the state whose development and upbuilding have been significantly furthered through his efforts. In a preliminary way it may be stated that he rendered valiant service as a soldier of the Union during the Civil war, that in all the relations of the "piping times of peace" that his loyalty has been of the same insistent order. He is president and treasurer of the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad Company, and president and treasurer of the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company,

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Page  1197 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1197 now one of the most important concerns of its kind in the entire state of Michigan. Edward Buckley claims the "right little, tight little isle" as the place of his nativity and is a scion of the staunchest of the sturdy English yeoman stock. He was born at Biddeford, Devonshire, England, on the 8th of August, 1842, and is a son of Robert S. and Mary Seldon Buckley, both of whom were born and reared in Devonshire, where the mother's father inherited a life interest in a farm, and the property passed into the possession of others after his death. In 1846, when Edward Buckley was about four years of age, his parents immigrated to America and located in the city of Montreal, Canada, where the father died shortly afterward, leaving the devoted wife and mother with two children, of whom Edward was the elder by about two years. After the death of the father, the widowed mother removed with her children to the city of Toronto, where the family home was maintained for several years. About the year 1855 the mother removed to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and later the home was established in the city of Milwaukee. Edward Buckley gained his rudimentary education in the schools of Toronto, and later he availed himself of the advantages of the common schools of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. He was about sixteen years of age at the time of the family removal from that place to Milwaukee, and in the latter city he was enabled to complete a course in a well ordered business college. There also he served an apprenticeship at the tinner's trade, in which he became a skilled artisan and to which he continued to devote his attention until his loyalty to the land of his adoption impelled him to tender his services in its defense when the integrity of the Union was menaced by armed rebellion. On the 5th of August, 1862, Mr. Buckley enlisted as a private in the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front, the regiment being assigned to the command of General Buell, in the Army of the Cumberland. It was the fortune of Mr. Buckley to live up to the full tension of the long and weary conflict between the North and South, and he participated in many of the important battles marking its progress, besides innumerable miner engagements in which his regiment was involved. He served uinder General Sheridan in the battles of Perrysville, Stone's River, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, and took part in the entire Atlanta campaign. He was a participant in the battles of Franklin, and the final important engagement in which he took part was the battle of Nashville. He continued with his regiment until victory had crowned the Union arms and peace had been declared, and he received his honorable discharge in August, 1865. After the close of his long and valorous service as a soldier of the Republic, Mr. Buckley returned to the north with his regiment, the members of which received their final discharge in the city of Milwaukee. In 1868 he formed a co-partnership with Henry V. Marchant, of Milwaukee, and opened a hardware store in Manistee. He continued in this line of business, with marked success, until 1873, when, like thousands of others, he was forced to the wall. In the following year he engaged in the general land and logging business thus giving inception to his identification with the line of industrial enterprise along which he has attained

Page  1198 1198 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN to so much of success and precedence. In 1880 Mr. Buckley entered into a co-partnership with William Douglas, under the firm name of Buckley & Douglas. The firm initiated aggressive operations in getting out timber and manufacturing the same. The logs were manufactured under contract with various mills, of which four or five were placed in requisition in getting out the product of the firm, running as high as seventy million feet in a single year. This output represented the timber cut in the firm's camps and also that purchased. In 1886 Buckley & Douglas purchased the extensive pine-land holdings of the firm of Ruddock Nuttall & Company, together with the mill property that had for many years been operated by that firm on Manistee Lake. The transfer of the property was made late in the autumn of 1886 and by the opening of the following spring the mill was practically rebuilt, with the installation of an entire new equipment of machinery. The total expenditure in this connection was one hundred and fifty thousand dollars before a board was sawed, and the plant became undoubtedly the finest "bill" mill in the state, its equipment including one eighty-foot log carriage, besides other machinery of the best modern type. The firm now initiated the special work of manufacturing lumber and bill timber for export trade, and for a period of about eight years they made large annual shipments to England. The export trade has been continued to the present time and is yet one of no inconsiderable scope. Through recourse to logging railways the fine mill of the firm and company was kept in operation day and night throughout the entire year, and the output demanded the sawing of an average of nearly fifty million feet of logs annually. The growth of the enterprise finally rendered expedient the reorganization of the business, and in 1892 the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company was organized and incorporated, as successor to the original firm. Of this corporation Mr. Buckley has since been president and treasurer, and Mr. Douglas was its vice-president until his death. To facilitate its operations the company, in 1887, built and equipped a standard-gauge railroad extending between Manistee and Traverse City, a distance of seventy miles, and provided with various branches into the pine and hardwood forests. The total length of the lines is two hundred and thrity-five miles and over the same a vast amount of logs have been transported to the company's mills. This railroad is still utilized for this purpose, as well as for general freight and passenger transportation.* The same is incorporated under the title of the Manistee & Northeastern Railroad Company, and of the same Mr. Buckley is president and treasurer, his long-time associate and valued friend, Mr. Douglas, having been vice-president of the company until the time of his death. This railroad line and its branches have given access to eightyfive thousand acres of timber land controlled by the Buckley & Douglas Lumber Company and have also, in an incidental way, contributed much to the general development and progress of the section tributary to the road. In 1896-7 this company completed the erection of the most extensive salt works to be found in the state. This great plant is located at Manistee and has a capacity for the production of twenty-five hundred barrels of salt per day, the brine being secured from wells sunk to a depth of

Page  1199 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1199 two thousand feet in the salt strata of rock. Mr. Buckley and his associates early adopted the judicious policy of purchasing the major portion of their log supply and saving, so far as possible, their own timber resources for future demands. By means of this policy they will be able to keep their mill supplied for many years with an excellent grade of pine and hardwood timber, the while the rapidly increasing consumption of hardwood and hemlock timber gives them admirable means for the development of further resources at their command,-these latter resources having had but slight consideration until within the past few years, after the gradual decadence of the great pine lumbering industry in Michigan. The manufacturing of hardwoods now constitutes an important feature in connection with the operation of practically all savw mills now in commission in the state. Through this source also the mills secure an important and necessary supply of fuel, for which the pine residuum was formerly used without moderation. Mr. Buckley has shown a vital interest in all measures and,enterprises that have tended to conserve the welfare of northern Michigan and has given to the same his earnest co-operation. He had the prescience to realize that with the decline of the pine lumbering operations other lines of industry must be encouraged in this section of the state, and he has been active in promoting immigration of settlers for the development of the denuded tracts of land into productive farms, besides which he has given his capitalistic and administrative support to numerous manufacturing and commercial enterprises. He has never had aught of inclination for the honors or emolument of political office, but is public-spirited and liberal as a citizen and a stanch advocate of the principles of the Republican party. Mr. Buckley vitalized the more gracious memories and associations of his service as a soldier of the Union by retaining membership in the Grand Army of the Republic, in Manistee. He is an appreciative member of the time-honored Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained to the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. Mr. Buckley has been twice married. In 1869 he wedded Miss Mary D. Ruggles, who was a daughter of the late Daniel D. Ruggles, a native of Maine, whence he came to the west and became prominently identified with the lumber industry in Michigan, where he continued to reside until his death. Mrs. Buckley was summoned to the life eternal in 1886, and is survived by no children. In March, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Buckley to Miss Jonnie Sloan, of Thomasville, Georgia, and they have one daughter, Virginia. CURTIS D. ALWAY.-A native son of the state of Michigan who has gained recognition as one of the able and successful younger members of the bar of Grand Traverse county is Mr. Alway, who is engaged in the general practice of his profession in Traverse City, where he is applying himself with all of earnestness and with distinctive success to the work of his chosen vocation. Mr. Alway was born in Bay City, Michigan, on the 26th of April, 1879, and is a son of William H. and Elizabeth (Stinchcombe) Alway, who have been residents of the city of Manistee, this state, for the past

Page  1200 1200 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN forty years. William H. Alway was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1848, and his wife is a native of Flushing, Genesee county, Michigan, where she was born in the year 1851. Of this union have been born five sons and one daughter, all of whom are living, and of the number Curtis D., of this sketch, was the third in order of birth. The father was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the trade of mechanical engineering, to which he has devoted his attention during the major part of his active career and in connection with which he has gained high reputation and a due measure of temporal success. He is now engaged in business on his own responsibility and he has done much important work of a mechanical order, including the installation of the vacuum system in the salt plant of the R. G. Peters Salt & Lumber Company at Eastlake, Manistee county, and in the great salt plant at Wyandotte, near the city of Detroit, this state. He is an authority in his chosen field of endeavor and has handled many important contracts. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. Curtis D. Alway was about nine years of age at the time of the family removal to Manistee, in which city he was reared to manhood. There he duly availed himself of the privileges of the public schools and after completing the curriculum of the high school he determined to prepare himself for the profession of law. With this laudable purpose in view he was fortunate in being able to secure the best of technical advantages, as he entered the law department of the great University of Michigan, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1904 and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was forthwith admitted to the bar of his native state, and on the 31st of August, 1904, he located in Traverse City, where he formed a partnership with Hon. Thomas Smurthwaite, with whom he was most agreeably associated in the practice of his profession until the removal of Mr. Smurthwaite to Manistee, in July, 1910, since which time he has conducted an individual practice of substantial and representative order. He is known as an able trial lawyer and as one who is never neglectful of any case entrusted to his case. As a counselor his fidelity is of the same insistent order, and he is a most careful observer of the unwritten ethical code of his profession, so that he has gained the respect and confidence of his confreres at the bar and of the courts and juries before which he has appeared as an advocate. On the 1st of May, 1910, he was appointed city attorney of Traverse City and he has since been the head of the legal department of the municipal government. He has carefully and ably protected and defended the interests of his home city and has thus amply justified his appointment to the position noted. In politics Mr. Alway is found enrolled as a loyal and effective advocate of the principles and policies of the Democratic party, and in the time-honored Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with the lodge, chapter and commandery in Traverse City, where he is also identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. He is popular in professional, business and social circles and is one of the valued members of the bar of Grand Traverse county.

Page  1201 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1201 EDGAR A. CRANXER.-Among the enterprising and energetic citizens of the younger generation at Alden, Michigan, Edgar A. Cranmer holds rank as one who has public-spiritedly devoted himself to the general welfare of his fellow citizens and as one whose various business enterprises have contributed not only to his own success but to the progress and development of the community at large. Mr. Edgar Allen Cranmer was born at Coldwater, Michigan, on the 10th of January, 1883, and he is a son of Howard A. Cranmer, whose birth occurred in Alpine township, Kent county, Michigan, in the year 1858. The father was a son of the first known white settler in Alpine township and as a youth he learned the cigarmaker's trade. He continued to be identified with the manufacture of cigars for over forty years but at the expiration of that time he was taken ill with fever. After recovering from the fever rheumatism set in and he was informed by the doctor that to stay in the cigar business would mean death to him within a year. He then went to Arkansas and later to Texas, where he remained for some time. He is now in Texas. The mother of him to whom this sketch is dedicated was Miss Susie Spear in her girlhood days and she and her husband became the parents of six children, of whom Edgar A. was the third in order of birth. After completing the curriculum of the public schools at Grand Rapids, Michigan, Edgar Allen Cranmer attended and was graduated in the Grand Rapids high school, being at that time but seventeen and a half years of age. He had worked in his father's cigar factory off and on while in school and after leaving school he took a journeyman's position in that establishment. When nineteen years of age he became a salesman on the road in the employ of his father and when his father became so seriously ill he assumed the entire responsibility of the latter's business. He conducted the same with all of success until he had reached his legal majority when he contracted lung fever and was confined to the house for over eight months. When he had recovered the business had been closed out and he was informed by his physician that to again engage in that work would result in quick consumption. Mr. Cranmer then entered the employ of the Grand Rapids Brass Company, where he was engaged in making locks. When twenty-three years of age he became inspector for the Grand Rapids School Seat Company and later he was bookkeeper for a real-estate concern. The latter position was followed by work as a shipping clerk for the National Biscuit Company and when twenty-four years of age he engaged with the National Dry Cleaning Company at Grand Rapids, to learn that business. One year later he accepted a position as office manager of the Kromer Dye Works and subsequently he was in the employ of Mr. Deebs, who conducted a tailoring and dyeing establishment. In the spring of 1910, however, he severed his connections in Grand Rapids and came to Bellaire, where he opened a dry-cleaning concern of his own. He has built up a large business and in addition to his local trade he has a number of agents in the surrounding townships. In the spring of 1911 he moved to Alden, Michigan. He is unusually loyal and public-spirited in all that tends to advance the general welfare of the community in which he maintains his

Page  1202 1202 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN home. Mr. Cranmer was married in the fall of 1911 to Miss Alice DeWitt of Fremont, Michigan, and intends to stay at Alden, the coming resort center of Michigan, as it is the key to a continuous chain of lakes seventy miles long. WILLIAM F. CUENY.-The record of this prominent business man, energetic civic force and estimable, enterprising and broad-minded citizen of Cheboygan is one of good capacity trained in an instructive experience, and well and wisely applied to desired ends in a department of human endeavor for which it is especially suitable, and in which it has wrought out logical results. Mr. Cueny is a business man of superior ability. He has acquired a thorough knowledge of his line of trade by continued and instructive connection with it, and he has used all his attainments and powers to make his mercantile establishment as advantageous to himself and as useful to the community in which it is operated as anybody could, and has used them successfully. Mr. Cueny belongs to a family of merchants. The achievements of his father, Joseph J. Cueny, one of the pioneer grocers of Cheboygan, will be found in a sketch of William's brother, Benjamin also a merchant, on another page of this work. The father and his wife, whose maiden name was Josephine Goetzmann, were early arrivals in Cheboygan, and potential forces in its early business and social life. They lived for a time in Detroit, this state, and there their son William was born on July 3, 1865. When he was four years old the family moved to Cheboygan, where he has lived ever since, growing to manhood amid the activities of the city and obtaining his education in its schools. When he left school, and the whole business world opened its attractive display before him, he chose the hardware trade as his proper field of exertion, and accepted a humble position in one of its emporiums for the purpose of learning the business. His duties were arduous, his pay was meager, his needs were pressing and his prospects for rapid advancement were not bright. But his ambition was high and his spirit was resolute. He persevered in his devotion to his calling, and felt within him that his course would lead him to the desired realization of his hopes. Mr. Cueny was first connected with the hardware trade for a period of fifteen years. He then turned his attention to the grocery business, of which he had acquired some knowledge, working in the service of his father. For ten years he adhered to this line of trade, applying to it all the energy of his nature, and studiously observing all the requirements of the community. The business qualities which sustained him in his other department of mercantile enterprise, also upheld him in this, and he proved himself to be as good a groceryman as hardware merchant, whether the comparison be made with his previous record or subsequent history. On November 1, 1910, he again engaged in the hardware business, and in his new venture in this line of trade is associated with Mr. Galbraith under the firm name of Cueny & Galbraith. The new firm deals in everything in the way of heavy and shelf hardware, and makes a specialty of mechanics' tools and requirements. It is now one of the leaders

Page  1203 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1203 in its line of business and commodities in this part of the state, and by its enterprise, completeness and excellence of stock, and fair dealing and courtesy toward all its patrons, deserves all that has ever been said in its praise, whether applied to the business methods of the house or the agreeable personal characteristics of its proprietors. Mr. Cueny is earnest in his interest in and effective in his service of the fraternal forces at work in his community as a member of the Cheboygan Lodge of Elks, and indefatigable in his work for the promotion of the public welfare as a pronounced and intelligent working Democrat in political relations. He is effective in behalf of every enterprise to which he gives his aid, and none ever lacks his support that is worthy in its aims or properly conducted in its operations. DR. WILLIS EARLE CHAPMAN when he received his degree of M. D., and the diploma certifying that he was legally qualified to practice medicine, seventeen years ago, he looked about for a suitable place to locate in for the purpose of building up a good practice and working out a creditable professional career. He had the world before him for his choice, and there were alluring voices sounding from many localities in differing strains and with varied attractions as the burden of their songs. But he was not long in making his selection. Cheboygan was attracting the attention of this whole portion of the country by its strident progress, and he determined to cast his lot in among its magnifying activities, being firmly convinced that a new place, which was possessed of almost boundless resources and was yet in the infancy of their development, offered better opportunities for a progressive and enterprising young man in any calling than any older and more settled community could. Dr. Chapman is a native of this state, grew to manhood among its people, was educated in its schools, academically and professionally, and has made his record in its strong currents of life and action. Whatever he is, therefore, he is wholly a product of Michigan. He was born on December 25, 1865, in Sparta, Kent county. His father, Charles M. Chapman, was a New Yorker by nativity, hailing from Havana, Cayuga, county, where his life began on September 20, 1831. He came to Michigan in the later '40s and located in Kent county, near where the city of Grand Rapids now stands, the whole region then being for the most part an unbroken wilderness, and still inhabited by the denizens of the forest. The elder Chapman boldly "stuck his stake" in this wilderness, and in time transformed his portion of it into a valuable and productive farm, enriched with good improvements and provided with all the comforts of a desirable rural home, using its own generous contributions of material for the purpose. On this farm he passed the remainder of his days, cultivating his land with energy and skill, and giving his active aid to all projects for the development and improvement of the country around him. He was prominent in the affairs of his township, serving as a member of the school board for many years, and filling other local offices with great advantage to the locality and credit to himself. He was energetic and influential in the order of Patrons of Husbandry, or Grangers, socially and for the good of his county and his calling, and Vol. 11 —16

Page  1204 1204 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN strong politically as a zealous Democrat, for the good of every part of his country, as he believed. His son, the doctor, began his education in the public school in Sparta, continued it in the high school there, and completed it at the State Agricultural College, in academic lines. He got his professional instruction in the medical department of the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated with the degree of Medical Doctor in 1894. Immediately after his graduation he took up his residence in Cheboygan and began the active general practice of medicine in which he has ever since been engaged. Dr. Chapman left the State University an accredited physician seventeen years ago, but he has never ceased being a student of medicine. By reading and reflection, by experience and observation, and by logical and discriminating deduction from all means of growth in knowledge in his business, he has kept himself in close touch-with the progress and improvement of the science to which he is devoted. And in addition he has freely and continuously used conference and association with his medical brethren as an additional source of information and advancement, being an active member of the County and State medical societies and the American Medical Association. He is at the time of this writing (1911) secretary of the State Medical Society. His interest in fraternal organizations is shown by his membership in the Masonic order in all its stages of progress from the lowest round in its mystic ladder to its thirty-second landing in the Scottish Rite, and also by his prominence and zeal as member ol Cheboygau Lodge No. 504 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. During the Spanish-American war he served as acting assistant surgeon in the United States army with fruitful diligence, and from the dawn of his manhood he has given the principles and candidates of the Republican party, to which he is warmly attached, earnest and effective support in all its campaigns. On April 27, 1898, Dr. Chapman was joined in wedlock with his present wife, whose maiden name was Mary May MeArthur. She was born in Cheboygan, Michigan, September 16, 1876, and is a daughter of John B. and Malinda N. (Judson) MeArthur, whose life story will be found briefly told on another page of this volume. Two children have been born of the union, a daughter named Natalie and a son named Earle, both of whom are attending school. The father is still on the sunny side of fifty years of life, and in full vigor of health in mind and body. He is at the full maturity of his powers, and has every faculty harnessed for the accomplishment of the highest and most extensive usefulness of which he is capable. If what he has already achieved can be taken as an earnest of what he is likely to accomplish, if his life is spared, his future will be crowned with a large measure of success in his profession and great and universal esteem and popularity among the people. FLAVEL J. SMITH.-There are turning points in every man 's life called opportunity. Taken advantage of they mean ultimate success. The career of Flavel J. Smith is a striking illustration of the latter statement.

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Page  1205 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1205 Diligent and alert for his chance of advancement, he has progressed steadily until he is recognized as one of the foremost citizens of Petosky today. Here he is held in high esteem by his fellow men, who honor him for his native ability and his fair and straightforward career. He served with all of valor and distinction throughout the entire period of the Civil war; was lieutenant and later regiment quartermaster in the Thirty-fifth Michigan regiment of the Spanish-American war; and for a number of terms has been sheriff of Emmet county, Michigan. He is a man of high and noble purpose, is sympathetic with his fellow men in time of trouble and is ever ready to lend a helping hand to those less fortunately situated in life than himself. A native of Michigan, Flavel J. Smith was born at Berville, in Saint Clair county, the date Qf his birth being the 9th of June, 1845. He is a son of Lewis N. and Sarah (Baker) Smith, the former a native of the state of Connecticut and the latter a native of New York. The mother passed to the great beyond in 1852, and the father was summoned to the life eternal in 1854, at the age of sixty years. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis N. Smith became the parents of nine children, of whom two are living in 1911, namely-Susan, who is the wife of Washington Langworthy and who resides at Bay View; and Flavel J., the immediate subject of this review. Lewis N. Smith removed from Connecticut to New York as a young man and in 1836 he came to Michigan, becoming one of the pioneer settlers in Berville, Saint Clair county. He made the trip from the Empire state to Michigan overland with an ox-team. He and Mr. Stoddard and Mr. Doty, were the first settlers in Saint Clair county, where they literally hewed farms for themselves out of the wilderness. Mr. Smith passed the residue of his life in Saint Clair county, where he gained recognition as a representative agriculturist and as a citizen of sterling integrity and worth. In politics he was an old-line Whig. Flavel J. Smith was a child of but seven years of age at the time of his father's death and two years before he was also bereft of his mother. Being thus doubly orphaned when a mere child his early educational training was of the most meager order. He began to shift for himself while still in childhood and after he had reached more mature years worked on the farm in summers and in the Michigan woods during the winters.' In 1861, when President Lincoln made his first call for volunteers, he enlisted for service in a Michigan regiment. His military career was of short duration, however, as he was discharged two months later on account of his extreme youth. His brother, Garrison E. Smith, had enlisted for service in Company H, Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, but his wife being taken seriously ill, he was obliged to find a substitute. At this point Flavel J. Smith, of this notice, stepped up and offered to take his brother's place, gaining permission so to do from one of the officers in Company H. In this way Mr. Smith became one of the great army of fighters who fought so valiantly for the cause of the Union during the period of the Civil war. He answered roll call for his brother and went to the front in the Fourth Army Corps, under the command of General Thomas. He participated in all the important engagements and skirmishes in which his regiment took part and the same included the battles of Huntersville. Alabama; Stevensville, Alabama; Nashville,

Page  1206 1206 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama. After the close of the war and when peace had again been established throughout the country, Mr. Smith returned to Michigan with his company and there his brother took his place and was mustered out of the army, this being on the 19th of October, 1865. Mr. Smith, of this article, stood by when his brother received his final discharge. There is no record of Mr. Smith's having served in the war as he was substitute for his brother. This noble service is characteristic of Mr. Smith's innate kindliness of spirit; his good deeds have ever been done with no thought of credit to be received for them. In the winter of 1865 Mr. Smith located at Ortonville, in Oakland county, Michigan, where he engaged in the livery business, continuing to be identified with that line of enterprise for the ensuing ten years. While a resident of Ortonville he was justice of the peace and sheriff of Oakland county for a number of terms. He removed to Petoskey in the year 1880 and here he has maintained the family home during the long intervening years to the present time. Shortly after his arrival in this city he engaged in the livery business and in connection with that work had charge of the United States mail for this section. For the ensuing eighteen years he was an important factor in the business world of Petoskey. In the '80s he was honored by his fellow citizens with election to the office of city marshal and in 1886 he was elected sheriff of Emmet county. He served for two successive terms in the latter position and was again elected sheriff in 1894, serving until 1898, when he resigned the office in favor of his son, Charles L. Smith. At the time of the inception of the Spanish-American war, Mr. Smith enlisted for service in Company C, Thirty-fifth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, in which he was commissioned first lieutenant, being particularly active in the enlistment of soldiers for the war. Having reached his fifty-third year at that time, the war department refused to accept his services but later through the intervention of Governor Alger he received his commission. Before the close of the Spanish-American war he was appointed regiment quarter-master. On the 25th of December, 1898, Company C presented him with a beautiful sword. After the close of his second military career, Mr. Smith was again elected sheriff of Emmet county and he has served in that capacity for ten terms to date. He has been particularly active in running down criminals and in bringing them to justice during his regime as sheriff and the fact of his constant re-election to that office is sufficient evidence of his unusually capable service. Mr. Smith has been twice married, his first union hwing been to Miss May J. Hoyt, the ceremony having been solemnized on the 24th of December, 1865. Mrs. Smith was born in the state of New York and she came to Michigan when a child. This union was prolific of three children,-Charles L., who is now a resident of Detroit, Michigan; Amy J., who is deceased; and Edith, who is the wife of William W. Lott, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Smith was summoned to the life eternal in 1902. On the 10th of August, 1910, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Mrs. Alice Belle Sears, nee Cory. Mrs. Smith was born in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and she was the seventh in order of birth in the family of fourteen children born to Reuben A. and Catherine T. (Alsbey) Cory, both natives of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Cory are now living

Page  1207 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1207 at Manitou, Michigan, where Mr. Cory was long engaged in the sawmill business. On the 20th of November, 1883, Alice Bell Cory, (now Mrs. Smith) married George Sears and to this union were born two sons, Edwin and Reuben. Mrs. Smith is a woman of most gracious personality and refinement and she is deeply beloved by all who have come within the sphere of her gentle influence. The attractive Smith home is the scene of many social gatherings and it is widely renowned as a center of most liberal hospitality. In politics Mr. Smith is an uncompromising advocate of the cause of the Republican party. That he is an active and zealous worker in the ranks of that organization may be gathered from the foregoing enumeration of the many honors in the way of public office that have been showered upon him. In the time-honored Masonic order he is affiliated with Durand Lodge, No. 344, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is past master. He first joined Cedar Lodge, No. 60, Clarkston, Michigan, in 1869 (August 19th) and in 1872 Ortonville Lodge, No. 339, serving as master of the latter for five years and being chiefly responsible for the charter. Mr. Smith is also a valued and appreciative member of Lombard Post, No. 170, Grand Army of the Republic, by virtue of his faithful service in the Civil war, and he is connected with Lodge No. 282. Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Petoskey, Michigan. In religious matters Mr. and Mrs. Smith are consistent members of the Baptist church. They are popular and prominent in connection with the best social activities of their home community and no citizens in Petoskey are accorded a higher degree of esteem than are Mr. and Mrs. Smith. EDGAR E. BEDEm. —Among the essentially representative and publicspirited citizens of Bellaire, Michigan, Edgar E. Bedell holds prestige as one whose interest in community affairs has ever been of the most insistent order and as a business man he has done a great deal to advance progress and development in Antrim county. Mr. Bedell was born in the town of Bernhardt Bay, Oswego county, New York, the date of his nativity being the 7th of March, 1864. He is a son of George and Elmira (Janes) Bedell, both of whom were likewise natives of the old Empire state of the Union. For a number of years the father was a ship builder for the Erie Canal Company and subsequently he became a captain on a packet line. In 1879 he removed with his family to Michigan, locating in the vicinity of Forest Home Township, in Antrim county, where he purchased a homestead right and where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. Here the father still lives, the mother having died about 1901. Mr. and Mrs. George Bedell became the parents of ten children and of the number nine are still living. Edgar E. Bedell was reared to the age of fourteen years in his New York home and there he received his preliminary educational training. After his parents' removal to Michigan he remained on the home farm until 1881, assisting his father in the work and management thereof. In that year, however, he decided to learn the painter's and decorator's trade and accordingly entered upon an apprenticeship under the di

Page  1208 1208 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN rection of Frank Bedell, a cousin at Bellaire. He remained at Bellaire for two years, at the expiration of which he went to Ashland, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the work of his trade for four and a half years. Painting did not exactly agree with him so he returned to Michigan, locating at Bellaire, where he worked in a hardware store for a time. He then entered the employ of Hemstreet & Hinman, grocers, and later he went to Escanaba, Michigan, where he became solicitor for the grocery department of a general store. Two years later, in 1904, he returned to Bellaire. He had erected a modern house before going to Escanaba, and thus again became a citizen of Antrim county. He engaged in painting and contracting and in that line of enterprise succeeded in building up an extensive patronage. In September, 1908, he established a job printing office but in January, 1911, he purchased his partner's interest. On the 29th of December, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bedell to Mrs. Emma Noteware, a widow who had one child by her former marriage, namely, Hayward E. Noteware, who is a painter and decorator by trade and who is now associated with Mr. Bedell in the painting business. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bedell. Mrs. Bedell is a valued member of the Order of the Eastern Star and she is popular in connection with the best social affairs of Bellaire, where she is admired and beloved by all with whom she has come in contact. Mr. Bedell is a business man of unusual ability and he has carried to successful completion every undertaking to which he has given his-attention. He is thrifty and prosperous and in his civic attitude he is always on the alert to do all in his power to advance the best interests of this section of the state. In politics he endorses the cause of the Democratic party and in the spring of 1907 he was given proof of public appreciation in that he was then elected to the office of clerk of Kearney township. He was chosen as his own successor in this office in 1908, 1909, 1910 and 1911. In the last election he had no opposition and was elected by unanimous vote. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Masonic order, in which he has been secretary of the local lodge for the past eight years. Mr. Bedell is a man of fine intellect and broad learning and he is kindly and charitable in the various walks of life. EDWARD E. KOBE.-Among the sterling citizens of Mason county who have achieved distinctive success in connection with normal lines of business enterprise is this well known and highly esteemed citizen of the thriving village of Scottville, where he is the owner of a well equipped general store and controls a large and prosperous business. Mr. Kobe claims the old Empire state of the Union as the place of his nativity, though he has been a resident of Michigan since his childhood days. He was born in the city of Ithaca, Tompkins county, New York, on the 2nd of February, 1866, and is a son of Joseph and Augustine Kobe, the former of whom was born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, which is now a German province, and the latter of whom was born in France. The father attained to the venerable age of eighty-one years and the mother was seventy-nine years of age at the time when she was summoned to the life eternal. This worthy couple became the parents

Page  1209 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1209 of ten sons and two daughters, and of the number six sons and two daughters are living. The father was reared and educated in his native land and the lineage of the family is traced back to staunch German origin. He participated in the Franco-Prussian war as a valiant soldier of France, and shortly after the close of the same he came with his wife to America. He remained for a time in the state of New York and then came to Michigan, where he devoted the remainder of his active life to agricultural pursuits. He became the owner of a farm in Oceana county and developed the same to a high state of cultivation. There he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1903. He was a man of inflexible integrity of character and ever commanded the unqualified respect of all who knew him. Both he and his wife were zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Edward E. Kobe, whose name introduces this article, was a child at the time of the family removal from New York state to Michigan, and he was reared to maturity on the old homestead farm of his father in Oceana county, in the meanwhile duly availing himself of the advantages of the public schools of the locality and period. As a young man Mr. Kobe came to Mason county and engaged in the general merchandise business in the village of Freesoil, where he remained one year. He then opened a general store at Hart, Oceana county, where he continued in business for two years, after which he conducted a general store in Oceana county for two years. In 1899 he again removed to Mason county, and at this time he established his residence in Scottville, where he opened his present store and where, through fair and honorable dealings, he has built up a large and substantial enterprise. His establishment is modern in its equipment and facilities and is devoted to the handling of general merchandise. He is loyal and public-spirited as a citizen and is one of the valued business men of his home town, where his circle of friends is coincident with that of his acquaintances. He is found aligned as an intelligent supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party; is affiliated with Scottville Lodge, No. 445, Free & Accepted Masons, with Ludington Chapter, No. 92, Royal Arch Masons, with the Knights Templar of Ludington, and with the Knights of Pythias Lodge No. 31. His wife holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, and both belong to the Eastern Star. In 1893 Mr. Kobe was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Teeple, who was born in Ohio and who is of staunch German descent. They have one son and one daughter,-Marshall E., and Joyce L. ERNEST W. HASTINGS.-For fully a score of years has Ernest W. Hastings been engaged in the real-estate business in Traverse City, Grand Traverse county, Michigan, and in connection with this line of enterprise he has done much to improve the general appearance of the city and to promote its general welfare. He is a man of fine intelligence and extraordinary executive ability and in addition to his various business ventures he has held many prominent positions in the arena of politics, among them being that of representative in the state legislature. Mr. Hastings was born at Lansing, Michigan, on the 16th of April,

Page  1210 1210 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1855, a son of Silas and Elizabeth (Woodhans) Hastings, both of whom are deceased. The father was born and reared in the state of Ohio and he was a carpenter by occupation. He located at Lansing, Michigan, in the year 1853, and there was engaged in the work of his trade until the time of the inception of the Civil war, when he showed his intrinsic patriotism to the cause of the Union by enlisting as a soldier in the First Regiment of Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, in which he served with'all of faithfulness and gallantry until his death, which occurred in July, 1863. His demise was incurred as the result of a sunstroke received in the trenches in front of Vicksburg. Mrs. Silas Hastings was a native of England, whence she emigrated to America in early girlhood, about the year 1848. She settled at Cleveland, Ohio, where was solemnized her marriage to Mr. Hastings and whence they removed to Lansing, Michigan, in 1853. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Hastings, with her only son, Ernest W., came to Traverse City, where she was united in marriage to William Holdsworth, one of the first settlers in Grand Traverse county, the ceremony having been performed in 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Holdsworth are both dead, the former having been summoned to the life eternal in 1906 and the latter having passed away in 1890. Ernest W. Hastings was a lad of but eight years of age at the time of his father's death. He availed himself of the advantages offered in the public schools of Lansing and Traverse City until he had attained to the age of sixteen years, at which time, in 1871, he went to the city of Cleveland, Ohio, where he entered upon an apprenticeship at the pattern-maker's trade, with which line of enterprise he continued to be identified for a number of years. Eventually, realizing that his education was not all that could be desired, he returned to Traverse City, where he pursued a complete commercial course in a local business college. He then entered the employ of the firm of J. Greilich & Company, and at the time of his marriage, in 1875, he had charge of the sash and door department of that concern. He continued incumbent of that position until 1880, when he met with an accident whereby one of his hands was rather seriously injured. While recovering from the injuries received, he became interested in the musical-instrument and sewing-machine business, to which he continued to devote his entire time and attention until 1890, in which year he engaged in the real-estate and fire insurance business. In 1900 he admitted his son Ralph S. to partnership in the latter venture, and a fine business has been built up under the firm name of Hastings & Son. On the 1st of August, 1910, however, he sold the fire-insurance branch of the concern to his son and partner and since that time the two lines of enterprise have been conducted individually by the father and son. In politics Mr. Hastings has ever been aligned as a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and in spite of the gigantic proportions assumed by his various business interests he has still had time to win renown as a strong party man and as a clean-cut politician. Prior to the organization of Traverse City as a city he gave most efficient service as a member of the village board and after the city had been incorporated he was for a number of

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Page  1211 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1211 years analderman from the Second ward. He was treasurer of the village for two terms and served a similar period as treasurer of the city. In 1900 he was given futher mark of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow men in that he was then elected to represent the Grand Traverse district in the state legislature. In 1902 he was requested to become candidate for re-election to the latter office, but he declined that honor on account of his wife's poor health. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, of which he was president for two years, and he was a charter member of the Lincoln Club, of which he was elected the first president. He has held various offices in the different fraternal societies with which he is affiliated and he has long been a deacon in the Traverse City Baptist church, of which he and his children are devout members. In the time-honored Masonic order he has passed through the circle of the York Rite branch, holding membership in Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; and Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars, besides which he is also a valued and appreciative member of the adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Grand Rapids. He is likewise connected with the Knights of Pythias. On the 9th of November, 1875, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Hastings to Miss Sarah E. Chantler, who was born and reared in the state of New York. She was a daughter of Charles and Catherine (McDougal) Chantler, who established their home in Grand Traverse county, Michigan, when Mrs. Hastings was a mere child. Mrs. Hastings was summoned to eternal rest on the 23d of August, 1910. She was a woman of unusually sweet personality and she was a potent influence for good in the home during her life time. Her death is deeply mourned by an adoring family and a large circle of warm and devoted friends. To Mr. and Mrs. Hastings were born five children, all of whom are living, in 1911. Ralph S., who was long the junior member in the firm of Hastings & Son, mentioned above, is now serving as city treasurer, this being his second term. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, in 1898, he enlisted as a soldier in Company M, Thirty-fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He was in Cuba with his regiment and participated in all the important conflicts marking the progress of that conflict, being present at the capture of San Juan Hill. On the 5th of September, 1900, he was united in marriage to Miss Ethel M. Hoxie and they have two children, Robert and Elizabeth. Walter E., of this city is-the other son; Edith and Grace C. are both graduates of the Traverse City high school and Ruth is still attending school. HOBART D. CHURCHILL.-A large and beneficent part was that played by the late Hobart D. Churchill in connection with the development and upbuilding of Alpena, which continued to represent his home for more than thirty years, during which he was a prominent factor in the activities of the lumbering industry in this section of the state. He was a man of marked ability and of inflexible integrity in all the relations of life, so that he merited and received the confidence and high regard of his fellow men. He was long numbered among the progressive and influen

Page  1212 1212 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN tial citizens of Alpena county, and the city of Alpena continued to be his home until his death, which occurred on the 11th of March, 1904, at Columbia, Tennessee, where he had been compelled to stop while en route to the south, whither he had set forth in the hope of recuperating his health. His contribution to the material and civic development of Alpena and his high standing as a citizen render it most consonant that in this volume be entered and perpetuated a brief tribute to his memory. Hobart D. Churchill was born at Batavia, Kane county, Illinois, on the 15th of February, 1848, and was not only a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of that commonwealth but also of one whose name has been identified with the annals of American history from the colonial era. He was a son of Joseph W. Churchill, who was born in Hubbardton, Rutland county, Vermont, in 1801, and who was a member of a family, of English ancestry, that was founded in New England in the early colonial days. As a young man Joseph W. Churchill removed to the state of New York and established his home at Batavia, Genessee county, where he continued to reside until 1838, when he removed with his family to Kane county, Illinois, and numbered himself among its sturdy pioneer settlers. He was virtually the founder of the present thriving little city of Batavia, that county, naming the settlement in honor of his former home in the state of New York and becoming one of the prominent and influential citizens of Kane county. In 1854 J. W. Churchill, with his family, removed to the state of Iowa, locating first in Pleasant Valley, on a farm, and later removing to Davenport, Iowa, where he spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1884. Hobart D. Churchill as a young man removed to Chicago, Illinois, where he engaged in the manufacturing of sash, doors and blinds. He continued to reside in the great western metropolis until 1872, when he removed to Alpena, Michigan, where he entered into partnership with his brother, Worthy L. Churchill, and engaged in lumbering operations, under the firm name of W. L. & H. D. Churchill. This title was retained until shortly before his death, as the business was not incorporated under its present title, the Churchill Lumber Company, until the 2d of March, 1903, a reorganization of the concern having taken place at this time. He was one of the prominent figures in connection with lumbering operations in this section of the state for many years, as was also his brother, and while thus forwarding his individual interests he also stood exponent of the most loyal and progressive citizenship. He was ever ready to lend his co-operation in the support of measures and enterprises projected for the general good of the community, and his sterling attributes of character gave him secure place in popular confidence and esteem. Though never imbued with ambition for political office, Mr. Churchill was aligned as a staunch and intelligent advocate of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor, and he was a zealous communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, as is also his wife, who still maintains her home in Alpena, in whose social activities she has long been a valued and popular factor. Both contributed generously to the upbuilding of the parish of Trinity church and he was

Page  1213 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MlICHIGAN 1213 mlost liberal in the support of the various departments of its work, serving for many years on the vestry. Mr. Churchill was also a most appreciative member of the time-honored Masonic fraternity and was one of the most prominent and valued of its representatives in Alpena. His local affiliations were as here noted: Hoper Lodge, No. 386, Free & Accepted Masons; Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; Sahgonahkato Council, No. 58, Royal & Select Masters; and Alpena Commandery, No. 34, Knights Templars. He passed various official chairs in each of these organizations and was eminent commander of his commandery at the time of his death. On the 20th of October, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Churchill to Miss Ella M. Hyde, who was born at Pleasant Valley, Scott county, Iowa, and who is a daughter of Andrew Jackson Hyde. Her father was a farmer by vocation and both he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in Davenport, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Churchill became the parents of one child, Howard L., concerning whom specific mention is made in the appending paragraphs. Howard L. Churchill, the only child of the honored subject of this memoir, has been, save for an interval of about eight years, a resident of Alpena from the time of his nativity and in his course as a business man and as a citizen he has well upheld the prestige of the name which he bears. He is one of the representative business men of his native city, where he is prominently concerned with the industrial interests with which his father was so long identified. Mr. Churchill was born in Alpena, on the 22d of January, 1878, and his early educational advantages were those afforded in the excellent public schools of this city. Here he continued to be associated with his father's business interests until 1899, when he went to Bay City and became actively interested in the manufacturing of beet sugar, in association with his uncle, Worthy L. Churchill. He was superintendent of the well equipped plant of the Bay City Sugar Company and retained this incumbency until 1907, when he returned to Alpena and became an active executive in the Churchill Lumber Company, which had been incorporated in March, 1903, about a year prior to his father's death, as already intimated in this context. He has since been treasurer of this corporation, which took over the interests of the old firm of W. L. & H. D. Churchill, and the enterprise is one that is carried on along progressive lines, so that it continued to be a valuable factor in connection with the industrial and commercial activities of this section of the state, its functions being both wholesale and retail, in addition to manufacturing. Like his father, Mr. Churchill accords allegiance to the cause of the Democratic party, without manifesting any predilection for official preferment, and he is a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, in whose faith he was reared. In the Masonic fraternity he is not only identified with the local lodge, chapter and commandery in which his father was affiliated, but he has also attained to their thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in which connection he holds membership in the consistory at Bay City; and at Saginaw he is affiliated with Elf Khurafeh Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles

Page  1214 1214 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Churchill is a bachelor and resides in the attractive old family home in Alpena. WEBSTER C. MARTIN, M. D., who is engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Scottville, Mason county, Michigan, possesses all the requisite qualities of the successful physician, for, added to his broad and accurate learning concerning the principles of his profession, he has a genial manner and sunshiny, hopeful nature which cannot fail to have its effect upon his patients. His courteous sympathy as well as his professional skill has gained him prestige during the eighteen years of his residence in this city. In addition to his chosen field of endeavor Dr. Martin has taken an active interest in public affairs and is at the present time, in 1911, serving as mayor of Scottville. In Washtenaw county, this state, occurred the birth of Dr. Martin, the date being April 7, 1868. His father, Hiram Martin, who is now deceased, was a prominent farmer in Washtenaw county during the major portion of his active business career. He was a native of New York state and his ancestry was of Irish and English extraction. After being reared and educated in the Empire state Hiram Martin came to Michigan and settled in Washtenaw county, where he purchased a farm, upon which he resided until his death, in January, 1910. He married Miss Lydia Clark, likewise a native of New York, whence she came to Michigan with her parents when a child of but three years of age. She was brought up in Washtenaw county and prior to her marriage she was a popular and successful teacher in her home county. Her death occurred in 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Martin became the parents of six children and of the number Webster C. is the third in order of birth and the oldest son. The brothers identified themselves with agricultural pursuits but W. C. turned his attention to teaching as a young man. After availing himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of his native county he was engaged in the pedagogic profession for three years. He then became interested in the medical profession and was matriculated in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in the medical department of which excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He initiated the active practice of his profession at Palo, Ionia county, Michigan, and after remaining in that place for a period of five months he came, in December of that year, to Scottville, where he has practiced continuously to the present time and where he enjoys a large and representative patronage. His work is not confined to the city but extends far into the adjacent country and he has a reputation for being one of the best physicians and surgeons in Mason county. In Scottville, on the 8th of July, 1896, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Martin to Miss Clare Kilbourne, whose birth occurred on the parental farmstead in Montcalm county, in which section she was reared and educated. Her ambitions led her to perfect herself in a scholastic way and she was engaged in teaching in various town and district schools for a period of twelve years. Dr. and Mrs. Martin have three children, whose names are here entered in order of birth,-Nettie E., Webster C

Page  1215 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1215 and Hiram Stewart. Mrs. Martin is of staunch Scotch stock and she is a woman of magnetic personality and gracious sincerity. In addition to his medical work Dr. Martin is an extensive landholder in Mason county, owning one hundred and sixty acres of most arable farm land, besides which he also has considerable real-estate in Scottville. In politics he is a loyal adherent of the cause of the Republican party and it has ever been his aim to do all in his power to advance the general welfare of the community in which he has so long maintained his home. For about ten years he was county coroner and he is now the efficient incumbent of the office of mayor of Scottville, in which connection he is giving a most able and satisfactory administration of the municipal affairs of the city. In a professional way he is affiliated with the Mason County Medical Society, the Michigan State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Socially he is a valued member of the time-honored Masonic order, having passed through the circle of York Rite Masonry. He holds membership in the Blue Lodge, No. 445, Free & Accepted Masons; the Chapter of Royal Arch Masons; and Commandery No. 31, Knights Templars, of Ludington. His religious faith is in harmony with the tenets of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is also a devout member. Dr. and Mrs. Martin hold a prominent and secure place in popular confidence and esteem. AUGUST F. BANOWSKE.-It is always most gratifying to the biographist and student of human nature to come in close touch with the history of a man who, in the face of almost insurmountable obstacles, has plodded persistently on and eventually, through his determination and energy, made of success not an accident but a logical result. August F. Banowske, who maintains his home at Bellaire, Antrim county, Michigan, is strictly a "self-made" man and as such a perusal of his career offers both lesson and incentive. He has been eminently successful as a tailor whose merit extends beyond the bounds of this city and he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in all matters pertaining to the good of the community. A native of the great Empire of Germany, August F. Banowske was born at Kulm on the 4th of August, 1876, and he is a son of David and Lina (Lorenz) Banowske, both of whom were born and reared in Germany, whence they emigrated to America about the year 1890, location being made at Bellaire, where they remained until their death. The first in order of birth in a family of two children, August F. Banowske passed his boyhood and youth in his native land, where he received his rudimentary educational training. He remained at home until he had attained to the age of fourteen years and when he had reached his sixteenth year he entered upon an apprenticeship at the tailor's trade, the same to consist of three years' service. Shortly after he began his work his parents removed to America and he being bound was forced to remain behind. He worked diligently for two years and at the expiration of that time, having carefully conserved his earnings, he was able to purchase his release from his master. This he did and immediately emigrated to America, proceeding direct to Bellaire from New York, where he disembarked. After visiting for a time at the home of

Page  1216 1216 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN his parents, he went to Mancelona, where he worked for three years for the late G. A. Birk. Returning to Bellaire, in 1897, he entered the employ of Will Stoll, remaining with him for four years. He then went to Thompsonville, Michigan, where he followed the work of his trade for a time, eventually buying the concern from his employer. In May, 1901, however, he decided that Bellaire was a better place for his business than Thompsonville and he then returned to Bellaire, where he opened a merchant tailoring establishment, equipped with a choice line of goods. His increasing business compelled him to make a number of changes and as time passed and rent became higher he decided to build a shop for himself. He secured an option on a piece of land on the west side of the principal street in Bellaire and in short order purchased the lot. He immediately began the erection of a store and workshop and in November, 1901, he moved into one of the finest store-buildings in Bellaire. During the intervening years to the present time, Mr. Banowske has built up a permanent and substantial business, relying upon his work and the high class of goods he carries as his best advertisement. Mr. Banowske solicits no business outside the walls of his store, in fact, he does no personal soliciting at all, depending solely upon the quality of his work to bring him new customers. He carries nothing that he cannot recommend and he never falls short of making good on a promise. He handles a full line of tailor's trimmings, as well as a large stock of gentlemen's furnishings. Moreover, his trade is not limited to home patronage but orders are placed with him by traveling men who know and appreciate the high grade of the work turned out in his establishment. He even has patrons from as far away as Boston, Massachusetts, and in no instance has he ever failed to give the utmost satisfaction. His shop is supplied with the latest of improvements and labor-saving devices and nothing that contributes to better and quicker work is omitted. In his political convictions Mr. Banowske is aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and he is ever on the alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises advanced for the general welfare. He has been honored by his fellow citizens with election to a number of offices of public trust and responsibility and in each of them he has discharged the duties devolving upon him with the greatest efficiency. In the spring of 1904 he was elected treasurer of Bellaire and in 1905 he was chosen as his own successor in that office. In April, 1905, he was elected clerk of Kearney township, remaining in tenure of that position for three years. In the spring of 1911 he was elected treasurer of Kearney township and he is serving in that capacity at the present time. When a child of seven years of age Mr. Banowske met with an accident in which his knee cap was broken. The surgical facilities at hand in those early days were of so crude a nature that when the wound healed the knee remained stiff and for twenty-one long years he was obliged to use a crutch. On the 14th of December, 1903, through the efforts of a local physician, an operation was performed in which the knee joint was removed and the bones of the thigh and lower limb united. While the injured limb is

Page  1217 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1217 slightly shorter than the other one no cane has to be used for support and the operation on a whole was a decided success. On the 8th of September, 1908, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Banowske to Miss Ida Bell Sampson, who was born and reared at Sumpter, Wayne county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of John E. and Annie Sampson, who are now living in their beautiful home at Bellaire. John E. Sampson was a gallant and faithful soldier in the war of the Rebellion and he was honorably discharged from service in 1865. In 1886 he removed, with his family, to Bellaire, where he is now living virtually retired, in the full enjoyment of former years of earnest toil and endeavor. During the major portion of his active business career he was identified with agricultural pursuits, in which line of enterprise he achieved prominent success. Mr. and Mrs. Banowske have no children. In religious faith Mrs. Banowske is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church and they are both popular and prominent in the best social activities of Bellaire. In a fraternal way Mr. Banowske is affiliated with the Elks and his wife is connected with the Order of the Maccabees. He is also a valued and appreciative member of the Modern Woodmen of America and in the various relations of life he has so conducted himself as to command the unalloyed confidence and esteem of his fellow men. LABAN HENRY SHANK, M. D.-Holding high position among his professional brethren in Leelanau county, is Dr. Laban Henry Shank, of Empire. Acute in his perceptions, widely read in his profession and skillful in applying his acquirements to practical use, his value as a physician and surgeon is of the highest character. Among the several distinctions which give him eminence among the members of his fraternity is the fact that he is Empire's pioneer physician, his identification with this place dating from the year 1890. He came here a young man and was the first of his profession to locate here permanently. Possessing a practice as general as his, it goes without saying that he must devote his life to its duties to a degree which is asked of the exponent of no other profession, but, nevertheless, Dr. Shank in some manner finds time and opportunity to express his loyalty to the section in very definite deeds, giving heart and hand to all that seems to him calculated to advance the interests of the whole of society. As evidence of this and also of the confidence in which he is held by his fellow citizens is the fact that he is health officer of Empire, a village trustee and a member of the school board. Laban Henry Shank is a native of the state of New York, his birth having occurred at Mount Morris, Livingston county, in 1862. He is the son of Franklin and Adelaide Shank, both natives of the Empire state. The former was a contractor and builder, whose career, like that of most of the young men of his generation, was interrupted by the Civil war. His sympathies were with the Union and its preservation and he enlisted in a New York regiment and served throughout the great conflict between the states. Young Laban Henry was born during this period, the cannon of Shiloh and Bull Run echoing about his cradle. Shortly after the return of peace to the devastated land, the

Page  1218 1218 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Shank family, consisting of the father, mother and children, made a change of residence and came to Flint, Michigan, a section which was rapidly opening up to settlement. Franklin Shank, whose demise occurred in 1897, is still remembered and honored in northern Michigan, and many of the finest and most substantial buildings of Flint and its vicinity are monuments to his memory. As previously stated Dr. Shank was born when his father was a wearer of the blue. He was but three years of age at the time of the removal to Michigan and it is thus owing to his parents initiative that he became so useful a factor in the splendid northern country. He received his general education in the schools of Flint, being graduated from their higher department in 1886, and, having come to a decision as to his life work, he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and received his degree in 1889. After spending a year in Colorado, a period divided between work and recreation, he came to Empire and here at once entered upon a career so useful and satisfactory, that he has ever since remained here, a witness of the phenomenal growth of the county and a contributor to the same. In 1889, Dr. Shank was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Casey, of Brantford, Ontario. She had been his class-mate at Ann Arbor, both being students in homeopathy, and the associations of class room and campus were further developed after the lapse of several years. Their union was of but brief duration, Mrs. Shank being summoned to the "Undiscovered Country" in 1895. In 1897 the subject was again married, Miss Alma Harwood, of Glen Arbor, Michigan, becoming his wife and the mistress of his household. They share their delightful home with two young daughters, Elizabeth and Alma, the former born in 1898 and the latter in 1900. Dr. Shank is liberal in religious views and subscribes to the policies of the Republican party. He is a Mason, and exemplifies in his own life the principles of moral and social justice and brotherly love which characterize that ancient order. He is also a popular member of the Maccabees. CHARLES W. SMITH in his checkered career has been identified with various lines of enterprise and at the present time, in 1911, he is well established as editor and publisher of the LeRay Sun, at LeRay, Osceola county, Michigan. Mr. Smith was born in Ohio, on the 15th of January, 1871, and is a son of Dr. Winfield Scott Smith, long a physician and dentist at Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Smith was a native son of the old Buckeye state and he received an excellent educational training in his youth, having ably supplemented his preliminary discipline by a course of study in college, in the medical department of which he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He was also graduated in the dental profession. He married Miss Pamelia Clark, likewise a native of Ohio, and they became the parents of five children, namely: Charles, Bessie, Jennie, Transilia and Theodore. Charles W. Smith, oldest in order of birth of the above-mentioned children, after completing the curriculum of the public schools of

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Page  1219 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1219 Cleveland was graduated in a business course in the Ohio Business University. For three years thereafter he was employed in his father's office, where he acquired a thorough knowledge of the medical profession. Instead of devoting his life to that line of endeavor, however, he entered upon an apprenticeship at the printers' trade, in which he eventually became an expert journeyman. In 1896 he enlisted in the United States army as a member of Troop B, First United States Cavalry, serving in that capacity for the ensuing three years, that period including service in the Spanish-American war, at the expiration of which he was honorably discharged, with the rank of orderly sergeant. He came to Michigan in 1900 and located at Mount Pleasant, where he remained for five years. For two years thereafter he resided at Cadillac, where he was foreman in the printing establishment of Perry Powers. In 1910 he removed to LeRay, where he established the LeRay Sun and where his identification with the printing business as editor and publisher has been of an eminently successful order. It is interesting to note that at one time in his youth Mr. Smith was a rolling-skater performer with Ringling Brothers' circus and for two years he was similarly engaged with the Lun Brothers. On the 2nd of December, 1908, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Smith to Miss Lucetta Donigan, who was born and reared in Lake county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of John Donigan, of Cadillac. The father is a carpenter by trade and is a prominent and influential citizen in Cadillac. Mr. Smith is a valued and appreciative member of the International Typographical Union and he is also affiliated with the Royal Arcanum. Endowed by nature with high intellectual qualities, to which have been added experiences of interesting order, Mr. Smith's is an attractive personality. GEORGE B. HOLMES.-A resident of Alpena county for more than forty years, this well known and highly esteemed citizen is numbered among the representative business men and progressive citizens of the city of Alpena, where he is still actively identified with the lumber business, with which line of enterprise he has been concerned for many years. George B. Holmes was born near Strathroy, province of Ontario. Canada, on the 22d of August, 1857, and is a son of William and Mary Holmes, both of whom were born in county Armagh, Ireland, and both of whom died when their son George B. was a child. Of the three children he is the elder of the two now living, and his brother, Albert W., is a resident of the state of Idaho. William Holmes was reared and educated in his native land, whence he immigrated to America when a young man. He located in Middlesex county, province of Ontario, Canada, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. After the death of his parents George B. Holmes was taken into the home of his aunt, Mrs. Richard Scott, and when he was seven years of age he accompanied them on their removal to Michigan. He was reared in Alpena county and was twelve years of age at the time when his uncle and aunt here established their home in 1869. His educational training was secured in the public schools and when a mere boy he found Vol. m-17

Page  1220 1220 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN employment in connection with fishing operations at Alpena. Later he worked in lumbering camps during the winter seasons and also gained his full quota of experience in driving logs down the rivers of this section of the state. He continued to be thus occupied until the autumn of 1882, when, shortly after his marriage, he engaged in lumbering operations in an independent way. He purchased one hundred and twenty acres of timber land on Gilchrist creek, Alpena county, and from the product of this tract he realized sufficient profit to enable him to broaden the scope of his lumbering enterprise. He had various partners in his operations and finally, in 1890, he became associated with Charles H. Reynolds in the purchase of the Pack building in Alpena. He is still one of the owners of this fine business block. In 1891 the firm of Holmes & Reynolds purchased a large tract of timber and stumpage land in Douglas county, Wisconsin, where they erected a sawmill and continued lumbering operations until 1895, when they sold the property and business to Cross, Badger & Company, of Chicago. For five years Mr. Holmes was one of the interested principals in the Churchill Lumber Company, and for a number of years he was associated with John Nicholson in lumbering operations in the vicinity of Alpena, under the firm name of Holmes & Nicholson. During the last few years he has been interested with his son George H. in the lumber business, under the firm name of George H. Holmes & Co. In 1893 Mr. Holmes became one of the organizers of the Churchill Lumber Company, previously mentioned, and he was vice-president of this corporation until 1907, when he sold his interest in the same. He is a member of the directorate of the Alpena County Savings Bank and is auditor and a director of the Hillman Savings Bank, at Hillman, Montmorency county. As a citizen Mr. Holmes has been signally loyal and public-spirited, and he has given effective service in various local offices of trust. He served two terms as supervisor of the Third ward of AIpena, was city comptroller for one term, and for six years was incumbent of the position of police commissioner. In politics he is found arrayed as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party. An appreciative member of the time-honored Masonic fraternity, Mr. Holmes' local affiliations in the same are as here noted: Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons; Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons; and Alpena Commandery, No. 34, Knights Templars. He is also identified with Michigan Sovereign Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Masonry, in the city of Detroit, and in the same has received the thirty-second degree. In the metropolis of the state he also holds membership in Moslem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. On the 20th of September, 1882, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Holmes to Miss Harriet Riley, who was born, reared and educated in Sanilac county, Michigan, and who is a daughter of John and Eliza E. (Reynolds) Riley, both of whom were born near the city of Dublin, Ireland, and both of whom were children at the time of the immigration of the respective families to America. They were reared and educated in the province of Ontario, Canada, where their marriage was

Page  1221 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1221 solemnized, and both passed the closing years of their lives in Sanilac county, Michigan, where Mr. Riley died at the age of sixty-seven and his wife at the age of seventy years. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes have two children: George H. and Mary H. Miss Mary is a popular factor in connection with the best social activities of her native city. George H. Holmes, only son of him whose name initiates this review, was born in Alpena on the 1st of November, 1883, and after finishing his education in the public schools, he continued his studies for two years in the Michigan State Agricultural College, near Lansing. As has already been noted, he is associated with his father in the lumber business, and he is known as one of the enterprising and progressive young business men of his native city. He gives his allegiance to the Republican party, and is affiliated with Alpena Lodge, No. 199, Free & Accepted Masons, and Thunder Bay Chapter, No. 74, Royal Arch Masons. On the 28th of August, 1907, was solemnized the marriage of George H. Holmes to Miss Grace E. Maltz, who was born in Alpena and who is a daughter of George L. Maltz, one of the most honored and influential citizens of this section of the state. WILLIAM H. STEEE is one of the representative citizens of Northport, Leelanau county, Michigan, playing an important part in the life of the community as a dealer in all kinds of farm produce and as superintendent of the Citizens' Telephone Company, of Northport. He enjoys the confidence of the community in which he is best known, and has served in several important public capacities. He is a native son of the state and very loyal to its interests. He was born at Freesoil, April 26, 1865, and his parents were Wilber F. and Martha J. (Voice) Steele, both of whom were born in Illinois. On the maternal side he comes of one of the early pioneer families of Michigan. Both his father and mother, Wilber F. and Martha J. (Voice) Steele, were born in Illinois. The latter came to Traverse City with her parents in one of the first schooners to reach the shores of northern Michigan and as a young woman she played a valuable and estimable part in the life of the new community, teaching the first school at Northport during the winter months, and by the influence of her admirable personality teaching far more than the so-called Three R's. The father was also one of the early Northport school teachers. The early education of Mr. Steele was secured in the district schools and it was finished upon a stage while making the journey between Northport and Traverse City. His father had the contract to carry the mail between these two points and when William was sixteen years of age he began to drive the stage. During the long journey he conned his school books and greatly assisted an interrupted education, while at the same time relieving the tedium of the oft-recurring journey. At times he was obliged to drive for miles on the ice during the winter months and often when the ice was breaking up would be compelled to jump the horse from one cake of ice to the other, leaving the sleigh, 'vith which he had started, behind and making the rest of the journey on horseback. After seven years' experience as a stage driver, during

Page  1222 1222 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN which he met with a number of adventures, he engaged in buying fruit and took the product of his father's orchard on shares. His plans grew in scope and he bought fruit from other farmers, and in order to reach the Chicago Markets he found it necessary to gather the fruit in wagons of his own and haul it to Traverse City, from whence it was shipped to the great metropolis. He later engaged in the purchase of potatoes, apples and farm produce for a Chicago firm, and after being engaged thus for some time he again began the fruit purchasing business on his own account. In 1890 he established himself even more substantially, erecting a store and handling all kinds of farm produce. In this he is now engaged and is one of the best known and most prosperous of Michigan fruit men. In evidence of his prestige in the field with which he is identified is the fact that in 1909 and 1910 he was given charge of the packing and shipment of the fruit exhibit of western Michigan which was held in Chicago. Several years ago, in 1907, Mr. Steele was appointed local superintendent of the Citizens' Telephone Company, and he has given remarkable evidence of business acumen and fine executive ability in his management of its affairs. Mr. Steele was married in 1887, the lady to become his wife and the mistress of his household being Miss Sarah Sanborn, of Leelanau, Michigan. She was born in Canada, and came to Michigan with her parents when a child. To the union four children have been born and all bid fair to become useful and brilliant citizens. Morgan C., the eldest son, is an editor and is located at Sutton's Bay, Michigan. He is a brilliant young fellow and is far advanced for his years. When only twelve years of age he superintended the issuing of a newspaper and for a fortnight during the absence of the editor acted in that capacity. Eugene R. is at school and will be graduated in 1911. Ida is with her brother at Sutton's Bay; and Albert, the youngest member of the family, is at home and in attendance at the public schools. In addition to his business interests, which are of broad scope and importance, Mr. Steele has assumed several public obligations and ever with great satisfaction to all concerned. He has been a member of the village board, has acted as village clerk, and in 1910 was census enumerator. WILLIAM REED.-Enterprising and progressive, William Reed, now serving as postmaster at Luther, is numbered among the foremost merchants of that place and as one of the ablest business men of Lake county. He was born in Howard City, Michigan, July 18, 1876, a son of the late John Reed, of Scotch-Irish ancestry. John Reed was born in Dublin, Ireland, of Scotch parentage, and was there educated, receiving a practical knowledge of books. When eighteen years of age he immigrated to America, locating in Toronto, Canada, where for a time he was variously occupied. Having accumulated quite a sum of money, he erected a hotel in that city, and conducted it several seasons, with excellent pecuniary results. Going from there to Warren, Ohio, he branched out in a new industry, establishing a soap factory. He succeeded so well in his venture that he thought to enlarge his business by opening another soap factory in Goshen, In

Page  1223 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1223 diana. His management of that, too, proved satisfactory, but he had the misfortune to lose all of his property through signing notes for other people. Left with no other resources than his spirit of courage and perseverance, he moved with his family to Howard City, Michigan, where he accepted a position as stationary engineer with the firm of Mender & Shaw. Wisely investing his salary in town lots, he made some money as a dealer in real estate, and having accumulated a sufficient sum went to Virginia and bought a plantation near Petersburg, where he carried on general farming a number of years. Opening then a lumber mill, he gave his sales agent full power of control, and again lost all of his possessions. Scarce discouraged, however, he came back to Michigan, and after living awhile in both Big Rapids and Cadillac settled in Luther, Lake county, where he continued a resident until his death, in the fifty-ninth year of his age. He married, in Ohio, Elizabeth Charters, who was born and reared in Ireland, and of their five children two died in infancy and three are living, as follows: Clara, Vina and William. William Reed attended the public schools of Michigan, Ohio, Virginia and Canada, obtaining the best possible education under the circumstances. While yet in his teens he began life for himself, for three years clerking in the dry goods establishment of S. Buckner, in Luther. He was afterwards clerk in the grocery of Del Gardner for two years, and was then for two years buyer for the J. S. Stearns Lumber Company. In 1900 Mr. Reed embarked in mercantile pursuits on his own account, beginning on a modest scale, and has continued to the present time, his success each year warranting him in enlarging his operations until now he has one of the best-stocked and best-managed stores of the kind in this section of the county. Mr. Reed married, January 24, 1900, Mabel Griffen, who was born in Indiana, and came to Lake county, Michigan, with her parents, and was here educated, and before her marriage taught school in Luther. Her father, Edgar Griffen, served as a soldier in the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have one child, Kenneth Reed. Politically Mr. Reed is a stanch adherent of the Republican party, and has served as township and village clerk, and as president of the village. He is now a member of the City Council, and is serving as postmaster, a position to which he was appointed in 1908. He is affiliated with various fraternal organizations, belonging to the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; to the Knights of the Maccabees; to the Modern Woodmen of America, and to the Eastern Star. ELISHA B. RAYBURN.-Among the leading exponents of the agricultural and live-stock industries in Alpena county is numbered this well known and highly esteemed citizen, whose fine landed estate is located in Ossineke township, near the village of Hubbard Lake. This farm comprises three hundred and twenty acres and is conceded to be one of the best improved in the county. It is devoted to diversified agriculture and the raising of high-grade live stock and has been the home of Mr. Rayburn since 1890. Elisha Benjamin Rayburn has been a resident of Michigan for

Page  1224 1224 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN nearly forty-five years, but claims the province of Ontario, Canada, as the place of his nativity. He was born on a pioneer farm in Caledonia township, York county, Ontario, some miles distant from the city of Toronto, on the 8th of August, 1833, so that he is now nearing the age of four score years, though his physical and mental powers have been so admirably preserved that he has the appearance and virile strength of one many years his junior. He has virtually retired from the more arduous labors that marked so many years of his life, but still gives an active general supervision to the work of his splendid farm. Mr. Rayburn is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Hilliak) Rayburn, the former of whom was born in Ireland, in 1776, of Scotch parentage, and the latter of whom was likewise a native of the fair Emerald Isle, where she was born in the year 1787. The parents both passed the closing years of their lives in York county, Ontario, where the father died in 1866, at the patriarchal age of ninety years, and where the mother died in the following year, at the age of eighty years. They became the parents of seven children, and of the three now living the subject of this review is the eldest; Elizabeth is the widow of William Scott, and John remains on the old homestead farm in York county, Ontario. Robert Rayburn was reared and educated in his native land and there his marriage was solemnized. He was identified with agricultural pursuits in Ireland until 1816, when he immigrated with his family to America and established his home in Caledonia township, York county, Ontario, where he secured a tract of land and reclaimed a larm from the wilderness. Upon this homestead, now a most valuable property, he and his wife passed the residue of their long, useful and worthy lives, secure in the high regard of all who knew them. They were most zealous members of the Presbyterian church and in Ireland the father was an active member of the organization of Protestants known as the Orangemen, but after he came to Canada he did not approve of the methods of the local organization and did not identify himself therewith. He whose name initiates this article was reared under the sturdy discipline of the pioneer farm which was the place of his birth, and thus he early learned the lessons of practical industry, the while he was afforded the advantages of the common schools of the locality and period. He continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits in the province of Ontario until 1866, when he removed with his family to Michigan and established his home in St. Clair county. He rented a farm and devoted his attention to its cultivation, besides which he found employment in other lines, finally becoming the owner of a farm, which he disposed of at the time of his removal to Alpena county, in 1886. Here he was variously employed until 1890, when he purchased his present farm of three hundred and twenty acres, in Ossineke township, where he has since resided. The greater portion of the tract had been cleared of timber but was virtually unimproved for agricultural purposes. With the aid of his sons Mr. Rayburn has brought the greater portion of his farm under effective cultivation, and his energy, enterprise and progressive methods have been shown in the fine improvements which he has made on the place, including the erec

Page  1225 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1225 tion of his commodious and attractive modern residence. In the autumn of 1910 his barn and granaries were destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of more than four thousand dollars, and he has since erected a large and substantial barn, with stone basement and the best of facilities. In connection with the growing of the various crops best suited to the soil and climate, Mr. Rayburn has given special attention to the raising of high-grade cattle and other live stock. He has excellent judgment and marked business acumen, and through his well directed efforts he has been specially successful in both departments of his farming enterprise, and he is one of the representative agriculturists of the county, loyal to its interests and ever ready to lend his aid in the promotion of enterprises tending to conserve the material and civic prosperity of the community. In politics Mr. Rayburn accords unequivocal allegiance to the cause of the Republican party, and he is well fortified in his opinions in regard to public affairs. The confidence and esteem reposed in him in the community is attested by the fact that he served two terms as treasurer of his township, though he has never been ambitious for public office. He is a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is active in the affairs of the church of this denomination at Hubbard Lake. His wife, who was his loved and devoted companion and helpmeet for more than half a century, was likewise a devoted member of the same church, and her faith was shown in her daily life. In the year 1857 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Rayburn to Miss Mary McGregor, and she was summoned to the life eternal on the 31st of January, 1910, after a wedded life covering the long period of fifty-three years. Her death was the great loss and bereavement of the life of her husband, but he is sustained and comforted in the gracious memories of their long and loving companionship. Mrs. Rayburn was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, in the year 1835, and was a daughter of Charles and Margaret (McCall) McGregor, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of the state of New York. She was fifth in a family of four sons and four daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Raybur became the parents of eight children, concerning whom the following brief record is entered in conclusion of this review: Robert resides in the city of Detroit, where he is superintendent of a large lumbering business; Margaret died, unmarried, at the age of thirtysix years; Charles married and remains on his father's farm and has the active supervision of its operation; Mary C. is the wife of John Hatton and they reside in the city.of Alpena; Martha is the widow of Leon Marshall; Benjamin is postmaster at Hubbard Lake, Alpena county, and is also incumbent of the office of supervisor of Ossineke township; Frederick is superintendent of a medical laboratory in the city of Toledo, Ohio; and Frank is associated in the work and management of the home farm. Mr. Rayburn is a man whose has labored with all of earnestness during the years of his long and active career, and he is now enjoying the generous reward of former years of toil and endeavor, secure in the esteem of his fellow men and compassed by most pleasing environments.

Page  1226 1226 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN WILLAM H. WHITE.-One of the most important original sources of material development and opulent prosperity in northern Michigan lay in the great forests, which in the primitive period were unexcelled by any in the world. The lumbering industry in that section drew to itself men of great capacity and foresight, and through its medium have been gained magnificent fortunes, while there has been an important concomitant influence upon all departments of civic and material advancement and cumulative prosperity. Among those who have been conspicuously identified with the timber and lumber industry of Michigan is William H. White, of Boyne City, Charlevoix county, Michigan, and his career has been marked by definite initiative and progressiveness, by well earned success, and by a personal integrity and honor that have gained to him the inviolable confidence and esteem of his fellow men. Few at the present day are more prominently and widely known in connection with lumbering operations in northern Michigan, and it would be difficult to find one whose knowledge of this line of industry is more authoritative and comprehensive. Both by character and matured powers Mr. White has proved himself admirably equipped for leadership and he is to be noted as a man of large affairs, great business acumen and progressive enterprise. The many extensive industrial concerns with which he is identified have played important part in furthering generic progress and prosperity in this section of the Wolverine state, and his civic loyalty and public spirit have been in evidence at all times. He stands at the head of a half dozen large corporations most prominently concerned with lumbering and concomitant operations and has shown distinctive constructive and administrative ability, the while he has been in the most significant sense the architect of his own fortunes. Such men merit deference and approbation for their worthy accomplishment, and as one of the world's great army of productive workers Mr. White is properly accorded recognition in this history of a section of Michigan to whose development and upbuilding he has contributed in most generous measure. Mr. White is president of the Boyne City Lumber Company, which is incorporated with a capital stock of five hundred thousand dollars; was the organizer and is secretary of the Tillamook Yellow Fir Company, of Oregon, of which his brother Thomas is president; is president of the W. H. White Lumber Company, capitalized for twelve hundred thousand dollars; is president of the White Brothers Lumber Company, of Vancouver Island, which bases its operations upon the great capital stock of two million dollars; is president of the White Veneer Company, of Boyne City; and is identified with several other large industrial enterprises, in the establishing of which he was the dominating factor. He has likewise gained distinction as one of the successful railroad builders of northern Michigan, and another of his notable achievements was the organization of the First National Bank of Boyne City, of which he is president and in which his careful and discriminating administration has made it one of the strong and popular financial institutions of the state. William H. White, one of Michigan's veritable "captains of industry," was born at Owen Sound, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 12th of April, 1859, and is a son of William and Anna (Clements) White.

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Page  1227 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1227 Both of the parents were born in the north of Ireland and the lineage of each is traced back to the staunchest of Scottish origin, the respective families having been numbered with many others of the Scottish stock who left their native land owing to religious and governmental persecutions and crossed over the border into Ireland to found new homes and stand exemplar of sterling character and worthy accomplishment in their own and later generations. William White was born in 1830 and passed the closing years of his life in Essex, Ontario. where he died in 1878. His widow still survives him and has attained to the venerable age of eighty-nine years. She maintains her home in Boyne City, Michigan, and is held in reverent affection by all who have come within the sphere of her gentle and gracious influence. Of the six sons and six daughters, five of the sons and four of the daughters are now living and of the number William H., of this review, was the second in order of birth. William White, the honored father of him whose name initiates this sketch, was reared and educated in his native land and as a young man he manifested his ambition and adventurous spirit by severing the home ties and immigrating to America, He established his home in the province of Ontario, Canada, and through the application of his sterling energies there provided admirably for his family during the passing years, marked by earnest and honest endeavor on his part and by integrity of purpose from which there was naught of deviation. As a buyer of cattle he went from one part of the country to another, and he drove his cattle from point to point until he had accumulated a sufficient number to justify shipment to the eastern markets. This line of enterprise he continued to follow until the close of his life and he was well known as a cattle drover, a term that is now practically obsolete, owing to the modern facilities for the handling of this line of industrial enterprise. William H. White is indebted to the schools of his native province for his early educational discipline, which has been most effectively supplemented by the lessons learned under the direction of that wisest of headmasters, experience, and his initial labors were those accorded in connection with the farm owned by his father. He finally became identified with lumbering operations in the Dominion of Canada and through practical application learned the details of the business in every department, as may be better understood when it is stated that he began his career in this connection in the humble capacity of a chopper. He utilized his youthful vigor in thus chopping cordwood and received in compensation for his services sixty-two and one-half cents a cord. There is marked differentiation between his status at this period of his career and that of the present time, when he is known as one of the veritable lumber kings of America. In 1875, about three years prior to the death of his honored father, Mr. White secured employment in lumber camps in Essex county, Ontario, and later he operated a steam threshing machine for two seasons. Thereafter he became an employe in a saw mill in Essex county, and in the year 1881 he came to Michigan and secured similar employment in a mill at East Jordan, Charlevoix county, owned by the John Monroe Company, whence he removed to Boyne City, this county, in 1883. Here he operated a small saw swill and broom handle factory in partnership, for a

Page  1228 1228 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN period of about three years, with R. E. Newvill in the latter's log contracting operations, and at the expiration of this time he purchased the business of Mr. Newvill, including a saw and planing mill, and thus gave inception to his independent operations in connection with the great industry in which it has been his to gain so distinctive success and prestige. Shortly after thus beginning operations Mr. White admitted Robert R. Perkins, to partnership, whose interests he repurchased in 1886, within which year he expanded the scope of his enterprise by securing timber lands in the vicinity of Boyne City, Michigan, where he also became the owner of a well equipped saw mill. By indefatigable industry and good management he had by this time established his business upon a secure financial basis, and to facilitate the various operations he effected the organization of the W. H. White Lumber Company. He then entered into a two years' contract to ship two million feet of lumber each year to the Sheboygan market. His brother James had secured a fourth interest in the business at the time of the organization of the W. H. White Lumber Company, and his brothers, Thomas and George, held another fourth interest for a period of about five years, at the expiration of which Thomas bought George's interest. William H. White has been president of the company bearing his name from the time of its inception and its operations reached large scope and importance. Mr. White is a man of diverse interests and of splendid constructive and administrative ability. In 1902 he effected the incorporation of the Boyne City Lumber Company, with a capital stock of five hundred thousand dollars, and assumed the presidency of the new corporation, which continues to be one of the most important identified with the lumber business in this section of the state. He is president of the Boyne City, Gaylord & Alpena Railroad Company, which now operates a line of one hundred and two miles and has excellent equipment. He was the projector of this road, which was originally constructed for the facilitating of his lumbering operations. The first ten miles of the line were completed on the 28th of August, 1893, and before the closing of navigation on Lake Michigan that season two million feet of logs had been transported over the line to Boyne City and from the latter port to Sheboygan, Wisconsin. In 1902 Mr. White became one of the most influential factors in the organization of the First National Bank of Boyne City, which was incorporated with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, and which is the successor of a state bank of which he had previously been president and which was capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars. Mr. White has been president of the First National Bank from the time of its organization and has directed its policies with characteristic progressiveness and care, with the result that it has become one of the substantial and valued monetary institutions of this favored section of the Wolverine state. In 1907 he was one of the organizers of the Tillamook Yellow Cedar & Fir Company, of Oregon, which has a capital stock of sixteen hundred thousand dollars and of which his brother Thomas is president. In the same year he organized the White Brothers Lumber Company, for operations on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. This corporation has a capital stock of two million dollars and controls ninety thousand acres

Page  1229 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1229 of timber land, the estimated yield of which has been placed conservatively at five billion feet of lumber. Mr. White is also one of the interested principals in the White Transportation Steamship Company which operates a line of modern vessels plying between Boyne City, Chicago, Buffalo and Georgian Bay and of which his brother James A. is president. This company is incorporated with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. From the foregoing brief data it may be seen that William H. White is a man of great executive ability, indefatigable energy, initiative power and distinctive genius in the combination and concentration of forces at command, and that he has made a record that will redound to his honor as a man of affairs and as a promoter of civic and material prosperity. It may further be stated that he is an officer of the company that is erecting the magnificent new hotel, The Wolverine, in Boyne City, of which company Thomas White is president. Essentially a business man, Mr. White has had no desire to enter the arena of practical politics or to seek public office, though he is a staunch adherent of the Republican party and as a citizen is essentially loyal, progressive and liberal,-one ever ready to lend his co-operation in the promotion of enterprises and measures projected for the general good of the community..In the year 1880 Mr. White wedded Miss Abigail Wigle, daughter of Simon S. Wigle, and she was summoned to the life eternal in 1889, being survived by two children, Pearl E. White, who is the wife of Joseph Ralph Aldendifer of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and L. H. White, superintendent of the Boyne City, Gaylor & Alpena Railroad, and who has evidenced considerable strength in that capacity. Mr. Joseph Ralph Aldendifer, Mr. W. H. White's son-in-law has charge of the retail business and yard of Boyne City. In October, 1899, Mr. White contracted a second marriage, by his union with Miss M. Louise Reeder, daughter of Daniel Reeder, a representative citizen of Lake City, Michigan. No children have been born of the second marriage. Mrs. White is a popular factor in connection with the social activities of Boyne City, where she is a gracious chatelaine of the beautiful family home, known as a center of generous but unostentatious hospitality. JULIUS B. LUND, of Cheboygan, president of that thriving enterprise, The Lund Dry Dock Company, is one of the well known and respected business men of this part of the state. He is a native of the country which has given many good citizens to the United StatesNorway-his birth having occurred in the capital city, Christiania, July 8, 1849. He is a son of Carl and Karen Lund and was left an orphan when a young lad, his father dying when he was eight years of age and his mother the following year. By the death of his parents, young Lund was thrown upon his own resources at an early age and learned the trade of a mechanical engineer. According to the custom of his country he served his. time in the army and the discipline of military life doubtless proved beneficial to him in more ways than one. On August 13, 1871, Mr. Lund was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Carlson. The thoughts of the young couple soon turned towards America, with its opportunities

Page  1230 1230 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN and advantages, and in 1873 they bade farewell to the friends on the other side and set sail, arriving at Quebec on May 28, of that year. They remained there but a short. time and then came on to Chicago, Mr. Lund soon finding employment in the rebuilding of the bridges over the Chicago river which had been burned in the historic fire of 1871. Subsequent to that, Mr. Lund worked for about eighteen months in the Illinois coal mines and then moved his family to Collingwood, Ontario, where they remained for about three years. From Collingwood Mr. Lund came to Cheboygan, where good fortunes and prosperity have been his portion. He arrived here in the year the Michigan Central Railroad was built into the city, when conditions were very different from the present, for the town and community were new. He chose as an occupation the one which promised immediate and steady returns for labor-the lumber business-becoming an employe of Thompson Smith & Sons. He spent the first winter in the woods and then was employed in a sawmill by the same firm. Quitting its service, he became engineer for James F. Maloney & Brothers in their brewery, and after leaving them was engineer in the Pfister & Vogel Leather Company's tannery, with which he was connected until he became chief engineer for the Cheboygan Paper Company. He then entered business for himself, engaging in the machinist's brass and iron foundry business and manufacturing ship builders and dry dock fixtures. The Lund Dry Dock Company, which is one of the important concerns of the city has a capital stock of sixty-five thousand dollars. The growth of the business has been exceedingly great. Only a few years ago Mr. Lund and his sons, Charles and Robert W., started a small dry dock and ship yard in Cheboygan on the east side of the river, their capital stock being five thousand dollars and their energy and skill as mechanics. Today they own the real estate, over three and one-half acres of land with six hundred and twenty feet of frontage on the east side of Cheboygan river, a well equipped machine shop, foundry and the necessary appliances for hauling out, rebuilding and repairing small sized water craft, such as tugs, lighters, yachts, etc., up to one hundred feet in length, the whole plant representing an actual cash value of twenty-five thousand dollars, without any encumbrances and all paid for out of the business itself in three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Lund have been born eight children, two of whom are deceased. Charles, the eldest, who is one of the Lund Dry Dock Company, is a master mechanic, who has just completed a three and onehalf years' contract with the city of Buffalo, New York, and has accepted another to make extensive improvements to the water works at Yonkerson-the-Hudson. George is foreman in the machine shop of the Julius B. Lund & Sons Company; Robert is superintendent of the shipyards belonging to the company; Mabel is next in order of birth; Arthur is learning his trade as machinist; and Alice is the youngest member of the family. Julius B. Lund is a public-spirited citizen and a loyal and active Democrat. He has served two terms as supervisor of the fifth ward in Cheboygan and he performed the duties of this office with great

Page  1231 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1231 credit to himself and benefit to the city. His fraternal relations extend to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, No. 504, and the name of Lund stands for good citizenship, progress and good business principles. WILLIAM E. MOON, M. D.-The medical profession in northern Michigan has an able, successful and popular representative in the person of this well known physician and surgeon of Traverse City, where he has been engaged in active general practice for more than a decade and a half. On the old homestead farm near the village of Forsyth, Macon county, Illinois, Dr. Moon was born on the 10th of November, 1863, and he is a son of Edwin F. and Sarah M. (Lippincott) Moon, who now reside in the town of Audubon, Iowa, where the father is living virtually retired, after many years of active and successful identification with the great basic industry of agriculture. He was born in the state of Ohio, in 1840, and is a scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of the old Buckeye commonwealth. His father, James R.^Moon was born in North Carolina and the lineage of the family is traced back to stanch Scotch-Irish origin. When Edwin F. Moon was a lad of nine years his parents removed to Illinois and located in Bureau county, whence they later removed to Macon county, that state, where they passed the residue of their lives and where the father reclaimed a productive farm. In that county Edwin F. Moon was reared to maturity, in the meanwhile availing himself of the advantages of the common schools of the locality and period. There he continued to be actively engaged in farming until 1876, when he removed to Audubon county, Iowa, where he purchased a tract of land and developed a fine farm. He continued to give his active supervision to this property until about 1890, when he located in the village of Audubon, that county, where he has since lived retired, after many years of earnest toil and endeavor. He is a man of strong personality and intrinsic integrity, so that he has not been denied the fullest measure of popular confidence and esteem. He is a Republican in his political proclivities. Mrs. Moon was born in New Jersey and is a member of the well known Lippincott family whose name has been identified with American annals since the Colonial epoch. Her marriage to Mr. Moon was solemnized in the state of Illinois, where her parents established their home in the pioneer days. Edwin F. and Sarah M. (Lippincott) Moon became the parents of six children and of those who are living Dr. William E. is the eldest; James H. is a resident of Motley, Minnesota, where he is engaged in farming; Minnie is the wife of C. M. Forney, of Baxter, Iowa; Daisy died in infancy; Winfield S. is a physician by vocation and resides at Atlantic, Iowa; and Alice is the wife of Charles Layland, of Audubon, Iowa. Dr. William E. Moon gained his rudimentary education in the district schools of his native county and was thirteen years of age at the time of the family removal to Audubon county, Iowa, where he was reared to adult age and where he continued his studies in the public schools until he had become eligible for pedagogic honors. He began teaching in the district schools when he was twenty years of age and

Page  1232 1232 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN he devoted his attention to this profession for a period of six years, within which, however, he was enabled to supplement his individual training by a course in Northern Indiana Business University & Normal School, now known as the Northern Indiana University, at Valparaiso. Having formulated definite plans for a future career, Dr. Moon finally entered the Keokuk Medical College, a well ordered institution in the city of Keokuk, Iowa, and in the same he was graduated as a member of the class of 1892. He duly received his degree of Doctor of Medicine and came forth well fortified for the work of his exacting profession, as his success in the same has admirably demonstrated, the while he has kept himself thoroughly in line with the advances made in both medicine and surgery. Soon after his graduation Dr. Moon came to northern Michigan and located in the city of Menominee, where he was engaged in practice until 1893, when he removed to Bloomer, Chippewa county, Wisconsin, which continued to be the scene of his professional labors until 1894, when he established his permanent residence in Traverse City, where he has since been engaged in general practice and where. his success has been on a party with his marked ability as a physician and surgeon. He was the first incumbent of the office of county coroner of Grand Traverse county and retained this office for four years. He has been progressive and public-spirited as a citizen and has shown definite appreciation of the attractions and resources of this favored section of the state. In East Bay township, six and one-half miles distant from Traverse City, he is the owner of a fine landed estate of one hundred acres, and this place, known as Hilltop farm is recognized as one of the best fruit farms in the county, having been improved with nine thousand fruit trees planted by the doctor. The finest varieties of apples, peaches and cherries are grown on this place and Dr. Moon takes great interest in the same and in the general advancement of fruit culture in the county. He has dealt successfully in real estate in this section and through his operations in this line has done much to further the march of development and industrial prosperity. He has given his support to all measures and enterprises tending to conserve the wellbeing of his home city and county and is at the present time representative of the fifth ward in the city council of Traverse City. He is identified with the Grand Traverse County Medical Society, the Michigan State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and among other local organizations is affiliated with the Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free & Accepted Masons, and Traverse City Lodge, No. 73, Knights Templar. He is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. In the year 1887 Dr. Moon wedded Miss Lucetta Bates, of Audubon, Iowa, and she died on the 23d of May of the following year. She is survived by one son, Louis E., who is a member of the class of 1912 in the medical department of the University of Michigan. In 1893 Dr. Moon married Miss Arabella McHenry, of Menominee, Michigan, from whom he was divorced, and she was summoned to eternal rest in 1908, being survived by one daughter. Blanche, who remains at the paternal home. On the 21st of September, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Moon to his present wife, whose maiden name was Marie Brosche,

Page  1233 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1233 the daughter of Adolph Brosche, a prominent fruit-grower of the peninsula. GEORGE MAHON, talented, clever and enterprising, holds a noteworthy position among the active and esteemed citizens of Grayling, Crawford county, and is numbered among its successful lawyers. He was born in 1850, in Ireland, where his parents, John and Hannah Mahon, spent their lives. The only member of his family to leave the Emerald Isle, Mr. Mahon immigrated to Canada in 1883, locating first in Toronto. From there he proceeded to Michigan, and for a number of years thereafter lived in Detroit and vicinity. Coming northward in 1902, he has since been a resident of Grayling, and actively identified with the promotion of its best interests. Entering the legal profession in 1907, Mr. Mahon has since built up a large and remunerative practice, his legal skill and ability being recognized and appreciated. In addition to his professional work, Mr. Mahon also carries on a substantial business as a collector for the Northern Michigan Agency and as a general collector for real estate owners in and adjacent to Grayling, his success in this line of work being worthy of remark. He takes an intelligent interest in public affairs, lending his influence towards the establishment of beneficial enterprises. For three terms he has served as justice of the peace, and is now notary public. Fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. Mahon has been twice married, the name of his first wife, to whom he was married in Ireland in 1872, having been Sarah Fox. He married in 1898 Miss Nettie Cole, and to them four children have been born, namely: George, Ruth, Theresa and Robert. JOHN J. MoRTIMER.-Persistency and a determination to forge ahead are strong elements in prosperity, and they are found among the salient characteristics of John J. Mortimer, who has resided at East Jordan, Michigan, since 1904 and who is here engaged in the plumbing business. His advancement in the business world has been through' his own efforts and today he is enjoying a richly merited success, while the future is bright with promise. John J. Mortimer was born in New York city, on the 5th of November, 1876, and he is a son of James and Annie Teresa (Carrigan) Mortimer, both of whom were born on the Fair Emerald Isle, whence they immigrated to America with their respective parents while very young. The paternal grandfather of him to whom this sketch is dedicated was an expert stone cutter and carver by occupation, and after his arrival in the national metropolis he was engaged on a good deal of very important work. He had the distinction of cutting the stone cape to the entrance of Central Park of New York. Mr. and Mrs. James Mortimer were united in marriage in New York city. John J. Mortimer received his elementary educational training in a ward school in his native city and subsequently he attended and was graduated in Dellasable Academy, on Second street in New York city. At the age of eighteen years he entered upon an apprenticeship at the

Page  1234 1234 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN plumber's trade and he served in that capacity for a period of three years, at the expiration of which he became a full-fledged journeyman. For one year after the completion of his apprenticeship he served as water inspector in New York. In 1900 he went to Baltimore, Maryland, and thence to Toronto, Canada, and later to Walkerville, Canada, putting in the steam fittings for the Walker Distillery Company. On coming to Michigan he located first at Battle Creek, where he was in the employ of a gas company and whence he was sent to Bellaire, Michigan, to install the steam heating plant in the Bellaire Hotel. In 1904 he came to East Jordan, where he secured work in the establishment of George Spencer, remaining with him for the ensuing four years. In November, 1908, he opened up a shop for himself and as a result of his unusual ability and broad experience along the line of his particular work he is making a decided success. He deals in plumbing specialties and in fittings for steam and hot-water heating. At Bellaire, Michigan, in the year 1908, Mr. Mortimer was united in marriage to Miss Edith E. Labadia, who was born in Bay City, Michigan, and who is a daughter of Francis and Louisa Labadia. The father is a blacksmith by trade but is now interested in the conduct of an extensive fruit farm in the vicinity of Bellaire. He was a gallant and faithful soldier in the Union army in the Civil war, having served for a period of three years in a New York regiment. Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer have one child, Mary Elizabeth, whose birth occurred on the 16th of January, 1910. In their religious affiliations Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer are devout communicants of the Catholic church, to whose philanthropical work they are most generous contributors. In a fraternal way Mr. Mortimer is a valued member of Tent No. 130 of the Knights of the Modern Maccabees. In politics he accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles promulgated by the Republican party and he has ever manifested a deep and sincere interest in community affairs, giving freely of his aid and influence in support of all measures projected for the good of the general welfare. REV. JOHN REDPATH.-In every nook and corner of the wide world the traveler-will find the Scotchman. These determined, steadfast, reliable representatives from the "land o' cakes" have exerted a wide influence in America, giving to the new land the benefits of the characteristics of the little nation, which, never conquered, though often beaten, finally gave kings to England, field-marshals to France and Russia annd Prussia, cardinals to Rome, the second greatest man to the Reformation, and to our own country a body of citizens whose priceless value cannot be reckoned. Among the latter may well be numbered the Rev. John Redpath, pioneer minister and missionary of the Presbyterian church. Born June 17, 1842, at Burnside near Roxburgh, the ancient capital of Scotland, his boyhood was spent in an historic region under the shadows of the Teviot Hills, about each crag and cranny of which were woven the hallowed stories of his Covenanter forefathers and of the heroic exploits of Bruce and the other romantic heroes of Scotland's borderland battlefields. Playing about the ruins and climbing over the

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Page  1235 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1235 crumbling arches of the old castle, he learned to love and venerate the storied land and region of his birth as only a Scot can. His father, Robert Redpath, born near Fogo Dunes, Berwickshire, was overseer of an estate bordering the river Tweed. On Sundays he led the singing in the United Presbyterian Church at Newton and every four weeks preached to a small congregation at Bross village. After services, and on holidays, he taught his family from the Bible, the catechism and the glorious pages of Scottish history dealing with the life of John Knox and the struggle for religious liberty through which he led his people. The mother, Christine Purvis, at the death of her husband in 1850, was left with five sons and three daughters, all of whom subsequently came to America to settle in Kalamazoo county, Michigan. The education of Rev. John Redpath, well begun under the stern discipline of the Scotch schoolmaster at Perney on the Queen's Highway, was interrupted by the family's emigration to America and their first struggles with the new problems of the then sparsely settled country. During these early years he worked on the land with his brothers. A fine farm was secured and cleared to make a home for their mother and sisters. Later he attended the old Gull Prairie Seminary at Richland in Kalamazoo county where he prepared to enter the Baptist College in Kalamazoo in 1865. After continuing his studies in this institution for three years he entered the junior class of the Literary Department of the University of Michigan in 1868. It was during this year that he finally resolved upon devoting his life to the service of God as a missionary, and in the fall of 1869 he entered Union Theological Seminary in New York City with the purpose of preparing himself for his life work, which he then hoped would be accomplished in Africa, on the field just then being made important by the work of David Livingston. He was graduated from this institution May 6, 1872. During his residence in New York he had charge of the Greenwich Street Sabbath School Mission and was a member of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. Having been licensed to preach by the presbytery of New York City on the 10th of April, 1872, and ordained as an evangelist on the 25th of December by the Presbytery of Grand Rapids which met at Portland, Michigan, Rev. Mr. Redpath began his missionary labors at Clam Lake a camp town which has since become the city of Cadillac. During the three years of his ministry there the First Presbyterian Church was built. In addition to filling this pulpit, he conducted services at Everett every two weeks and in the summer of 1874 he preached for two months at Petoskey, making his journey northward on one of the first regular trains run over the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad between these two points. His first sermon in Petoskey was addressed to the Indians assembled in the old mission school which had been organized and maintained for a number of years by the venerated Andrew Porter who acted as an interpreter and translated the spiritual message of Mr. Redpath into the language of the natives. That same evening he preached his first sermon to a small but appreciative company of white people assembled in the dining room of Dr. Little's hotel. Later being called to the Vol. 111-18

Page  1236 1236 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN pastorate at Petoskey, he proved by the earnestness of his life, the splendid and indubitable qualifications for his chosen work as a pioneer missionary with the result that the first Protestant church building in Emmet county was built and the first service held within its walls June 10, 1876. He continued his ministry in Petoskey until the fall of 1877 when he was called to the pastorate at Big Rapids where he remained until the fall of 1878. During this year the Westminster Presbyterian Church was organized. In the fall of 1878 he located on a new missionary field at Boyne Falls, Charlevoix county where he remained until 1893. During these years his labors led him through miles of unbroken forests, traversed on horseback, to small groups of people to whom he preached the gospel, filling on each Sunday as many as three different pulpits. While on this field he organized and built buildings for the Presbyterian churches at Boyne Falls, Crofton, East Jordon, Boyne City and Elmira, and served on the County Board of School Examiners for eight years, one year of which he was secretary of the board. In April, 1893, Rev. John Redpath was appointed Sabbath School Missionary for the Presbytery of Petoskey, a field covering twelve northernmost counties of the lower peninsula of Michigan. At this time he moved his family to Petoskey where he has since made his home. The diligent and splendid services which he renedered during the twelve years of his term as Sabbath School Missionary are witnessed by Sunday Schools organized and maintained in every part of the territory which he covered, acting as a means for bringing the message of Christianity to new and primitive settlements in the woods, to men in the camps and workers in places far removed from strong and well established church organizations. In recognition of his faithful services to the Presbyterian Church of Michigan and his ability as a leader. he has five times been commissioner to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of America, in Pittsburg in 1878, Philadelphia 1888, Washington, D. C., 1893, New York city, 1902, and in Atlantic City in 1911. Since 1905 he has been devoting himself to mission work among the Indians at Omena, in Grand Traverse county, and Cross Village, Emmet county. He has also held services in lumber camps and visited and helped the poor and destitute of remote neighborhoods in various parts of Northern Michigan. On December 5, 1877, he was married to Miss Sara Upjohn, a daughter of Dr. Uriah and Maria (Mills) Upjohn at Richland, Kalamazoo county, Michigan. Dr. Upjohn, a native of Shaftsbury, England, after completing his medical education in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York city, located in Kalamazoo county in 1833 where he was married to Miss Maria Mills, daughter of Deacon Simeon Mills who moved to Michigan from Connecticut in 1826. Mrs. Redpath was her husband's companion and helper in the fullest sense of the word until she was called from the family home in Petoskey to her heavenly reward on April 28, 1908. Her life was characterized by true womanly sweetness and untiring devotion to the duties of wife and mother in her home. The union of the subject and his wife was blessed by the birth of four children, two of whom survive. Robert U. is a physician

Page  1237 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1237 and is engaged in the export business in New York city; William E. died in infancy; James N. is a farmer in Emmet county, Michigan; and Ienry T. died January 5, 1908, at the age of twenty-one years. During a long and active life Rev. Mr. Redpath has striven nobly in the cause of righteousness to spread the knowledge of the Kingdom of God among men. His character, founded on early Calvinistic training and life-long belief has been that of a root-and-branch reformer. Always espousing with enthusiastic zeal the cause of right and giving untiring effort toward the betterment of the social, political and spiritual conditions of the people in Northern Michigan, possessed of a pleasant and cheerful disposition with quick sympathies and unlimited capacity for friendship, he has been enabled to exert a far-reaching personal influence among the people with whom his life's work has been cast. HARRY S. PRICE.-It is safe to say that few men have contributed in more definite manner to the advancement and prosperity of East Jordan than Harry S. Price, one of the city's most prominent business men. He is identified with the industrial life of the community as a manufacturer of brick, and as a contractor and builder and many of the handsomest buildings of the county are due to him and his creative powers. He is still to be numbered among the members of the younger generation, his birth having occurred in Michigan, June 16, 1876. His father, Robert Price, was born in Canada and came to the States when a boy, and his mother, whose maiden name was Mary Seel, was a native of Wisconsin. He had the advantage of passing some of his youthful days amid rural surroundings, for his father was a farmer, and he had an opportunity to develop brain and brawn in the performance of the many duties which fall to the lot of the farmer's son, while his early education was acquired in the district schools. From his earliest youth Mr. Price had been interested in the field of endeavor in which he has achieved so much success. He learned drafting and construction work by means of correspondence school courses and his practical work began in 1896, when he removed to East Jordan and three years later he embarked as a contractor and builder. In 1907 Mr. Price took his place as a leader in the industrial life of the city by establishing a brick yard and becoming one of that most beneficent class of citizens,-an employer of men. This gave employment to twenty men and three teams and was equipped with all the most modern appliances, such as the steam dryer, which makes it possible to manufacture brick at any and all times. The present capacity has come to be 20,000 per day, and he has only recently added equipment to also manufacture paving brick. In addition to his work as a contractor and builder, which is of important character, Mr. Price is also a draftsman, making plans and estimates for all kinds of buildings. He drew the plans for those two handsome edifices, the high school building and the Catholic school of East Jordan, and he built both under contract. He also built under contract the high school at Hamilton, Michigan, costing $15,000; the high school at Northport, Michigan, costing $18,000; and that at Boyne

Page  1238 1238 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN City, whose cost was $33,000. He built the court house at Antrim for $31,000; the Carnegie library building at Charlevoix for $10,000 and the First National Bank at Ludington for $43,000. In 1911 Mr. Price and Messrs. Malpass and Plank bought the electric light plant at Frankfort, Michigan. They are metamorphosing it completely, putting it under the latest improvements and they contemplate taking over the pumping station at Frankfort. One of their important achievements was the promotion of a stock company which built the opera house block, with the stores and offices at East Jordan. This company made the plans for this handsome and commodious addition to the city and the same is to be erected during the season of 1911. They built the hotel at Bay View, Michigan, and also the concrete dam at Bellaire for the Bellaire Water Works and Lighting Plant, and also the Argo Flour Mill at East Jordan. Mr. Price and his business associates enjoy the respect and confidence of the public and their service to it has amply merited the same. Mr. Price laid the foundation of an ideally happy life companionship when in October, 1899, he was united in marriage to Miss Grace Beers, of Eveline, Michigan. Mrs. Price was born at Eveline, Michigan, her parents being Ammond and Jennie Beers, prominent and highly respected people of their locality. Three children have been born to the household, namely Margaret, Gayle and Junior. The subject has several fraternal affiliations, being a member of the Masonic order and of the Knights of Pythias. His wife is a member of the Eastern Star, connected with the Masonic order, and is a prominent member of the Christian Science church of East Jordan. Mr. Price is a stalwart advocate of the men and measures of the "Grand Old Party" and is a valued member of the village board of trustees. JOHN J. TWEDDLE.-Throughout the entire period of its history as one of the sovereign states of the Union, Michigan has been indebted to New York state for the continuous contribution of sterling citizens, and the Empire commonwealth has been most prominently and effectively represented in the development and upbuilding of the various sections of Michigan, as the annals of history emphatically indicate. Among the well known citizens of Grand Traverse county who claim the state of New York as the place of their nativity is Mr. Tweddle, who is a member of one of the sterling pioneer families of northern Michigan and a leading representative of the legal profession of this section of the state. He maintains his home in Traverse City, where he is actively engaged in the practice of law and he is also the owner of a valuable landed estate in this county, as well as of realty in his home city. John J. Tweddle was born in Cortland county, New York, on the 14th of July, 1859, and is a son of Daniel and Mary A. (Bell) Tweddle, both of whom were born in Cumberlandshire, one of the northern counties of England, where they were reared and educated and where their marriage was solemnized. The father was born in the year 1829 and his death occurred in 1903; the mother was born in 1837 and still maintains her residence on the old homestead farm in Empire township,

Page  1239 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1239 Leelanau county, Michigan. The marriage of the parents occurred at Aspatria, Cumberlandshire, where both were communicants of the Church of England, and they came to America on their wedding journey, making the voyage on a sailing vessel of the type common to that day. They were on the ocean for six weeks and finally landed in the port of New York city, whence they proceeded to Truxton, Cortland county, that state, where the father engaged in dairy farming. He was a man of fine intellectuality, having received good educational advantages in his native land, where he also learned the trade of cooper. In the early '60s he removed to the province of Ontario, Canada, where he was engaged in the cooperage business for some time. He then established his home in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, where he became a contractor in connection with street grading and other public improvements and where he continued to reside until 1865, when he came to northern Michigan and purchased a tract of wild land in the present township of Empire, Leelanau county, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he became a citizen of prominence and influence in connection with public affairs. He was one of the potent factors in bringing about the organization of Empire township and was its first supervisor, besides which he was called upon to serve as county treasurer in the early days. He was well equipped for leadership in the directing of puplic opinion and activities and his strong and upright character gained and retained to him the unqualified confidence and good will of the community in which he so long maintained his home and to the industrial and civic development of which he contributed in generous measure. He developed one of the fine landed estates of the county and continued to reside on his homestead until his death, at the venerable age of seventy-four years. He was a stalwart supporter and effective advocate of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and he ever maintained the religious faith in which he was reared, both he and his devoted wife having become communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church after coming to America, as this is of the same communion as the established church of England. They became the parents of nine children, and of the number three sons and three daughters are now living, John J., of this review, having been the second in order of birth. John J. Tweddle was not only afforded the advantages of the public schools but also was fortunate in receiving, with the other children, instruction from his honored father, who was, as already stated, a man of excellent education, and the influences of a cultured and refined home were his even after this home had been established in the wilds of northern Michigan. He was about sixteen years of age at the time when his father located on the pioneer farm in Leelanau county and he contributed his quota to the reclamation and development of the same,a discipline which promoted in him a wholesome and enduring appreciation of the dignity and value of honest toil. He continued to be associated in the work and management of the home farm until he had attained to the age of twenty-two years, when he left the parental roof and made his way on foot to Traverse City. Here he passed the requisite examination and secured a first-grade certificate as a teacher. He

Page  1240 1240 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN forthwith put his scholastic acquirements to practical use and for seven years he devoted his attention to the work of the pedagogic profession, in connection with which he was a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of Benzie and Grand Traverse counties. While thus engaged he showed his capacity for application and also his well directed ambition by initiating the study of law, to which he devoted himself closely during his vacations and other leisure time, with the result that he was admitted to the bar in 1892, upon examination before the circuit court. In the meanwhile he had entered the law department of the University of Michigan, in which celebrated institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1893 and from which he duly received his degree of Bachelor of Laws. Thus fortified for the work of his chosen vocation, Mr. Tweddle located in Traverse City, where he served his novitiate, which was of short duration, as he soon proved his powers as an advocate and counselor and gained a remunerative practice. Prompted by a desire for a wider field of endeavor, he removed to the city of Grand Rapids and there he continued in successful practice for the ensuing four years, during which he held a place of prominence as a member of the exceptionally strong bar of Kent county. The death of his father, in 1907, rendered it expedient for him to assume the management of the estate, and he thus returned to Traverse City, where he has since continued in the successful practice of his profession and where his clientage is of distinctively representative order. He still continues to give a general supervision to the old homestead farm and other matters pertaining to his father's very appreciable estate. Though he accords a staunch allegiance to the Republican party and is essentially loyal and public-spirited in his civic attitude, Mr. Tweddle is unlike many other members of his profession, in that he has not permitted himself to be drawn into the turbulent vortex of so-called practical politics and has not been imbued with the somewhat characteristic and overweening desire for public office. He is affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free and Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; and Traverse City Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church, in which they are actively identified with the parish in their home city. In 1887, Mr. Tweddle was united in marriage to Miss Della Cooper, who was born at Bowling Green, Ohio, in which state were also born her parents, Joseph and Abigail (Abbott) Cooper. Mr. and Mrs. Tweddle have one daughter, Elda, who is now the wife of Charles Egler. SPENCER C. CHASE. —Among the able and representative business men of Roscommon county, Michigan, Spencer C. Chase holds a secure vantage ground both on account of his extensive mercantile interests and by reason of his loyal and public-spirited attitude in all matters pertaining to the advancement of the general welfare. He is one of the active and enterprising men whose business qualifications have made for him a place in the ranks of his colleagues in northern Michigan. Mr. Chase was born in Madison county, New York, the date of his birth being the 2nd of February, 1862. te is a son of Francis A. and Sophia

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Page  1241 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1241 B. (Conant) Chase, both of whom were likewise born in the state of New York. To Mr. and Mrs. Chase were born five children, four of whom grew to years of maturity, namely,-Spencer C., Minnie E., Frank and Charles. The Chase family removed to Michigan in the year 1872, at which time the subject of this review was a child of ten years of age. In 1875 the family home was established in Crawford county, Michigan, where the father purchased a tract of one hundred and twenty acres of land, on which he farmed until 1888, in which year he removed to Roscommon, where his death occurred in 1892. The mother was summoned to the great beyond in 1899, at the age of fifty-four years. Spencer C. Chase received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of Madison county, New York, and after arriving in Michigan further study was somewhat curtailed. He early began to assist his father in the work and management of the home farm and he was variously engaged until 1896, in which year he opened a general store at Roscommon, to the growth of which concern he has devoted most of his time and attention during the long intervening years to the present time. He controls a large and lucrative patronage and his large and well stocked store measures twenty-seven by one hundred feet in lateral dimensions. In politics Mr. Chase is a stanch advocate of the cause of the Republican party and he is ever on the qui vive to do all in his power to advance the good of the community. In the year 1895 was recorded the marriage of Mr. Chase to Miss Edith L. Green, who was reared and educated at Bay City and who is a daughter of Seneca W. and Sarah Green, representative citizens of Boyne City, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Chase have no children. Thus, in a brief and somewhat disjointed manner, the writer has endeavored to set forth the leading facts in the life and the salient attributes in the character of one of the active and successful business men of the county which is honored by his citizenship. His business training has been long and thorough and his practical knowledge is one of the kind that enables the possessor to inaugurate important enterprises and to push them to completion with every assurance of ultimate success. Mr. Chase is an intelligent, broad-minded man, of courteous demeanor, and thus far his career has been one of great activity and signal usefulness. He bears an unsullied reputation in commercial and social circles and his honesty and integrity have gained him the unqualified regard of all with whom he has come in contact. Entirely free from ostentation, he is kindly and genial in his relations with others and has the friendship and good will of his fellow citizens, who esteem and honor him for his manly characteristics and genuine personal worth. ROBERT E. WALTER.-Much has been written concerning corruption in public office, and while there are instances of this, much to be lamented, it is the exception and not the rule. Abraham Lincoln said "You can fool all the people some of the time; some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time." This truth is specially manifest in politics and as long as the attainment of public office depends on popular suffrage so long is trust to be placed in the

Page  1242 1242 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN common sense of the American people, who will not retain in the public service those whom they have no reason to trust. There is in the history of Grand Traverse county, Michigan, no record more clean and. commendable than is that of Robert E. Walter, who is now serving as county clerk, to which responsible position he was first elected in 1900, and who in former years and in other duties discharged his public duties with such fidelity and promptness that he won the unqualified trust and confidence of the entire public. He has been continuously reelected to the office of county clerk since 1900, a fact which indicates an unblemished official career and the warm regard and friendship entertained for him throughout the community. Robert E. Walter was born in Litchfield, Hillsdale county, Michigan, on the 16th of September, 1877. His father is Lewis S. Walter, a native of the fine old Wolverine state, a practicing physician and now a resident of Fife Lake, where he has maintained his home for the past twenty-two years. His mother, whose maiden name was Jennie L. Hubbard, was born in Pulaski county, Michigan. In December, 1876, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. and Mrs. Walter, and to this union were born six children, namely,-Robert E., the immediate subject of this review; Cora I., who is now the wife of J. Harry Cook, of Traverse City; Roy L., of Battle Creek, Michigan, was a soldier in the SpanishAmerican war; and R. Guy; Lloyd R.; and Frank A. Robert E. Walter began to attend school when a child of but five years of age and after his parents' removal to Fife Lake he attended the public schools at that place until he was ready to enter high school, at which time he came to Traverse City. In the midst of his highschool course occurred the hostilities between Spain and America in regard to Cuba and the youthful student was immediately fired with boyish enthusiasm to become a participant in the ensuing warfare. Accordingly, he enlisted, in May, 1898, in Company M, Thirty-fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and in a few weeks he was with his regiment in Cuba. The regiment disembarked as Siboney, July 1, marched all night and reached the scene of hostilities early on the morning of the 2nd, the day of the battle of San Juan Hill. The duty assigned to the Michigan regiment was on the line, supporting the batteries and doing outpost duty. The members of the company received their honorable discharge on the 9th of December, 1898, and on its return to Michigan Company M received a most royal reception. After his return to Traverse City Mr. Walter re-entered high school and was eventually graduated as a member of the class of 1900, of which he was president and of which Edna Holdsworth, whom he later married, was secretary. In the spring of 1899, while still a high-school student, Mr. Walter was nominated on the Republican ticket as township clerk, to which office he was duly elected, without opposition. In 1900 he was re-nominated. This time there was an opposing candidate but the opposition never developed sufficient strength at any time to endanger his election. Three days prior to the convening of the Republican county convention, in 1900, he was requested to become a candidate for the office of county clerk, but he did not decide to enter the race until the day before the convention met. Although opposition

Page  1243 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1243 was strong, Mr. Walter secured the nomination and in the ensuing election was elected with a most gratifying majority. In 1902 he was re-elected to the office of county clerk and in each ensuing election he has been the successful candidate, continuing incumbent of this office to the present time, in 1911. He is a man of fine moral fiber, excellent judgment and remarkable executive ability, gaining and retaining the high regard of his fellow citizens. On the 30th of July, 1902, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Walter to Miss Edna Holdsworth, who was born in Traverse City on the 7th of April, 1879. She is a daughter of Edwin H. and Eliza (Gorball) Holdsworth, both of whom were born and reared in Michigan, the former of whom died when Mrs. Walter was an infant of but six months of age, and the latter of whom died when she was seven years old. Mrs. Walter has two brothers,-Percy, who graduated in the engineering department of the University of Michigan, is now engaged in the work of his profession at Bay City, Michigan; and Byron, who was graduated in the Michigan Agricultural College, with many athletic honors. Mrs. Walter was a popular and successful teacher for several years prior to her marriage and in addition to her high school training she was for a time a student in the avomen's department of the Michigan Agricultural College. As previously intimated, Mr. Walter is a strong advocate of the cause of the Republican party, in the local councils of which he is a most active worker, having been secretary of the Republican county committee for the past six years. In July, 1910, he was appointed by the Republican county committee to organize the Lincoln Club, which embraces ten counties. He is ever ready to do all in his power to advance the general welfare of the city and county in which he resides and is decidedly loyal and public-spirited in his civic attitude. He is a member of the Spanish-American Veterans' Association, having been one of the organizers of Hanna Camp, No. 23, in which he is judge advocate of the department of Michigan. In the time-honored Masonic order he has passed through the circle of the York Rite branch, holding membership in Traverse City Lodge, No. 222, Free and Accepted Masons; Traverse City Chapter, No. 102, Royal Arch Masons; and Traverse City Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templars. He is also affiliated with Traverse City Lodge, No. 200, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; with the Knights of the Maccabees, the Independent Order of Foresters and with the Knights of Pythias. In their religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Walter are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church and they are prominent and popular factors in connection with the best social activities in Traverse City. Doc SELDEN W. FLANDERS. —'Doc" Flanders is the beloved sobriquet which is given to the subject of this sketch by every man, woman and child in Alpena county, where he has made his home for a long time. He has a big heart and a generous disposition, and no one can go to Doe Flanders with trouble without coming away comforted. He sometimes prescribes for and heals physical ills, as well, though he never takes any remuneration for such services, so that it is small won

Page  1244 1244 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN der that every one is his friend. He has also the distinction of being postmaster of the village of Flanders, named in his honor, an attractive and thriving town of this section of the state. Selden Wade Flanders claims the old Pine Tree state as the place of his nativity, and is a scion of old and honored pioneer families of that commonwealth,-families that were founded in New England in the Colonial epoch of our national history. He was born at Mayfield, Somerset county, Maine, on the 19th of March, 1847, and is a son of Barnett and Susanna (Ford) Flanders, both of whom were likewise born and reared in Somerset county, where they passed their entire lives and where the father followed the vocation of farming throughout his active career. He was eighty-one years of age at the time of his death and his wife was summoned to eternal rest when fifty-four years of age. They became the parents of five sons and one daughter, and of tfe five now living the subject of this sketch is the eldest; Alfonzo still maintains his home in Somerset county, Maine, where he has long been actively identified with agricultural pursuits; Daniel resides at Solon, that county, and has likewise followed the vocation of farming and stockgrowing; Enoch is a representative agriculturist of Alpena county, Michigan, as is also Fremont, the youngest ofrthe brothers. The father was originally an old-line Whig in his political adherency but he transferred his allegiance to the Republican party at the time of its organization and ever afterward gave a zealous support to its cause. Selden W. Flanders was reared to the sturdy and invigorating discipline of the homestead farm in New England, and while assisting in its work during the summer season he was enabled to avail himself of the advantages of the common schools of the locality during the winter terms; he thus laid the foundation for that broad and practical education which he has gained through years of association with men and affairs and through well directed reading, by which he has kept in touch with the trend of events and with matters of public polity. Mr. Flanders continued to reside in his native state until he had attained to the age of twenty-four years, when, in 1871, he came to Michigan. In September of that year he took passage on the steamer, City of Fremont, by which he made the voyage from Port Huron to Alpena. The latter city was then a mere lumbering village, and here he secured employment as teamster for Charles W. Richardson. In the autumn of 1872 he became associated with L. J. Sylvester in assuming a contract to cut eighty million feet of timber and to deliver the logs in Hubbard Lake, Alpena county. After the completion of this contract Mr. Flanders turned his attention to reclaiming a tract of wild land into a productive farm. He secured this land in sections 31 and 36, Greeley township, Alpena county, and in due course of time he cleared two hundred acres and also erected farm buildings, at a cost of about fifteen thousand dollars. Later his progressive ideas and productive energy were further shown by erecting a saw mill in the same township, where he built up a prosperous lumber business and where he also established a planing mill and grist mill. Three years after their erection these mills were destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of more than fifteen thousand dollars, but the owner bravely faced this ill fortune and has

Page  1245 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1245 proved himself possessed of those qualities that will win success in the face of disaster and other obstacles. Prior to the placing of his mills in operation Mr. Flanders had erected a hotel and store building in Green township, and this hotel, known as the Greeley house, he conducted for more than twenty years. He still owns a well improved farm of two hundred and forty acres, in Green township, and in 1900 he was appointed postmaster at Flanders, a little village named in his honor, as has already been stated in this context. He has served continuously in this office, through reappointment, and since 1901 he has also been incumbent of the office of deputy state road commissioner. He served ten years as treasurer of Greeley township and for a number of years was a valued member of the school board of his district, and in 1907 was elected county road commissioner. He has been a most effective advocate of the cause of good roads and as county road commissioner and deputy state commissioner he has done much to bring about excellent improvements in this line. In politics he is found aligned as an uncompromising supporter of the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor and he has been an active worker in its local ranks during his residence in Alpena county. He is well known in this section of the state and as one of its honored pioneers he enjoys unalloyed personal popularity in the county that has so long represented his home. He is affiliated with Alpena Lodge, No. 505, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is also identified with the Knights of the Maccabees. In the year 1875 Mr. Flanders marked the anniversary of the signing of that immortal document, the signing of the Declaration of Independence, by a noteworthy event in his life history, as on the 4th of July of that year he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Rich, of Alpena. She was born in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, where she was reared and educated and whence she accompanied her parents on their removal to Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Flanders have one daughter, Susan, who is now the wife of William Spain, a prosperous agriculturist of Alpena county. Mr. and Mrs. Spain have two children,-Wade and Naomi. A. S. YOUNG is postmaster of Harrison and has held this office since 1905, giving to its duties the greatest amount of faithfulness and efficiency. He is also at the present time justice of the peace. As a citizen he is interested in the success of good government, participates in the political bouts of the Republican party and aids in the promotion of business and social harmony by a straightforward course as a citizen. Mr. Young is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in that state January 11, 1858. When a young man the subject and four companions decided to come to Michigan. They first secured work in Jackson county, engaging as farm laborers and remaining in the vicinity of their first stop for four years. Mr. Young and one of his associates decided to make change from the southern part of the state to the northern and in 1882 they arrived in Clare county, and remained in its vicinity for some time, earning their livlihood in various capacities. On May 1, 1884, Mr. Young came to Harrison and secured a position as a

Page  1246 1246 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN clerk in a hotel, remaining here for one year. Then the excellent wages in a shingle mill tempted him and he began work in this concern. He followed this line of activity for some time and, proving thrifty as well as industrious, he saved from his earnings a sum sufficient to enable him to come into Harrison village and engage in mercantile pursuits. He proved successful and the opportunity coming to sell at a handsome profit he did so and again accepted a position in the mill. Later he worked for a time at a place called Happy and then returned to Harrison, where he engaged in the work of a carpenter and joiner and continued in the same until his appointment as postmaster on November 29, 1905. In the six years of his encumbency he has proved a faithful and able servant of Uncle Sam. Mr. Young established a happy home and congenial life companionship when, in 1884, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Ellsworth, of Harrison, a native of Midland, Michigan. To this union have been born two children, namely: Elinor C., born in 1885, and called to her eternal rest in 1907; and Cecil May, born in October, 1887. Miss Cecil is the attractive and efficient deputy postmistress. Mr. Young has held the office of justice of the peace (which office he still holds) for fourteen years. He was alderman of his ward for years and for several terms was city clerk. He is the champion of good education and holds membership on the school board. He is also a member of the Court of Honor. In church matters he holds liberal views. SOLOMON W. KRAMER, a retired business man and highly respected citizen of Cadillac, Michigan, was born in the province of Courtland, Russia, on the Baltic Sea, in January, 1850. He attended the school near his home until he was thirteen years of age, and from that time until he was seventeen was a student in the Provincial Institute, paying his own way by teaching the lower grade pupils. When he was eighteen he accepted a position in the internal revenue office of the Province. He first came to the United States in August, 1872, and at that time spent more than a year in this country, returning in January, 1874. His second journey to America was in September, 1876, and on March 15th, of the following year, he took up his residence at what was then Clam Lake, now Cadillac, Michigan, and here he at once engaged in general merchandising under the firm name of Kramer & Medalie. After they had conducted business about nine months, Mr. Kramer purchased his partner's interest, and under his own name continued the business until 1905, when he retired. In the meantime he made some valuable investments and became identified with a number of local enterprises. He was one of the organizers of the Cadillac State Bank, of which he has been vice president since its organization. He was one of the organizers of the Cadillac Lumber Company, of which he is president, and he also helped to organize the St. Johns Table Company of Cadillac. Of this last named company he is a director. For six or seven years he was a member of the Board of Public Works, having received his first appointment on that board in 1895. Fraternally Mr. Kramer has for years been identified with the Masonic Order, having membership in Clam Lake Lodge, No. 331, F. & A.

Page  1247 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1247 M.; Cadillac Chapter, No. 103, R. A. M.; and Cadillac Council, No. 70. Politically he has always been a staunch Republican. In 1881, at Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Kramer and Miss R. J. Harris were united in marriage, and they are the parents of four children, three sons and one daughter, namely: Lawrence Z., of Jackson, Michigan; Milton H., inspector of railroad material at St. Louis, Missouri, and a graduate of the State University of Michigan; Helen C. and Ivol L., students at Oberlin college, Oberlin, Ohio, the former making a specialty of music. Lawrence Z. married a Miss Suggit, of Grand Rapids, Michigan. FREEMAN L. DECKER.-It is not necessary for a man to be a member of any church in order to be religious. A man's religion is what he believes in his heart, not always what he openly professes, but that which is his guiding principle. Mr. Freeman L. Decker, of Lake City, Michigan, is a deeply religious man, although he belongs to no church. His creed is right and justice, charity and charitableness. His whole life has been spent in seeking to benefit those in need and in bettering the conditions in his native state. He is respected by old and young alike. His knowledge of human nature has taught him to look upon the errors of others in sorrow, not in anger. From the time he was a mere lad he has had great determination of purpose, balanced by good, common sense. He has a good word for every one. Although he is very positive in his views he is most charitable toward the opinions of others and does not insist that it is necessary to think his thoughts in order to be right. In short, he is a man whom to see is to love and admire. Freeman L. Decker was born at Pinkney, Livingston county, Michigan, June 1, 1851. He was the son of James and Sally (Webb) Decker, who were both natives of New York state. They came to Michigan when it was still a territory. Freeman received very little education when he was a child. He had to work hard on his father's farm and was only able to attend school during a part of the winter. He remained in Livingston county until he was thirty years old, for the most part engaged in farming. In 1881 he came to Missaukee county and bought land in Forest township. The people of Forest township at once recognized that Mr. Decker was a born leader. While he was living at Pinkney he had been constable and for four years he was deputy sheriff of Livingston county. Now in Forest township he was elected supervisor and he held this office for nine consecutive years. He was also justice of the peace for nine years. In 1890 he moved to a farm he had purchased in Reader township. Here he was elected to the office of supervisor of the town. He filled the duties devolving on him for nine years. During these nine years he was elected assessor of the village of Lake City. In 1899 he returned to his farm in Forest township and he was again elected supervisor, holding the office for a second period of nine years, thus for twenty-seven consecutive years he was holding the office of supervisor-nine in Forest township, nine in Reader township and then nine in Forest township again. In 1908 he once more returned to his farm at Lake City, where he was again elected supervisor. In 1904 he was elected representative to the legislature from Missaukee and Kalkaska counties. At the next election, in 1906, he was

Page  1248 1248 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN nominated for the same office, but was defeated, undoubtedly on account of his absence in California. Charles Brott was elected. In 1908 he was nominated again and was elected. In 1910 he 'was re-elected. For twenty-four years he was assessor for the schools of Forest and Reader townships respectively. For seventeen years he was chairman of the board of supervisors of Missaukee county. For seven years he was president of the Missaukee Agricultural Society. During his first term of office as representative he held the chairmanship of the committee on schools, a standing committee, and also was chairman of the special committee on the cold water school. During his second term he was chairman of the committee on Northern Asylum for the Insane and of the committee on geological survey. During his third term he introduced the bill that all fees received by the state officers should be turned over to the state and the salaries be paid by the state. This bill became a law, thereby making a saving to the state of at least thirty thousand dollars a year. The above is a record that no man can beat and very few can equal. Such a politician is an honor to his party, to his state and to the country. He is not in politics for what he can get out of it, but he honestly has the good of the people at heart. Many politicians say they desire the public good. Mr. Decker makes no protestations, but that the people believe in him is shown not by his election to office, but by his repeated election to the same office. There is no man in the county who has done more for it than has Mr. Decker. In 1878 Mr. Decker married Lucy J. Wood, of Pinkney, Michigan. Her parents, like those of her husband, originally came from the state of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Decker had two children: Viola is now the wife of Calden Hair, of Elk City, Oregon. Mr. Hair is a farmer and fruit grower in Oregon. George, the second child, is married to Miss Carrie Thompson, whose parents came from New York state. In the winter of 1906 Mrs. Decker began to fail in health. In the summer of that year her husband took her to California, hoping that she might regain strength, but the trip was of no use, for she died there. In May, 1908, Mr. Decker married Mrs. Vina Sherman, a widow. She was Vina Dean before her marriage and was a Canadian by birth. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman had four children, two of whom, Zota and Aggie, are living with her in their home at Lake City, where Mr. Decker is very devoted to them. There is no man in the county who contributes to church work more liberally than Mr. Decker has during his residence here, notwithstanding the fact that he is not a member of any church. When an appeal is made to him for help, he always investigates it and if, in his opinion, the object is a worthy one, he contributes what he feels he can afford. Mr. Decker is as clean in his morals as he is in his political life, which has never been besmirched, even by his political opponents. Because of Mr. Decker's character he is respected and because of his sympathetic, genial personality he is loved by all his wide circle of friends. LEMUEL G. DAFOE.-One of the distinguished members of the bar of northern Michigan, Lemuel G. Dafoe is engaged in the active practice of his profession in the city of Alpena, which has represented his home

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Page  1249 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1249 from his childhood days to the present time, and he has not only achieved special precedence in his chosen vocation but has also been a potent force in connection with political affairs in Michigan and has served in various offices of public trust,-preferments that offer adequate voucher for the high esteem accorded him in the community in which he was reared and which has been the stage of his well directed activities. Thus in a personal way and as a scion of one of the honored pioneer families of Alpena, there is all of consistency in according him special recognition in this publication. Lemuel G. Dafoe, senior member of the law firm of Dafoe & Johnson, was born at Dunville, Haldimand county, Province of Ontario, Canada, on the 2nd of October, 1857, and is a son of Samuel I. and Catherine (Bairn) Dafoe, the former of whom was born in Lockport, New York, in 1831, of staunch French-Huguenot ancestry, and the latter was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1841, being a member of a sterling Protestant family of that section of the Emerald Isle. The father died on the 3d of February, 1908, at the age of sixty-seven years, and the devoted wife and mother did not long survive him, as she was summoned to the life eternal on the 21st of February of the following year, at the age of sixty-eight years. To them were born five children. Lemuel G. was the second in order of birth. Besides him two sons and one daughter survive the honored parents, both of whom were zealous members of the Congregational church. Samuel I. Dafoe came with his family to Alpena, Michigan, in the year 1863, and here he was identified with lumbering operations for a time, after which for many years he engaged in the grocery business. He was one of the pioneer merchants of the city at the time of his retirement from active business, in 1885. He was a man of sterling character,-sincere, earnest and kindly,-and in Alpena both he and his wife are held in affectionate memory by all who came within the sphere of their influence. He did his part in connection with the development and upbuilding of the city. Lemuel G. Dafoe was about six years of age at the time of the family removal to Alpena, and to the public schools of this city he is indebted for his early educational discipline, which was supplemented by a course of two years in the Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilanti, after which, he taught district school for three years, when he entered the law office of Judge Robert J. Kelley as a law student, remaining there until 1882, when he entered the University of Michigan. In March, 1883, he was admitted to the bar of the state at Ann Arbor, Michigan. He then returned to his home in Alpena, where he has since been engaged in the active and successful practice of his profession, in which he has gained high reputation, especially as a trial lawyer. In 1884 he was elected prosecuting attorney of Alpena county, overcoming the 500 Democratic majority in the county. In 1888-90 he was unanimously nominated by the Republicans of county to same office, but declined nomination for business reasons. In 1892 he was again elected public prosecutor for the county. From the time of initiating the practice of his profession Mr. Dafoe has been a zealous worker in behalf of the cause of the Republican party, and he is not only an ef

Page  1250 1250 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN fective exponent of its principles and policies but has also shown much facility in the manoeuvering of political forces. In 1890 he was elected a member of the lower house of the state legislature, in which he served one term, declining a renomination for second term. In 1894 and 1896 he was Alpena county's candidate for Republican nominee for congress from the Tenth district of Michigan, receiving support of most of counties in district, but met defeat because of Bay county's large delegation being one-third of total delegation in convention. The contest in 1896 being decided by Iosco county's delegation throwing their support to Bay county's candidate, the late Hon. R. 0. Crump. Three votes of five votes of Iosco county's delegation given to Mr. Dafoe would have ensured his nomination. In the August, 1908, primaries he was again candidate for congress but was defeated by Hon. George A. Loud, who was and is now congressman from Tenth district. In 1898 Mr. Dafoe was appointed postmaster of Alpena, by President McKinley and at the expiration of his term of four years, in 1902, he was reappointed, by President Roosevelt. He retired from this office in 1906. In April, 1910, further mark of popular esteem was accorded him, in that he was elected mayor of Alpena, an office in which he has given a most progressive and resourceful administration and in which he has zealously pushed forward legitimate public improvements, so that conditions justify Alpenaites boasting "our city is the best lighted, our streets the cleanest and dustless of any city in the state." Through his initiative, the common council by ordinance authorized a Park and Playground Commission. These commissioners, one being Mr. Dafoe, have formulated a city park and playground plan, that when completed, will make Alpena entitled to the name, "the beautiful Park City of the Great Lakes." The commission have already acquired upwards of 60 acres of land upon shores of bay and along river. banks in city and throughout the city, during year 1911, and commenced work of carrying out the park and playgrounds as planned. In the spring of 1890 Mr. Dafoe was appointed city attorney, and thus he has given to his home town a full share of loyal service. He is a member of the Michigan State League of Republican clubs, and was a delegate at large to the National convention of this organization in the city of Detroit, in 1896, as was he also to the national convention of Republican clubs held in 1898, in the city of St. Paul. In 1904 he was a delegate to the Republican national convention, in the city of Chicago, and it is interesting to record in this connection that his only daughter, Naomi J., was "the little girl in white" who attracted so much attention in the convention as she was taken from her father's shoulders and placed on the platform beside the chairman of the convention, Hon. Joseph Cannon. The metropolitan papers in general made special mention of this extraordinary "political debut" of the winsome little maiden from Michigan. Reverting to the professional work of Mr. Dafoe, it may be noted that upon initiating practice in Alpena he formed a partnership alliance with Hon. James D. Turnbull, in July, 1883. Thereafter they continued to be associated under the firm name of Turnbull & Dafoe until the 1st of January, 1885, when, upon the admission of Hon. John

Page  1251 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICH1GAN 1251 Shields to partnership, the title was changed to Turnbull, Shields & Dafoe. This firm thus continued in effective association until the 1st of January, 1886, when Mr. Shields withdrew to assume the office of Chief Justice of the Supreme court of Arizona, a position to which he was appointed by President Cleveland. Thereafter the firm of Turnbull & Dafoe was maintained until January 1, 1892. Since August, 1910, he has been associated in practice with Edwin R. Johnson, under the title of Dafoe & Johnson, and the firm control a large and representative practice, extending into both the state and federal courts. Mr. Dafoe has made judicious investments in real estate and industrial enterprises and he is actively identified with the Northeastern Michigan Development Bureau, of whose executive committee he is a member. He is affiliated with Myrtle Lodge, No. 432, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Alpena Lodge, No. 505, Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks; Alpena Lodge, No. 148, Knights of Pythias; and Alpena Aerie, No. 441, Fraternal Order of Eagles. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church. On the 4th of February, 1888, were cemented the marital bonds which united the life destinies of Mr. Dafoe with those of Miss Marie Ward Gallagher, who was born in Marine City, Michigan, and who is a daughter of the late David Ward Gallagher of Detroit. Mr. and Mrs. Dafoe have one daughter, Naomi J., who is now a student in National Park Seminary, at Forest Glen, Maryland. WILLIAM H. ABBS.-For the past twenty-seven years has William H. Abbs been closely identified with varied business interests in Manistee, Michigan, and since 1892 he has been the able.incumbent of the office of salt commissioner. Mr. Abbs was born in Toronto, province of Ontario, Canada, on the 15th of March, 1855, and he is a son of Robert and Felicia (Gibson) Abbs, both of whom were born and reared in England, whence they came to America in the year 1836, settling in Canada, where their marriage was solemnized and where a number of their children were born. In 1863 removal was made to Saginaw, Michigan, where Mr. and Mrs. Robert Abbs continued to reside until their death. The father was identified with the lumber business during the greater part of his active business career and he was a man of fine initiative power and impregnable integrity. He reared a family of four children, three of whom are now living. He married for his second wife, Mrs. Bell, and they had two children, a son and Sarah, who married Mr. Ed. Mitchell. William H. Abbs was a child of eight years at the time when his father established the family home in Michigan and he remained at home and attended the schools of Saginaw until he had attained to the age of fourteen years when he left the parental home and went to Flushing, Michigan, where he entered upon a three years' apprenticeship at the cooper's trade. Thereafter he worked at Saginaw and other places until 1877, in which year he went to Tawas City, where he engaged in the livery and sale stable business. He remained at Tawas City for a period of six years, at the expiration of which he came to Manistee, where he began to work at his trade for Canfield and Wheeler, continuing in their employ for the ensuing two years. He then entered a grocery store at Vol. III-19

Page  1252 1252 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN East Lake, remaining there for one year, after which he went to Magoon for a while. He then entered the employ of R. G. Peters, of Manistee, as overseer of his cooper shop, retaining this position for four years. In 1892 he was appointed salt commissioner and he has held this important office during the long intervening years to the present time. For six or eight years he was engaged in the livery and sale business in this city and during that time furnished a great many horses for use in the woods. He then bought the grocery business at Greenbush and First streets, in connection with A. E. Lott, and the firm of Lott & Company was formed. This store represents one of the most enterprising concerns in the city and through the able management of Messrs. Abbs and Lott its scope of operations has been gradually increased until it controls a large and most fastidious patronage. In the year 1883 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Abbs to Miss illa DuPraw, of Saginaw, in which city she was born and reared. Her parents were born in France and immigrated to this country. Mr. and Mrs. Abbs became the parents of two children,-Xrisa and Hazel, the latter of whom is deceased, her death having occurred at the age of three years. Xrisa was born at Saginaw on the 29th of May, 1886, and she was graduated in the Manistee high school, after which she pursued a course of study in the Manistee Business College. On the 20th of October, 1908, she was united in marriage to Mr. A. E. Lott, who is associated in business with Mr. Abbs, as already noted. In politics Mr. Abbs accords a stalwart allegiance to the principles of the Republican party and though he does not take an active interest in local politics he is alert and enthusiastically in sympathy with all measures and enterprises' advanced for the general welfare of the community. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Modern Romans. He is a man of fine mental caliber and broad humanitarianism, is liberal in thought and action and is charitable towards others' opinions, being ever mindful of their rights and sensibilities. His wife holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, and they hold a secure place in popular confidence and regard. W. HARRY PRImE.-One of the most prominent and influential business men of Whittemore, Iosco county, Michigan, is W. Harry Price, who is now, in 1911, giving most efficient service as postmaster and as justice of the peace at Whittemore and who is here engaged in the general merchandise business. He has been incumbent of many important offices of public trust and responsibility and in each of them has acquitted himself with honor and distinction. Mr. Price was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, on the 30th of July, 1874, and he is a son of William and Elizabeth (McDonough) Price, both of whom were likewise born and reared in Ontario, Canada, whence they came to the United States about the year 1884. The father died in 1903 from accidental poisoning and the mother now maintains her home at Whittemore. They became the parents of four children, concerning whom the following brief data are here incorporated,-Priscilla is the wife of Dr. J. H.

Page  1253 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1253 Botz, of Clayville, Virginia; Esther married Eugene Thompson and they reside at Boyne Falls, Michigan; Cline E. is engaged in the navy yard at Bremerton, Washington; W. Harry is the immediate subject of this review. W. Harry Price received his educational training in the public schools of Tawas City and in the high school at East Tawas. He also attended the public schools at Whittemore. When seventeen years of age he turned his attention to the pedagogic profession, with which he continued to be identified for the ensuing seven years. In 1886 he came to Whittemore and completed the course in the public schools, returning as principal of the high school in 1898. In 1900 he embarked in the merchandise business in Oscoda, Michigan, moving to Whittemore in 1902, and in his well equipped establishment he carries a full line of general merchandise in both the fancy and staple articles; his goods are of the latest production and his prices are reasonable. In politics Mr. Price endorses the cause of the Republican party and he has ever given most freely of his aid and influence in support of all projects advanced for the good of the community. He has served as postmaster of the village for the past nine years, has been township clerk for three terms, also township treasurer, alderman of the city for one term, and he has been secretary of the school board several terms, also the treasurer and secretary of the board of trade. He is now, in 1911, incumbent of the responsible office of justice of the peace. In a fraternal way Mr. Price is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church, at Whittemore. In the year 1901 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Price to Miss Florence B. Oakes, who was born and reared at East Tawas and who is a daughter of George E. and Lottie (Adams) Oakes, of Albion, Michigan. Mr. and Mrs. Price have three children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here recorded,-George, May 1, 1904; Elizabeth, April 14, 1906; and Donald, January 13, 1908. JOHN B. McARTHuR.-When Scotland puts her hand to the plow, or to anything else, things move. Her sons have a way of "pushing good things along," which is rather disconcerting to lazy people, but the delight of those who love activity and progress within the limits of law and order, John B. McArthur, of Cheboygan, millwright, civil engineer, land dealer, real estate owner, public-minded citizen, and all-around useful, intelligent and honored member of the community, is in his eightieth year and has justly earned the assurance that he is a Scotch-American who has always stood for the most advanced type of wisely and honorably directed industry and ability. Mr. McArthur is a native of Scotland, born April 15, 1831, to John and Ann (McKeegan) McArthur, both natives of Argyleshire, the former dying in September, 1871, at the age of eighty-four, and the mother passing away in 1867, when sixty-nine. Of the four sons and three daughters born to this union, all have ended their earthly walks except John B. McArthur, who was the fourth child of the family. When he was in his second year the family emigrated to Sidney, Nova

Page  1254 1254 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN Scotia, where his father became one of the pioneer farmers in that part of the new world. The homestead of two hundred acres was a credit to Arcadian America and to the McArthur family; there the parents spent the closing years of their worthy lives and John B. McArthur the happiest years of his boyhood. Mr. McArthur obtained his schooling at Sidney, Nova Scotia, the practical business of his life commencing when he apprenticed himself as a millwright to Samuel Fetch, for a period of three years, at one dollar per day. While thus engaged he studied civil engineering as a private venture, making a specialty of surveying. For two years thereafter he worked at his profession in Brocklin, Ontario, assisting Samuel Cliff in various personal matters. Finding that the building of mills was more profitable, however, he returned to his "trade," and busied himself for some time in various localities of Ontario. The year 1865 witnessed Mr. McArthur's advent to Michigan and the United States, his first location being Bay City. He worked as a millwright at that point for a short time, when he moved to Saginaw, and, knowledge of his masterly work reaching larger centers, he was, in 1868 called to Detroit, where he built one of the most complete saw-mills then operated in the state, for Hubbard & King. The last mill which he constructed was for Nelson & Bullen at Cheboygan, in 1878-9. For three years thereafter, Mr. McArthur was engaged in the manufacturing branch of the saw-mill business, and then became known as an extensive logger and dealer in farm and city lands. He has made a profitable business of clearing lands and selling the tracts for farming purposes; at the present time he has two farms on his hands, which he has thus cleared of timber-one of sixty-five acres and another of one hundred and twenty. There is probably no man in the county better posted on a greater variety of practical subjects than Mr. McArthur. On the subject of mill building-both saw and flour-he is especially well versed; for he is thoroughly experienced, from the old over-shot water wheel mills, when the work was all done by hand, to the modem roller-process affair where the hand is simply used to guide vastly greater mechanical forces. He talks with equal intelligence and interest on the business of logging and saw-milling in general, on agricultural matters, the improvement of country and city lands and public affairs. As he has served as road commissioner since 1904; has been village and school trustee and president of the school board, his views of local public affairs are also drawn from experience and have therefore weight. Mr. McArthur's Masonic connections are with Cheboygan Lodge, No. 283, Cheboygan Chapter, No. 101, and Inverness Council, No. 60, and no man in the order is more respected or gauges his life more closely, to its rules of conduct and spirit. In December, 1869, Mr. McArthur married Miss Melinda Judson, a native of Brockville, Ontario, who died in 1884, mother of seven children, of whom the following five are living: William, John, James, George and Mary, wife of Dr. Willis Earle Chapman, of Cheboygan (whose biography appears elsewhere). Mr. McArthur's second wife was

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Page  1255 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1255 Alicia Walker, who was born at Walkerville, Ontario, and died in 1904, leaving one child, Bruce. DANIEL J. MCDONALD. —From steady and profitable participation in the stirring industries of Cheboygan, Michigan, with the bracing and invigorating air, enjoyable rest after labor and revivifying social life of the city on the historic straits which connect two of the great lakes of the world, to military duty in semi-tropical Cuba, in intense action on the battlefield, with every hour fraught with peril and the gaunt figure of Death in view at every point of the compass, is a long step, and an uninviting one. Yet it is one that Daniel J. McDonald, and thousands like him, took, and rejoiced in the opportunity to take it, and in the glory to the citizen-soldiery of the United States which it brought as its inevitable result. Daniel J. McDonald was a Michigan soldier in the Spanish-American war, and exhibited on the gory field of international strife the same qualities of sterling manhood and devotion to the interests and the honor of his country that he has exhibited in the pursuits of peaceful and productive industry, the record of which it is the province of these paragraphs to preserve in a permanent form. He was born in Cheboygan, Michigan, on May 14, 1866, the son of Ronald F. and Rachel McDonald, natives of Scotland and still living representatives of the sturdy yeomanry of that country. The father came from his native heaths and hills, where every acre of tillable land yields its tribute to the needs of the people, to the wilds of Ontario at a time when he was a young man filled with high hopes and a determination to realize them, and the land to which he came was filled with measureless resources and waiting for the commanding might of mind to to develop them. There he married Rachel McDonald, who had come to Ontario with her parents. They became the parents of eight children, all of whom are living, their son Daniel being the second. In 1863 they moved from Ontario to Cheboygan, and here the father engaged in the lumber trade for a time. He then took up a track of wild land, and devoted all his energies to reducing it to responsive obedience and profitable productiveness. On this farm he and his wife are now living, comfortable in the fruits of their industry and thrift, and rich in the esteem and good will of everyone who knows them. He has rendered his locality good service not only by giving it an instructive example in progressive and profitable farming, but also as an upright and capable official in several positions of importance and responsibility in the public life of his township and city. Daniel J. McDonald grew to manhood on his father's farm and passed his boyhood and youth in no wise different, in the main, from the manner in which other farmers' sons in the same environment passed theirs. He did his due portion of the farm work, and, when he could be spared from this, attended the country school in the vicinity, or the more pretentious one in the village of Cheboygan. After leaving school he secured employment for a time in the saw mill of the W. & A. McArthur Company, and through his fidelity to the company's interests and his ability and industry in promoting them, rose to the

Page  1256 1256 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN management of the mercantile department of its business, occupying this position for a period of twelve years. In 1890 Daniel J. McDonald joined Company H, Third Infantry, Michigan National Guards, and was one of its organizers and a charter member, and was a member and was with Company H at Ishpeming and Negaunee during the miners' strike. He rose from the position of private to that of Second Lieutenant and as such went to Cuba with the Company, serving in the Spanish-American war, he commanding the special detail from the Thirty-third Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry, that opened the firing at the great battle of July 1, 1898, his position being in command of such detail at Aquadores, and was under the fire of the Spanish soldiers for eight hours on that day. Shortly afterward, he was detailed as regimental quarter-master, in which position he served during the remainder of the time on the Island. At the re-organization of the Company at Cheboygan after the war, he was made First Lieutenant, shortly afterward being promoted to Major and Commissary on the Brigade Staff, and retired as Major in 1908. He was one of the promoters and was instrumental in the building of the new armory in Cheboygan. After his return from the war, the subject of this sketch took up his position as manager of the W. & A. McArthur Company's mercantile business. In 1905 he organized the Hub Mercantile Company of Cheboygan and took upon himself the active management of its business. He has been at the head of the company ever since, and it has prospered under his judicious and enterprising direction, steadily expanding its trade and making continued gains in public confidence and general popularity. Mr. McDonald has been energetic and serviceable in connection with the public affairs and the fraternal life of the city. He was for years a member of the voluntary fire department, and served one term as alderman from the Fifth ward. He is a prominent and influential member of Cheboygan Lodge, No. 504 Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the Knights of Columbus. On January 19, 1903, Mr. McDonald united himself in marriage with Miss Eva Amiot. She is a native of Cheboygan and the daughter of Henry Amiot, who was born in Ontario. Of their children five are living, and Mrs. McDonald was the third in the order of birth in the family. Her mother is living, but her father died a number of years ago. She and her husband have two children, their sons Delwin and Milton. DAVID H. CaoWLEY.-This prominent lawyer, energetic and public spirited citizen and genial social force has been a resident of Cheboygan during the last five years, and has been prominent in the official life of the community almost from his entry among its people. As soon as he has completed his tenure of one office he has been elected to another and higher one, the electors proving by their course toward him in this respect that they believe in him and find his services valuable to them and altogether worthy of their approval. Mr. Crowley was born in Leslie, Ingham county, Michigan, on Sep

Page  1257 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1257 tember 5, 1882. He is a son and the fifth born child of Daniel and Margaret (Smith) Crowley, the former a native of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw county, this state, born in 1853, and the latter of Ireland, where her life began in 1855. They were married in 1871 and have had six children, five of whom are living. The parents also are living and have their home in Leslie. The father has been in the employ of the Michigan Central Railroad, in the track department, continuously since 1870, and is one of its oldest employes in length of unbroken service. He is a Catholic in religion and a Republican in political allegiance. His son David began his academic education in the schools of his native town and completed it at the high school in Saginaw, from which he was graduated in 1901. Soon after leaving that institution he entered the law department of the University of Michigan as a student. He pursued a complete and thorough course of professional study at the University and was graduated from it with the degree of LL. B. in 1905. He then had the world before him for the choice of a location in which to practice his profession and develop his career in it, but he was not long in making his decision. Northern Michigan was then attracting, as it is now, the attention of the country with its striden progress, and making its fine opportunities for men of ability, industry and character known throughout the land with a voice of persuasive eloquence. Mr. Crowley heard the plea with attention, and in February, 1906, became a resident of Cheboygan, and at once entered upon the practice of his profession in that city. Unlike many tyros in the professions, he did not have to wait long before he attracted public attention in a way that has proved highly advantageous to him. At the first election following his location in the city, which came only a few months after his arrival, he was elected a justice of the peace for a four years' term. In 1906 he was also elected court commissioner, and filled the office one term. His prompt recognition and elevation to official station were not due to family influence or adventitious circumstances of any kind, the basis of the public esteem and confidence being wholly within himself. The people soon realized that he was a young man of ability and force of character, and at once harnessed him for their needs and put him to work in their service. He has justified their confidence, and they have kept him in the performance of public duties ever since, considerably to his own credit and their benefit. In 1908 he was elected prosecuting attorney of the county, resigning as justice, and in 1910 was re-elected to 'this responsible and honorable office. His tenure of it continues the record of excellent service made in other positions, and is strengthening him generally in popular estimation as one of the most capable, reliable and satisfactory men in the county for official positions in the line of his profession, as he has proven himself to be one of the most worthy and useful of its citizens in all the relations of life. Mr. Crowley has been zealous and energetic in the aid of all worthy enterprises for the advancement and improvement of the city and county of his home, and in support of several of the associations numerous among men for their mental; moral and social elevation and enjoyment.

Page  1258 1258 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN He is vice president of the State Prosecuting Attorneys' Association, and takes a leading part in its proceedings and social sessions. He 'is also a member of the Yakima Club of Cheboygan, and one of the most potential forces in everything that ministers to its progress, its usefulness and the pleasure of those who belong to it. In fraternal circles he is united with Cheboygan Lodge, No. 791, Knights of Columbus, and is District Deputy Supreme Knight for the Northern district of the state in the order. He also belongs to Cheboygan Lodge, No. 504, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is its present exalted ruler. In addition he holds valued membership in the order of Modern Woodmen of America. The local organizations of these fraternities in which he is enrolled have all felt the quickening influence of his intelligence and zeal, and are much the better for the impulse. On August 17, 1909, Mr. Crowley was united in marriage with Miss Nina C. Barrett, a native of Cheboygan and the daughter of Joel L. and Mary E. (Berry) Barrett, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Crowley is one of the most cultivated and popular young women in the city, and a valued contributor to all worthy phases and departments of its intellectual, moral and social life. JOHN MI. PERRY.-A man who has long been identified with the commercial life of Michigan is John M. Perry, of Tustin, who is representing Osceola district in the state legislature. He has varied financial interests in this section of the Wolverine state and in all his dealings he has gained a reputation for unquestioned honesty and integrity. He was born in the state of New York, on the 12th of MIay, 1864, and is a son of Milton W. Perry, who was one of the early pioneers in Osceola county, this state, and who is now a resident of Cadillac, where he is living in retirement. His nativity likewise occurred in the old Empire state of the Union and he was reared and educated in the place of his birth. He married Miss Melissa Lane, of New York, also living, and they became the parents of six children, three of whom were born in New York and three in Michigan. After his arrival in the Wolverine state Milton W. Perry was for a time engaged on the construction of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad. In the late '60s his father located his family on a homestead near what is now the village of Tustin, and for several years they experienced all the rigorous hardships of pioneer life. Their first log cabin was built of small logs that four men could carry, as there were no teams in the county; and it was thirty miles to their post office and trading point. John M. Perry was afforded the somewhat meager advantages of the pioneer schools in his youth and he was practically raised in the woods. In 1883, in order to gain a higher education, he was sent to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he pursued a course of study in the Northern Business & Normal University. In the following year he obtained employment in a drug store at Cadillac, the same being known as the City Drug Store. In 1886 he passed the pharmaceutical examination at Grand Rapids, the second of its kind ever held in the state. He remained in Cadillac until the fall of 1889, at which time he removed to Tustin, Osceola county,

Page  1259 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1259 where he purchased the drug establishment of Dr. A. J. Thompson, continuing to operate the same with eminent success until the autumn of 1908. In 1901 he had opened the Bank of Tustin, which he conducted alone until 1906, in which year he organized a stock company which includes five of the substantial business men of Tustin besides himself. Of this substantial monetary intitution he is cashier at the present time. He is also interested in the Tustin Warehouse Company. In politics John M. Perry is now aligned as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the Republican party and he has manifested a deep and abiding interest in all matters tending to advance the general welfare of the community in which he has elected to maintain his home. In 1906 he was honored with the election as representative of Osceola district in the state legislature and in 1908 he was again chosen for that office; also in 1910 for a third term and was unanimously chosen speaker pro tem in the session of 1911. Prior to 1906 Mr. Perry had been a staunch adherent of the principles of the Democratic party but during the campaign of that year he became a Republican. He is a member of the Republican county committee and takes an active interest in all local politics. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the Modern Maccabees, the Independent Order of Foresters and the Modern Brotherhood. He and his wife are active members of the Presbyterian church at Tustin. At Cadillac, in November, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Perry to Miss Alice A. Bickhart, who was born and raised in Indiana and who traces her ancestry back to staunch German extraction. Her father, N. H. Bickhart, was for a number of years a millwright at Cadillac. Mr. and Mrs. Perry have two children,-Inez Irene and Clyde Edwin, both of whom remain at the parental home. LEW A. CHICHESTER.-The efficient cashier of the popular and substantial monetary institution known as the Iosco County Bank, at Whittemore, Michigan, is Lew A. Chichester, who here holds prestige as one of the eminently prosperous and energetic business men of the younger generation. Mr. Chichester was born at Battle Creek, Michigan, the date of his birth being June 12, 1884. He is a son of Alrirus D. and Mary L. (Crothers) Chichester, the former of whom is deceased and the latter of whom now maintains her home at Kalamazoo. The father was an expert mechanic by occupation and he met death as the result of injuries received by the explosion of a boiler in a threshing machine which he was operating at Aberdeen, South Dakota, September 21, 1891. He was a native of Michigan and his wife was born at Rochester, New York. Their marriage was solemnized at Battle Creek in 1877, and they became the parents of two children, both of whom are now living, George W., who is in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Company, at Chicago, Illinois, and Lew A., the subject of this sketch. Lew A. Chichester early availed himself of the advantages afforded in the public schools of Battle Creek and Marshall and he later supplemented this training by a course of study in the Michigan Business & Normal College, at Battle Creek, in which he was duly graduated as a member of the class of 1902. For a period of three years thereafter, he

Page  1260 1260 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN was employed as bookkeeper by the firm of Ranger & Farley, who operate a large furniture and undertaking establishment at Battle Creek, Michigan. In 1905 he accepted a position as assistant cashier of the Arenac Exchange Bank of Omer, Michigan, a private bank owned by C. W. MePhail and C. H. Macomber. In February, 1906, this firm organized the Iosco County Bank at Whittemore, Michigan, with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, and Mr. Chichester was elected cashier of the institution. The home of the bank is in a fine pressed-brick building, whose lateral dimensions are twenty feet by forty feet. This concern is one of the most prosperous banking institutions in the county and the sterling integrity of character of its official backers with twenty years of successful banking experience, constitutes one of its best assets. Politically Mr. Chichester endorses the cause of the Republican party, and while he has never manifested aught of ambition for the honors or emoluments of political office of any description, he has ever been most liberal and influential in his support of all measures and enterprises advanced for the good of the general welfare of the community and of the county in which he has elected to maintain his home. In connection with his work as cashier of the Iosco County Bank Mr. Chichester writes fire and life insurance. In 1908 he erected a beautiful home at Whittemore, the same being widely renowned for its gracious and generous hospitality. In a fraternal way he is connected with various representative organizations and his religious faith is in harmony with the teachings of'the Baptist church. He and his wife are popular and prominent in connection with the best social activities in Whittemore, and he is recognized as an essentially capable and reliable business man. At Marshall, Michigan, in the year 1906, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Chichester to Miss Bessie L. Wright, a daughter of I. B. Wright, who is engaged in the vacuum cleaner business at Marshall, Michigan, where Mrs. Chichester was born and educated. JAMES M. PENNELL.-Passing his youth and early manhood in arduous effort for advancement in life, and living with great frugality and prudence in order that he might gain a foothold for his purposes, using every advantage and opportunity available to him to prepare himself for the career he had determined to work out, and rising to his present standing in business and public esteem by resolute and persevering endeavor, James M. Pennell, of Cheboygan, has fully justified in his record all the outlay in money, exertion and self-denial his training cost him. Mr. Pennell's life began at Belmore, Putnam county, Ohio, on December 28, 1862, while his father was in the field or on the march in defense of the Union, and was about three years old before the latter ever saw him. He is a son of John and Nancy (Moorehead) Pennell, like himself, natives of Ohio, both now deceased, the father having died in 1906, thirteen years after the death of his wife. He was sixty-five years old when he passed away. They had three children, all of whom are living, James M. and his brothers Edward M. and Eugene D. They are all energetic and prosperous in business, and show in their daily lives the

Page  1261 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHiGAN 1261 influence for good exerted on them by the teachings and examples given them at the parental hearthstone. The father was a merchant before the Civil war, and when that deluge of death and disaster broke over our unhappy country, he promptly enlisted in the Twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under the Union flag, which soon became a part of the Army of the Cumberland, under command of the valiant and skillful fighting General Thomas. Mr. Pennell took part in all the encounters with the enemy his regiment was engaged in, but escaped harm himself, although he often saw his comrades fall around him like flies in an early frost, and was never taken prisoner or absent from duty on account of sickness during the whole of his military service of three years. After the war the elder Mr. Pennell returned to his home at Belmore, Ohio, and for some years followed general merchandising there. He then removed to Detroit, Michigan, and afterward to Grand Rapids, conducting a general merchandising business in each city for a period and passing his last days in the latter. He was a member of Fairbanks Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in Detroit, and a straightforward and unwavering Republican in his political affiliation and action. James M. Pennell attended a public school in his boyhood for a short time, but the exigencies of his family made it necessary for him to do something toward earning his own living at an early age. When he was twelve he went to work on a farm in the neighborhood of his home at a compensation of five dollars a month and his board. He saved every dollar of his wages he could and used it all to further educate himself. In time he accumulated enough to enable him to attend an academy in Portage, Ohio, and in that institution and his private studies he made such progress that he was able to secure a certificate licensing him to teach school in the county of Wood, where he was then living, in 1879, when he was but seventeen. He did not remain in Ohio, however, as he believed he would find better opportunities farther West. Accordingly he migrated to Seward county, Nebraska, where he taught his first school in a dugout. He taught two years in Nebraska, and the money he earned in that venture, although he would look upon it as a trifling sum now, seemed like a fortune to him then. In pursuance of his purpose, he returned toward the East for additional mental training, and pursued a course of special instruction in the Business University in Detroit, this state. On completing his course in this institution Mr. Pennell located in Sanilac county, Michigan, where he continued teaching school for eight years. At the end of that period he took up his residence in Downington in that county, and started an enterprise in artistic stone cutting and monument building. This he conducted profitably in Downington a few years. In 1900 he moved to Cheboygan, and in association with his brother Edward founded the Northern Marble and Granite Works in this city. But before locating in Cheboygan he passed a few years in Deckerville, Sanilac county. where he served as township clerk and afterward as clerk of the village government. He also lived at West Branch, Ogemaw county, from 1896 to 1900. In all places where he has lived he has been

Page  1262 1262 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN recognized as a good business man and an exemplary citizen, well able to take good care of his own interests and cheerfully liberal in the service of others and the community in general, and everywhere he stands in excellent repute. The electorate of Cheboygan was not slow in taking practical notice of Mr. Pennell's public spirit and capability after his arrival in the city. He was elected supervisor of the Fourth ward in 1909, 1910 and 1911, and his services to the people in that position won their unqualified approval. He is a Republican in politics and zealously loyal to his party. In fraternal circles he is an enthusiastic Freemason, a Knight of the Maccabees and a Woodman of the World, holding membership in the Council in the last named organizatian. In the Masonic order he has progressed to the holy and sublime degree of the Royal Arch. Mr. Pennell has been twice married. He was first united in wedlock with Miss Sarah Baker on July 22, 1885. She died on November 25, 1888, leaving two children, her son Walter E. and her daughter Jennie. On January 29, 1889, the father took a second wife, his choice at this time being Miss Minnie Drummond, who was born in this state, at Ortonville, Oakland county. The fruit of the second marriage is one child, a son named Frank W., who was graduated from the Cheboygan High School in 1908, and in that year won the state championship in the contests conducted by the High School Oratorical Association. He is at present (1911) in his third year as a student in the literary and law departments of the University of Michigan. The two children of the father's first marriage have also been well educated and hold a high rank in the scholarship of the county. The son, Walter E., was graduated from the Cheboygan High School in 1905, and the McLaughlin Business College in Grand Rapids in 1908, in the department of stenography and bookkeeping. He is now superintendent of the clerical department in the plant of the Armour Packing Company at Marquette. Jennie, the daughter, is the wife of Amiel Schwartz. She is also a graduate of the Cheboygan High School, and in addition holds a diploma in the County Normal class of 1908. Her residence is in Munising, Michigan. MICHAEL BUCHANAN DANAHER.-A citizen of well-deserved prominence and influence in Ludington, Michigan, is Michael Buchanan Danaher, attorney-at-law and identified with lumber and other important interests of the section. He stands as one of the pillars of the local Democratic party and is particularly prominent in public affairs, having served his fellowmen in various capacities, to their honor and his own credit. He was prosecuting attorney of Mason county, Michigan, for four years and for twelve successive years was president of the school board of the city of Ludington. Mr. Danaher is the son of Patrick M. Danaher, born in Limerick county, Ireland, in 1815, and his wife, Mary (O'Brien) Danaher, born in the same district in 1825. The elder gentleman received his education in this country, attending the district schools and a night school in Cincinnati. He was able and ambitious and he became a railroad contractor before the attainment of his majority, following this busi

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Page  1263 HISTORY OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN 1263 ness in the west and south for many years. He became a resident of Wisconsin about 1850 and built under contract the plank road between Cheboygan and Fond-du-Lac. He owned and conducted a farm in Kenosha county for five years and subsequently came to Michigan (in 1862) engaging in the lumber business at Whitehall. Two years afterward he removed to Ludington and in 1870 established the Danaher & Melendy Company, which still continues in the lumber business in Michigan and elsewhere. He was a man of much prominence and influence in public affairs. He was a Democrat in politics; was once a candidate for the legislature from his native state and was twice mayor of the city of Ludington, the city enjoying a career of municipal prosperity under his administration. He died in 1886. Michael B. Danaher was born in Ludington and has passed almost his entire life in this place. In 1879 he was graduated from the literary department of the University of Michigan and then prepared for the law, beginning the practice of the profession in Ludington, Michigan, in 1881. He is an able and representative practitioner, but does not limit his activities to the profession, being interested in lumber and in various other enterprises in his home town. In politics Mr. Danaher is a Cleveland Democrat and his given heart and hand to the men and measures of the party since his earliest voting days. As previously mentioned, he was prosecuting attorney of Mason county for two terms and has the unusual record of having been president of the school board for twelve years. In 1886 he was the candidate of the Democratic party to represent the county in the State Senate, but was defeated. Admirably public spirited and altruistic, he can ever be depended upon to give his support to all measures likely to result in benefit to the many. Mr. Danaher is a member of the Catholic church and is affiliated with the Catholic order, the Knights of Columbus. The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks also claims his membership. Mr. Danaher is unmarried. JOHN M. CLARK.-The creator, developer, active manager and quickening spirit of Onaway's telephone system, with its hundreds of miles of connections and its extensive local ramifications, John M. Clark has done a good work for this portion of the country that will live after him as a monument to his breadth of view, push and daring enterprise, which no d