The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.

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Title
The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D.
Author
Hammond, Henry, 1605-1660.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Royston ...,
1684.
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Subject terms
Devotional exercises.
Cite this Item
"The daily practice of devotion, or, The hours of prayer fitted to the main uses of a Christian life also lamentations and prayers for the peaceful re-settlement of this church and state / by the late pious and reverend H.H., D.D." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A45408.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 26, 2024.

Pages

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Page 157

OF DEATH.

AND now I cannot think any Conclusion more fit and proper for this daily course of Devout Life, than a short medi∣tation on that which shall be the Conclusion of Life it self.

I. First therefore, consider the shortness and miseries of this Life, That our days consume in vanity, and our years Psal. in trouble; That our whole Life is but as a Dream, and when Death awakes us, we find our hands empty of all that which hath cost us so much la∣bour, and travel, and sorrow, and sin.

Page 158

II. Remember the swiftness and suddenness of Death; That our days are but a span-long, and our flourishing but as a flower of the field, which though it be not plucked up, yet soon withers of it self, and falls away.

The Young may dye soon, but the Old cannot live long.

III. Remember that in this short life, we are yet to provide for an Eternity either of weal or woe; and therefore cannot be too care∣ful how we spend every minute of that upon which depends a matter of so great, so lasting impor∣tance.

IV. There is but one way of Birth, but many ways and means of Death: and our Life hangs by so small a thred, that every little Chance is ready to break it off.

Page 159

V. After Death we are immedi∣ately called to Judgment before the high Court of Heaven, to give a severe account how we have performed that duty to which we were created; and according∣ly to receive an irrevocable sen∣tence of eternal happiness or mi∣sery.

VI. The Judge, before whom we shall stand, is infinite both in Knowledge and Power; so that it is impossible either to hide any thing from his all-seeing eye, or to escape out of the reach of his Almighty hand.

VII. The Lord cometh in a day when we look not for him, and in an hour when we are not aware: Let us therefore watch, and wait for his coming, that when he knocketh, we may open unto him im∣mediately, Vers. 36.

Page 160

How dangerous and deplorable a condition would it be, to be found and taken away in the midst of any Sin, or in a continued course of sinful Life?

On the contrary: How hap∣py, and blessed, and joyful a thing would it be, to be found practising and persevering in that which is good?

Blessed is that servant, whom his Lord when he cometh shall find so doing, Luke 12. 43.

Notes

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