The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.

About this Item

Title
The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.
Author
Hammond, Henry, 1605-1660.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Royston ...,
1684.
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Subject terms
Devotional exercises.
Cite this Item
"The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A45408.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 26, 2024.

Pages

Preparatives to Prayer.

  • I. THerefore in this, as in all other things, before you begin sit down and consider with your self what you are about to do.
  • ...II.

    Resolve, that to make any Ad∣dress to God, without a Resoluti∣on at least to set your self heartily and wholly to his Service, is not only fruitless, but hurtful, and that which will turn your very Prayer into sin.

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  • ...

    For to hope for any favour at his hands, and yet continue in your sinful course, is to make him such an one as your self.

  • III. Remember your own meanness, and the Majesty of Him to whom you speak; that he is the Great King sitting in Heaven, and you a poor worm creeping on the Earth.
  • IV. Consider how unworthy you are to receive the least favour from him, whom you have so of∣ten and so highly provoked in de∣spight of his continual mercies to you.
  • V. Consider how great a favour and benefit you enjoy in this liber∣ty of approaching and speaking to God.
  • VI. Be sober and moderate in your Petitions regulating and submit∣ting

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  • your desires, both for the Matter, and Manner, and Mea∣sure, and Season, to his Wis∣dom and Will.
  • VII. Remember that he is a Spirit, and sees into the heart, and there∣fore not only your words and be∣haviour, but also your thoughts and imaginations must be such as may not offend his pure eyes.
  • VIII. Let your Praying be rather fre∣quent than long, that the tedious∣ness of many words may not wea∣ry and dull the Devotion of your Mind.
  • ...IX.

    Recollect and take up your thoughts from the world and worldly things, that they may be wholly intent upon the business you are about.

    And this you may do by a short Meditation, or preparatory Pray∣er, or reading somewhat in the

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  • ...

    Scripture, or some other pious Book.

  • ...X.

    Now when you have thus brought your gift to the Altar, remember the advice of your Saviour; first put away all malice and hatred out of your heart, and forgive all others be∣fore you presume to ask pardon for your self.

    And know that this is a qualifi∣cation so necessary, so essential to the due performance of any Devotions, that our Saviour in that very short Prayer of his own thought it worth the mentioning, and that as a kind of Condition, Forgive us our trespasses, as we for∣give them that trespass against us.

Notes

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