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Author: Parsons, Robert, 1546-1610.
Title: A conference about the next succession to the crown of England divided into two parts : the first containeth the discourse of a civil lawyer, how and in what manner propinquity of bloud is to be preferred : the second containeth the speech of a temporal lawyer about the particular titles of all such as do, or may, pretend (within England or without) to the next succession : whereunto is also added a new and perfect arbor and genealogy of the descents of all the kings and princes of England, from the Conquest to the present day, whereby each mans pretence is made more plain ... / published by R. Doleman.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2007 January (TCP phase 1)
Availability:

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Print source: A conference about the next succession to the crown of England divided into two parts : the first containeth the discourse of a civil lawyer, how and in what manner propinquity of bloud is to be preferred : the second containeth the speech of a temporal lawyer about the particular titles of all such as do, or may, pretend (within England or without) to the next succession : whereunto is also added a new and perfect arbor and genealogy of the descents of all the kings and princes of England, from the Conquest to the present day, whereby each mans pretence is made more plain ... / published by R. Doleman.
Parsons, Robert, 1546-1610., Allen, William, 1532-1594., Englefield, Francis, d. 1596?

[S.l.]: Reprinted at N. with license, MDCLXXXI [1681]
Notes:
Written by Robert Parsons, under the pseudonym R. Doleman, and approved by Cardinal Allen and Sir Francis Englefield who are sometimes credited as joint authors--cf. DNB v.43, p.415.
Originally published in 1594.
Running title: A conference touching succession to the crown.
"Dedicated to the Right Honourable the Earl of Essex, one of Her Majesties Privy-Council, and of the noble Order of the Garter."
Reproduction of original in the Union Theological Seminary Library, New York.
Subject terms:
Great Britain -- Kings and rulers -- Succession.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A56468.0001.001

Contents
title page
The sum of both Parts more in particular.
To the Right Right Honourable the Earl of Essex, one of Her Majesties Privy Council.
The CONTENTS of the first PART.
The CONTENTS of the second Book.
part 1
The Preface, containing the occasion of this, Treatise with the subject, purpose, and parts thereof.
CAP. I. That Succession to Government by nearness of Blood, is not by Law of Nature and Divine, but only by Humane and Positive Laws of every particular Common-wealth, and conse∣quently may upon just causes be altered by the same.
CHAP. II. Of the Form of Monarchies and Kingdoms in Particular, and the different Laws, where∣by they are to be Obtained, Holden and Go∣verned in divers Countries, according as each Commonwealth hath Chosen and Esta∣blished.
CHAP. III. Of Kings lawfully chastised by their Common∣wealths, for their Misgovernment; and of the good and prosperous Success that God hath commonly given to the same.
CHAP. IV. Wherein consisteth principally the lawfulness of Proceeding against Princes, which in the former Chapter is mentioned. What Interest Princes have in their Subjects Goods, or Lives; How Oaths doth bind, or may be broken by Subjects towards Princes: And finally, the difference between a good King, and a Tyrant.
CHAP. V. Of the Coronations of Princes, and manner of their Admission to their Authority, and the Oaths which they do make in the same unto the Commonwealth, for their good Go∣vernment.
CHAP. VI. What is due to only Succession by Birth, and what Interest or Right an Heir apparent hath to the Crown, before he be Crowned or Admitted by the Commonwealth; and how justly he may be put back, if he have not the other parts requisite also.
CHAP. VII. How the next in Succession by Propinquity of Bloud hath often-times been put back by the Cemmonwealth, and other further off admitted in their places, even in those Kingdoms where Succession prevaileth; with many Examples of the Kingdoms of Israel and Spain.
CHAP. VIII. Divres other examples out of the States of France and England for proof that the Next in Bloud are sometimes put back from Suc∣cession, and how God had approved the same with good success.
CHAP. IX. What are the principal points which a Common∣wealth ought to respect in admitting or ex∣cluding of any Prince, that pretendeth to succeed: wherein it is handled largely; also of the diversity of Religion, and other such Cases.
part 2
THE PREFACE OF THE Second Part.
CHAP. I. Of the divers Books and Treatises that have been written heretofore about the Titles of such as pretend to the Crown of England, aed what they do contain in favour or dis∣favour of sundry Pretenders.
CHAP. II. Of the Succession of the Crown of England, from the Conquest, unto the time of King Edward the III. with the beginning of three principal Lineages of the English Bloud-Royal, dispersed into the Houses of Britain, Lancaster, and York.
CHAP. III. Of the succession of English Kings from King Edward the third, unto our days, with the particular causes of dissention between the Families of York and Lancaster, more largely declared.
CHAP. IV. Of the great and general controversie and con∣tention between the two Houses Royal of Lan∣caster and York, and which of them may seem to have had the better Right to the Crown, by way of Succession.
CHAP. V. Of five Principal Houses or Lineages that do or may pretend to the Crown of England, which are the Houses of Scotland, Suffolk, Clarence, Britany, and Portugal, and first of all, of the House of Scotland, which containeth the pretentions of the King of Scots and the Lady Arabella.
CHAP. VI. Of the House of Suffolk, containing the Claims of the Countess of Darby and her Children, as also of the Children of the Earl of Hart∣ford.
CHAP. VII. Of the Houses of Clarence and Britany; which contain the laims of the Earl of Hunting∣ton, with the Pooles, as also of the Lady Infanta of Spain, and others of those Fa∣milies.
CHAP. VIII. Of the House of Portugal, which containeth the Claims as well of the King and Prince of Spain to the succession of England, as also of the Dukes of Parma and Bragansa by the House of Lancaster.
CHAP. IX. Whether it be better to be under a Foreign or Home born Prince, and whether under a great and mighty Monarch, or under a little Prince or King.
CHAP. X. Other Secondary and Collateral Lines, and how extream doubtful all these Pretences be, and which of all these Pretenders are most like to prevail in the end, and to get the Crown of England.
A Perfect and Exact Arbor and Ge∣nealogy of all the Kings, Queens and Princes of the Blood-Royal of England, from the time of William the Conquerour unto our time; whereby are to be seen the grounds of the Pre∣tenders to the same Crown at this day according to the Book of R. Doleman, set forth of the said Pretenders, and their several Claims in the year 1594.