To the honorable committee at Bury The humble petition of the chiefe inhabitants of the liberty of St. Ethelred and of Hoxon Hundred, in the county of Suffocke, on the behalfe of themselves and others well-affected.

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Title
To the honorable committee at Bury The humble petition of the chiefe inhabitants of the liberty of St. Ethelred and of Hoxon Hundred, in the county of Suffocke, on the behalfe of themselves and others well-affected.
Author
E. I.
Publication
London :: Printed for Robert Bostocke,
1643.
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Subject terms
Great Britain -- Militia -- Early works to 1800.
Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Early works to 1800.
Suffolk (England) -- History -- 17th century -- Early works to 1800.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A87318.0001.001
Cite this Item
"To the honorable committee at Bury The humble petition of the chiefe inhabitants of the liberty of St. Ethelred and of Hoxon Hundred, in the county of Suffocke, on the behalfe of themselves and others well-affected." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A87318.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed June 24, 2024.

Pages

SIR,

I Have here sent you a Coppy of a Petition, which is this day presented to the Committee at Bury, and from thence to the Earle of Manchester (of which presenters, though unworthy, I am one) and now on the way to Cambridg to the Earl, it was consented to and subscribed by 2000 hands of able and sufficient men, with much alacrity and willingnesse, who I beleeve confidently wyll spend their last drop of Blood in defence of the Parliament and famous City of London: I have sent it you up to publish the same, it may be it will comfort your City to see others of your mind; I beleeve it will be at the Parliament about Friday at the furthest, for a confirma∣tion of our disires: it was drawne by many able Gentlemen and Divines, and the same petition is now on foot in Norfolke, and you will heare of it the next weeke, I beleeve by that time the report is come at Oxford, the Cavaliers will have no great mind to visit us as they much threaten, I speake of the least: I am sure more subscribed then I mention, and Multitudes more would have done if we had had time.

Your most affectionate friend, E. I.

Decemb. 12. 1643.

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