The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes.

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Title
The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes.
Author
Burroughs, Jeremiah, 1599-1646.
Publication
London :: Printed for R. Dawlman,
1643.
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Subject terms
Ferne, H. -- (Henry), 1602-1662. -- Resolving of conscience.
God -- Early works to 1800.
Cite this Item
"The glorious name of God, The Lord of Hosts opened in two sermons, at Michaels Cornhill, London, vindicating the Commission from this Lord of Hosts, to subjects, in some case, to take up arms : with a post-script, briefly answering a late treatise by Henry Ferne, D.D. / by Jer. Burroughes." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A30577.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 25, 2024.

Pages

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To the Reader.

THe necessity of the time put me to preach upon this subject, the City being in great feare of a great Army comming against it in the name of the King, and the necessity of the subject for this time made me not unwilling to yeeld to the making my meditations upon this subject, yet more publike. Something I have enlarged, especially in the ar∣gument of justifying the present taking up armes so much cryed down, as if it were against the King, to be by com∣mission from the Lord of Hosts, which is discussed page 27. and so on: the satisfation of the consciences of men in this thing is of so great consequence in this time, that every man is bound to afford what help hereunto he is able. I should have had guilt lye grating upon mine own conscience if I had stifled what I might afford to the helping towards the satisfaction of others; although therefore I am not ignorant, but sensible enough that it is an argument wherein a man runs hazard enough; yet whatsoever I suffer in it, may I be usefull, I have enough. This I can say, if I ever did, or am like to publish any thing in the uprightnes of my heart, aim∣ing at the glory of God, and thy good, I blesse God I have comfort in this; and in this (whatsoever the issue be) I shal re∣joyce. Certainly things had never come to that passe they are at, if mens consciences had bin rightly informed in the liber∣ties God hath given them. The infusing contrary principles, and making men beleeve that the subject must and would suffer any thing rather then rise up to maintaine his own

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right hath beene the cause of the bold adventures of many amongst us.

What I have said is breife, comming to you as a Sermon, it could not admit of larger discourse, but if there be need it would not be very difficult to enlarge these things in ano∣ther way. Read for thy profit, and I have my end.

Yours to serve for Christ, Jer: Burroughes.

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