Several objections against the reducement of interest propounded in a letter with the Answer thereunto.

About this Item

Title
Several objections against the reducement of interest propounded in a letter with the Answer thereunto.
Author
Culpeper, Thomas, Sir, 1626-1697.
Publication
London :: [s.n.],
Printed in the year, 1671.
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Subject terms
Interest -- Great Britain.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A35410.0001.001
Cite this Item
"Several objections against the reducement of interest propounded in a letter with the Answer thereunto." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A35410.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed June 22, 2024.

Pages

SIR,

BY divers persons whom I have spoken with upon your late Argument▪ I find, that the main of your discourse is either granted or faintly controverted, very few directly denying the Rise of Land by the Fall of In∣terest, but rather, as it were, confessing and avoiding it: They say, It holds in the notion, but fayles in the Practise; Being clogged with di∣vers appendant inconveniencies, which either wholly frustrate its good success, or overballance it with other and worse effects, The grand Objections are these; Some affirm, It will have no influence at all; whatsoever is defalked from Interest will be more then supplied in gratuities; Brokage, new devices for security, &c. according to the old saying, Necessity hath no Law: Some al∣ledge, that since it is now so hard to borrow at six per Cent. It will be almost impossible at four, because men will rather keep their monies in their Chsts, then run so great a hazard, (as Lenders they say now do,) for so small a profit, By others, it is offered by way of grave and friendly advice to Borrowers, that they take heed what they do, For most will be dri∣ven upon purchasing and other dealings, and so their debts generally and ruinously called in, I desire to be clear in this Argument, that so I may be able to maintain it, And therefore your Resolution herein will much Oblige

SIR,

Your most humble Servant, I S.

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