The advantages which will manifestly accrue to this kingdom by abatement of interest from six to four per. cent

About this Item

Title
The advantages which will manifestly accrue to this kingdom by abatement of interest from six to four per. cent
Author
Culpeper, Thomas, Sir, 1626-1697.
Publication
London :: printed by T.L. for Christopher Wilkinson, at the Black-Boy over against St. Dunstans Church in Fleetstreet,
1668.
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Subject terms
Usury -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Interest -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A35404.0001.001
Cite this Item
"The advantages which will manifestly accrue to this kingdom by abatement of interest from six to four per. cent." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A35404.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed June 21, 2024.

Pages

Page [unnumbered]

The Advantages which will manifestly accrue to this Kingdom by abatement of interest from six to four per. Cent.

  • 1. It will inviolably Establish the Crown of England, By
    • The Advancement of his Majesties Customs
    • The Ease of his Majesties Subjects.
    • The making of lands wch are in safe hands the over-ballancing Scale of Wealth and Power.
  • 2 It will accommodate his Majesty in his present wants even by a Land Tax if better Expedients be not offered▪) which the Owner may well afford to admit of (at least pro hâc vice) being eased a∣nother way; The slie Usurer (who could never yet be met with) in Effect contributing as much as he.
  • 3. It willl in short time pay the debts of the whole Gentry, by timely sales, And yet leave them (one with another) richer than they are.
  • 4. It will make Money so Easie to be borrowed, That even the Lender will shortlie pay the Broker and Coveyancer, By
    • Diminishing the Number
    • Enlarging the Securitie
    Of Borrowers.
  • 5. It will speedilie double, if not treable, the Yearly Fruit, and Product of our Lands, (the only so∣lid Basis of our Wealth and Trade) by enabling, encouraging, and even forcing improvements of all kinds, whereby we may afford to under-sell our Neighbours, who now under-sell us.
  • 6. It will revive our dying Manufacture, 〈◊〉〈◊〉 making the stock of it cheap, and the Market quick.
  • 7. It will plentifully relieve the Poor, by setting all our Heads and Hands to work, in the Countrie, for improvement of Lands; In Cities and Towns by way of Manufacture.
  • 8. It only can preserve the utter destruction of our Timber.
  • 9. It only can re-build London speedily, as to the Publick, Profitably as to the Builder.

All which Assertions I am ready to prove to any Man, that Will discourse it with me fairly, closely, and methodically.

T. C.

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