Le Morte Darthur / by Syr Thomas Malory ; the original edition of William Caxton now reprinted and edited with an introduction and glossary by H. Oskar Sommer ; with an essay on Malory's prose style by Andrew Lang

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Title
Le Morte Darthur / by Syr Thomas Malory ; the original edition of William Caxton now reprinted and edited with an introduction and glossary by H. Oskar Sommer ; with an essay on Malory's prose style by Andrew Lang
Author
Malory, Thomas, Sir, 15th cent.
Editor
Caxton, William, ca. 1422-1491, Sommer, H. Oskar (Heinrich Oskar), b. 1861
Publication
London: David Nutt
1889
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"Le Morte Darthur / by Syr Thomas Malory ; the original edition of William Caxton now reprinted and edited with an introduction and glossary by H. Oskar Sommer ; with an essay on Malory's prose style by Andrew Lang." In the digital collection Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/MaloryWks2. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed May 28, 2024.

Pages

¶ Capitulum xxxij /

THenne syr Gareth rode vnto the barbycan of the castel / and praid the porter fayr to lete hym in to the castel / The porter ansuerd vngoodely ageyne / and saide thow getest no lodgyng here / Fayr syr say not soo for I am a knyȝte of kynge Arthurs / & pray the lord or the lady of this castel to gyue me herberow for the loue of kynge Arthur / Thenne the porter wente vnto the duchesse / and told her how ther was a knyghte of kyng Arthurs wold haue herberowe / lete hym in said the duchesse / for I wille see that knyghte / And for kyng Arthurs sake he shalle not be herberoules /

¶ Thenne she yode vp in to a toure ouer the gate with greete torche lyght / whan sir Gareth sawe that torche lyghte he cryed

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[leaf 132v] on hyhe whether thou be lord or lady gyaunt or champyon I take no force so that I may haue herberowe this nyghte / & yf hit so be that I must nedes fyghte / spare me not to morne when I haue restyd me for bothe I and myn hors ben wery / Syr knyghte said the lady thou spekest knyghtly and boldly / but wete thou wel the lord of this castel loueth not kyng Arthur / nor none of his court / for my lord hath euer ben ageynst hym and therfor thou were better not to come within this castel / For and thou come in this nyghte / thou must come in vnder suche fourme that where someuer thou mete my lord by styȝ or by strete / thou must yelde the to hym as prysoner / Madame said syre Gareth what is your lord and what is his name / syr my lordes name is the duke de la rouse / wel madame said syr Gareth I shal promyse yow in what place I mete your lord I shalle yelde me vnto hym and to his good grace with that I vnderstande he wille do me no harme / And yf I vnderstand that he wille I wil releace my self and I can with my spere and my swerd / ye say wel said the duchesse / and thenne she lete the drawe brydge doune / and soo he rode in to the halle / and there he alyghte / and his hors was ledde in to a stable / & in the halle he vnarmed hym / & saide madame I will not oute of this holle this nyghte / And whan it is daye lyght / lete see / who wil haue adoo with me / he shal fynde me redy / Thenne was he sette vnto souper / and had many good dysshes / thenne syr Gareth lyst wel to ete / and knyghtely he ete his mete / and egerly / there was many a fair lady by hym / & some said they neuer sawe a goodlyer man nor so wel of etynge / thenne they made hym passyng good chere / & shortly whan he had souped his bedde was made there so he rested hym al nyghte / And on the morne he herd masse & brake his fast & toke his leue at the duchesse / & at them al / & thanked her goodely of her lodgyng & of his good chere / & thenne she asked gym his name / Madame he saide truly my name is Gareth of Orkeney / & some men calle me Beaumayns / thēne knewe she wel it was the same knyȝt that fouȝt for dame lyones / so sir gareth departed & rode vp in to a montayne / & ther mette hym a knyghte / his name was syr Bendelayne and sayd to syr Gareth thou shalt not passe this way / for outher thou shalt Iuste with me or

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[leaf 133r] els be my prysoner / Thenme wille I Iuste said syr Gareth / And soo they lete their horses renne / and there syr Gareth smote hym thorou oute the body / and syr Bendalyne rode forth to his castel there besyde and there dyed / So syr gareth wold haue rested hym / and he cam rydynge to Bendalaynis castel / Thenne his knyghtes and seruauntes aspyed that it was he that had slayne their lord / Thenne they armed xx good men and cam out and assailled syr gareth / and soo he had no spere but his swerd / and put his shelde afore hym / and there they brake their speres vpon hym / and they assailled hem passyngly sore / But euer syr gareth deffended hym as a knyght

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