Proceedings of the Board of Regents (1886-1891)
University of Michigan. Board of Regents.

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Page  1 MARCH MEETING, 1886. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOn, March 30th, 1886. The Board of Regents met in the room of the President, at 7 o'clock P. M. Present: Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett and Whitman. Absent: Regent Field. The meeting was called to order and opened with devotional exercises by the President. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Executive Committee and Regent Clark were appointed a Committee to prepare a recast of the Standing Committees of the Board of Regents, and present the same to the Board for their approval. The following is the report of the above Committee which on motion of Regent Shearer, was adopted: Executive Committee. The President, Regents Blair, Grosvenor and Whitman. Finance Committee. Regents Grosvenor, Willett and Field. Committee on Literary Department. Regents Clark, Willett and Whitman. Committee on Law Department. Regents Joy, Blair and Willett. Committee on Medical Department, Homceopathic College, and Dental School. Regents Grosvenor, Shearer and Joy.

Page  2 2 MARCH MEETING, 1886. Library Committee. Regents Willett, Blair, Field and the President. Committee on Museum, School of Mines, and Astronomical Observatory. Regents Blair, Clark and Field. Committee on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Department. Regents Joy, Clark and Whitman. Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Regents Shearer, Grosvenor and Joy. The President presented and read the following report of the action taken by the Executive Committee since the last meeting of the Board. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, l March 30, 1886. The Executive Committee respectfully beg leave to report that, since the last meeting of the Board, they have th v taken action as follows: On Dec. 8th, 1885, they met at the University. On the recommendation of the Committee on the Law Department, they voted to accept the resignation of William P. Wells, Kent Professor of Law, and to appoint Hon. Otto Kirchner, of Detroit, as his successor for the remainder of the University year, at the salary of $2,200 a year. Members of the Law Faculty having expressed a desire to invite some eminent speaker to address the Law Alumni at Commencement, the Committee voted to appropriate.50 for paying the travelling expenses of the speaker and for publishing his address. The Committee appointed Daniel A. McLachlan, M. D., Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Homoeopathic Medical College, for the remainder of the year at the salary of $1,600 a year, and David F. McGuire, M. D., was promoted from Associate Professor to Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology for the remainder of the year at the salary of $400 a year. These two appointments were made necessary by the continued illness of Professor T. P. Wilson, whose resignation is in your hands. The Committee voted to change the title of Clarence G. Taylor, B. S. from Assistant in Mechanical Engineering to that of Superintendent of Shops in the Engineering Laboratory. Oi Jan. 29th, 1886, on the recommendation of the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, the Committee appointed Mr. Otto

Page  3 MARCH MEETING, 1886. 3 Scherer Assistant in that Laboratory for the second semester of this year at a salary of $65 for that period. They also engaged Arthur L. Green, Ph. C., the Assistant in Pharmacognosy at a salary of $260 a year, to discharge additional duties in the Laboratory and in Pharmacognosy for the second semester, with an additional compensation of $100 for that time. These appropriations do not increase the total expenditures beyond the usual sum. All of which is respectfully submitted. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, Executive Committee. E. 0. GROSVENOR, On motion of Regent Willett, the report of the Executive Committee was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following communication from Professor T. P. Wilson of the Hom(eopathic College. ANN ARBOR, Mic.c, Dec. 9,1885. t To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN,-I beg respectfully to tender my resignation as Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. T. P. WILSON. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the resignation of Professor T. P. Wilson was accepted. Regent Joy presented and read the following communication from Professor William P. Wells, of the Law Department: DETROIT, Dec. 1st, 1885. HON. JAMES B ANGELL, LL. D., President of the University of Michigan: MY DEAR SIR: —Having already verbally communicated to you my purpose, for reasons connected with my private interests, to sever my connection with the University, I now offer my resignation of the Kent Professorship in the Law Department, to take effect on the 31st December inst. I need not assure you or the Board of Regents that this step, on my part, is taken with reluctance and regret. The years that I

Page  4 MARCH MEETING, 1886. have given to service in the Law School have been among the happiest of my life. To have had the opportunity of refreshing my own legal studies, and exploring the sources and development of the law by more systematic research than is possible in the exigencies of legal practice; to have been brought in contact with the fresh and eager minds which have passed under my instruction; to have enjoyed intimate and improving intercourse with my distinguished associates in the faculty; to have been benefited by my nearness to the academic life of the University; all these have been sources of great pleasure to me, and will continue among my dearest recollections. I recall with gratification the unfailing courtesy towards me of the President and all the members of the Board of Regents; and I remember with peculiar sensibility, that during a long illness, a few years ago, so protracted under leave of absence as to have justified the Board in intimating a wish for my resignation, nothing was ever manifested to me except kindness and consideration. The interest I felt in the University before my official connection with it, deepened during the years I have given to its service, will not be diminished by the termination of my present connection with it. No occasion in the future will be neglected by me, when I can serve it in any way. With just pride in the distinction it confers on our Commonwealth, in its assured prosperity and its high place among leading Universities and in the great work it is doing for the cause of liberal culture in the land, I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, WM. P. WELLS. On motion of Regent Joy, the resignation of Professor Wim. P. Wells was accepted. Regent Joy presented the following communication from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. The Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Thomas Wilson Miller, having completed all requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist is hereby respectfully recommended for that degree. By order of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. T. J. WRAMPELMEIER, Dean, pro tern. March 24, 1886.

Page  5 MARCH MEETING, 1886. On motion of Regent Joy, the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was conferred upon Thomas Wilson Miller in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following communication from the Dean of the Dental Department. ANN ARBOR,? March 30th, 1886. To the Honorable the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-Charles George Bush, having complied with all the requirements of this Department, is hereby recommended by the Faculty of the Dental College, for the Degree of " Doctor of Dental Surgery." Very Respectfully, J. TAFT, Dean. On motion the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon Charles George Bush, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Dental College. On motion of Regent Shearer, the President was requested to convey the thanks of the Board to the Crosby Steam Gauge Company, of Boston, for one Pop Safety Valve in section, and one very handsome skeleton Steam Gauge. Also to Messrs. Stevens and Scott, of Detroit, for one Injector, and one Gate Valve in section. Regent Blair presented and read the following communication from Sir Robert Hart, Inspector General of Chinese Maritime Customs: INSPECTORATE GENERAL OF CUSTOIS, PEKING, 1 October, 1885. SIR:-Your telegram was received some months ago, expressing your desire to secure the Chinese Exhibit at the New Orleans Cotton Exposition for the Michigan University, and the Chinese Commission was in consequence instructed to present, and eventually did present, that Exhibit to you to be dealt with as proposed. Seeing that so far there is no other record of the matter than the telegrams which were received from you or sent to the Commission, I-with whom it lay to dispose of the Exhibit-now address you

Page  6 MARCH MEETING, 1886. officially to say that from among the several claimants it gave me great pleasure to select your University for the gift, mindful as I was of the pleasant relations that you cultivated and maintained, official and private, when at the American Legation here. The destination of the Exhibit was duly reported to the Chinese Foreign Board on the 13th August last. I am, Sir, Your Obedient Servant, ROBERT HART, Inspector General of Chinese Maritime Customs, President of the Chinese Commission for the New Orleans World's Exposition of 1884-5. To HON. JAMES B. ANGELL, LL. D., President of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U. S. A. On motion of Regent Blair the foregoing communication was received, and ordered printed in the minutes. Regent Joy, Chairman of the Law Committee, presented a report from the Law Faculty, offered in compliance with the request made by the Board in October last (p: 651) for a report by the Faculty on the organization, methods of instruction and work in the Law Department. On motion of Regent Joy the report was received and laid on the table. Regent Clark presented a communication from Ex-Regent Van Riper in relation to the sale of lands in Ohio in which the University has some interest, which on motion was referred to the Finance Committee. Regent Clark presented the following request of Professor C. M. Gayley: To the Hon. the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-In view of the fact that I desire to pursue my studies in Germany, I would request you to grant me leave of absence for one year, dated from Oct. 1st, 1886. Respectfully Yours, C. M. GAYLEY. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the request of Professor Gayley was granted, his salary to lapse during his absence.

Page  7 MARCH MEETING, 1886. By permission, Professors Rogers and Hutchins addressed the Board in regard to equalizing the salaries in the Law. Department. On motion of Regent Joy the Board went into executive session. Regent Whitman moved that the salaries of the full Professors in the Law Department be made equal after the first day of October next. Carried. Regent Willett moved that a committee of three be appointed to consider all questions relating to salaries, and report at the next meeting of the Board. The motion prevailed, and Regents Willett, Grosvenor, and Blair were named as such committee. Dr. A. G. Oven having resigned as assistant to Dr. Frothingham, on motion of Regent Grosvenor Mr. I. H. Andrus was appointed to assist Dr. Frothingham for the remainder of the college year at the salary of the previous incumbent. On motion of Regent Grosvenor Doctor Frothingham was granted permission to attend the meeting of the American Medical Association during the first week in May. By permission, Professor H-. L. Obetz addressed the Board on the condition and needs of the Homceopathic Medical College. Regent Shearer presented the memorial of H. G. Prettyman and others, asking permission to connect a system of house drainage with the University sewer, at a point on 12th Street, near North University Avenue. The request was fully discussed by the Board, and permission to make said connection was withheld, for the reason that while in this particular case no harm might result, yet if allowed, it would establish a precedent that might become very troublesome. Regent Shearer, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, presented the following report;

Page  8 8 MARCH MEETING, 1886. March 30, 1886. The Honorable the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN: As to the matter of the alterations and improvements in the Law Library Room, referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, your Committee would recommend as follows: viz: That two large windows be formed in the northwest and southwest corners of the Library Room, and that two half windows be put into the east wall, all to be made to conform to the external features of the building. Also that suitable book cases, with seven or a suitable number of shelves in each, be formed as far as practicable from the cases in present use, and that cases of capacity for at least 13,000 volumes be so made. Your Committee would also recommend that a new floor of hard maple be laid over the present floor, and that this room be generally put in good order. The whole to be done under the direction of the Board of Auditors during the next vacation, and to be paid for from the Fund for Repairs. JAS. SHEARER, E. O. GROSVENOR, and Grounds. E.. GROSENOR, } Committee on Buildings JAMES F. JOY, On motion of Regent Clark the report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was accepted and adopted by the following vote: Ayes —Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Willett, Clark and Whitman. Nays-None. The following report and recommendation was presented by Regent Shearer, Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds. March 30, 1886. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-Your Committee on Buildings and Grounds who were authorized by resolution Aug. 25, 1885, to act for the Board of Regents, in all matters connected with the erection of the Building for the Engineering Laboratory, have to report that the contract for the building was made with Messrs. J. L. Gearing & Sons, of Detroit, as ordered by the Board, and that this firm has completed said contract to the entire satisfaction of your Committee with the exception of a few small portions of the work, that can not be done well before warm weather.

Page  9 MARCH MEETING, 1886. 9 The cost of the Building to this date has been............................$ 10,626 95 There has been expended for Plant..................................... 1,681 85 12,308 80 Leaving of the appropriation unexpended................................ 2,691 20 15,000 00 Your Committee offer herewith the Report of Professor M. E. Cooley, the Superintendent of the Building, for your further information, and would recommend that the remaining balance of the appropriation be expended under the direction of Professor M. E. Cooley and the Auditing Board. JAMES SH.R EARER, ) Committee on Buildings J. 0. GROSVENO, and Grounds. JAMNIES F. JOY, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, f ANN ARBOR, March 30, 1886. HON. JAMES SHEARER, Chairman Committee on Buildings and Grounds; SIR:-I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the expenditures to date of the Legislative appropriation of $15,000.00 for the Engineering Laboratory. Contract price of Building.................................$ 9,387 00 $ Allowances on work not executed.............................. 170 60 9,216 40 Extras allowed and paid as per written agreement............. 715 85 9,932 25 Total paid J. L. Gearing & Sons on contract.................... $9,932 25 Total paid when building is completed. 150 00 Retained until completion. $9,782 25 Actually paid. Paid J. L. Gearing & Sons, since settlement of March 2, for work not contracted for when settlement was made.. Gordon W. Lloyd, Architect, for plans........................ Expenses incurred by M. E. Cooley in connection with plans; trip East, Detroit and Bay City..................... Advertising for proposals, Ann Arbor papers, $1.75; Detroit papers, $23.73......................................... M. E. Cooley; 5 months salary as Superintendent, $50.00....... Total cost of Building...................................... Paid up to date for plant and equipment...................... Total amt. of appropriation expended to date.............. 47 00 285 00 87 22 25 48 250 00 694 70 10,626 95 1,681 85 12,308 80 Amt. of Appropriation....................................................$15,000 00 Amt. expended to date.................................................... 12,308 80 Remaining unexpended................................................... 2,691 20 Of this $2,691.20, about $650.00 has already been contracted for, and about

Page  10 10 MARCH MEETING. 1886. $600.00 will be required for steam heating. The basement floor is yet to be put in at a cost of about $300.00, and the old brick building must be changed somewhat at a probable expense of $150.00; $200.00 will be required to pay for services of an assistant to January 1, 1887. Already contracted for.......................................$ 650 00 $ Steam heating.................................................. 600 00 Basem ent floor................................................. 300 00 Changing old Building...................................... 150 00 A ssistant....................................................... 200 00 1,900 00 Remaining unexpended....................................... 2,691 20 Probable expense yet to be incurred.......................... 1,900 00 Balance..................................................... 791 20 A portion of this last balance must be expended for labor, setting machinery, and belting. Very respectfully submitted, M. E. COOLEY, Superintendent. On motion of Regent Blair the report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was accepted and adopted by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Willett the Board adjourned to 8 o'clock tomorrow morning. MORNING SESSION, The Board reassembled in the room of the President, at 8 o'clock A. M., pursuant to adjournment. Present: The President, Regents Shearer, Grosyenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, and Whitman. Absent: Regents Joy and Field. Regent Grosvenor moved that the sum of $500 be fixed as the limit of the current expenses in the department of General Chemistry for the present college year; and that the same amount be named as the annual appropriation of that Department, to stand until otherwise ordered by the Board. The motion of Regent Grosvenor was carried by the following vote:

Page  11 MARCH MEETING, 1886. 11 Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, and Whitman. Nays-None. The President presented the following supplemental report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave further to report that as Professor Harrington was unable, by reason of illness, to consider the proposition to continue through the second semester the instruction in Physics, the Committee in February appointed Dewitt B. Brace, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Physics for the second semester, at a salary of $800 for that period. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR. Executive Committee. E. O. GROSVENOR, On motion of Regent Shearer the report of the Executive Committee was accepted and adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Blair presented the following report and recommendations of the "University Senate." UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGGAN, March 30, 1886. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The University Senate, in response to the request of your Board (June Meeting, 1885; Proceedings, p. 553), have given further consideration to the subject of the proposed celebration of the approaching semi-centennial anniversary of the organization of the University, and have agreed to recommend to your Board the following plan and order of exercises: I. That the proposed celebration be appointed for Wednesday and Thursday of Commencement Week, June, 1887. II. That the exercises of the occasion be as follows: Wednesday Morning. —Two public addresses-one by a representative of the Board of Regents; the other, on the growth of the educational system of the State, by a representative of the State Teachers' Association. Wednesday Afternoon.-Exercises of the Society of the Alumni.

Page  12 MARCH MEETING, 1886. Wednesday Evening.-Reception by the University Senate. Thursday Morning.-The principal address of the occasion, in place of the usual Commencement oration, to be followed by congratulatory addresses from representatives of Harvard University, Yale College, and the University of Virginia, or other universities to be designated by the committee on invitations. Thursday Afternoon.-Further congratulatory addresses by representatives of other institutions of learning-to be received at the Commencement banquet. Thursday Evening.-A musical festival in University Hall. III. That the Board of Regents designate a representative to give the first address on Wednesday morning. IV. That the State Teachers' Association be invited, at their annual meeting in December next, to appoint some person to give the second address. V. That the Society of the Alumnibe invited, at their annual meeting in June next, to make such arrangements as they may deem proper for the commemoration of the occasion on Wednesday afternoon. VI. That the members of the various Faculties, with their wives, be invited to assist the President and Mrs. Angell in receiving the guests on Wednesday evening. VII. That the President of the University be invited to give the principal address of the occasion on Thursday morning. VIII. That the following committees be appointed: (1) A Committee on Invitations, of which the President of the University shall be Chairman. (2) A Committee on Arrangements, to be selected from the various Faculties. (3) A Committee on Entertainment and Hospitality, to consist of citizens of Ann Arbor, and members, of the various Faculties. IX. That a Commemoration Volume be published by the University, containing the programme of exercises and the addresses pertaining to the occasion. Respectfully submitted, W. H. PETTEE, Secretary of the Senate. Regent Blair presented the following resolution, which was adopted:

Page  13 MARCH MEETING. 1886. 13 Resolved, That the Board of Regents agree with the recommendation of the University Senate that the approaching semicentennial of the organization of the University should be appropriately celebrated, and hereby approve the plan set forth in their report of March 30, 1886. Resolved firther, That the carrying of the plan into effect be committed to the Senate, and that such appropriations will be hereafter made as may be necessary for this purpose. On motion of Regent Blair the Executive Committee was charged with the duty of selecting some person to represent the Board of Regents at the coming semi-centennial celebration. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Section 2, Chapter 5, of the By-Laws was changed to read as follows: "The two regular meetings of the Board shall be held, one at some time in the first half of October, and the other at some time in the last half of March of each year." Regent Blair presented the following communication from Acting Professor V. M. Spalding: To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-Mr. Joseph B. Whittier, of East Saginaw, an Alumnus of the University, has recently presented the botanical department with one hundred dollars for the purchase of Ellis' North American Fungi. This collection, numbering now seventeen hundred species, has been procured and will be of very great value to special students of Botany. Very Respectfully, V. M. SPALDING, Acting Professor of Botany. On motion of Regent Blair, the President was requested to convey to Mr. Joseph B. Whittier the cordial thanks of the Board for his generous gift in aid of the special students in Botany. Regent Shearer, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds submitted the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That the Board of Auditors be and hereby are directed to move the framed building, now used as a part of the

Page  14 MARCH MEETING, 1886. Engineering Laboratory, to its former position, and use said building as a Carpenter Shop; such portion of the machinery as is required for the use of the Engineering Department to be taken out and retained. Regent Blair presented the request of Acting Professor B. W. Cheever for an appropriation of $200, to purchase additional apparatus in the Chemical Laboratory, which was referred to the Committee on the School of Mines. Regent Clark presented the request of Acting Professor V. M. Spalding for an appropriation of $100, for the purchase of one immersion lense for use in the Botanical Laboratory. Referred to the Finance Committee. Regent Grosvenor presented the following communication from George E. Steele, Esq., of Traverse City. TRAVERSE CITY, January 26, 1886. i To the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: HON. GENTLEMEN:-I take pleasure in presenting to the University for the use of the Engineering Department, my Standard Steel Rod, 72 inches long, at a temperature of 61.6 o F.-rate of expansion of 0.00043 inches for one degree. This standard measure was obtained from the U. S. Coast Survey Office. I do this with the only provision that it shall be supplemented by you with a suitable apparatus of wood 100 feet in length for use in testing any chains, tapes, or measures, and especially of any belonging to members of the Michigan Engineering Society. GEO. E. STEELE. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the gift of Mr. Steele was accepted, and the President was requested to convey the thanks of the Board to him for the same. Professor J. B. Davis presented the following plan for carrying out the conditions in the communication of George E. Steele, Esq. This plan was adopted by the Board, and the Auditing Board were instructed to carry out the same. JAS. B ANGELL, LL. D., President of the University of Michigan: SIR: —In response to your request relating to the erection of a wooden standard measure upon the College grounds, in conformity to the conditions of the gift of Hon. George E. Steele, of Traverse

Page  15 MARCH MEETING, 1886. 15 City, Mich., to the University of a six feet steel U. S. Coast Survey Standard Rod, I beg leave to report as follows: 1. This wooden standard should be about 101 feet long. 2. It may be made of 2x4 pine scantling spliced and bolted together with carriage bolts. 3. Bolts may be fixed in it at the proper places for the various needed lengths on it to be indicated by marks on said bolt heads. 4. This pine rod may be carried on some 11 to 13 cast brack ets with a small adjustment both horizontally and vertically for setting and keeping said rod straight and level. 5. Said cast brackets may be carried by suitable castings secured to a solid brick wall in some of the buildings. 6. Another bracket of suitable form should be fixed beyond one end of the wooden rod to attach the end of any measure to, for comparison with the standard wooden rod. 7. I consider the brick wall on the west side of the hallway, upon the third floor of the main building, as the best place for this rod. 8. I think $50. a sufficient sum for erecting this rod. Even this sum need not be expended if the employees of the College can do a part of the work, such as making patterns for castings, making and mounting the rod and setting the brackets. 9. If informed of the action of the Regents favorably to the erection of this rod, I can publish it in the proceedings of the Michigan Engineering Society so that the members of the society can avail themselves of the provisions of Mr. Steele's gift. 10. I contemplate no charges for making comparisons. Respectfully, J. B. DAVIS. By permission, Doctor Palmer, Dean of the Medical Faculty, addressed the Board on the condition and needs of the Medical Department. A communication was received from the officers of the American Medical Missionary Society, an organization formed to aid medical students intending to enter upon the duties of medical missionaries in foreign fields. The object of the communication was to ascertain whether the Board of Regents could remit the fees of such students. On the recommendation of the Medical Committee it was voted that the Board has no power to remit the fees.

Page  16 16 MARCH MEETING, 1886. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Auditing Board were authorized to assign, discharge or otherwise to dispose of for the best interests of the University, a certain mortgage on lands in the State of Ohio, known as the Porter mortgage, in which the University has a small interest. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Auditing Board were authorized to employ a messenger boy in the General Offices, at a salary not exceeding two hundred and fifty ($250.) dollars. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  17 JUNE MEETING, 1886. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 June 29, 1886. The Board of Regents assembled in regular session in the room of the President, at 9 o'clock, A. M. Present: The President, Regents Grosvenor, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Absent: Regents Shearer and Blair. The meeting was called to order and opened with devotional exercises by the President. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. The President stated that he had received several communications which he desired to present to the Board, and suggested that the papers be received and referred to the Appropriate Committees. Agreed to. The following communication from the Ann Arbor Water Company was presented and read by Regent Grosvenor, and on his motion was received and ordered to be printed in the minutes: ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, May 21st, 1886. 5 The Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN,-Please to take notice that the Ann Arbor Water Company hereby withdraws its proposal to furnish water from its mains to the University of Michigan at an annual rental of Five Hundred Dollars per year. Very truly, THE ANN ARBOR WATER COMPANY. Per H. 2

Page  18 18 JUNE MEETING, 1886. On motion of Regent Joy, the sum of seventy-five dollars was appropriated for advertising the Law Department for the year 1886-7 by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. By permission, Professor Calvin Thomas addressed the Board. He stated that our General Library was sadly deficient in German Literature, and that for a long time he had been greatly embarrassed for want of the works of the best German Authors. To meet this want he had made an appeal to the German citizens of the State to contribute to a fund to be designated the Goethe Library Fund: the response to this appeal had been very gratifying, and that the donations had already reached the sum of more than $1,300. He asked the Board to accept the trusteeship of this fund. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the acceptance of the trusteeship of the above fund by the Board, was referred to the Library and Law Committees jointly. Regent Joy presented the following communication from the Dean of the Faculty of the Department of Law: To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: The Faculty of Law respectfully report that the following named persons have completed the course of instruction in the Law Department, and they recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred upon them: Respectfully submitted for the Faculty, CHARLES A. KENT, Dean. Ralph Leonard Aldrich, Frank Lord Boyd, Michael Edward Ames, George Andrew Callinan Brady, Stanley Corwin Andrews, John Irwin Breck, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. Asahel George Avery, Noah Harrison Browning, Lincoln Avery, B. S., William Henry Brunson, Michigan Agricultural College. Patrick Joseph Bannon, Lettie Lavilla Burlingame, Archibald Mechling Blakeley, AttCharles Henry Carlson,

Page  19 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 19 Louis Grant Carpenter, John Wharton Clark, A. B., Iowa College. William Millian Clary, James Albert Crawford, George Boyer Creveling, James Edmund Cross, Alfred Owen Crozier, George Zophar Dimmitt, A. B., Centre College. Alpheus Edwin Doe, Charles Dresbach, Att'y, Benjamin Woodbury Driggs, Jr. Charles Henry Dudley, B. C. E., Cornell College. Frank Edward Durning, John Myron Edgerton, Robert Emory Evans, Alfred Wallingford Farrar, John Adam Gallup, A. B., Olivet College. Leonard Bertin Gardner, Edwin Clendenin Garrigues, Henry Clarke Gilbert, Joseph Buckner Gill, John Wesley Gillespie, Jacob Warren Houder, Edward Everett Hull, Charles Mark Humphrey, Isaac N. Huntsberger, A.M., Att., University of Wooster. Yasnoskeh Ishii, James Glacstone Jolly, B. C. L., McGill University. Winthrop Reed Kendall, Charles Henry Kline, Milton Kraus, Jason Gordon Lamison,,James Marshall Lawson, A. B., College of New Jersey. Roger Miller Lee, Frank Nathaniel Lufkin, A. B., George Alexander Lukehart, Harry Silvis Lydick, William Lewis Marquardt, James Charles Martin, A. B., Norman Thickstun Mason, A.B., Cornell College. William Luther Mason, Calvin Dexter May, Ph. B., William Arthur Frank May, William A. McDonald, Att'y, Delbert James Haff, A.B., Att'y, John Webster McKenzie, William Henri Haggerty, Ph. M.,Alonzo B. McMillan, Hillsdale College. Charles Brook Iamble, James McNamara, James William Hamilton, Tom Henry McNeil, A. B Elias N. Hartman, V alter Scott Meeker, Thomas Davis Healy, B. S., Mary Merrill, Ambrose Edgel Helmick, Henry David Merithew, George Everard Hibner, Att'y, Charles Frederic Miller, Francis Grant Higgins, Edward Charles Miller, Edward Everett Hogg, Volney Miller, Frank Hooper, John T. Moffit, A. B., I Frank M. Hostetter, Cornell College. George Ladd Munn, A. B., University of Rochester.

Page  20 20 JUNE MEETING, 1886. Henry William Nieman, Robert Allen Nye, Rollo Blakesley Oglesbee, Att'y, John Michael Opsahl, William Claiborne Overton, Charles Edward Peele, Ruport Tarpley Pickens, A. B., Yadkin College. George Gregg Prewitt, Henry Saint Rayner, Att'y, Charles Matloche Rice, Granville Addison Richardson, John Charles Richter, Jr., James Scouton, Kelly Stephen Searl, Charles Edward Servis, John Clarence Shaw, Fred Bemister Shepherd, Allen Shewmon, Benjamin Franklin Shively, Att., Brown Sylvester Smith, Ezra Smith, James Gabriel Smith, A. B., University of Kansas. William James Spears, Att'y, Marline Bingham Stephens, Joseph Henderson Stewart, John Emmett Sullivan, A. B., Detroit College. William Harvey Talcott, Att'y, Oris Columbus Tarpenning, Zeb Vance Walser, A. B., Yadkin College. William Worth Wendell, Thomas Burchard White, Augustus W. Wolfe, Arthur Creighton Wright, Francis WVright. On motion of Regent Joy, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendations of the Faculty of the Law Department. The request of the Law Librarian for an increase of salary was presented by Regent Joy, and was on motion referred to the Special Committee on Salaries. Regent Joy, Chairman of the Committee on Pharmaceutical Department, presented and read the following communication: ANN ARnoR, June 28, 1886. The Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN,-The following named persons, having completed all requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist, are respectfully recommended to your honorable body for that degree: George Sherman Alcorn, Andrew John Buckham, John Lansing Banister, Edward W. Clark, Ph. G., Gordon Acers Bowdish, John Robert Conrads,

Page  21 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 21 George Beal Daniels, Gerhard Meinert, Jeptha Wade Doty, Edsel Alexander Ruddiman, Wirt Payson Doty, Elmer Gardner Runyan, Harvey Kimble Eaton, Otto Scherer, George Henry Felt, Jr., Edgar Dennis Smith, Charles Thomas Haigh, Edwin Rawson Stivers, Paul Henry Hirth, Mason Sacia Thomson, Fred Fenner Vedder. By order of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. T. J. WRAMPELMEIER, Dean pro tern. On motion of Regent.Joy the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Professor Charles E. Greene asked for an appropriation of $200 to purchase drawings for the Engineering Department. The request of Prof. Greene was referred to the Committee on the Literary Department. The proposition of Mr. Thomas C. Trueblood to teach elocution and oratory in this University, one semester in each year, for a salary of $1,100, was referred to the Special Committee on Salaries at the last session of the Board. Regent Willett, Chairman of Special Committee, reported that they had had the same under consideration and recommended that the proposition of Mr. Trueblood be not accepted. The Board by vote concurred in the report and recommendation of the Committee. Regent Grosvenor Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following communication from the Dean of the Homceopathic Faculty: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Ann Arbor, Mich., June 30, 1886. To the Honorable Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN,-The Faculty of the Homoeopathic Medical College respectfully report the following named persons as having complied with the requirements of the University, and beg to re

Page  22 22 JUNE MEETING, 1886. commend them to your Honorable Board for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In behalf of the Faculty, H. L. OBETZ, M. D., Dean. Lawrence Baldwin. Roscoe Dudley Mack. George Gabriel Caron. John Wesley McLachlan. Annie Elizabeth Clark. Isaiah Snyder Morris. Laura Amada Edwards. Edward Herman Pond, A. B. Joseph Johnson Fowler. Hugh B. Reynolds. George Wirt Hathaway. Nana Braden Riddell. Mary Tufts Hathaway. Robert Coleman Rudy. George Benson Kelso. Elizabeth Uncapher. Harold Beckwith Wilson, B. S. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Homoeopathic Medical College. A vacancy having occurred in the Law Faculty by reason of the expiration of the time for which Professor Kirchner was appointed, Regent Joy moved that the appointment of Professor Otto Kirchner be made permanent. Regent Willett moved that the matter be referred to the Law Committee, which was so ordered. On motion of Regent Joy the Board took a recess until 1:30 o'clock P. Ai. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled in the room of the President at 1:30 o'clock P. M., and on motion of Regent Joy went into executive session. After remaining in executive session for some time, the business of the open session was resumed. Regent Whitman moved that Professor H. S. Carhart be appointed Professor of Physics at a salary of $2,200. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes —Regents Grosvenor, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None.

Page  23 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 23 At the last meeting of the Board the Executive Committee was charged with the duty of selecting one member of the Board of Regents to deliver an address at the coming celebration of the semi-centennial anniversary of the organization of the University. Regent Grosvenor from the Executive Committee, reported that his Committee had made choice of Regent Blair to deliver said address. On motion of Regent Clark, Regent Whitman was invited to deliver an address of welcome to the Peninsular Saenger-Bund which meets in University Hall in August next. On motion of Regent Blair the Board adjourned to 7 o'clock P. M. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7 o'clock P. M. Regent Grosvenor Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented and read the following communication from the Dean of the Medical Faculty: DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Ann Arbor, June 28, 1886. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: The following named persons having complied with all the requirements made for graduation in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, are hereby recommended for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine. A. B. PALMER, Dean. CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE. Frank Seth Armitage, Esther Clara H. Brooks, A. B., Smith College. Achbor Jehu Baker, A. M., Belno Addison Brown. B. D., Iowa College. Nashotah Theological College. Florence Adell Belknap, Heman Hampton Brown, John Albert Bobb, Rose Standish Bryan, Fred Nathaniel Bonine, Lawrence Byron, Teunis Ardenne Boot, Rosalie Armstrong Chadbourne, Edward Lincoln Bower, Edmund Conley,

Page  24 24 JUNE MEETING, 1886. Mary Catherine Cook, Mary Helen Cullings, 3Byron Francis Dawson, Ph. C., Charles Richard Dewey, Wealthly Desire Dibble, Harley Mitchell Dunlap, Jacob Asher Fink, Charles George Forbes, John Calvin Frets, Miriam Gardner, Walter Harding) lImer Ellsworth Hendershott, Emily Alice Hill, Sarah C. Hills, Wilmer Brown Hoge, Ph. C. William Henry Hood, B. S. Adrian College. Frank Howe Hovey, Edwin J. Howe, Enos John Hughes, Jesse Butler Hull, Samuel Adams Jackson, Thomas Smith Kingston, Martha Elizabeth Lough, Oliver Almond LaCrone, Frederick Lohrstorfer, Horace Mandel Lowe, Harry Arthur March, Frank Wilson Martin, Mary Simpson McCarty, Daniel McEacheran, Edward L. Mooney, William Phipps Munn, Frank Neely, Louis Delevan Niles, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. Charles Eugene Norris, John Edward Ottaway, Johannes Abraham Otte, A. B., Hope College. Edward B. Patterson, A. M., Oberlin College. Charles Birdsall Pearson, William Crosby Riddel, William H. Riley~ Dana Chapman Rood, Frank Lisle Rose, Hannah Cullombine Rous, John Henry Seiler, Warren Bradford Sexton, Frank Edward Victor Shore, William Forsyth Shorts, Nobyoshi H. Shirafji, Harry Austin Sifton, Lois Hepsy Stoddard, Thomas A. Stoddard, Mary Elizabeth Strain, John Hubert Swanson, Fred Adelbert Swartwood, George Robert Taylor, James Bricker Tedrow, Ph. B., Mt. Union College. Mary Glover Thompson, Mary Rosetta Thompson, Fred Arthur Todd, Cora Alfretta Turner, Albert Mason Tyler, James Townley Upjohn, Glenn Bee Venable, Joseph Adam Weitz, A. M., Jacob Wile, Jr., Flora Belle Williams, Harry Almon Wood, Scott Percy Woodin. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon the persons named in the re

Page  25 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 25 commendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Regent Clark submitted the following communication from the Secretary of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts: DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS. Ann Arbor, June 28th, 1886. % To the Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN,-I have the honor to report to your Honorable Body that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, being satisfied that the reason for the absence from Commencement, of John Nelson James, candidate for Bachelor of Arts, Thomas Bertrand Bronson, candidate for Master of Arts, Lewis Addison Rhoades, candidate for Master of Arts, are satisfactory, respectfully recommended that the degree to which they are entitled be conferred upon them in their absence. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Secretary. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN,-By direction of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, I have the honor to report that the following persons are recommended to you for the degrees indicated: BACHELOR OF LETTERS. Albert Levi Arner, Flisha Monroe Hartman, Ada Electa Ferguson, Alexander Frazer McEwan, Edward Leroy Parmenter, Jr. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (COURSE IN BIOLOGY). Charles Wright Dodge, Erwin F. Smith. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (COURSE IN CHEMISTRY). Edward DeMill Campbell, Louis Munroe Dennis, Ph. B., Frederick George Novy. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING). Lewis Ezra Denham, Burt McDonald. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING). Clifford Chester Smith.

Page  26 26 JUNE MEETING, 1886. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING). Raymond Walter Beach, Louis Clarence Hill, William Wallace Campbell, William Clarence King, Fred Goodrich Frink, Fred Morley, Leslie Warren Goddard, George Rosen Simpson, Howard George Hetzler, Ernest Stenger. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN GENERAL SCIENCE). Charles Erwin Bruce, Luella Belle Foss, Mary Climie, Albert Cotton Grier, Nathan Davis Corbin, Wilber Fisk Jackman, Frederick Wiley Stevens. BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Franklin Augustus Ainsworth, Ross LeHunte Mahon, Nellie Elizabeth Bancroft, Josiah McRoberts, Harriet Alice Chipman, William Morgan Odell, Claus Siem Claussen, Kate Orr, Fannie G. Kahn, Helen Lucy Osgood, Caroline E. Lorman, Edwin Frank Saunders, Frank Louis Weaver BACHELOR OF ARTS. Charles Lincoln Andrews, Martin Darrell Atkins, Monroe D. Baker, Walter Bond Bliss, Herbert Eugene Boynton, Edson Pratt Bradley, Edward Caldwell, William Whiting Chapin, Frank Alfred Clary, Minnie Louise Converse, Ira George Curry, Nettie Chloe Daniels, Nat Earl Degren, Elwood Frank Demmon, Robert Neil Dickman, George Philip Fleisher, Joseph Ganahl, Jr., William Marshall Giller, Elizabeth Portia Goodson, Myron Oscar Graves, Wilbur James Gregory, Clara Viets Grover, James Grant Hays, Jonathan Heaton, Frederick Charles Hicks, Fred Bruce Hollenbeck, George Francis James, John Nelson James, Andrew Stewart Lobingier, Elmer Adelbert Lyman, William Andrew McAndrew, William McCracken, Ollice Parks, Edwin Deppen Peifer, Herman Joseph Powell, George Lamphere Price, Hewey Abbott Reynolds, Sarah Elizabeth Satterthwaite, Clyde William Smith, Hiram Allen Sober,

Page  27 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 27 Grant Byron Swisher, Belmont Waples, Orla Benedict Tayler, Frank Day Wells, Henry Silas Tibbit, Chauncey Alvah Wheeler, Samuel Brown Todd, Fred Bishop Wixson, Eliza Putnam Underwood, Frederick Thompson Wright. IMASTER OF ARTS. Thomas Bertrand Bronson, Mary Emilie Holmes, Webster Cook, Lewis Addison Rhoades. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Edward Playfair Anderson, Douglas Houghton Campbell, J. Rose Colby. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Secretary. Regent Clark presented the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That the degrees indicated in the foregoing communication be and are hereby conferred upon the persons named therein in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. The President presented the following communication from the Board of Health: OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, CITY OF ANN ARBOR, Ann Arbor, June 29th, 1886.. Dr. J. B. Angell, President University of Mich.: Complaints having been made to us of the existence of a nuisance in the form of an offensive odor arising at the outlet of the University sewer, and having inspected and declared the same to be a nuisance and detrimental to public health, you are therefore requested to present the action of the Board of Health to the proper authorities for immediate action to abate the same. By order of the Board of Health. JOHN KNAPP, Health Officer. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Auditing Board were instructed to abate the nuisance at the outlet of the University sewer. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Walter Miller, A. M., was appointed instructor in Greek for the ensuing year at a salary of $900, by the following vote:

Page  28 JUNE MEETING, 1886. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Joy, Professor H. S. Frieze was appointed Acting Presidcent during the absence of President Angell. Regent Joy submitted the following report: On the recommendation of the Law Committee it was voted that the Board of Regents will agree to become trustees of all the moneys which have been raised for the German American Goethe Fund so called, by Professor Thomas, or by other means, or which may be raised, that all such money be paid to the Treasurer of this Board to be credited by him to this special fund and to be managed and invested under the care of the Finance Committee of the Board. That it shall be expended to the amount of the first one thousand dollars under the direction of the President, the Librarian, and the Professor of German Language and Literature. That all money above the said one thousand dollars which is in or may come into this fund, shall be invested under the direction of the said Finance Committee, and only the interest thereon may be expended by or under the direction of the parties above named. The above report was concurred in by the full Board. The President presented and read the following commucation from Professor H. S. Frieze: To the Honorable the Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN,-I have the pleasure of presenting to the University in behalf of Mr. Chas. H. Denison, of the class of 1861, a crayon portrait of the late Henry Philip Tappan, first President of the University. This portrait, which is of the life size, and of quarter length, was made by Mr. Otto Venius, of New York. It was studied from several photographs of Dr. Tappan, taken in his best days, when residing at the University, and Mr. Denison constantly watched the work in its process, making suggestions from his own memory; so that all of us who knew the first President are agreed in pronouncing the likeness absolutely perfect. The artistic excellence of the execution of the portrait, also adds greatly to the value of Mr. Denison's gift; and he especially deserves our thanks for pointing out the way in which good service can done to,

Page  29 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 29 the University by its alumni in placing within its halls the forms and features of the distinguished dead whose names are conspicuous in its history. Very respectfully, HENRY S. FRIEZE. On motion of Regent Field, the portrait of Dr. Tappan was received and the cordial thanks of the Board were tendered to Mr. Charles H. Denison for his valued gift. By permission Dr. A. B. Palmer addressed the Board on the condition and needs of the Medical Department. On motion of Regent Joy the Board adjourned to tomorrow morning at 10:30 o'clock. MORNING SESSION, Wednesday, June 30, 1886. The Board of Regents reassembled in the room of the President at 10:30 A. M. Full Board present except Regent Shearer. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Committee on the Dental School, submitted the following communication from the Dean of the Faculty of the Dental Department: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, DENTAL COLLEGE. Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN,-The following named persons, members of the Senior Class of this Department, for the term just closed, having completed the prescribed course of study and work, and conformed to the requirements in a satisfactory manner, are by the Faculty of the College, presented and recommended to your Honorable Board, for the Degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery: CLASS OF 1886. Henry Leo Banzhaf, George James Dennis, Edmund Keyes Clements, Frank Fringer Douds, William Albert Courtney, Calvin Ezra Fitzgerald, Herbert Cox, Felipe Gallegos, Harry Williamson Davis, Charles Perry Hanson, Henry Addison Dawley, Anastasia Helen Hefter,

Page  30 JUNE MEETING, 1886. William A. Hoover, Matilda N ehls, Ralph Hoyt, Charles Sillman Page, Merritt Custar Hutchins, Albert Rysdorp, Michael Willis Lau, Clifford Francis Snyder, Edward Emery Lobb, Frederick Mott Thompson, Caroline Ada Magness, Marie A. Thompson. Thomas John Mason, Walton Kellogg Walwrath, Arthur Henry McCann, George Henry Watson, Benjamin Franklin Yates, Respectfully yours, J. TAFT, Dean. On motion the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendations therein contained. Regent Grosvenor moved that the title of T. J. Wrampelmeier be Assistant Professor, and that his salary be 81,360. The motion of Regent Grosvenor was carried by the following vote: Ayes —Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-Regent Willett. Regent Grosvenor presented the following communication from the Director of the Chemical Laboratory: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, CHEMICAL LABORATORY, Ann Arbor, June 30, 1886. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN,-I beg leave to recommend appointments in the teaching force of the Chemical Laboratory as follows: That the following re-appointments be made, for the year 1886-87, each at the same salary granted in 1885-86: Mrs. Kate C. Johnson, Dispensing Clerk in the Chemical Laboratory; Eugene V. Riker, Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory, and Charles L. Davis, Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry; Also, that Mr. George W. VWhyte be appointed Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, in place of Edward D. Campbell, whose term of service has expired, and at the same salary. And that Mr. Charles P. Beckwith be appointed as Assistant in the Chemical

Page  31 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 31 Laboratory in place of Mr. L. M. Dennis, whose term of service expires, and at the salary of the previous incumbent. Further I beg leave to recommend that Edsel A. Ruddiman, Ph. C., be appointed as Assistant in Pharmacognosy, at the salary of one hundred and fifty dollars, and for the year 1886-7, in place of A. L. Green, whose term of service expires, and whose rate of salary as fixed one year ago (irrespective of the absence of the undersigned) was $260.00 per annum. By these recommendations, the expenditure for Assistants has been reduced (1) $110.00 in the successor of Mr. Green, and $250.00 in the successors of Mr. VanSlyke, $360.00, therefore, remain. And I respectfully ask you to add this to the salary of Mr. T. J. Wrampelmeier. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Director of the Chemical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Grosvenor all the appointments recommended in the above communication were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The annual reports of the Medical Faculty, and the House Surgeon in University Hospital, were received and placed on file. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That this Board desires to express to William P. Wells, whose resignation as Professor in the Law Department has been accepted, its appreciation of the long and valuable services so faithfully rendered by him to the University. The Medical Faculty submitted the following recommendations: Osbourne F. Chadbourne, M. D., to be Assistant to the chair of Pathology and the Practice of Medicine at a salary of $100. Thomas J. Sullivan Assistant to the chair of Surgery, salary $100.

Page  32 32 JUNE MEETING, 1886. James N. Martin Assistant to the chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, salary $100. James H. Andrus Assistant to the chair of Materia Medica and Ophthalmology, salary $100. William A. Campbell to be Secretary of the Faculty, salary $100. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the above appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved that $200 be appropriated to purchase drawings for use in the Engineering Department. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Joy the sum of $500 was appropriated from the contingent fund for the purchase of additional equipment in the Engineering Laboratory by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Eield and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reconvened at 2 o'clock p. M. Regent Grosvenor presented the request of the Homceopathic Medical Faculty, asking that the Board provide for instruction in Medical Jurisprudence in their Department. This request was referred to the Law Committee. Regent Grosvenor presented the request of the Faculty of the Homoeopathic Medical College to be allowed to revise

Page  33 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 33 the form of the Diploma of their Department. This request was referred to the Executive Committee. Acting Professor of Botany, V. NM. Spalding, asked for an appropriation of $300 to purchase additional apparatnus for his Department. On motion of Regent Grosveinor the sum of $145 or so much thereof as may be necessary to purchase one immersion lens and one dry lens for use in the Botanical Laboratory. The vote on this motion was: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The Homoeopathic Faculty submitted a plan which embraced some changes in the course of instruction in that Department, which on motion of Regent Grosvenor was referred to the Executive Committee with power to act. The Law Committee to whom was referred the question of the permanent appointment of Professor Otto Kirchner as Kent Professor of Law, reported that they had been unable to reach any conclusion in Committee, and referred the matter back for the consideration of the full Board. Mr. Kirchner and Mr. C. I. Walker were placed in nomination for the Kent Professorship for one year. A call vote was taken which resulted as follows: For Professor Kirchner-Regents Grosvenor and Joy. For C. I. Walker-Regents Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman and Blair; and Mr. Walker was declared elected for the coming year. On motion of Regent Joy the appointment of Assistant Professor of Law J. C. Knowlton was continued for one year at a salary of $1,200, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, ('lark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Clark submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the salaries of full Professors in the Law and Dental Departments, be fixed at $2,000 from October first, 1886.

Page  34 34 JUNE MEETING, 1886. The resolution of Regent Clark was adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Field, Jacob E. Reighard, Ph. B., was appointed Assistant in Zoology for one year at a salary of 8900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Field, and Whitman. Nays-Regent Willett. Regent Clark moved that Professor John Dewey be made Assistant Professor of Philosophy at a salary of $1,600. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Joy, the honorary degree of Master of Arts was conferred on MASAKAZU TOYAMA, a former student of this University, and now Dean of the College of Literature in the University of Tokio, Japan. On motion of Regent Whitman, the honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred on ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, M. D., Director of the Chemical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on SIR ROBERT HART, Inspector General of Maritime Customs of the Empire of China. On motion of Regent Willett, the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on HON. CUSHMAN KELLOGG DAVIS, of St. Paul, Minn., a graduate of the Class of 1857. On motion of Regent Joy, the Board took a recess to tomorrow afternoon at 12:30 o'clock. AFTERNOON SESSION, TITURSDAY, July 1st, 1886. At 12:30 o'clock the Board convened, and on motion of Regent Grosvenor, adopted a vote of thanks to the Hon.

Page  35 JUNE MEETING, 1886. 35 Cushman K. Davis, of St. Paul, Minn., for his scholarly and eloquent commencement address, and requested a copy for publication. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  36

Page  37 SPECIAL MEETING. 1886. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, July 19, 1886. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P).. Present: Acting President Frieze, Regents Grosvenor Blair, Clark and Whitman. Absent: Regents Shearer, Joy and Willett. The meeting was called to order and opened by Acting President Frieze. Regent Grosvenor presented and read the following report of'the Executive Committee: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN,, July 6, 1886. t To the Honorable Board of Regents: The Executive Committee respectfully beg leave to report that on July 1st they transacted the following business, as a quorum of the Board was not present, and the necessity for action on these matters seemed pressing. The sum of $300, to be paid from the dental fund, was appropriated for the purchase of dental journals and books, recommended by the dean of the Dental Faculty as necessary. EDIWARD B. PATTERSON, nM. D., was appointed ward master in the University hospital for one year at a salary of $300. CHARLES STEWART was appointed nurse at the usual salary. MRS. IDA R BBRIGHAMi was appointed ward mistress for one year in the University Hospital at a salary of $300; it being understood that two nurses were to be appointed by the Auditing Board at such rates that the total sum expended in the woman's ward should not exceed the expenditure of last year. The above appointments were made on the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery.

Page  38 38 SPECIAL MEETING, 1886. On the recommendation of the Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College, the following appointments were made: R. C. REEDY, M. D., House Surgeon and Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, salary $350. G. G. CAnON, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology and Otology, salary $100, and Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine, salary $100. EMMIA E. BOWER, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Gynsecology, salary $100, and Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica, salary $100. BENJAMIN L. D'OOGE, A. M., was re-appointed Instructor in Latin for one year, and Arthur WV. Burnett, A. B.,.was re-appointed Instructor in English and German for one year, each at a salary of $900. On July 6th, on the recommendation of Dr. Herdman, who stated that other members of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery concurred in the the recommendation. Miss MARY HELEN CULLINGS was appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy at the usual salary of $100. Respectfully submitted, JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, lExecutive Committee. E. O. GROSVENOR, ) On motion of Regent Clark the report of the Executive Committee just read was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board went into executive session; after which the business of the open session was resumed. The resignation of Prof. C. A. Kent was presented and read by the President, and on motion of Regent Field, was accepted and ordered placed on file. The secretary presented the request of Professor Harrington that water be put in the Observatory buildings for fire purposes. The Board did not think the pressure in the mains was sufficient at that elevation to be of any service as a fire protection, and therefore declined to order it put in.

Page  39 SPECIAL MEETING, 1886. 39 Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the filling of the vacancy in the Law Faculty caused by the resignation of Professor Kent, be deferred until the next meeting of the Board, and that when this Board adjourned it be to Monday, August 23, at 7 o'clock p. Mi. The above resolution was adopted by the full vote of the Board. Regent Grosvenor, chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the resignation of Mrs. M. J. Gillett, matron of the Homceopathic College, which was on motion accepted. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Mrs. M. I. Brockenshaw was appointed matron in the Homceopathic Medical College. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned to Monday, August 23, at 7 o'clock p. M. JAMES H. WADE,. Secretary.

Page  40

Page  41 ADJOURNED MEETING. 1886. ANN ARBOR, August 23d, 1886. i The Board of Regents met in adjourned session in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P. M. Present: Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Absent: Regent Shearer. Acting President Frieze being ill, was not present. The meeting was called to order by the Secretary, and on nmtion of Regent Grosvenoir, Regent Joy was called to the Chair. On motion of Regent Clark, the resignations of Benjamin L. D'Ooge, Instructor in Latin, and Theodore J. Wrampelmeier, Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry and Pharmacy, were accepted. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the sum of.70.00, be and is hereby appropriated for the purchase of one microtome and one dissecting instrument for the use of the Zoological Laboratory. The resolution of Regent Grosvenor was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willet, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. The Auditing Board submitted.the following report:

Page  42 42 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. ANN ARBOR, August 23, 1886. To the the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN,-The Auditing Board to whom was referred the selection and appointment of two female nurses in the University Hospital, would respectfully report that they have appointed (subjected to your approval) Miss Lois H. Stoddard and Miss Mary Cutler. The salary of each to be $150 and board. HENRY S. FREIZE, H. SOULE,. Auditing Board. JAMES H. WADE, The report of the Auditing Board was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion. of Regent Grosvenor, the title of ProFessor Thomas M. Cooley, was changed to Professor of American History and Constitutional _Law. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board went into executive session. After which the business of the open session was renewed. On motion of Regent Field, the Board proceeded to elect a Professor, to fill the vacancy in the Law Faculty, caused by the resignation of Professor Charles A. Kent. Levi T. Griffin, of Detroit, was elected Fletcher Professor of Law for one year at a salary of $2,000, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Joy, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  43 OCTOBER MEETING. 1886. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, October 12th, 1886.. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President, at 7:00 o'clock P. M. Present: The President, Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field, and Whitman. Absent: Regents Shearer, Joy, and Willett. The meeting was called to order and opened with devotional exercises by the President. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Several communications which had been received by the President, were at his suggestion referred to appropriate Committees. The President stated that his annual report had been prepared and was held subject to the pleasure of the Board. Regent Field moved that the Board now listen to the reading of the President's report. Carried. PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: I beg leave to present to you my annual report for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1886. The following changes have been made in the Faculties: The Executive Committee took action as follows, on )ec. 8, 1885: Professor William P. Wells having resigned,

Page  44 44 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. Dec. 1, the Kent Professorship of Law, the Committee appointed Otto Kirchner, of Detroit, to fill the vacancy for the remainder of the year. They also appointed Daniel A. McLachlan, M. D., Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Homceopathic Medical College, to take the place of Professor T. P. Wilson, who was disabled by illness, and who resigned on the following day, Dec. 9. They changed the title of David P. McGuire, M. D., from Associate Professor to Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Homceopathic Medical College, and the title of Clarence G. Taylor, from Assistant in Mechanical Engineering to Superintendent of Shops in the Engineering Laboratory. In February, the Executive Committee appointed Dewitt B. Brace, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Physics for the second semester. The above action of the Executive Committee was ratified by the Board at the March meeting, 1886. During the second semester, Professor Prescott was absent on leave, and Professor Johnson was in charge of the Chemical Laboratory, and T. S. Wrampelmeier was Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry and Pharmacy. In June, 1886, H. S. Carhart, A. M., was appointed Professor of Physics, and Charles I. Walker, LL. D., Kent Professor of Law; Jerome C. Knowlton, A. M., was continued Assistant Professor of Law for one year; John Dewey, A. M., was promoted from the Instructorship to the Assistant Professorship of Philosophy; Walter Miller, A. M., was appointed Instructor in Greek, and Jacob E. Reighard, Ph. B., Instructor in Zoology. Professor Frieze was made Acting President for the period of President Angell's absence in Europe. July 19th, Charles A. Kent's resignation of the Fletcher Professorship of Law, was tendered and accepted; B. L. D'Ooge, A. M., was reappointed Instructor in Latin; and Arthur W. Burnett, A. M., was reappointed Instructor in English and German for one year.

Page  45 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 45 August 23d, Levi T. Griffin, A. M., of Detroit, was elected Fletcher Professor of Law; Charles M. Gayley being absent on leave in Europe, and B. L. D'Ooge having resigned his place as Instructor in Latin, Andrew C. McLaughlin, A. B., was appointed in his stead. The title of Thomas M. Cooley was changed from Professor of History to Professor of American History and Constitutional Law. The resignation of T. J. Wrampelmeier, Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry and Pharmacy, was accepted. Many of the graduates of the Law School will hear with regret of the resignations of Professor Kent and Professor Wells. The former had held his chair continuously since 1868, and the latter had served with a somewhat prolonged interruption by illness, since 1874. Both had devoted themselves with fidelity to the school, and by their ability and learning had left their impress upon it. But while we are called to part with these experienced teachers, we have the pleasure of welcoming back Professor Walker, who was connected with the school before either of the two Professors just named. He filled the Kent chair of Law from 1859 to 1876. It is with special pleasure that we see Professor Olney and Professor Elisha Jones sufficiently recovered from prolonged illness to undertake their work again this year. Professor D'Ooge is absent on leave as the Director of the American School of Archaeology at Athens for the coming academic year. The appointment of him to this post is alike an honor to him and to the University and will as may be seen, be of real service to our Institution as well as to the cause of good learning: The degrees conferred have been as follows: DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. B achelor of L etters.......................................... 5 Bachelor of Science (Course in Biology)....................... 2 " " ' (Course in Chemistry).................... 3...' (Course in Mining Engineering).......... 2 " C' (Course in Mechanical Engineering)...... 1

Page  46 46 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. Bachelor of Science (Course in Civil Engineering)............. 10." " (Course in General Science)............... 7 Bachelor of Philosophy....................................... 13 Bachelor of A rts............................................. 50 Master of Arts................................ 4 Doctor of Philosophy................................. 3 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery).. 83 B achelor of Law s.......................................... 116 Pharmaceutical Chemist.................................-... 23 Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic College)................... 17 Doctor of Dental Surgery.................................... 29 368 HONORARY DEGREES. Master of Arts............................................... 1 Doctor of Philosophy.................................... 1 D octor of L aw s.............................................. 2 Trotal.............................................................. 372 The number of students was as follows: DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Resident Graduates.................................. 23 Graduates studying in absentia....................... 12 Candidates for a Degree............................. 476 Students not Candidates for a Degree................ 85 - 596 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. R esident Graduates.................................... 2 Third Year Students................................ 83 Second Year Students................................. 114 First Year Students.................................. 128 - 327 DEPARTMENT OF LAW. Seniors................................................ 118 Juniors................................................ 168 - 286 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. Resident Graduate..................................... 1 Second Year Students................................. 24 First Year Students............................... 36 - 61 HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Students-Total in the College......................... 49

Page  47 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 47 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Students-Total in the College........................ 82 1,401 The total attendance the previous year was 1,295. The largest part by far of the increase this year was in the Literary Department. We were gratified to see that not only was the number who entered from the preparatory schools larger than usual, but there was an unprecedented accession of students from other colleges. These last were attracted, as we think they well may be, by the variety and extent of the advanced instruction which we are able to offer them under our elective system in the last half of the college course. If the day should ever come when we could leave to the schools or the smaller colleges the work now done here in the first two years of the course, and could bend our energies entirely to the work of the last two years and to professional instruction, we should rejoice. It is certain that during the year now about to begin the attendance in the Literary Department will be altogether beyond precedent, and that the total attendance in the University will closely approach that of 1881 and 1882. The women in the University numbered 229. The previous year there were 196. Two years ago there were 180. The attendance of women this year was distributed as follows: Department of Literature, Science and the Arts.............. 135 Department of Medicine and Surgery........................ 61 Department of Law.......................................... 5 School of Pharmacy....................................... 2 Homceopathic Medical College.............................. 20 College of Dental Surgery................................. 6 229 There is not only an increase in numbers as compared with the two previous years, but also an increase in the proportion of women to the total attendance. In 1883-4 the wo

Page  48 8 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. men formed 13 per cent of all the students, in 1884-5, 15 per cent, in 1885-6 a little over 16 per cent. The experience of years does not shake our confidence in the wisdom of the policy of opening our doors to the:women. Every year sees more and more of the colleges and universities in this country and in Europe extending the privileges of instruction to them. We hazard little in predicting that most of those institutions which now provide separate instruction for the two sexes will at no distant day abandon so expensive and unnecessary a system. The work of the University in all its Departments has gone on with harmony and marked efficiency. In the light of our own experience and of the warm discussions upon the elective system of studies in colleges, we are strongly impressed with the belief that the plan which we are now pursuing in our Literary Department is best adapted to the needs of the American college student. That plan prescribes about one-half of his course to each student, covering most of the work of the first year and a half or two years, and after he is thus grounded in the more fundamental studies leaves him large liberty in the choice of his studies for the last two years of his course. Our so-called university system opens to advanced students and especially to graduates large opportunities for specialization of study. We thus secure the elementary knowledge of various branches which every scholar should have and at the same time open to those who are sufficiently mature and advanced to form wise judgments of their special needs, the privilege of devoting much time to the studies they may choose. The demands upon the students in the Law Department have been made, during the past year, more exacting and rigorous than ever before, and the Faculty have decided to introduce the most important change which has been made in the method of the school since its establishment. They have graded the course, and instruction will in the main be given separately to the two classes. Text-book work and the study

Page  49 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 49 of leading cases will be combined with instruction by lecture. The training will, we believe, be more thorough and systematic and effective than it has ever before been. The Homceopathic Medical College has in large degree escaped the unpleasant embarrassments from which it has often suffered by reason of the unfriendly attitude of certain homceopathic physicians in the State and has had a quiet and successful year. The result is visible in the larger class which is presenting itself now. Its prospects have not been so bright in many years. The Department of Medicine and Surgery and the School of Pharmacy have carried on their work with their usual vigor. Some of the wants of the Medical Department will be referred to later in this Report. By the prudent and judicious use of the fund for repairs given us by the last Legislature the Steward has carried on the work begun last year so that our buildings are now in better condition than they have been for many years. Perhaps the most important improvements completed this year have been in the Law Building. The reconstruction of the Law Library room will attract particular attention. The better lighting gained by the opening of new windows, the hard wood flooring, the re-arrangement of the books in new cases easily accessible, adapt the room admirably to its purposes. The Museum building has been thoroughly examined and the defects in its original construction have been remedied as far as possible. A good deal of work has been done at the Observatory. The improvements which the steward has with the limited means at his command been able to make in our grounds, you will observe with pleasure. Cases have been made for the Chinese exhibit, and the articles have been tastefully arranged in them. The whole of one room in the Museum is assigned to them, and the value of this handsome gift of the Chinese Government can now be appreciated.

Page  50 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. About one-half of the Rogers collection of statuary has been received and placed in our Art Gallery. This part of the collection numbers fifty-three statues and groups including many of the finest works of the eminent sculptor. It is perhaps not so generally understood as it should be that these casts, being the literal transcripts of the clay as it left the artist's hand, are more valuable for purposes of instruction in art than copies wrought in marble, because they reproduce more exactly the artist's work. One has only to compare the cast of Nydia with our marble statue of Nydia to perceive this. When we consider the variety and beauty of the work in this Rogers collection, we may say with safety that no collection of statuary comparable with it is to be found in the gallery of any other of our Universities. From the reports of the Curators of the Museum, I draw the following facts. Two important additions have been made to the Botanical Collection, first a set of North American Fungi, the gift of Joseph B. Whittier, of East Saginaw, and second, a collection of North American Woods presented by Prof. C. F. Sargent of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. The fungi are nmounted ready for use by students. Assistance is needed to care for the botanical collections. A considerable number of desirable specimens has been added by gift to the collections in applied chemistry, especially to the pharmaceutical collections. Director Otto J. Klotz, Astronomer of the Dominion of Canada, and a graduate of our Literary Department in 1872, has presented to our paleontological museum a highly interesting collection of fossils from the flanks of the Rocky Mountains in latitude 57 ~. They are said by the Curator to represent the primordial zone of life. The locality is hitherto unknown to science, and the species sent appear to be new. It will be remembered that most of Dr. Roeminger's unique collection of fossils is deposited on our shelves. It is

Page  51 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. so very desirable that we should secure it, that I cannot but call attention to the danger of our losing it, unless we can soon fihd the means of purchasing it. Our Museum of Art has received not only the statuary above referred to, but also two additions to our collection of portraits, one of President Tappan, presented by C. H. Denison, Esq., of the claas of 1861, and the other of Professor Ford, by the last graduating class of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. We very much desire to make large additions to our collection of the portraits of men who have been benefactors of the University, either by important gifts or by eminent service as teachers in its Faculties. It would also be fitting that in the halls of the State University the portraits of the Governors of the State should be placed. The other Museums have received no important additions, as the condition of our treasury has been such that we have not been able to avail ourselves even of favorable opportunities to increase our scientific collections by purchase. The report of the Librarian shows that we have now in all our Libraries 60,201 volumes, 12,267 unbound pamphlets and 212 charts. Of these there are in the General Library 47,187 volumes, 11,404 unbound pamphlets and 212 charts; in the Law Library 9,250 volumes; in the Medical Library 3,3.60 volumes, 872 unbound pamphlets; and in the Library of the Dental College 404 volumes. The increase in all the Libraries has been 3,640 volumes and 1,087 pamphlets. The number of volumes drawn by readers for use in the reading room and by Professors for use out of the building has been 82,063. Among the gifts to the Library we may name the great Piranesi collection of Engravings, 27 volumes, containing 1,577 engravings, presented through Dr. Frieze by a recent graduate who prefers that his name should not be known; a collection of English Dramatic works, 240 volumes, presented through Professor Demmon by a recent graduate who makes the same modest request as the giver of the engravings con

Page  52 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. cerning the disclosure of his name; the addition by James McMillan, Esq., to the McMillan Shakespearean collection, of 298 volumes and 111 pamphlets of great value purchased from the Crosby Shakespeare Library of Zanesville, 0., and a number of valuable works added by Philo Parsons, Esq., to the Parsons Library. It is with special pleasure that I make mention of the generous interest manifested in our Library by some of our German fellow citizens. Having learned of the inadequacy of our means to provide the needed supply of German literature, they have established the so-called " Goethe Library Fund," the proceeds of which are to be devoted to the purchase of German books for our Library. The sum of $1,360 has already been raised, and it is confidently expected that handsome additions will be made to the fund. A thousand dollars worth of books have already been ordered on the account of this fund. Now, as always, our prosperity brings with it the call for larger equipment. It is obvious that we should have a new building, especially constructed for galleries of art. To display properly the Rogers collection of statuary and the Lewis collection of pictures we need much larger accommodations than are afforded by our present galleries in the Library building. We cannot doubt that in due time the State will cheerfully furnish a suitable house for these valuable gifts which have been so generously bestowed upon it by two of its citizens. The Art Building should have architectural fitness for the high purpose to which it is to be dedicated. We are also in pressing need of certain scientific laboratories. We should have without delay a physical laboratory for instruction in the wide domain of theoretical and applied physics. Our outfit for teaching this branch should be materially enlarged. In no department of college work has greater change been made in our better colleges and scientific schools during the last few years. The demand for high training in physics with special reference to practical applica

Page  53 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 53 tion, as for example in electrical engineering, is very considerable. A building must be constructed with special regard to the work in physics. We wish to give to our Professor in charge of that important department of study, who is a teacher and investigator of large experience and established reputation, the materials for securing the greatest efficiency to his department. The Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery also make an urgent request for a laboratory for pathological, physiological and histological work. The best medical schools are coming to give instruction as largely as possible by laboratory methods, and there can be no question that these methods present great advantages for imparting instruction in certain branches. At an early day our medical school won distinction through its laboratory facilities for the study of chemistry, when few medical schools offered such advantages. We must see that we are not now outstripped by other schools in furnishing opportunity for laboratory work in such other branches as can be best taught in part at least by the aid of laboratories. The State Board of Health has also forwarded a request to us to establish a hygienic laboratory, in which investigations could be made of the adulterations of food and of all such sanitary problems as it is well to have studied for the protection of health. There can be no doubt that the State would receive from such a laboratory, properly organized and conducted, more than it would cost to establish and maintain it. In Germany such laboratories are maintained by the government, and the city of Paris has one which is found to be of the greatest service to the public. Probably the medical and hygienic laboratories could all be provided for under one roof. It is possible that a physical laboratory could be placed in a separate wing, and some economy in expenditure thus be secured. I commend the whole subject to your most careful consideration.

Page  54 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. As we expected, the new Engineering Laboratory is completely filled at once on its being opened. The question of enlargement will force itself on us at an early day. The equipment should be increased without delay. There is a strong and growing tendency among young men to prepare themselves for the various fields of engineering work andfor the practical application of the sciences to the arts of life. To all such some part of our shop work is helpful, if not absolutely essential. We have now about 1'20 students of engineering in the University, and the number is steadily increasing year by year. Our present Engineering Laboratory can accommodate only 45, and so many only by undue crowding. We need more room, and we need for those who cal be accommodated more tools and machinery, especially a new steam engine, and more assistants. The implements for an experimental laboratory for testing machines, steam engines, the strength of materials, etc., are much desired. As elsewhere stated, we should aim at the earliest opportunity to add to our other engineering work instruction in electrical engineering. The growth of the Dental College calls for an enlargement of the building they occupy. That growth has been healthy and promising. It has taken place in the face of a constant and rapid increase of the requirements for admission and especially for graduation. When it was organized in 1875 a two years course of six months in each year secured a degree. Now a student must study dentistry three years and pursue in that time two courses of nine months each in order to graduate, and the standard of examinations has been raised. The success of the graduates, the eagerness with which in many cases they are invited to settle in important towns, and the recognition of their diplomas in Europe, attest the excellence of the instruction. The school has beyond doubt rendered a most valuable public service by sending forth well-trained men and women to the important work entrusted to the dental profession. Every year it attracts stun

Page  55 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. dents from beyond the seas. It is to be hoped that means may be found to give the school the ampler accommodations which the present number of students requires. Without such enlargement it will be necessary to refuse admission to many applicants. We need at once to settle upon some carefully considered plan concerning building upon the campus. It is greatly to be regretted that when land in the vicinity of the University was cheap, the Regents had not procured at least a hundred acres. But no one could in the early days foresee the needs which we now experience. Our forty acres seemed a liberal supply. But already we are finding ourselves crowded, while yet at no distant time, and we hope very soon, we shall be called to find sites for the art gallery, the gymnasium, and several laboratories. If we could at once remove the dissecting room and the hospitals from the campus to some eligible site, not far away, I should deem it very wise to make the removal. It would be well if we had a large field for the sports of the students. More room than we have is now desired by them for ball grounds and tennis courts, and we can of course never have fine lawns on ground which is used for either ball or tennis. The expediency of acquiring more land before the growth of the city carries the price still higher than it now is seems to me well worthy of consideration. The report of the Finance Committee will doubtless show that the aid furnished to our repair and contingent fund was of very essential service. It is very desirable that such aid be again furnished, since it is far more economical to keep our buildings in repair than to allow them to get into so bad a condition as they were in two years ago. A smaller sum will suffice for the next two years than we asked before. By the closest economy and by heroically refusing our various departments many things which they greatly needed, and by pinching salaries, we have somewhat improved the condition of our treasury. The new appraisal of the property of the

Page  56 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. State so increases the valuation that the one-twentieth mill tax will yield about $6,700 more than heretofore. We may count on an enlarged income from students' fees for the year 1886-7. Still our needs are so many and so pressing that we must rely on the constant aid of the State. For many years now that aid has been so cheerfully furnished that we do not allow ourselves to doubt that it will be continued. The simple truth is that the State now holds property here representing a greater value than all the money it has raised for the support of the University. The service which the University has rendered to the State by the education of its sons and daughters has been a clear gain to the State. We believe that the slight burden, which we ask her to take upon herself in securing a larger usefulness to the Institution and so a larger blessing to her own children, will be cheerfully borne by her in the future as it has been in the past. JAMES B. ANGELL. Regent Field presented the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved, That the report of the President be accepted and printed in the minutes, and that one thousand extra copies be printed and bound in paper covers, for the use of the Board and of the University. The President presented and read the following report: UNIVERSITY OF MICIIGAN, t October 12, 1886. t To the Board of Regents; Mr. T. J. Wrampelmeier having resigned the chair of Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry and Pharmacy, the Executive Committee on September 23, last, appointed Alviso B. Stevens, Ph. C., a skilful pharmacist of Detroit, Instructor in Pharmacy for the current academic year, at a salary of $1,000. They also appointed Fred. G. Novy, B. S., Assistant in Organic Chemistry for 1886-7 at the salary of $200, and Edgar D. Smith, Ph. C., Assistant in Pharmacy for 1886-7 at the salary of $160. It is understood that Mr. Stevens assisted by Mr. Smith will take the principal portion of the work in Pharmacy heretofore performed by Dr. Prescott and Mr. Wrampelmtier, and that Dr.

Page  57 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. Prescott, assisted by Mr. Novy, will take the work in Organic Chemistry heretofore done by \Mr. Wrampelmeier. These changes do not increase the sum expended for salaries heretofore. September 2d, the Committee appointed A. C. McLaughlin, A. B., Instructor in Latin for one year at a salary of $900, in place of B. L. D'Ooge who resigned to accept a Professorship in the Normal School. Respectfully submitted, JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, CHAS. 1E. WHITMAN, E. O. GROSVENOR. On motion of Regent Field the report of the Executive Committee just read was accepted and adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Blair from the Law Committee presented and read a letter from Levi T. Griffin, accepting the Fletcher Professorship in the Law Department to which he had been appointed at the last meeting of the Board, which was on motion, accepted and placed on file. On motion of Regent Clark, the Board listened to the following report of the Librarian: To the Honorable the Board Regtnts of the University of Michigan: The following report on the Libraries of the University covers the twelve months between Oct. 1st, 1885, and Sept. 30, 1886. It is submitted at this time in accordance with the law defining the duties of the Librarian. The Libraries are four in number, viz.: The General Library, the Law Library, the Medical Library, and the Library of the Dental College. They contained Sept. 30th, the end of the period covered by this report, 60,201 volumes, 12,267 unbound pamphlets, and 212 charts. The distribution of the books is as follows: In the General Library there are 47,187 volumes, 11,404 unbound pamphlets, and 212 charts.

Page  58 58 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. In the Law Library there are 9,250 volumes. In the Medical Library there are 3,360 volumes, and 872 unbound pamphlets. In the Library of the Dental College there are 404 volumes. The additions to the General Library during the year have been 3,057 volumes, 877 unbound pamphlets, and 1 chart. Of these 1,511 volumes and 30 pamphlets were bought; 1,179 volumes and 847 pamphlets were presented, and 367 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The expenditures for this library, so far as the bills came to me for endorsement, were $4,477.96. Of this sum $3,346.17 were paid for books and pamphlets; $468.44 for subscriptions to periodicals, and $663.35 for binding, rebinding, and mending volumes. This was all paid out of the special fund for the purchase of books. There was also paid out of the current expense fund for catalogue cards, readers' tickets, book supports, &c., $72.10. The Legislature of 1885 appropriated $10,000 for the Libraries of the University, $5,000 for the year 1885, and $5,000 for the year 1886. The division of this by the Board was as follows: FOR THE YEAR 1885. To the General Library.......................................................$3,000 To the Law Library............................................................ 1,000 To the M edical Library.................................................. 1,000 FOR THE YEAR 1886. To the General Library......................$................................ $3,500 To the Law Library.......................................................... 1,01'0 To the Medical Library...................................................... 500 Of the two sums assigned to the General Library, making together $6,500, there remained unexpended Sept. 30th, $1,484.78. I have since that date turned over to the Steward unpaid bills amounting to $218.20. There are outstanding orders for books that will cover quite $250 more. This reduces the unexpended balance to about $1,000, which sum must meet all our expenses until another appropriation shall be made by the Legislature of 1887. Out of tie sum of $1,000 must necessarily be paid the subscriptions to periodicals for 1887, which will exceed $450, and something for binding and mending and continuations. There cannot possibly remain much for the purchase of books. When the Legislative appropriation for the Libraries for the year 1886 was divided by the Board in Nov. 1885, 1 had the honor in

Page  59 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 59 connection with Professor Pettee, of presenting for your consideration certain needs of the General Library. I called attention, at that time, to the fact that the University had post graduate students 'in attendance, and that she was using every proper endeavor to increase the number of them. Now the post graduate's method of work is different from that of the undergraduate. He concentrates his energies on one subject for the whole period of his stay at the University. Those who make specialties of Literature. History, Philosophy, Language, and the phases of Political Science, are entirely dependent for material with which to work, upon the library, while those working at the Physical Sciences and Natural History are largely dependent upon it. What do we have to meet the demands of students working in these special directions? We have in English Literature a good collection for the study of Shakespeare, and a good beginning of a collection for the study of English Dramatic Literature in general. In German Literature we shall have in the course of the year a good collection for the study of Goethe and his period. But nowhere except in the three instances named, is there, in all the realm of literature, a department, or a period, or an author, adequately represented. This lack is emphasized every time a post graduate asks to see the literature of the subject to which he proposes to give his time. In History and Political Science the lack is not so conspicuous. The Parsons Library and the collection presented by an unknown benefactor of the library, through Professor C. K. Adams, add greatly to the strength of these departments; but there is still very much lacking, especially in the department of History. The Physical sciences are fairly well represented, but in the literature of Natural Iistory we are lamentably weak. In the department of Philosophy, also, our collection is far from full. Can these departments, and others not named, be brought up with the sums that we have been accustomed to receive for the purchase of books? I will go into particulars on the subject. The average sum annually at the disposal of the library for the last nine years-since the Legislature began to make special appropriations for it-has been about 83,700. This includes the large appropriation of $15,090, made for the years 1883-84.

Page  60 60 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. The phrase purchase of books has been interpreted to cover subscriptions to periodicals, and the cost of binding and mending, and transportation-the transportation of both purchases and gifts. The average yearly cost of these three things, viz.: subscriptions to periodicals, binding and mending, and transportation, is about $1,200. Deducting this from the.3,700 there remains $2,500. It has been found necessary to have a reserve-something with which to buy books of general reference, and books that pertain to departments of literature that are not represented by chairs of instruction, as Art, Theology, Philology, Bibliography, and something, also, to make Our bills good when the cost of books has been underestimated. This reserve has been about one-third of the sum remaining after the periodicals, binding and transportation have been provided for. Reduced by one-third $2,500 becomes $1,663. This divided among the 23 departments of instruction gives to each a little less than $73 for the year. While this may suffice for some of the departments of which the literature is not large, how far will it go towards supplying the wants of others of which the literature is large? Of Zoology, for instance, which covers Biology, and Comparative Anatomy, as well as that literature which describes and classifies the varied forms of animal life? This sum will barely pay for the numbers of Tryon's Manual of Conchology which are issued during a year, and which are necessary for the identification of the shells in the Museum. How far will it go towards supplying the wants of the department of English Literature which covers Grammar, Rhetoric, Literary History and Criticism, as well as the works of the Standard Authors of England and America? The new Scholar's edition of Wordsworth, by Knight, alone costs $50.00. It is evident that we cannot meet the needs of this post graduate class of students without more funds than we have been accustomed to have. It is, also, evident that we must meet these needs or run the risk of losing, the students. The University is competing for them with institutions that have large libraries with large incomes. I, therefore, urge upon the Board the importance of securing from the Legislature of 1887 as liberal an appropriation as possible. Also, events lead me to suggest that a specified sum be asked for for each library, rather than one sum to be divided among the libraries subsequently.

Page  61 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 61 Attention is particularly called to the large number of books and pamphlets presented, viz.: 1,179 volumes, and 847 pamphlets, or more than a third of all the additions to the library. Among the benefactors of this year are found those of former years. Mr. McMillan furnished money to buy from the Shakespeare library of Mr. Joseph Crosby of Zanesville, O., which had come to sale, all the books contained in it which were not found in the McMillan Shakespeare Collection. These additions, consisting of 298 volumes and 111 pamphlets, bring our Shakespeare collection up to 3,000 volumes and more. Mr. Parsons has made very valuable additions to the collection bearing his name. Dr. S. A. Green, Librarian of the Massachusetts Historical Society continues to send parcels of books and pamphlets. Other benefactors have arisen, but they are unknown. One, through Dr. Frieze, has contributed money for the purchase of the Piranesi collections of Engravings; 27 volumes containing 1,577 engravings of great interest and value. Another, through Professor Demmon, has furnished money for the beginning of a Dramatic Collection. With this money 240 volumes consisting chiefly of collections of plays, and works of individual dramatists, have been bought. About a year ago Professor Thomas conceived the idea of interesting the German citizens of the state in the establishment of a Goethe Library in the University, which should be a part of the General Library. The idea was carried out very successfully, as is already known to the Board. The contributions now amount to 81,200. Orders for books have been given to the amount of $800, and the books have already reached New York from Germany. Many gifts have come to the Library from men in the service of the University, and from Alumni in different parts of the country. These have been prompted by the warmest affection for the University, and frequently have been accompanied by expressions of such affection. The use of the Library continues to be gratifying; we cannot however, now make it a matter of record to the extent that we have been accustomed to do. Each year that we have been in the new building there has been a small decrease in the number of books used in the Reading Room. On the other hand, however, there has been a constantly increasing demand for accommodation in the Seminary Rooms, and for permission to visit the Book Room.

Page  62 62 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. All my observation leads me to believe that on the whole, there is an increased use of the Library from year to year: The number of volumes' drawn and used in the Reading Room w as............................................ 79,380 The number drawn out by Professors................ 2,683 In all.....................................82,063 vols. Tickets of admission to the Book room were granted to 21 persons, who made 413 visits to the shelves. In the course of both semesters 204 students were admitted to the Seminary Rooms-128 to the West Room for the study of English Literature, Latin, Greek, and Classical Art, and 76 to the East Room for the study of History, Political Economy, Philosophy, and the art of Teaching. Seven volumes have disappeared. Three of them belonged to the main collection, viz.: Green's Short History of England, Eng. Edition Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, and Fairbairn's Studies in the Philosophy of Religion and History. Two were from the Chemical Laboratory, viz.: Wohler's Inorganic Analysis, and Tidy's Chemistry. Two were from the Botanical Rooms, viz.: Poulsen's Micro-Chemistry, and The National Dispensatory, 1880. A faithful search has been made for these without success, and I feel it my duty to report them; still I am not without hope that some of them may yet return to us. Two volumes have been used up and laid aside, viz:-Wilson's French and English Dictionary, and Spier's and Surenne's French and English Dictionary. The books are, generally, in a good condition. MEDICAL LIBRARY. The Medical Library has been much strengthened during the year by the addition of new editions of standard works, and many new books. Many gaps have been filled in sets of periodicals. The strength of this library lies in its sets of bound periodicals. The additions during the year have been 454 volumes and 145 pamphlets. Of these, 282 volumes and 1 pamphlet were bought, 13 volumes and 144 pamphlets were presented, and 149 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills endorsed by me for this library was $1,157.68. Of this amount, $790.26 were for books, $218.97 for periodicals, and

Page  63 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. $148.45 for binding. The use of this collection is included in the statistics for the General Library. The books of both collections are shelved in one building and handled by one set of attendants. LIBRARY OF THE DENTAL COLLEGE. The purchases for the Library of the Dental College are made by the Dean of the College out of the special funds of his department. I cannot, therefore, report in regard to expenditures. The books are kept in closed cases in the Faculty room of the College building. They are all in very good order. At no remote period, additional shelf room will be required, The extent of the collection, as stated in the beginning of this report, is 404 volumes. THE LAW LIBRARY. I give, verbatim, the report on the Law Library made to me by Mr. Vance, the assistant in charge. "Amount expended from Oct. 1, 1885, to Sept. 30, 1886.... $1,087.18 No. of periodicals taken.................................. 10 Books added during the year............................. 195 vols. IMPROVEMENTS IN THE LIBRARY ROOM. During the year a new hardwood floor has been laid; the old book cases have been altered, new book cases suitable in design and appropriate in style have been constructed and placed in position. Four new windows have been made, and to the walls of the room the color has been given best suited to the purposes of a reading room. The combined result of these changes and improvements is that the Library Room of the Law Department is considered to be superior to any other room similar in character in the State and probably second to no other library room connected with any Law School in the country." There is one thing I wish to add to Mr. Vance's report. During the last part of last year it was represented to me by students that the statutes of the different States were not possessed by the Law Library, and that there was frequent need of them. It occurred to me that some of them might be given, on application, and I accordingly wrote in the vacation to most of the State governments, asking for copies of their Revised Statutes and Session Laws passed after the last revision, for our Law Library, if they were accustomed, on solicitation, to send them to the libraries of Law Schools. To about one-quarter of my applications there have been favorable responses, and in reply to nearly all the others have come expressions of regret that no law

Page  64 64 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. existed which made compliance possible. As the matter stands, the Revised Statutes and Session Laws of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Missouri, New Hampshire, and Illinois, Nevada, and Rhode Island have been received. Those of Maine and Massachusetts are promised. The number of volumes in this library, as stated earlier, is 9,250 volumes. This is exclusive of the volumes of Laws just referred to, which have not yet been placed in the Library. Certain changes have taken place in the force engaged in the General Library. Mr. R. F. Eldredge, general assistant, has been succeeded by Mr. G. F. James, of the class of '86. Mr. F. C. Hicks, and Mr. T. H. McNeil, assistants in charge of the Seminary Rooms, have been succeeded by Mr. A. J. Covell and Mr. G. W. Lacea. Mr. Osgood Ingalls and Mr. F. M. Sessions, desk attendants, have been succeeded by Mr. D. C. Worcester, and Mr. F. F. Lehman In all cases the compensation has been unchanged. Very respectfully submitted, R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. On motion of Regent Field the report of the Librarian was accepted and ordered printed in the minutes. Professor Frieze presented and read the following communication from the Secretary of the Senate: To the Honorable Board of Regents: At a meeting of the University Senate held last evening a communication was presented from Harvard University inviting the University of Michigan to participate by a delegate in the celebration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of Harvard, to be held on the 6th, 7th and 8th of November next, and a committee consisting of Professors Frieze, T. M. Cooley, Palmer, Rogers and Prescott, was appointed to act in conjunction with your Board in the selection of a delegate. Respectfully yours. MW. H. PETTEE, Secretary of the Senate. Regent Blair moved that the President appoint a committee of three to act with the Senate Committee in selecting a delegate to represent the University of Michigan at the celebration of the 250th anniversary of Harvard University.

Page  65 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 65 The motion prevailed and the President named Regents Blair, Field and Grosvenor as such committee. Regent Blair, chairman of special committee to select a delegate to attend the anniversary celebration of Harvard University, reported that they had made choice of President Angell, and recommended that the Auditing Board be authorized to pay the expenses incurred by him while acting as such delegate. The above report and recommendation were adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor presented a form of receipt to be given by the Treasurer to donors to the German American Goethe Library Fund of the University. On motion the form was adopted, and the Steward instructed to cause the same to be printed for immediate use. Regent Grosvenor presented and read the following resignations in the Iomceopathic Medical College; of Emma E. Bower, Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics, and Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica. R. C. Reedy, M. D., House Surgeon and Assistant to the Chair of Surgery. G. G. Caron, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology and the Chair of Theory and Practice. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the foregoing resignations were accepted. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Medical Committee, read a communication from the Homceopathic Medical Faculty in which the following appointments were recommended: George G. Caron, M. D., to be House Surgeon and Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine, salary $350. Harold B. Wilson, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology and Otology, salary $100, and Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, salary $100; and Frank A. Johnson, M. D., to be Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, salary $100, and Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica, salary $100.

Page  66 66 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the above recommendations of the Homeopathic Faculty were approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Blair read the following communication from Professor M. W. Harrington, Director of the Observatory: ANN ARBOR, MICH., I October 13, 1886. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I need in my department a good astronomical globe. Those I have are antiquated and out of repair. Mr. Morley has shown me Bailey's Cosmosphere, and 1 find it well suited to my purpose. Mr. Morley will have the Cosmosphere set up for inspection. I think it the best instrument of the kind now on the market, and am sure that if purchased it will increase the efficiency of instruction in astronomy. I regret that I cannot be present personally at the meeting to call the attention of members of the Board to the especial excellencies of this apparatus. Very respectfully, M. W. HARRINGTON. Mr. Morley being present, was invited by the Board to explain the working of his Cosmosphere, after which on motion of Regent Blair the matter was referred to the Committee on "Observatory and School of Mines." The following communication was received from the Faculty of the Law Department: To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: At a meeting of the Board held on Oct. 14th, 1885, a resolution was adopted, calling on the Faculty of Law to consider whether certain changes might not be made with advantage in the course of instruction pursued in the Law Department. The Faculty having taken the matter into consideration, found themselves unable to agree on any fundamental changes in. the system pursued, owing to certain differences of opinion among themselves, and they accordingly reported to the Board at a meeting in March, 1885, that any change in the methods of instruction was, in their judgment, at that time impracticable.

Page  67 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 67 Since that report was transmitted to the Board, changes have taken place in the Faculty itself, and the present members of that body are now unanimously agreed upon certain very fundamental changes in the course of instruction. (1). We deem it advisable that the course of instruction should be a graded one, and the lectures delivered to the two classes separately, the more elementary subjects to be assigned to the junior year, and the more complicated postponed to the senior year. This change exacts much more labor from the Professors, requiring them in one year to deliver the lectures formerly delivered in two years. But they are willing to take upon themselves the additional labor in the hope of thereby promoting the efficiency of the Department, and of enhancing the reputation of the University itself. (2). The system of instruction by text-books has proved very satifactory, and while we are not at all of the opinion that instruction by lectures should be supplanted by the use of text-books, we are firmly persuaded that it would be a great misfortune to the Department if the text-book instruction were to be abandoned. We therefore have thought that this system of instruction should be continued with the Junior class as heretofore, and also that it should be extended to the Senior class during the second Semester. The extension of the system to the Senior class will devolve on the Assistant Professor a largely increased amount of labor, which he is very cheerfully prepared to render. (3). As much instruction can be derived from a proper study of leading cases, the Faculty have thought it well that such a study should be made a feature of the instruction given during the Senior year. Such instruction has been given in other law schools of the country, and has been found to be of very great benefit to the students. We hope and believe that similarly happy results will attend its introduction into our course. Having reached the conclusion that the above noted changes in the course of instruction would be to the advantage of the Department and should not be postponed, but made applicable to the current College year, the Faculty ventured to open the school on October 1st under a system of instruction embodying the ideas advanced in this communication. We preferred to begin the new year upon the new plan, inasmuch as it would be less difficult to change afterwards from the new system to the old if the Board

Page  68 68 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886, disapproved this change, than it would be to change from the old to the new after the work of the year had once commenced. In an appendix hereunto annexed will be found in detail the system of instruction which we are now pursuing. We hereby respectfully submit our action in the matter to the consideration of the Board, hoping that it may meet with cordial approval, and at the same time we desire to express our willingness to conform to the wishes of the Board, if in your opinion it is wise to modify in any way the plan we are now pursuing. We cannot conclude our report without calling attention to the desirability of having some instruction given in the Law School on the subject of Medical Jurisprudence. For years the Faculty of Advocates in Scotland has insisted that every gentleman who is called to the Scotch Bar should have studied Forensic Medicine. While this has not been insisted on in this country, it is agreed that a knowledge of the subject is very desirable. We would therefore recommend to the Board that Edward S. Dunster, M. D., be appointed a Lecturer in the Law Department on Special Heads of Medical Jurisprudence, that Victor C. Vaughan, M. D., be appointed a Lecturer in the Law Department on Toxicology; and that Charles H. Stowell, M. D., be appointed a Lecturer in the Law Department on Legal Microscopy. We make these recommendations after conference with the gentlemen named, and with the assurance upon their part of entire willingness to give the instruction desired in addition to the instruction given by them in the Medical Department. It is intended that this instruction, if authorized by the Board, shall be given at such hours as not to conflict with or in any manner curtail the instruction now being given in this Department. We would also suggest that it would increase the efficiency of the Department, if a special lecturer on Admiralty Law could be appointed to deliver a few lectures upon that subject to the Senior class. There is no provision for instruction upon that subject, and it never has been possible to give any adequate instruction therein in the past. A special lecturer might be appointed for that particular subject at very little expense. But we do not urge that any action be taken at this meeting of the Board so far as this appointment is concerned. We would also call the attention of the Board to the desirability of making some provision for the training of law students

Page  69 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 69 in Forensic Elocution. In some of the Law Schools of the country opportunity is afforded for training of this character, and we cannot prudently neglect providing such instruction here. If an instructor in Elocution should be appointed, he could give instruction both in the Law and Literary Departments; but in our judgment his work should be so arranged that he could give at least as much time to the training of the students in this Department as to those in the Literary Department, not only because his classes would be as large in the one Department as they would be in the other, but also because it is more important that law students should receive such training than it is for any other class of students in the University. All of which is respectfully submitted, HENRY WADE ROGERS. H. B. HUTCHINS. C. I. WALKER. LEVI T. GRIFFIN. J. C. KNOWLTON. APPENDIX. In the Lecture Course the assignment of topics is made as follows: JUNIOR YEAR. Crim inal Law............................. T orts................................... R eal E state.............................. E asem ents............................ The Origin, History and Nature of Equity l Jurisprudence....................... The Maxims of Equity................ J Contracts................................ Agency................................... P artnership.............................. Evidence................................ Common Law Pleading and Practice in Cases at Law........................ SENIOR YEAR. Constitutional Law........................ Domestic Relations...................... W ills.................................... TheAdministration and Distttribution of E states.............................J Professor Rogers. Professor Hutchins. Professor Walker. Professor Griffin. Professor Cooley. Professor Rogers.

Page  70 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. Equity Jurisprudence................rofessor utch Equity Pleading and Procedure......... P esso utc Personal Property........................ Bills and Notes, and Commercial Law ProfessorWalker. Generally....................... Private and Municipal Corporations..... Jurisprudence of the United States....... Professor riffin International Law................. r. As to Text Book instruction the arrangement is as follows: The members of the Junior class will be required to attend daily recitations in Cooley's edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, Anson on Contracts, and Schouler on Bailments. This work will be done under the direction of Assistant Professor Knowlton, and will continue throughout the Junior year. The class will meet at 8 o'clock A. M. All members of the Senior class will during the second semester attend recitations in Gould on Pleading, and such of them as may so elect can attend recitations in Pomeroy on Remedies and Remedial Rights (Code Pleading). Students who come from Code States will be expected to attend regular recitations in this work, and they will find the instruction thus obtained invaluable in their subsequent practice. Students from States where the reformed procedure has not been introduced, may or may not, at their option, attend such recitations. But students from Code States are expected to attend the recitations in Gould on Pleading, as well as in Pomeroy, inasmuch as the works on common law pleading are not superseded by the codes, and it is thought that a careful study of such works is the best preparation for the pleader whether he practices under the old or the new procedure. This work will also be under the direction of Assistant Professor Knowlton, The class will meet at nine o'clock A. Ir. As to the instruction in Leading Cases, the following announcement has been made: THE STUDY OF LEADING CASES. As much instruction can be derived from a proper study of what are known as Leading Cases, and inasmuch as it is desirable that students should be familiar with the more important of these cases, they are requested to purchase "Indermaur's Common Law Cases." They will be expected to make themselves familiar with the cases contained in that work, and they will be examined upon

Page  71 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 71 them during the year by one or more of the professors at such times as shall be hereafter announced. And upon the subject of Examinations the following announcement has been made: EXAMINATIONS. At the end of the year the members of the Junior and Senior classes will be subjected to an oral and written examination both upon the lectures and the text-book work. The members of the Junior class will be required to pass these examinations as a condition precedent of their admission into the Senior class. Regent Blair submitted the following resolutions which were adopted: Resolved, That this Board approves the action of the Law Faculty in making the changes in the course of instruction in the Law Department, outl.ned in the communication this day received, and that hereafter instruction in that Department shall proceed according to the plan lately put in operation by the Faculty. Resolved further, That the part of said communication which recommends appointments and instruction' upon other subjects than those previously taught in the Law School, be referred to the Law Committee of this Board with instructions to report thereon at the next meeting. Professor J. B. Steere, on behalf of the City Council, addressed the Board urging the desirableness of the Board placing two electric lights on the tower of the main building. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the matter was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Regent Clark presented the following communication from the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy: To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: All the requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist have been completed by Mr. William Douglas Codnon, and he is recommended to you for that degree. By direction of the Faculty, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Dean. Memorandum. Mr. Condon had completed the requirements for graduation

Page  72 72 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. in June last, but could not be present on Commencement Day, as required by University law for graduation at that time. The Faculty, therefore, have directed me to present his name to the Regents for action at the October Meeting. A. B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Clark, the Degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was conferred on William Douglas Condon, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Regent Whitman presented and read the following comnunication from Professor Frieze, Dean of the Literary Faculty: To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: I have the honor of presenting to the University in behalf of an Alumnus who prefers to withhold his name, a collection of the complete works of Giovanni Battista Piranesi, the most distinguished Roman engraver of the eighteenth century. The collection embraces fifteen hundred plates, printed on folio pages, with an explanatory text. They were executed under the patronage of the papal government. They are universally regarded as masterpieces of the art of engraving. The subjects represented by them are the architectural remains of ancient Rome and many of the most important medieval and modern works of art in the modern Roman museums and palaces. This collection is a most valuable accession to the art treasures possessed by the University, and, we have reason to hope, is the beginning of similar gifts destined to build up, what the University at present much needs, a complete art library. The purchase of the Piranesi collection was made by Professor Elisha Jones with funds placed in his hands for this purpose during his recent visit to Rome. HENRY S. FRIEZE, Dean Literary Faculty. At the conclusion of the reading of the above communication, Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the communication from Professor Frieze be accepted, and 'that he be requested to convey to this unknown donor the cordial thanks of the Board for his valuable contribution to the Department of Art in this University.

Page  73 OCTOBER MEETING, 1886. 73 The resolution of Regent Whitman was adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board adjourned to to-morrow morning at 8:30 o'clock A. M. MORNING SESSION, WEDNESDAY, October 13, 1886. The Board reassembled in the President's room at 8:30 A. M. Present-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark and Whitman. There being no quorum present, the Board listened to Dr. Vaughan, who presented the request of the "State Board of Health," that the Board of Regents establish a "Hygienic Laboratory," in the University. By common consent, the matter was referred to the Medical Faculty and the State Board of Health, to consider fully, and report at some future meeting of the Board. On motion the Board adjourned to December "ith, at 7 o'clock P. M. JAMES H. WADE. Secretary.

Page  74

Page  75 ADJOURNED MEETING. 1886. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, t December 7th, 1886. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President, at 7:00 o'clock P. M. Present: The President, Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, and Field. Absent: Regents Shearer, Joy, and Whitman.. The meeting was called to order by the President. Sundry papers which had reached the President, were at his suggestion, referred to appropriate Committees of the Board. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Finance Committee, presented and read the following report: To the Board of Regents: The Finance Committee herewith present the Treasurer's statement' of receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending September 30th, 1886, also their estimates of receipts and expenditures for the year ending September 30th, 1887. Your Committee have caused the books and vouchers of the Treasurer to be examined and compared with the accounts of the Secretary and have found satisfactory evidence of the correctness of the Treasurer's report, although a few vouchers are incomplete and not in the usual form. The sums involved are small, being remittances for purchases made in Europe. The proper vouchers when received will be placed on file. It will be seen by the Treasurer's report that there is a larger balance in the Treasury than was estimated a year ago. This has arisen in part from increased receipts from students' fees and miscellaneous sources, and in part from a reduction in current expenses. The principal re

Page  76 76 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. ductions have been made in the estimates for repairs and contingent expenses, for fuel and lights and for chemical laboratory supplies, some of the repairs contemplated having necessarily been postponed until another year and the exceptionally mild winter of 1885-86 having effected an unexpected saving in fuel. This apparent gain will be affected in part by an outstanding indebtedness of about $5,000, as follows: $2,000 for bills already audited and payable on demand and about $3,000 for fuel and laboratory supplies purchased and received or in transit, for which bills have not been audited. The slight improvement in the condition of the finances has been accomplished only by the exercise of the most rigid economy, and the Auditing Board should be heartily commended for their watchful care in avoiding all unnecessary expenditures and for enforcing all economies inaugurated by the Board. In the judgment of your Committee economy must be continued, and appropriations from the Legislature must be secured to provide for any increase of salaries or of teaching force as well as for all new buildings or other permanent improvements that may be needed. In the estimate of receipts for the ensuing year, the Committee have assumed that the next Legislature will provide at least the same amount as in former years for the support of the Homoeopathic Medical College, the Hospitals, the College of Dental Surgery and for assistance in the Engineering Laboratory. The estimate of expenditures includes the usual items. The sums standing to the credit of the Engineering Laboratory and of the Libraries are unexpended balances of the appropriations for those purposes. For anything in excess of these sums we must depend upon the Legislature. The estimate of $5,000.00 for the Rogers collection is based on what was expended for transportation and placing in its present position the portion already received. The expense attendant upon the acceptance of Mr. Rogers's munificent gift, and of the New Orleans Chinese Collection presented by the Chinese Governmnent, it is anticipated will be reimbursed by the Legislature. Respectfully submitted, E. O. GROSVENOR, Chairman, MOSES W. FIELD, C. J. WILLETT.

Page  77 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. 77 Estimate of Receipts for the Year Ending September 30th, 1887. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1886............................... $ 17,173 71 To be received for University interest.................................... 38,000 00 " " from State 1-20 Mill Tax................................... 43,875 00 " < "t Homoeopathic Department.................. 6,000 00." " " Students' Fees and Laboratory Deposits............. 63,000 00 " *'. Sale of Dental Supplies.............................. 3,000 00 " " " Sale of Anatomical Material......................... 400 00 " " " Sale of Medicine at University Hospital.............. 500 00 " " " Sale of Medicine at Homceopathic Hospital.......... 200 00 ' " " Matron University Hospital......................... 700 00." " " Interest on Bank Deposits........................... 500 00 Appropriations Expected from the Legislature. For University Hospital..................................... $ 5,000 00 " College of Dental Surgery............................. 8,000 00 " Homceopathic Medical College........................ 6,200 00 Assistant Engineering Laboratory...................... 1,000 00 20,200 00 $193,548 71 Estimate of Expenses. For Salaries of Professors, Officers and Employees..................... $ 139,000 00 " Alterations and Repairs.......................................... 5,000 00 " Fuel and Lights...................................................... 10,000 00 Current Expenses of General Library............................. 300 00 '.... Medical "........................... 50 00 " ' " Law ".............................. 50 00 Grounds..................................................... 500 00 " P ostag e........................................................... 500 00 " Insurance........................................................ 1,700 00 " Calendar, Regents' Proceedings and Miscellaneous Printing...... 2,000 00 " Current Expenses of Museum.................................... 300 00 "Supplies for Chemical Laboratory................................ 5,000 00 " " Botanical "............................... 100 00 " H istological "................................ 200 00 " " Physiological "................................. 200 00 ~*' " Engineering "............................... 4 00 M' icroscopical "................................ 200 00 i' ' Physical "............................... 400 00 " " General (Chem istry..................................... 500 00.". Zoological Laboratory................................ 100 00 " Current Expenses in the Engineering Department.................. 400 00 " " "..Astronomical Observatory.................. 300 00 " Anatomical Material............................................. 2,500 00 Advertising Literary Department................................... 300 00 ' " Medical ".................................. 200 00 Law ".................................. 200 00 Pharmacy "................................... 200 00 "Purchase of Books for General Library (Balance of Appropriation) 3,303 27 Engineering Laboratory 7" ( 771 69

Page  78 78 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. For Transportation of the Rogers Collection........................... $ 3,500 00 " Current Expenses of University Hospital........................... 5,000 00 ~" " Homceopathic Department.................. 4,000 00 Dental College............................... 2,500 00 " Lease of W ater Privilege........................................ 75 00 " Purchase and filling of Diplomas................................. 650 00 " Comm encem ent Exercises......................................... 1,200 00 " Taxes on Lots in Springwells..................................... 100 00 " Sem i-Centennial Celebration....................................... 1,000 00 Balance on hand, September 30th, 1887...................... 848 75 $ 193,548 71 The University having advanced the sum of $3,769.96 for transporting and placing the Rogers and Chinese Collections, the State will be asked to reimburse us in that amount. If this is done, the balance on hand September 30th, 1887, will be increased by that amount. TREASURERS' REPORT. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit a statement of the receipts and disbursements of this Office for and during the fiscal year ending with September 30th, 1886. Respectfully, IH. SOULE, Treasurer. Receipts. Balance in Treasury October 1st, 1885...................... $ 22,153 86 From State Treasurer, 1-20 Mill Tax......................... 0,375 00 " " "University Interest............. 29,581 00 " ' "Repairs and Contingent.......... 16,000 00 "' " " Books for Libraries................. 5,000 00 ".." IHomceopathic College and Hospital.. 12,400 00 " " " University Hospital................. 5,000 00... " Dental College................... 8,000 00 "." " Assistant in Engineering Laboratory. 1,000 00.. Increase of Salaries, Law Dept..... 2,800 00 " " " Engineering Laboratory.......... 10.000 00.. " t Homoeopathic College, Law of 1875.. 6,0(0 00 " "." Removal of the Gifts of Mr. Rogers... 2,500 00 " University Hospital, Sale of Material................. 1,028 37 Homceopathic " "................. 216 05 Dental College "................... 3,490 99 Anatomical Material Sold............................ 461 60 " Interest on Deposits.................................. 994 08 " M iscellaneous............................................ 1,374 82 " Students' Fees........................................ 64,076 40-222,452 17

Page  79 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. 79 Disbursements. Salaries of Officers, Professors and Employees............ $134,481 00 Vouchers for Current Expenses.......................... 25,474 37 " General Library............................ 6,558 49 " Repairs and Contingent................. 11,021 48 ' " Physical Laboratory...................... 91 42 " Physiological......................... 16 93 " Engineering......................... 14,032 93 " University Hospital.......................... 2,607' 86 " Homoeopathic College...:..................... 610 30 " Homoeopathic College and Hospital........... 2,576 65 " Dental College................. 1,330 02 " Removal of the Gifts of Mr. Rogers........... 4,477 01 " Clock for University..................... 2,000 00-205,278 46 Balance in Treasury September 30th, 1886........ 17,173 71 $222,452 17 Classification. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. From State Treasurer, acct. 1-20 Mill Tax...................$ 30,375 00 " " " " Interest........................ 29,581 00- 59,956 00 " First National Bank of Ann Arbor, Interest......... 994 08 "University Hospital, Sale of Material.................. 1,028 37 Homeopathic ".................. 216 05 " Dental College " i.................. 3,490 99 " Anatomical Material sold to Medical Schools...... 461 60 Miscellaneous Sources.............................. 1,374 82 $ 7,565 91 ' Students Fees, acct. Medicine and Surgery........... 12,475 00 " " " " Literary...................... 13,585 00 " Law........................... 13,085 00... " " Dental College.................. 3,910 00... " " ' M echanical....................... 212 00 " " ". Physiology.................... 36 00 " " " Pharmacy..................... 1,985 00 t" " " t" Homceopathic College........... 2,365 00 " " " General Chemistry............. 246 00 i' " " " Practical Anatomy............... 3,540 00.... " Microscopical.................... 267 00 " '; " " H istological...................... 640 00 " "' " " A. and A. Chemistry............. 7,950 40.. ". " Diplomas........................ 3,750 00 " " " " ~Zoology........................ 30 00- 64,076 40 Totalfees...................................... $ 64,076 40 Less returned fees.............................. 2,347 7'3 N et........................................ $ 61,728 67 131,598 31 Balance overdrawn September 30th, 1886......... 9,568 57 $ 141,166 88

Page  80 80 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. Balance overdrawn October 1st, 1885..................... $ 1,941 51 General Pay Roll............................................. 113,751 00 Contingent............................................. 184 50 Fuel and Lights.............................................. 6,781 21 General Library.............................................. 181 85 Medical............................... 39 85 Grounds............................................... 62 52 Postage................................................ 199 05 Insurance 2.............................................. 77 25 Advertising and Printing...................................... 606 46 Museum.................................................... 204 04 Chemical Laboratory......................... 4,133 88 Botanical...................................... 145 00 H istological ".................................... 378 64 Engineering "................................ 565 37 Microscopical".............................. 124 77 General Chemistry............................................ 332 18 Civil Engineering........................................ 187 96 Astronomical Observatory................................. 27 67 A natom ical........................2........................,147 54 Physics...................................................... 455 46 Physiology................................................. 92 19 Dental Material.............................................. 2,200 81 Advertising Medical........................................ 261 86 " Law........................................... 241 39 " Pharmacy...................................... 125 90 Zoological................................. 344 67 Calendar..................................................... 914 61 Chinese Exhibit....................... 1,460 01 Students' Fees Refunded.......... 2,347 73 -141,166 88 Special Funds. HOMOEOPATHIC COLLEGE. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885..................... 857 80 From State Treasurer................................ 6,000 00 $ 6,857 80 DISBURSEMENTS. Salaries of Professors and Employees....................... 247 50 Vouchers for Current Expenses............................... 610 30 Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886................... 6,000 00 6,857 80 HOMCEOPATHIC COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL. RECEIPTS. From State Treasurer..................................... 12,400 00 DISBURSEMENTS, Balance Homceopathic Hospital, overdrawn October 1st, 1885 462 48 Salaries of Professors and Employees........................ 7,982 50 Vouchers for Current Expenses............................ 2,576 65 Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886................... 1,378 37 12,400 00

Page  81 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885..................... $ From State Treasurer...................................... DISBURSEMENTS. Salaries of Surgeon and Employees......................... Vouchers for Current Expenses................... Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886................. REPAIRS AND CONTINGENT. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885.................. From State Treasurer...................................... DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Current Expenses.............................. Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886................... GENERAL LIBRARY. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885..................... From State Treasurer..................................... DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Current Expenses.............................. Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886.................. PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885...................... DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Current Expenses............................. Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886................. PHYSICAL LABORATORY. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885....................... DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Current Expenses............................. DENTAL COLLEGE. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885........................ From State Treasurer..................................... DISBURSEMENTS. Salaries of Professors and Employees...................... Vouchers for Current Expenses......................... Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886............... 81 2,270 51 5.000 00 1,850 00 2,607 86 2,812 65 7,270 51 7,270 51 5,395 43 16,(100 00 21,395 43 11,021 48 10,3i3 95 21,395 43 4,861 76 5,000 00 9,861 76 6,558 49 3,303 27 9,861 76 211 36 211 36 16 93 194 43 211 36 91 42 91 42 91 42 91 42 4,064 95 8,000 00 12,064 95 6,850 00 $ 1,330 02 3,884 93 12,064 95

Page  82 82 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886, ENGINEERING LABORATORY. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885...................... 4,804 62 From State Treasurer..................................... 10,000 00 14,804 62 DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Expenses.......................... 14,032 93 Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886.................... 771 69 14,804 62 ASSISTANT IN ENGINEERING LABORATORY. RECEIPTS. From State Treasurer...................................... 1,000 00 1,000 00 DISBURSEMENTS. Salary of Assistant......................................... 1.000 00 1,000 00 INCREASE OF SALARIES OF LAW PROFESSORS. RECEIPTS. From State Treasurer..................................... 2,800 00 2,800 00 DISBURSEMENTS. Salaries of Professors....................................... 2,800 00 2,800 00 UNIVERSITY CLOCK. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, October 1st, 1885...................... 2,000 00 2,000 00 DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Expenses............................... 2,000 00 2,000 00 REMOVAL OF THE GIFTS OF MR. ROGERS. RECEIPTS. From State Treasurer..................................... 2,500 00 Balance overdrawn September 30th, 1886.................... 1,977 01 4,477 01 DISBURSEMENTS. Vouchers for Current Expenses.............................. 4,477 01 4,477 01 Statement of Special Funds. BALANCES IN TREASURY, SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1886. Hom ceopathic College...................................... 6,000 00 Homceopathic College and Hospital......................... 1,378 37 University H ospital.......................................... 2,812 65 Repairs and Contingent.................................. 10,373 95 General Library.......................................... 3,303 27 Physiological Laboratory................................. 194 43 Dental College.......................................... 3,884 93 Engineering Laboratory................................... 771 69 28,719 29 Less Removal of the Gifts of Mr. Rogers, overdrawn........ 1,977 01 26,742 28 General Fund Account Overdrawn.......................... 9,568 57 Balance in Treasury, September 30th, 1886....... $ 17,173 71

Page  83 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. 83 On motion of Regent Field the report of the Finance Committee was accepted and adopted. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, permission was granted Dr. H. L. Obetz to reside in Detroit, provided he continue to discharge his whole duties as Professor of Surgery in the Homceopathic Medical College here. On motion of Regent Willett, Librarian Davis addressed the Board, urging an increase of his salary. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Dr... B. Baker and Dr. H. F. Lyster, members of the State Board of Health, and Professor Vaughan addressed the Board on the desirability of establishing a Laboratory of Hygiene in the University; Professor Sewall on the need of a Physiological Laboratory, and Professor Carhart on the need of a Physical Laboratory; also Professor Winchell presented the needs of the department of General Geology. On motion of Regent Blair the Board went into executive session, after which the Board adjourned to to-morrow morning at nine o'clock. MORNING SESSION, The Board assembled at nine o'clock A. M. Regent Whitman having arrived, the absent members were, Regents Shearer and Joy. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Regent Clark presented the request of Dr. Prescott for a small appropriation for the purchase of books for use in the Chemical Laboratory. This request was referred to the Library Committee of the Faculty. Regent Clark presented and read the following communi

Page  84 84 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. cation from Dr. A. B. Prescott, Dean of the School of Phar macy. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, I December 6th, 1886. President Angell: DEAR SIR,-Within a few weeks the University has received specially prepared collections of products and materials, to illustrate the course of manufacture in several extensive chemical industries in this country. It seems proper, therefore, that the Board of Regents should acknowledge, with thanks, the contributions of the following named manufacturers: The Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Company, Natrona, Pa., raw materials, and products, finished and unfinished, from their alkali and acid works. The Solvay Process Company, Syracuse, New York, articles showing the operations of alkali manufacture by the "ammonia method." The Chemical Wood Treatment Company, Brooklyn, N. Y., articles giving instruction as to WAood Distillation and its products, carefully prepared. Messrs Marx & Rawolle, 163 William St., New York, illustrations of the production of Glycerine, in Holland, France, and the United States. Messrs. Theo. Metcalf & Co., Boston, Mass., samples of Lanolin, and materials. It should be said that the specimens presented, for the most part, do not consist of articles of commerce, but were chosen to represent the steps of manufacture, in the Museum of Applied Chem istry. Respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. Regent Clark submitted the following resolutions which were adopted unanimously. Resolved, That the thanks of the Board of Regents of the State of Michigan be returned to the Knowles Steam Pump Co., of Boston, Mass., for a Steam Pump No. 000, presented to the University of Michigan. Resolved, That the thanks of the Board of Regents of the

Page  85 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. 85 State of Michigan be, and are hereby extended to the Penn. Salt Manufacturing Company of Natrona, Pa., for raw materials, and products, finished and unfinished, from their Alkali and Acid Works. Also to the Solvay Process Company, Syracuse, New York, for articles showing the operations of alkali manufacture by the "ammonia method." Also to the Chemical Wood Treatment Company, Brooklyn, N. Y., for articles giving instruction as to Wood Distillation and its products, carefully prepared. Also to Messrs Marx & Rawolie, 163 William St., N. Y., for illustrations of the production of Glycerine in Holland, France and the United States. Also to Messrs Theo. Metcalf & Co., Boston, Mass., for samples of Lanolin and materials. Regent Blair presented and read the following report of the Law Committee: The Committee on the Law Department to which were referred the recommendations of the Law Faculty, on the subject of lectures to be delivered by Professors of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, report that they have had the same under consideration and see no objection to granting all the requests contained in the paper referred to and recommend the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved, That the recommendations of the Law Faculty submitted to the Board of Regents at the present meeting are hereby approved, and Thomas C. Trueblood be, and he is hereby appointed teacher in elocution in the Law Department for the year 1886 -1887 for a period of ten weeks at a compensation of $325 as recommended; that Edward S. Dunster, M. D., be appointed lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence in the Law Department; Victor C. Vaughan, M. D., lecturer on Toxicology in the Law Department; and Chas. H. Stowell, M. D., lecturer on Legal Microscopy in the Law Department, and that Henry Wade Rogers be appointed lecturer in the Medical Department upon such topics as may be desired by that Department; and that these services are to be rendered without additional salary or compensation as it is understood to have been arranged between the two Faculties. The report and resolutions of the Law Committee were adopted by the following vote:

Page  86 86 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. By permission, Professor Carhart presented plans for the proposed new Physical Laboratory Building. On motion of Regent Clark, Elmer G. Willyoung was appointed Assistant in the Physical Laboratory at a salary of $200. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board went into Executive Session. At the expiration of the Executive Sestion the Board adjourned to 1:30 P.,M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 1:30 P. M. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That in view of the condition of Professor Sewall's health, and the importance of securing to him the services of an experienced Assistant, H. K. Lum, MI. D., be appointed Assistant to the Chair of Physiology, for the present college year at a salary of $400.00. The resolution of Regent Grosvenor was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the salary of Librarian R. C. Davis was increased from $1,500 to $2,000 per year, by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The question of advancing John M. Schaeberle from Assistant, to Instructor in the Observatory, was presented by

Page  87 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1886. 87 Regent Willett. After some discussion the matter was laid on the table. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the title of Acting Professor V. M. Spalding was made "Professor." Regent Field moved that the salary of Professor Spalding be $1,800. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark and Field. Nays-Regents Grosvenor, Willett, and Whitman. Regent Grosvenor presented and read a communication from the Homoeopathic Medical Faculty asking for a readjustment of salaries in that Department. After discussion the matter was laid on.the table. On motion of Regent Field the salary of Assistant Librarian J. H. Vance was increased from $400 to $600, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-Regents Grosvenor and Willett. On motion of Regent Field the Executive Committee and the Law Committee, jointly, were authorized to employ some competent person to give a course of ten lectures on " Admiralty Law," in the Law Department, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the request of Prof. Cady for an increase of salary was referred to the Literary Committee. On motion of Regent Willett, the Auditing Board were authorized to purchase a Cosmosphere for the use of the astronomical department, at a cost not exceeding $35. On motion of Regent Field, the recommendations contained in the President's Report were referred to appropriate committees of the Board. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  89 MARCH MEETING. 1887. UNIVERSITY OF M1ICHIGAN, ) ANN AIROR, March 22d, 1887. 5 The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock r:. Mi. Present:-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Absent:-Regents Shearer, Draper and Willett. The meeting was called to order and opened with devotional exercises by the President. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the minutes of the last meeting were approved. Sundry papers which had reached the President were referred to appropriate committees for consideration. The Executive Committee of the Board made the following report: UNIVEIRSITY (F MICHIGIAN, ANN Ai;ROI, March 22d, 1887.! IThe Executive Committee beg leave to report: On Dec. 21st, they gave leave of absence for the rest of the academic year, to Professor T. M. Cooley, and appointed William P. Wells, Lecturer on American History and Constitutional Law for the remainder of thie academic year at the salary of $2,200 a year. The death of iProfessor ()lney havinlg rendered it necessary to procure immediate assistance in the Malthematical Department, the Committee on January 19th, 1887, appointed J, M. Schaeberle,

Page  90 90 MARCH MEETING, 1SS7. who was Assistant ill Astronomy, Instructor in Mathematics and Astronomy for the remainder of the year at the salary of 81.00 a year. I.espectfully submitted, JAMES B. ANG(-ELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, E. 0. GR1OSYENOR. CHAS.. WI. WHITMAN. On motion of Regent Field, the report of the Executive Committee was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents (Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and W ihitman. Nays —None. The Executive Committee made the following report of their investigation of certain charges of mismanagement in the University Hospital, which was on motion adopted. UTNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. I ANN. ARm3on, Mich., March 22, 1887. i The Executive Commiittee beg leave to report as follows: They met at the University on Feb. 14th, to consider the subject submitted in the following paper. (Present, the President and Regents Blair and Grosvenor.) ANN ARBOR., Mich, Feb I th, 1887. President James B. Angell: DEAR SIR:-I am instructed to inform you of the action taken at tihe mteetiln of the Faculty last evening, Thursday, Feb. 10, in regard to the affairs of the Hospital. WHEREAS; Accusations of a serious character have been made to variolus persons in tie community, and have reached the public, of gross mismnanag'nement in the University Hospital, and on the other hand, charges of outrag(ous impropriety on the part of a subordinate in the Hospital, viz.: C(harges of having excited patients to complain of their treatment, and of inducing them to make disparaging, exaggerated and false statements, and aiding them in going out of the Hospital to make such statements. Therefore Resolved, Thatj the Board of Regents, -or their Executive Committee, be requested to institute as soon as may be a thorough investigation into the facts of the case, and take such action as justice and the circumstances require. Yours very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, MI. I). Secretary. Department of Medicine and Surgery. They listened to statements from members of the Hospital Committee of the 'aculty, and from nmembers of the lHospital Staff, and others, and considered sundry communications placed! before them, and finally adopted the following finding.

Page  91 MARCH MEETING, 1887. 91 "Certain complaints concerning the management of the University Hospital having been brought to the attention of the Executive Committee, they assembled at the Hospital, and listened to statements by Dr. Palmer and Dr. Frothingham of the Hospital Committee of the Faculty, Dr. Chadbourne, House Surgeon, Dr. Patterson, Ward Master, Ida R. Brigham, M. D., Ward Mistress, Mrs. -losebrough, Matron, Miss Stoddlarc, M. D., Nurse, Miss Cutler, Nurse, also to statements of Rev. Dr. Haskell, Miss Brown. Mrs. Sunderland, and Mrs. Jaycox, residents of Ann Arbor, and to numerous letters and communications from patients, presented through the above named persons or otherwise. After carefully considering all the statements and papers, tlis committee have come to the conclusion that while there have been some cases of negligence in the preparation and in the serving of food, tlTere has been no such neglect or mismanagement as calls for the action of the Board of Regents, but whatever improvements are needed can, they believe, be secured by the exercise of proper supervision on the part of the IHospital Committee, andl they commend the matter to the careful and continued attention of that Committee." The Commnittee also accepted the resignation of Miss Brigllam aIs Ward Mistress. They authorized the Auditing Boarc to supply such additional assistance in the Hospital as was rendered necessary by the resignation of Miss Brigham. Rlespectfully submtitted, JAMES B. AN GELL, AUSTI, S N BLAIR,, E. O. (O:1I()SYENR. The President stated that the sum of $500, had been realized from the sale of certain lands in the State of Ohio, bequeathed to the University by the late Mary J. Porter, and asked the Board to indicate what disposition they desired should be made of the money. On motion of Regent Grosvernor it was ordered that the money be placed in the Generctl Fund. On motion of Regent Grosvernor, the name of Regent Draper was substituted for Regent Joy's in the Standing Committees of the Board,

Page  92 92 MARCH MEETING, 1887. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the question of asking the State to refund to the University certain taxes paid on lots in Springwells, was referred to the Committee on the Law Department for consideration. The following communication was received from the Secretary of the University Senate. Communication from the University Senate relative to the Semi-Centennial Celebration: Marhli 22, 1887. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The University Senate begs leave to present a preliminary report of progress made (under resolution of your Board, adopted in March 1886, Proceedings, page 13) in arranging details of the semicentennial celebration to be held next June, and to submlit certain reconimendations for your consideration. The Senate has had the umatter under discussion at several meetings, has appointed committees and sub-committees, and has had a circular of information printed and sent to all, or nearly all, the newspapers published in this State, and to a considerable number of papers of large circulation in other parts of the country. A copy of this circular, together with a letter from the Secretary of the Committee of arrangements prepared to accompany the circular, is herewith appended. UNIVTERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SEAMI-CENT NIAL CELEBRA\TION, March 1, 1887. CIRCULAR } No. 1. ) In connection with the exercises of Commencement Week, June 25-30, 1887, the University of Michigan will celebrate tlhe fiftieth anniversary of its organization. The programme of the proposed celebration, so far as it can be made known at the present time, is as follows: SUNDAY, JUNE 26: An address by Professor Henry S. Frieze, LL. D., upon "The Relation of State Universities to Religion.', (This address will take the place of the usual baccalaureate sermon.) MONDAY and TUESDAY, JUNE 27 and 28: Class-Day exercises in the various departments.

Page  93 MaARCH MEETING, l(d')., 93 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, forenoon: An address by H-on. Austin Blair, on behalf of the Board of Regents; also an address by Professor J. M. B. Sill, Principal of the State Normal School, on behalf of the State Teachers' Association. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, afternoon: Addresses before the various Societies of Alumni as follows: Department of Literature, Science and the Arts, by Hon. Thomas W. Palmer, United States Senator from Michigan. Department of Law, by Hon. Samuel F. Miller, Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Department of Medicine and Surgery, by Dr. WV. H. Daly, of Pittsburgh, Pa. Homceopathic Medical College, by Dr. John W. Coolidge of Scranton, Pa. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, evening: Mendelssohn's Oratorio of Elijah given by the University Musical Society. 'rHURSDAY, JUNE 30, forenoon: Exercises of the forty-third annual Commencement. The Commemoration Address will be given by President Angell. Addresses from representatives of other universities and colleges are expected, either in connection with the Commencement exercises or else at the banquet to follow. THURSDAY, JUNE 30, evening: Conmmn enceent Banquet. The University desires to obtain the address of all its former students. Address J. H. Wade, Ann Arbor, Mich. UNIVERSITY OF MIICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MIICH., March 1, 1887.; To the Editor of the.............................................. SIR:-At Commencement time in 1887 the University of Michigan will celebrate the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of its organization and desires to welcome back upon that occasion as many as possible of its former students who are scattered over the country to the number of ten or eleven thousand. The programme of the proposed festival, so far as it is known at the present time, is indicated in the accompanying circular, to which your attention is respectfully invited. You would confer a favor upon the University and doubtless also upon many of your readers, if, in connection with any reference you may choose to make in your journal to the approaching jubilee, you were to say that any former student of

Page  94 94 MARCH MEETING, 18i7. the University who desires to receive circulars of information relative to the Semi-Centennial Celebration, should send his address at once to J. H. Wade, Ann Arbor, Mich. For the General Committee of Arrangements, CALVIN THOMAS, Secretary. Considerable progress has been made in determining the character of the programme for the celebration, but provision will have to be made for the expenses, that will necessarily be incurred, before final action can be taken, or any more definite statement published for the information of the alumni and the general public. The sub-committee on music in their report of progress, which report has received the approval of the Senate, ask for an appropriation of five hundred dollars from your Board as a guaranty fund to cover any deficit that may occur. The full text of this report is as follows: REPORT OF MiT SIC (COMMITTEE. They recommend, (1.) That the concert-the Oratorio of Elijah-be given Wednesday evening of Commencement Week. (2.) That the programme be given by the Choral Society, the Amphion Club, and the Glee Club. (3.) That an orchestra of the size of the one employed last year be secured for the concert. (4.) That an appropriation of five hundred dollars be asked for from the Board of Regents to cover such deficit as may arise. (5.) That tickets for the concert be sold at fifty cents each. (6.) That the same orchestra, employed for the concert, be employed for the Commencement Exercises, Thursday morning. BANQUET. The sub-committee on banquet have reported plans and suggestions, which have received the approval of the Senate. The special features of these plans are indicated in the following summary, which is respectfully commended to the consideration of your Board. It is recommended, (1.) That the banquet be served at the usual hour on Commencement Day in the Chapel, with provision for any excess of

Page  95 MARCH MEETING, 1887. 95 numbers in a tent to be spread in the angle between the central building and the north wing. (2.) That admission to the banquet be by ticket only. (3.) That after setting aside a sufficient number of tickets for invited guests, the remainder be held for sale, one ticket only to each purchaser. (4.) That the privilege of purchasing tickets prior to Commencement Day be restricted to graduates and former students of the University; but that graduates of 1887 have the privilege of purchasing tickets, provided any remain unsold in the hands of the committee, at the close of the Commencement Exercises. In the opinion of the Senate, the price charged for tickets should be at least one dollar each, but the determination of this question they wish to leave in the hands of your Board, in case the propositions above submitted shall meet with your approval. Very respectfully submitted, WiN. II. PETTEE, Secretary of the University Senate. Also the following communication from Prof. Charles S. Denison, Chairman of Sub-Committee on decoration: U'NIVERSITY OF MICHIG-AN. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: G(ENELEMEN: —Having been placed at the head of the Committee on Decoration, which is a sub-committee of the General Committee having in charge the matter of arranging for the approaching Semi-centennial Celebration of the University, I beg leave to bring to your notice the necessity of providing a small appropriation —say fifty or one hundred dollars or more as the Board may approve —to be expended for purposes of decoration at that time. I do not venture to advocate a large outlay in this direction and would only say that the results attained must in every way be commensurate with the appropriation. Very respectfully yours, CHARLES S. DENISON, Chairman Sub. Corn. of Gen. Corn. Ann Arbor, March 21st, 1887.

Page  96 MARCH iVMEETING, iY';', On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the foregoing corri munications were referred to a special committee, consisting of Regents Blair, Field and Whitman, and the Auditing Board for consideration, with instructions to report at the present meeting of the Board. Regent Grosvernor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, 'That from and after October 1st, 1887, tie salary of President James B. Angell shall be $5,000 per annum payable quarterly, and that all emoluments now allowed to him shall be continued. The resolution of Regent Grosvenor was adopted by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The request of a large number of the Professors asking that the salaries be paid monthly instead of quarterly, was referred to the Finance Committee for consideration. The resignation of Dr. E. B. Patterson, Ward Master in University Hospital, was received and accepted. Regent Blair, Chairman of Special Committee on the Semi-Centennial Celebration, submitted the following report and resolution. The Special Committee to whom was referred the communication of the Secretary of the Senate have had the same under consideration and respectfully report and recommend the adoption of the following resolution: Resolved, That the plans proposed in said communication be and the same are hereby approved by this Board, and that an appropriation of five hundred dollars from the general fund is hereby made as a guaranty fund to cover any deficiency that may arise as recommended, and that the sum of seventy-five dollars be appropriated for purposes of decoration as recommended, and that the price of dinner tickets be placed at one dollar per ticket. A. BLAIR, MOSES W. FIELD, CHAS. R. WHITMAN.

Page  97 MARCH MEE'TINvG, 188'7. 97 Regent Grosvernor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the sum of,150, or so much thereof as may be necessary, be appropriated for the purpose of defraying the expenses of Professor Davis' Class in Civil Engineering', while engaged in work in the field, the money to be expended under the direction of the Auditing Board. The vote on this resolution resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents (Grosvernor, Blair, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays —None. The following communication from Prof. J. W. Langley was presented and read by Regent Clark. TrNIVER\SITY OF MICHIcIAN, March 21st, 1887. l-resident Jas. B. Angell: DEAR SIR: —My assistant, Mr. Chas. K. McGee, is incapacitated for duty on account of sickness. He remained at work substantially during the whole of the tirst semester of this year. He now desires from the Regents leave of absence for the second semester of the present college year. I concur in his request and recommend that it be granted. Mr. McGee's absence leaves the Department of General Chemistry without an assistant, and compels much of the work which he ordinarily performed to be omitted. Another part of this labor can, however, be done by a comparatively untrained man, and I therefore recommend that Mr. F. F. Sharpless, an undergraduate, be appointed temporary assistant for the time extending from March 15th, to June 30th, at a salary of $100,00 payable in the quarter ending June 30th. Respectfully yours, JO()HN W. LANGLEY. On motion of Regent Clark the recommendations contained in the communication of Prof. Langley were a'lopted by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Field and AWhitman. Nays-None. The President presented the request of Prof. Charles lM. Gayley, (now in Europe), asking that his leave of absence be

Page  98 MARCH MEETING, 1887. extended another year. On motion of Regent Whitman the request of Prof. Gayley was granted. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the President was appointed a delegate from this University to attend the (Centennial Celebration of Columbia College. On motion of Regent Clark, the Board went into executive session. After remaining in Executive Session for some time,.the business of the open session was resumed, and on motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. MORNING SESSION, Wednesday, March 23, 188'. The Board reassembled at 9 o'clock A. r. Present:-Regents Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Draper and Whitman. Absent:-Regents Shearer. Willett and Field. Regent Blair presented and read the following communications from Mrs. W.. W. Murphy and Librarian R. C. Davis. YPSILANTI, ( Jan. 20th, 1887. Hon. J. B. Angell, President of the Michigan University: DEAR SIR:-My late Husband, William AW. Murphy, by his last will made the following bequest to the University: "I give and bequeath to the University of the State of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, all my old books and maps printed and published prior to the year eighteen hundred and forty, and I request the Regents, if convenient, to keep the same in a separate book case. Many of these books are old, rare and valuable." In accordance with this, it has given me pleasure to select and deliver to the Librarian of the University the books covered by the bequest. With great respect, I remain very truly yours, ELLEN B. MURPHY.

Page  99 MARCH MEETING, lSU'7. 93. ANN A s OR, Mich, / March 22, 1887. To President Angell: I have the the honor of submitting the following statement for your use at the meeting of the Board of Regents this evening. The books bequeathed to the University by the late Hlon. W. W. Murphy were delivered into my hands by Mrs. Murphy, in January. The collection consists of 154 volumes, eight pamphlets, and fifty loose maps of various portions of the Western Continent, without date, but evidently of the sixteenth century. Many of the books are old and rare and only at long intervals are found in catalogues of books for sale. There are also some fine specimens of early printing. If in collecting, Mr. lMurphy had any specialty it was chartography. There are about a dozen volumes on this subject, including several volumes of old alid valuable maps. Very respectfully, R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. On motion of Regent Blair, the President was requested to accept the bequest of the late Hon. W. W. Murphy, and to express to Mrs. Murphy the cordial thanks of the Board for the same. The following communication from Professor Hutchins was read by Regent Blair. ANN ARBOR, [ March 22, 1887. To the Honorable the Board of Regents, of the University of Mich. (GENTLEMEN:- -- hereby resign my position as Jay Professor of Law in the Law Department of the University, the resignation to take effect Oct. 1st, 1887. And I take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the uniform kindness that 1 have always received at the hands of the Board of Regents and of the Faculties and other Officers of the Univeisity during the seven years of mv service here as a teacher. I assure you that I belieue in the University of Michigan. I tender my resignation with many feelings of regret; and only because of an opening offered elsewhere that I think it best, under all the circumstances to accept. With great respect, I am very sincerely yours, H. B. HUTCHINS.

Page  100 1(0 MAIRCH MEE TING, NI'7, Regent Blair from the Law Committee, submitted the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved, That the resignation of Prof. H. B. Hutchins, Jay Professor of Law, in the Law Department of the University is hereby accepted, to take effect on the 1st day of October next, in accordance with his request, and the Board of Regents hereby tender the thanks of the University of Michigan to Professor Hutchins for his faithful and satisfactory service here. The following resolution submitted by Regent Whitman, was adopted by the Board unanimously. Resolved, That the privileges of the University be extended to John Randolph Rogers, son of the eminent sculptor Randolph Rogers, as a testimonial of the estimation in which the generous donor of the valued Rogers Collection is held by the Board of Regents. Regent Whitman presented and read the following communication from the Society of the Alumni of the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-We have the honor, in obedience to the instructions of the Society of Alumni of the University of Michigan, to transmit herewith a copy of a resolution adopted by said Society at its last meeting relative to the establishment of the Williams Professorship of the University of Michigan and respectfully ask your early consideration thereof. M. H. GOODRICH, Prest. pro tern. V. M. SPALDING, Secretary. WH:EREAS, It is provided by the terms of the subscription agreement to raise a fund for the endowment of a Professorship in the University of Michigan to be known as the Williams Professorship, that the Interest, Income, and Profit, of the fund to be raised should be paid to the occupant of the chair of said Professorship after Professor Williams death, and WHEREAS, It seems desirable that a Professor who may have reached the period and condition for service at which Dr. Williams had arrived when he received the proceeds and income of this fund, should at the request of the Alumni or Board of Direc

Page  101 MARCH MEETING, 1887. 101 tors be transferred from his own chair to the Williams Professorship, which should be an emeritus professorship, and should thereupon receive the income of the said fund or so much thereof as the Society of Alumni should annually vote to him or the Board of Directors should deem advisable, and should there be more than one needing the benefit of this fund at the same time the professor first transferred or appointed should hold the professorship and the others in order, first, second, and third assistants, therefore Resolved, That the Board of Directors of this Society be and are hereby instructed to present to the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan, at the earliest practicable opportunity, a request that they establish such Williams Professorship in the University of Michligan at a time not later than March 1887, which professorship shall be an limeitus Professorship and substantially in conformity to the plan indicated in this resolution. In compliance with the request of the Society of the Alumni of the Literary Department, Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously. Resolved, That there be established in the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts, of the University of Michigan, a Professorship which shall be known and designated as the Williams Professorship, and which shall be an Emeritus Professorship; that the occupant of said chair of the said Williams Professorship be appointed only upon the nomination of the Society of Alumni, or the Board of Directors thereof from the professors in active service in the University and as provided in the resolution adopted relative to said professorship at the annual meeting of said Society of Alumni in June, 1886. On motion of Regent Blair, the Secretary was instructed to notify Dr. C. Rominger that the Board were unable to purchase his collection of fossils, now in the Museum Regent Clark submitted the following resolution which was unanimously adopted. Resolved, That a vote of thanks of the Board of Regents be and is hereby tendered co The Lansing Iron and Engine Works for a set of cascings and forgings, presented to the [University for an 8x12 Automatic Engine. AllTH[ 11 M. ('LAR1K. March 23d, 1887.

Page  102 102 IMARCH MIEETING, 1887. Regent Grosvenor presented and read the following memorial from the Faculty of the Homweopathic )Medical College. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMAN: —The undersigned members of the Faculty of the Homneopathic Medical College, respectfully ask your honorable body to enact the following resolutions for the government of our college, and to define the relationship of this college with the Department of Medicine and Shurgery. The sections are Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, S, and 9, of the original resolutions offered by Regent Iynd, at the organization of this college and adopted by the Board. and read as follows: Sec. 3. That all students entering such college shall record their names with the Secretary of the University under the designation of students of the Homceopathic Medical College, of the University, and shall be so registered in the Calendar: Shall pay the same fees, and be subjected to the same regulations which are now in force or which may be hereafter established for the government of the Medical Department of the lUnivereity of Michigan. Sec. 4. Students entering the Hom(-opathic Medical College shall receive instructions in the now existing Medical I)epartmenlt in all branches not provided for by the chairs established above, (including practical anatomy:) They shall be entitled to all the priviletges accorded to studenlts il the Medical Department, and shall conform to all requierements of said Medical Department so far a- they apply to all branches in hl-ich such students shall receive instruction in the now existing Department. Sec. 5. Lectures shall as far as possible be given to such students by the Homceopathie medical professors at and during the same hours which may be occupied by professors holding corresponding chairs in the Medical Department of the University, and at any other time which lmay be (letermined by such Homexopathic professors, provided always, that such students are not engaged in the legitimate performlance of duty in the now existing Medical Department. Sec. (6. The salme conditions shall be applied to their matriculatioll, tille of stld(l ald' grao(.ll:aticn a.s 110ow exist or 1lly hereafter be tix(d ill tlie. lMedical LiDpaltllent of the Unlliversity: and it shall be thle ditty of tile.Iresicdelt to satisfy himself that

Page  103 MARCH.MEIETING, 1887. 103 such conditions are duly enforced in the Homoeopathic Medical College and in the Medical Department. Sec. 7. Every professor in the Medical Department of the University, and also in the Homceopathic Medical College, shall upon the completion of the required course of study. and upon students giving the necessary evidence of professional scholarship, furnish the President with official information to that effect; the Deans of the respective Faculties shall report to the President who shall present such reports to the Board of Regents. Sec. 8. All students graduating from the Homueopathic Medical College shall be furnished with Diplomas so designated. Sec. 9. From and after the present University Commencement, degrees shall be conferred as provided for by the Regents of the University, but all Diplomas in every Department of the University shall be signed by the President and the Secretary and shall have the corporate seal of the University attached. We ask you to add the following sections: Sec. 10. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Department of Medicine and Surgery to furnish the President of the University with an official copy of the schedule of lectures to be observed at the opening of each year, and to notify him of any changes made during the year. Said schedule shall always be sent in time to give all students of the Holmneopathic College due notice as to the time lectures begin and the order to be obselrCed. Sec. 11. The Secretary of the Department of Mledicine and Surgery, shall at the endcl of ea.ch semester, furnish an official copy of the attendance record of the students to the President of the University, together with such students quiz record on the various courses of lectures attended in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and standilg in the examinations taken in said Departme.nt. H. L. O()ETZ, J.AMES C. WOOD, D. A. McLACHLAN, H. R. ARNDT. Doctors Obetz, Wood and MeLachlan addressed the Board in support of the Memorial, and Doctors Vaughn and Frothingham in opposition. Pending the discussion, and on motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Board adjourned to 1:'30 o'clock p. M.

Page  104 104 MARCH MEETING, 1887. AFTERNOON SESSION, The Board reassembled at 1:30 \'. M. The first business to come before the Board was the consideration of the Memorial of the Homoeopathic Faculty. On motion of Regent Draper, the Board decided to dispence with the further discussion of the, subject, and adopted the following resolution: Resolved, That the series of resolutions adopted by the Board on the 11th day of May 1875, for the government of the Homceopathic College, is now in force, except section seven (7), and that the following stand as section seven (7) in said series. Section seven (7). "Every Professor in the Medical Department of the University, and also in the Homceopathic Medical College, shall, upon the completion of the requirec course of study, and upon the student's giving the necessaiy evidence of professional scholarship furnish the President with official information of such fact, and thereupon the President sliall communicate the same to the Deans of the respective Faculties and to the lBard of Regents." (n motion of Regent Grosvenor, the request of Dr. W. J. Herdman for an appropriation of $180 for the purchase of three microscopes for use in Pathological Histology, was re ferred to the Auditing Board, with power. Regent Draper submitted the following resolution. Resolved. That Thomas C. Trueblood be and lie is herebiy appointed Teacher of Elocution in the Law Department, during the second semeste' of the next college year, at a salary of five hundred dollars. The resolution of Regent Draper was adopted by the following vote: Ayes —l-egents Grosvenor. Blair, Clark, Draper and Whitman. Nays Nollne.

Page  105 MARCH MEETING, 1887. 105 Regent Clark presented the following communication: To the Hon. Board of Regents: The Greek and Latin Departments of the University respectfully petition for an appropriation of one hnndred and fifty dollars. They desire this amount for the purchase of magic lantern views to illustrate lectures on Grecian and Roman History and Archaeology. The money is asked for at this time that Prof. D'Ooge may be able to purchase the views while in Greece and Rome. HENRY S. FRIEZE, ELIS t1A JONES, A. H. 1PATTENGILL. March 22, 1887. On motion of Regent Clark, an appropriation of $150 was made for the purchase of Magic Lantern Views to illustrate lectures in the Classical Department, by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Grosvenor, Biair, Draper. Clrk and Whitman. Nays ---None. The following resolutions introduced by Regent Grosvenor, were adopted. Resolved, That in view of the notice to the Board, of J. Austin Scott and J. W. Knight desiring to be re'eased from their obligation upon a certain bond made by the First National Bank of Ann Arbor to the Regents of the University and guaranteed by said Scott and Knight, and others, it is expedient and proper that a new bond be obtained from said Bank. Resolved, That the Auditing Board be directed to obtain from the First National Bank of Ann Arbor, a bond to secure the University of Michigan for its deposits. in the penal sum of fifty thousand dollars, $50,000.00. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  106

Page  107 JUNE MEETING, SPECIAL MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, a ANN ARBOR, June 27th, 1887. The Board of Regents assembled in special session in the room of the President at 2 o'clock P. m. Present: The President, Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. The President submitted the following report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave to report as follows: On May 3,1887, Edgar D. Smith was at his request released from his post as Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory, where he was serving at a salary of 8160 a year. The Committee added the duties which had been discharged by Mr. Smith to those of Mr. E. A. Ruddiman, another Assistant, and increased Mr. Ruddiman's compensation by the sum of $80, the same sum which would have been paid to Mr. Smith, had he remained. Respectfully submitted, JAMES B. ANGELL, CHAS. R. WHITMAN, E. 0. GROSVENOIB. The report of the Executive Committee was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Regent Grosvenor presented the following communication from Dr. 0. F. Ghadbourne.

Page  108 108 JUNE MEETING, 1887. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, June 17th, 1887. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: I hereby respectfully tender my resignation as Resident Physician and Surgeon at University Hospital, to take effect Oct. 1, 1887. O. F. CHADBOURNE. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the resignation of Dr 0. F. Chadbourne was accepted. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of Medical Committee, presented the report of the House Surgeon at University Hospital, which was accepted and placed on file. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Dean of the Law Department: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: The Faculty of Law respectfully report that the following named persons in the Law Department have passed all the required examinations, and they therefore recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred upon them. Respectfully, submitted for the Faculty. HENRY WADE ROGERS, Dean. Ann Arbor, June 27th, 1887, Thomas Adams, Cassius Alexander, George Butler Andrewx,2 George Edgar Arbury, Reuben Ensign Babcock, Hiram. Hiubbard. Bacon, lJr. Charles _Nathan Banks, John David Barkalow, John Grant Barnes, William Alexander Bar-nes, John D. Barry, Richard Martello Bates, Edward Davison. Black, Franklin. Pierce Blackman, George Morton. Bleecker, Charles Blanchard Boyce, James Walter Bralnnum, James Leazure Loar, Charles Albert Loomis, Ubald. Loranger, Austin Clark Loveland, Albert Hurd Lowman, Oscar Charles Lungershausen, Charles Robert Mains, George Culley Manlly, Asa Edson Mattice, James David May, Rebecca Ilay, William Culp McEldowney. William Wilson MeN-air, Charlie 'Warren Miller, Elner Ellsworth Miller, William Henry MohTrmlanr, Florence C. Moriarty,

Page  109 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 109 Elmer Ellsworth Brooks, Edwin Newton Brown, George Fawcett Brown, John Brown, Will Ellis Brown, George Brinton McClellan Burd, Wolcott Hackley Butler, Clinton Lee Caldwell, Daniel Fisher Campbell, William Owens Campbell, Charles Lunt Carter, Howard Williamson Cavanagh, William Clinton Chadwick, Charles Sherwin Chase, Fred I. Chichester, William Alexander Clark, John Quincy Cline, Harry Godfrey Clock, John Francis Connor, Oliver James Cook, Edwin A. Corbin, John Clinton Coveney, Edward Leverett Curtis, Webster William Davis, William David Davis, Corinne Douglas, Hamilton Douglas, Frank Edward Duncan, George Dysart, Albert Danner Elliot, Byron Ransom Erskine, John Alaric Fairchild, Lucius Matlack Fall, Leonard Sumner Ferry, Jay Elisha Gladding, Joseph Montgomery Glasgow, Oliver Anson Goss, Louis Edward Gossman, William Emory Gross, Wilfred Rudesill Guy, Att'y, Bayard Taylor Hainer, B. S., Grant Earl Halderman, Tadao Nakamura, Durbin Newton, Edmund Cone Nordyke, Francis Joseph O'Brien, Ellsworth E. Otis, James Beatty Owens, Frank Sparrow Parker, Thomas J. Peach, Edwin Deppen Peifer, Edward Fitch Pettis, Jay Eugene Pickard, Charles Sumner Pierce, Frank Alvin Rasch, Louis Oliver Rasch, Charles Reed, James Edgar Ricketts, Charles Perry Roberts, Absalom Rosenberger, Frank Henry Rutter, George Washington Saulsberry, James Newton Saunders, Jr., Edward Jay Scofield, John Vincent Sheehan, Timothy Daniel Sheehan, Samuel Ira Slade, Francis Giles Shumway, Charles Milton Smith, Henry Isaac Smith, Welcome Johnston Smith, Frederick Waeir Stevens, John Wesley Mayo Stewart, Charles McClellan Strickler, Elvin Swarthout, Jacob Bowman Sweitzer, Lyman Beecher Sullivan, Harvey Tappan, Orla Benedict Taylor, Sidney Stockton Taylor, Walter Augustus Thieme, Albert Martin Thomas, Isaac Samuel Thompson, Carl Andrew Wagner,

Page  110 110 JUNE YMEETING, 1887. James Preston Hall, James Grant Hays, Samuel Franklin Henderson, Charles Gilbert Hinds, Oscar James Hood, Clinton Woodbury Howard, Joseph Henry Ingwersen, William Jefferson Inman, Kakutaro Itaya, Fred William Job, Adna Romulus Johnson, Thomas D. Kearney, Austin McCreary Keen, Frank Herman Kennedy, William Henry King, Charles Willibald Kuhne, Charles Carney Lee, William Edward Walsh, Thomas Henry Ward, Francis Louis Weaver, Frank Wells, James Henry Wendorf, Ernest Willard Whipple, John Jefferson Whitacre, Avery Claborn White, Fred Patterson Whiteley, Mary Collins Whiting, William Tyre Whittington, Levi Peet Wilcox, Margaret Lyons Wilcox, Lytle Wilkinson, George Rodden Willard, Otis Andrew Williams, Charles Bramble Wilmot, Emmet Daniel Wiltse. On motion of Regent Draper it was voted that the Degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication in accordance with the recommendation of the Law Faculty. Regent Willett presented the following communication from the Secretary of the Literary Faculty: To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-By direction of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, I have the honor to report that the following named persons are recommended to your honorable body for the degrees indicated: BACHELOR OF LETTERS. Elma Mary Blackman, Antoinette Brown, Leonidas Connell, Maria Ruth Guppy, George Matthews Hewey, Dora Ella Kennedy, Maria McDonald, Myron Williams Mills, Stafford T. Mitchell, Edwin P. Trueblood. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MINING ENGINEERING). John McIntyre Jaycox.

Page  111 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 111 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING). Francis Joseph Baker, John Denison lHibbard, Joseph Halsted, James Alfred Sinclair, Kendal Woodward Hess, Earl Porter Wetmore. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING). Benjamin Butler Brown, George Loughnane, Seward Cramer, John Cranch Moses, Charles Young Dixon, Fred Blackburn Pelham, William Roy Hand, George Ernest Rcehm, George B. Hodge, Benno Rohnert. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN GENERAL SCIENCE). Katherine Eloise Barnes, Louis Parker Jocelyn, Charles Potwin Beckwith, Webster S. Ruckman, Addie Deett Bird, Elmer Sanford, Arthur Graham Hall, James Lincoln Skinner, K. Gertrude Stevens. BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Wirt McGregor Austin, Thomas Jack Ballinger, Emma E. Beers, Frank Forest Bumps, Anna Louise Campbell, George Peter Cary, Celia Chamberlain, David Emil Heineman, Michael Edward McEnany, Robert Webber Moore, Robert Ezra Park, Samuel Kemp Pittman, Jesse Cornell Shattuck, Francis Adelia Slaght, George Edward Taylor, John Charles Warmbier, Francis James Woolley. BACHELOR OF ARTS. Ephraim Douglass Adams, James Everett Ball, Arthur Lincoln Benedict, Adelaide May Bradford, Robert Corwin Bryant, Clarence Byrnes, Martin Cavanaugh, William Wallace Chalmers, Fred Converse Clark, Minnie Olive Florence Clark, Isabella Cook, Charles Horton Cooley, Arthur John Covell, Florence Bingham Kinne, Clesson Selwyne Kinney, Llewellyn Cary Lawrence, Moritz Levi, Helen Louisa Lovell, Lawrence Amos McLouth, Susie Suvina Mishler, Thomas Frank Moran, Alphonso Gerald Newcomer, Claire Avery Orr, Belle Purmort, John Charles Ranacher, Edmund Jeremiah Shaw,

Page  112 112 JUNE MEETING, 1887. George Ellsworth Dawson, Elizabeth Sargent Gastman, Charles Edwards Grove, William Henry Hawkes, Satia Jewett Hyde, Violet Delille Jayne, Frederica Florence Jones, |auy Lincoln Kiefer, Frederick David Sherman, Mark Roger Sherman, Walter Teis Smith, Jerome Beers Thomas, Jr., Franklin Luppen Velde, William Henry Walker, James A. Wardlow, Frank Enos Welch. MASTER OF SCIENCE. Shigehide Arakawa, B. Agr., Frederick George Novy. MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY. Elvin Swarthout. MASTER OF ARTS. Estelle Louis Guppy, George Culley Manly, George Francis James, Hannah Robie Sewall, Margaret Stewart. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Webster Cook, John Foster Eastwood. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved, That the degrees as indicated in the communication just read, be conferred upon the persons named, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The following communication from the Dean of the Dental College was presented by Regent Grosvenor. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, June 27, 1887. The Honorable Board of Regents University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-The following named persons having passed a satisfactory examination, and completed the required course of study and work in the College of Dental Surgery, are hereby recommended for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Respectfully submitted, Ernest Lee Avery, Frank Corington Babcock, Gilbert Eli Corbin, M. D., J. TAFT, Dean. John Thomas Martin, Lewis Henry McDonald, George Hart Miner,

Page  113 JUNE' MlEETING, 188'7 Edward Lincoln Dillman, Joseph Lawrence Nordikel Almon Dewhirst, Edward Everett Paxson, Elmer Llewellyn Drake, William Arthur Powers, Fred William Gordon, William Daniel Saunders, Almer Myron Harrison, Frank Leslie Small, David Alexander Harroun, Eva Claire Smith, Harry Duncan Heller, Clarence John:Burr Stephens James Bailey Hoar, James C. Stevens, Fred Adolph Kotts, Patrick James Sullivan, Cyreno Nathaniel Leonard, Charles Henry Worboys, William Adelbert Wright. On motion of Regent Grosvenor it was voted that the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman df the Finance Committee, presented the bond of the First National Bank of Ann Arbor, to secure the deposit of the University funds in said Bank, which on motion was accepted, approved, and placed in the hands of the President for safe keeping. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously. Resolved, That the thanks of the Regents be presented to the donors of valuable gifts as follows: 1. To the Hon. James McMillan for a marble bust of himself, presented at the request of the President. 2. To Mr. A. 0. Revenaugh for a large portrait of the late Professor Williams, painted by Mr. Revenaugh, the donor. 3. To Mr. Henry Phillips, for a collection of valuable prehistoric flint implements from Denmark. 4. To members of the Junior and Freshman classes of the Department of Medicine and Surgery and to members of the Dental classes for a large portrait of Professor Ford, presented by them. 5. To the graduating class of the Literary Department for a portrait of the late Professor Olney. On motion of Regent Draper, all Professors who have given instruction to the present graduating class in the Law Department, were authorized to sign the diplomas.

Page  114 114 JUNE MEETING, 1887. Regent Grosvenor presented the following resolution of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Resolved, That this Faculty request a conference with the Board of Regents to consider the question of supplying rooms for giving instruction in Physiology, Sanitary Science, Pathological Anatomy and Histology; and that the Secretary be requested to ascertain when such a conference can be had, and that he notify the members of this Faculty accordingly. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Medical Faculty were notified that the Board would hear them on the subject matter of the foregoing resolution, to-morrow morning at 8:30 o'clock. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following communication from the Dean of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 27th, 1887. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-The following persons having complied with all the requirements of the College of Medicine and Surgery are hereby, by a vote of the Faculty, recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. John Frederick Abbott, Justina Southgate Anderson, Oliver Elmer Ellsworth Arndt, William Tisdale Atkinson, Leonard Chester Backus, James Kleckner Bartholomew Roxie Ellen Bates, Arthur Bennett, Edward Samuel Blair, A. B., Allegheny College. Josephine Dorr Blake, A. B., Vassar College. Henry Boss, Augusta Mulford Brewer, Lyman Augustus Brewer, A. B. PALMER, Dean. Charles John Hood, Benjamin Franklin Horner, Gotthelf Charles Huber, Philo Hull, Gilbert Bastedo Johnston, William Murray Johnston, Frank Miner Kerry, B. S., Hillsdale College. June kichi Kimura, George Washington Lacea, B. L., Otto Landmann, Ph. B., Ella Marx, George McIntyre, Jennette Matilda McLaren,

Page  115 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 115 Arthur H. Brownell, A. B., Hamilton College. William Edward Buschman, Mary Elizabeth Clark, B. L., Miles Hartson Clark, A. B., Williams College. Frank Smith Coller, William J. Coppernoll, Walter Armstrong Cowie, Lancelot B. Dawson, John Webb Decker, Homer George Emery, Elizabeth Martha Farrand, Ashbel Howard Fassett, Charles Mark Freeman, Louis Albert Fritsche, John Clark Gauntlett, Edward Branford Gibson, Leon Mitchel Gillette, Mary Edna Goble, George Gundlach, Addie Emma Gurd, George Clinton Hafford, George Andrew Hare, Jessie Daniells Hare, Leonard Francis Hatch, Kate Annabelle Hathaway, Grant Sumner Hicks, Homer Dwight Hodge, David Decker McNaughton, Burton Albion Meacham, George Leonard Meyer, Wilmot Fred Miller, Frank Daniel Myers, Otto Negelspach, Henry Palmer, Ph. C., Thomas Charles Phillips, B. S., Edward Joseph Price, John Abbott Price, Eugene V. Riker, A. B., *Alpheus Worley Ringer, Edward Alexander Runyan, Albert Franklin Schafer, Minnie Elizabeth Sinclair, Peter Franklin Smith, William Hoffman Stauffer, Frederick Charles Thompson, Edward R. Wagner, A. M., Michael Eugene Whalen, Almond Henry Wicks, Esther Gilbert Willoughby, William Henry Winslow, Thomas Michael Winters, Frank Paine Witter, Nellie Ida Woodworth, Charles D'Abbs Wright, Wilbur Clarence Wright. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, it was voted that the degree of Doctor of Medicine be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty. Regent Clark presented the following communication from Charles K. Adams, President of Cornell University, which was ordered spread on the minutes. *Deceased.

Page  116 116 JUNE MEETING, 1887. PRESIDENT'S ROOMS, CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ITHACA, N. Y., May 4th, 1887. To the Honorable the Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-Soon after the organization of the School of Political Science in the University of Michigan, some five years ago, I received from a personal friend, who was at the same time an ardent friend of the University, a considerable sum of money, amounting in all to $4,350, for the purchase of books in the department of History and Political Science. Accompanying the gift were two easy conditions, first, that I should purchase with the money such books as I needed in the department without asking the advice of any one, and, secondly, that I should not reveal to any one except the President and the Librarian the name of the giver. These conditions were complied with. Not long since I received a letter from my friend of which the following is an extract: "Some time ago I received your letter with the package of invoices and vouchers of the books you bought with the money I gave you for the School of Political Science. I have looked over the list. They are a noble lot, and I am very glad to believe that the money will do as much good as any equal amount I ever expended. I don't know whether the Regents of the University know who Mr. 'X.' is or not; I see no reason why the matter should now be a secret. I care nothing about it now one way or the other." The injunction of secrecy having thus been removed, I take pleasure in informing your honorable body that the benefactor of the University was James J. Hagerman, Esq., of the class of '61, now at Colorado Springs, Col. Hoping that the books so generously contributed will long continue to instruct and inspire students of History and Political Science, and wishing for the University in all of its Departments the prosperity it so richly deserves, I am Your obedient servant, C. K. ADAMS. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution, which was adopted unanimously. WHEREAS, The injunction of secrecy as to the donor of a considerable proportion of the books, purchased for the Department of History and Political Science, has been removed, as appears from the letter of President Adams; Therefore, Resolved, That the thanks of this board be and are hereby tendered to the liberal donor, James J. Hagerman, Esq., of Colorado Springs, Col.

Page  117 JUNE MEETING, 188'7. 117 On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board went into Executive Session, after some time the business of the open session was resumed. And on motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned to 7:30 o'clock P. M. EVENING SESSION. The Board of Regents reassembled in the room of the President at 7:30 P. M. Full Board present. The following communication from the Dean of the Homeopathic Medical College, was presented by Regent Grosvenor. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 1 June 27th, 1887. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-The following persons having complied with all the requirements of the Homceopathic Medical College for graduation, are recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. H. L. OBETZ, Dean. George Lake Bailey, Samuel Geo. Milner, A. M., Olivia Artemisia Baldwin, Eliza Louise Orleman, John Stuart Campbell, Earl Fuller Shaw, Geo. Willard Kishpaugh, Melancthon B. Snyder, A. B., Matilda Jamison Lyons, Sue McGlaughlin Snyder, Arabella Merrill, Rodney Chester Taylor, Zilpha Rosannah Wheelock. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, it was voted that the degree of Doctor of Medicine be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Homceopathic Faculty. The President presented a communication from Prof. Winchell, relating to the purchase of the Rominger Collection. Referred to the Committee on Museum. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the sum of $600, or so much thereof as may be necessary, be appropriated for the purpose of publishing the SemiCentennial Commemorative Volume, and that the money be expended under the direction of the Auditing Board.

Page  118 JUNE MEETING, 1887. The resolution of Regent Willett was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Regent Whitman was appointed to the place of Regent Draper on the Standing Committee on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Department. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board went into Executive Session. After remaining in Executive Session some time, the business of the open session was resumed. Regent Whitman moved that Professor Henry C. Adams be elected Professor of Political Economy and Finance, at the salary of $2,200 a year, beginning Oct. 1st, next. The motion was carried by the following vote. Ayes - Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, A. C. McLaughlin was appointed Instructor in History for one year at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Walter Miller was appointed Instructor in Latin for one year, salary $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, Associate Professor W. W. Beman was promoted to the Chair of Mathematics, with the title of Professor, and salary of $2,200, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None.

Page  119 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 119 On motion of Regent Whitman, S. W. Clary was appointed Instructor in Modern Languages for one year, salary $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and WJhitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, Arthur W. Burnett was appointed Instructor in English for one year, at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Professor J. B. Steere asked for, and obtained leave of absence for one year, his salary to lapse during his absence. Regent Blair moved that the sum of sixty dollars ($60.) be appropriated for the purpose of defraying the expenses of Justice Miller, of the United States Supreme Court, who delivered the address to the Graduating Law Class. The motion of Regent Blair was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. On motion of Regent Shearer, the salary of R. F. Sanford was made $1,200 per year, from July 1st, 1887, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Whitman moved that the salary of Acting Professor Cady be $1,600. Regent Grosvenor moved to amend by making it $1,200. The amendment of Regent Grosvenor was carried, and the vote on the original motion as amended resulted as follows:

Page  120 120 JUNE MEETING, 1887. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett and Field. Nays-Regent Whitman. On motion the Board adjourned to 8:30 to-morrow morning for its regular annual meeting. ANNUAL MEETING. MORNING SESSION. TUESDAY, June 28th, 1887. The Board assembled for its annual meeting in the room of the President at 8:30 o'clock. Full Board present. A conference with the Medical Faculty having been made the special order for this hour, the Board listened to Professors Herdman, Vaughan, Sewall, and Stowell, and also to Professor Carhart on the need of more room for the various Laboratories in which they were interested. On motion of Regent Willett the whole matter was referred to the Medical Committee. Doctor Palmer, Dean of the Medical Faculty, presented and read his annual report to the Board. Doctor Maclean suggested to the Board the expediency of appropriating $50 to purchase an illustrated report of the clinical work done by the Professor of Surgery during the past year. On motion the matter was referred to the Medical Committee. By permission Professor Langley addressed the Board on the subject of the ventilation of the Medical Building. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Professor Langley was requested to reduce his remarks to writing, and the subject was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds.

Page  121 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 121 On motion the Board adjourned to 2:30 o'clock P. M. AFfERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2:30 P. M. On motion of Regent Field, Dr. Maclean addressed the Board on the needs of the Medical Department. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Auditing Board was authorized to purchase new instruments for the use of the Professor of Surgery at a cost not exceeding $300. Regent Draper submitted the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the President, to investigate and make report as to the clinical requirements of the Medical Department. The President appointed Regents Draper, Blair and Grosvenor as such committee. Regent Whitman presented the following communication from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy: UNIVERSITY OF M[CHIG AN, CHEMICAL LABORATORY, Ann Arbor, June 28th, 1887. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I respectfully request the purchase of the following named articles for the use of the students of the chemical laboratory. said students being now uniformly required to pay fees proportional to the expense of the laboratory material they use: 1 Zeiss's Bacteria Microscope, with Abbe's illuminating apparatus. Objectives A & D with 1-12 oil immersion. Eye pieces 2, 4, 5, magnifying from 50 to 1265 diam. Seybold, 1319,$170.00. 1 Zeiss Microscope. Stand IV., No. 6, Objectives A., D., Eye pieces 2. 4, $70.00. 3 dozen 1-5 Objectives, Society Screw, ($11.50 each), $414.00. 3 Eye pieces, B, 14 inch, $10.50. 1 Polariscope, Hoppe-Seylor's, $63.00. In all very nearly $727. Respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT.

Page  122 122 JUNE MIEETING, 1887. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Auditing Board were authorized to make the purchases named in the foregoing communication by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The following communication from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy was presented and read by Regent Whitman. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SCHOOL OF 1PI-IARMACY, Ann Arbor, June 28, 1887. ) To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy, I respectfully report that the following named persons have completed all the requirements for the degrees herewith writ ten over their names. FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PIHARPLMACY. Edsel Alexander Ruddim'.n, Ph. C. FOR THE DEGREE OF PHARMACEUTICAL CHEM3IST. Charles Baker, B. S., Herman Louis Barie, Adam John Baumhardt, Emery Rice BeaI, Louis Britten Carr, Joseph Martin Croman, William Henry Doehne, William Arnold Dothany, B. S Louis A. Dryfoos, Richard Southard Dupont, Leroy Adelbert Ellis, Samuel Slokom Hance, Florence Edith Hendershott, Fred Joseph Henning, Wilber Fisk Jackman, B. S., Mervin A. Jones, Benjamin Silvanus Krause, Willis Leisenring, B. S.:, Edward I1all Marshall, A. B., Andrew Stuart Mitchell, Gustave Adolph Reule,, Julius Otto Schlotterbeck, Charles G. Shubel, Darius Parsons Shuler, Clayton Joseph Standart, George Ballard Topping, Abraham VanZwaluwenburg, Willard McKenzie Warren, Charles Delos Wiley. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. P RESCOTT, Dean.

Page  123 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 123 On motion of Regent Whitman, it was voted that the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Dr. H. K. Lum was reappointed Assistant in the Physiological Laboratory at a salary of $400, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor nominated the following persons for appointments in the Homceopathic Medical College for the ensuing year. John S. Campbell, M. D., to be House Surgeon and Assistant to the Professor of Materia Medica, at a salary of $350; Samuel G. Milner, A. M., M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, and to the Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, salary $200; Rodney C. Taylor, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Surgery, and to the Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, salary $200. The appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. George E. Fairbairn, not having been recommended by the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for graduation, because he had not presented himself for examination in a study needed to complete his course, his father appeared before the Board to inquire if the degree sought by his son could be conferred. The Board, on motion of Regent Draper, declined to grant the degree. Doctor A. B. Prescott, Dean of the School of Pharmacy. by a communication to the Board, recommended the following appointments in the Chemical Laboratory for the ensuing year.

Page  124 124 JUNE MEETING, 1887. (1). That Alviso 13. Stevens be continued as instrutctor in Pharmacy. Salary $1,000. (2). That Mrs. Kate C. Johnson be continued as dispensing clerk. Salary $600. (3). That Charles L. Davis be continued as Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry. Salary $250. (4). That Frank C. Smith be Assistant in Qualitative Analysis. Salary $250. (5). That Abram Van Zwaluwenburg, Ph. C., be Assistant in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacy. Salary $192. (6). That William F. Edwards be Assistant in Qualitative Analy sis. Salary $192. (7). That John D. Biker be Assistant in Physiological Chemistry. Salary $192. On motion of Regent Whitman, the above appointments were made in accordance with the recommendation of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the sum of $75 was appropriated for advertising the Law Department. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Yhitman. Nays-None. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the Librarian, Secretary, and Treasurer, draw the same salary as full Professors, and that the salary of all full Professors be $2,200. On motion the resolution of Regent Willett was referred to the Finance Committee. Regent Grosvenor moved that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be associated with the Medical Committee in disposing of such questions relating to Buildings as have been referred to the Medical Committee. Carried.

Page  125 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 125 On motion of Regent Grosvenor, an appropriation of 8155 was made for the purpose of purchasing one section cutter, and four microscopes for use in the Botanical Laboratory, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the Auditing Board were authorized to sell six microscopes now in use in the Botanical Laboratory, and to replace them with new ones of improved construction. On motion of Regent Clark, the title of Professor Morris was changed to Professor of Philosophy. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution which was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That on and after October 1st, 1887, the salaries of Professors in the Medical College shall not exceed $2,000 per annum. Provided, however, that all Professors, whose salaries are now established at $2,200, shall, on account of their long and valuable service, (unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Regents), be entitled to the same salary during their continuance as such Professors. Regent Shearer read a communication from Professor M. E. Cooley in regard to salaries in the Engineering Labor. atory, which was referred to the Finance Committee. On motion of Regent Blair, T. C. Trueblood was retained as Teacher of Elocution for one semester of the ensuing year, at a salary of $1,000, one-half of his time to be given to the Law Department, and the other half to the Literary Department. The vote on the above appointments was as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. N ays-N one.

Page  126 126 - JUNE MEETING, 1887. On motion of Regent Shearer, J. M. Schaeberle was appointed Instructor in Astronomy at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Shearer, Ludovic Estes was appointed Instructor in Mathematics at a salary of $900 by the following vote: Ayes-Regent Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Shearer submitted the following resolutions which were adopted. WHEREAS, The Legislature has made appropriations to the University for the construction and equipment of the several buildings hereinafter named, to wit: For additional heating apparatus and boiler house........................... $ 15,000 For forge and foundry rooms and equipment of same.................... 9,250 For machinery for the engineering laboratory............................... 6,750 Therefore, be it Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be and are hereby directed to procure designs for the several buildings named above, to receive proposals for the same, to approve the contracts and the monthly estimates for the payment of the contractors, and to act for the Board in all matters that may arise in connection with the operations in the completion of the several buildings above named under the contracts made for the same. Resolved, That the President and Secretary of this Board be and are hereby authorized and directed to sign contracts for this Board for the new Boiler House and Heating Apparatus and for the addition to the Engineering Laboratory, after the several contracts have been approved by the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. On motion of Regent Willett, the consideration of the appointing of Professors in the Law Department, and of the erection of a building for Scientific Laboratories, was deferred until the next meeting of the Board.

Page  127 JUNE, MEETING, 1887. 19 Regent Shearer moved that the salary of Professor de Pont as Secretary of the Literary Faculty be increased $200. The motion was referred to the Finance Committee. On motion of Regent Field the Board adjourned to 7 o'clock P. M. EVENING SESSION. Regent Clark stated that Professor Cady had been called upon to do a vast amount of extra work during the last semester, in preparing music for the Semi-Centennial and Commencement Week, and moved that the sum of $200 be allowed him as compensation for such extra labor. The motion of Regent Clark was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the matter of the scientific laboratories and equipment be referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to investigate and, upon consultation with the President and the several Departments concerned and competent architects, to report at the next meeting of the Board what may be most expedient and advisable in the premises, and if a portion of the buildings demanded may be constructed with the fund at command, and that the sentiment of the Board is that the $35,000 be expended for a building. The resolution was amended by fixing the sum for the building at $30,000, and was then adopted. Regent Willett presented and read the following recommendations of the Library Committee of the Faculty. (1). That a door be cut from the Reading Room into the Lecture Room in the east wing of the Library building. (2). That the salary of the assistants in charge of the Seminary Rooms be reduced from $150 per annum to $125. (3). That the salary of the assistant at the delivery desk be increased from $200 per annum to $225. (4). That the salary of Miss Ida R. Morrish, Assistant in charge of the catalogue, be increased from $500 per annum to $600.

Page  128 128 JUNE MEETING, 1887. (5). That in the division of the $5,000, appropriated by the Legislature for the maintenance of the Libraries of the University for the year 1887-8, $3,500 be assigned to the General Library for the year 1887. The above recommendations were adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned to 8:30 to-morrow morning. MORNING SESSION, WEDNESDAY, June 29th. The Board assembled at 8:30 A. r. Full Board present. Regent Blair moved that when the Board adjourn it adjourn to July 8th, at 7 o'clock p. M. The motion was carried unanimously. On motion of Regent Blair, the degree of Bachelor of Laws was conferred upon "Anton Henry Classen." On motion of Regent Clark it was voted that J. E. Reighard be put in charge of the instruction in Zoology for the coming year and that he be appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Zoology for that period with the salary of $1,600 a year. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, Mr. F. L. Washburn was elected Instructor in Zoology for one year, beginning Oct. 1st, at a salary of $900 a year. On motion of Regent Willett, it was voted that the salary of Filibert Roth, Janitor in the Museum, be increased on October 1st to $600 a year. The vote was:

Page  129 JUNE MEETING, 1887. 129 Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, it was voted that the sum of $250 be appropriated for the purchase of microscopes for the Zoological Laboratory and that the sum of $250 be appropriated for the purchase of book on Systematic Zoology, which are needed for work in the museum and especially for identification of specimens. The vote stood: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field ax.d Whitman. Nays-None. By unanimous vote of the Board it was ordered that the following honorary degrees be conferred. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy on Captain Otto Ernest Michaelis, U. S. A.; military and scientific writer. The degree of Doctor of Laws on the following persons: Justin Winsor, Librarian of Harvard University, bibliographer, historical editor, historian. Granville Stanley Hall, Professor of Psychology and Pedagogy, in Johns Hopkins University, philosopher. William Petit Trowbridge, Professor in the School of Mines of Columbia College, mathematical writer. Henry Billings Brown, United States District Judge, jurist. Alexander Macfarlane, Professor of Physics in the University of Texas, physicist. James Lambert High, writer on law. James F. Joy, Ex-Regent of the University. Edward Charles Pickering, Director of the Harvard College observatory, astronomer, physicist. Thomas C. Chamberlin, President of the University of Wisconsin, geologist.

Page  130 130 JUNE MEETING, 1887. Eugene Woldemor Hilgard, Professor in the University of California, chemist, geologist. Joshua Allen Lippincott, President of the University of Kansas. Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, President of Rose Polytechnic Institute, physicist. John Wayne Champlin, Justice of the Supreme Court of Michigan, jurist. John W. Daniel, United States Senator from Virginia, writer on law. Asa Gray, Professor of Natural History and Director of the Herbarium in Harvard University, botanist. James Bryce, Professor of International Law in the University of Oxford, historian, constitutional lawyer, statesman. Samuel Smith Harris, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Michigan; pulpit orator, theologian. Samuel Freeman Miller, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, jurist.

Page  131 SPECIAL MEETING. JULY 8, 1887. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock p. M. Present: The President, Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Absent: Regent Willett. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution: -Resolved, That the following appointments be made in the Department of Medicine and Surgery for the ensuing year: George Gundlach, M. D., Resident Physician and Surgeon in University Hospital, salary $450. George W. Lacea, M. D., Wardmaster, salary $300. Patrick Scully, Nurse in male ward, salary $300. M. E. Sinclair, Wardmistress, salary $300. Miss Ernestine J. Hicks, XNurse in female ward, salary to be fixed by the Auditing Board. James N. Martin, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, salary $100. Thomas C. Phillips, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Materia Medica and Ophthalmology, salary $100. Win. A. Campbell, M. D., to be Secretary of the Faculty at a salary of $200; and that Professor Maclean and Professor Palmer be authorized to appoint their own assistants at-a salary of $100 each. The foregoing resolution of Regent Grosvenor was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, G. C. Huber, M. D., was appointed Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy at a salary of $450, by the following vote:

Page  132 132 JUTLY MEETING, 1887. lyes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the salary of Clarence G. Taylor, Superintends ant of Shops in the Engineering Laboratory be fixed at 81,400; that a skilled machinist be employed by the Auditing Board, at a salary of $750; and that the Auditing Board be requested to provide for such janitor work as may be necessary in that laboratory. The resolution of Regent Grosvenor was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor moved that the salary of Professor P.. de Pont as Secretary of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts be increased by the sum, of $200, which was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark Field and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Doctor Palmer, Dean of the Medical Faculty, was allowed a clerk at a salary of $200, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays —N one. Regent Draper moved that Professors Griffin, Walker, and Knowlton be continued as Professors in the Law Department for another year at the same salary. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair; Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Draper submitted the following which was con. curred in by the entire Board.

Page  133 JULY MEETING, 1887. 133 The Board of Regents are in receipt of the following communication from Mr. Albert D. Elliott, a graduate of the Law class of 1887. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, July 8th, 1887. i Professor Henry Wade Rogers: DEAR SIR:-Allow me to present to the Law Department, an oil portrait of Hon. Thomas M. Cooley, who was for so many years one of its honored Professors. I feel that the men who helped to bring such great renown, not only. to the Law Department, but to the whole University should be remembered. If the portrait of Judge Cooley encourages like gifts from students or others of the Alumni, I shall feel amply rewarded. Surely, the students of the different departments will be benelitted by having before them in the class room the portraits of those who have given the best years of their lives to their instruction, and who have achieved greatness and prominence. The portraits of such men as Judge Cooley, Judge Campbell, Ex Gov. Felch and others will give birth to higher thoughts and aspirations. It is my wish that the portrait of Judge Cooley shall always adorn the walls of the Law School, for his name and that of the Law Department of the University of Michigan are inseparable. Most respectfilly, ALBERT D. ELLIOTT, Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Board accepts the appropriate gift, and thanking Mr. Elliott for the same, directs that it be hung upon the walls of the lecture room of the Law Department, in compliance with the request of the donor. Regent Clark, Chairman of the Literary Committee, presented and read the following communication from the Professors of Modern Languages. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. MEMORIAL CONCERNING THE DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUJAGES. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-In view of the great size of the Department of Modern Languages, and in view of other facts hereinafter set forth, you are respectfully requested to take into consideration the ex

Page  134 134 1JULY MiEETING, 1S7. pediency of dividing the said department and of establishing in lieu of the present single Professorship of Modern Languages, two Professorships, one of the Iomance Languages and Literatures, and one of the Germanic Languages and Literatures. The Department of Modern Languages is now by far tle largest in the University. Accurate data for comparison are f-urnished by the following table which gives tle total membership for the present semester of all the classes in each of the subjects mentioned. Greek................ 160 Philosophy............ 25) Botany................ 73 Latin........ 54 Pedagogy............. 138Physiology............. 13 Mathematics......... 385 Interr:ational Law.... 1l Drawing................ 1 8" French............. 305 I Physics.. 47 ivil Engineering....... 0 German............ 35 Chemistry.............. 1 Surveyi ng............ 25 Spanish.......... 17\ Astronomy............. 174 Mechanical Engineering 93 - Minieralogy........... 16 Metallurgy............. 5 Modern Languages.. 674 (Geolog.............. 4 Musi.................. 60 English.............. 360 Zoology............ 45 Bibliography............ 27 History.....4......... 348 From these figures it will be seen that the classes in Modern Languages have at the present time an aggregate membership more than four times as great as in Greek, two and a half times as great as in Latin or Philosophy, somewhat less than twice as great as in Mathematics, English or History, and considerably greater than in all the Physical and Biological Sciences taken together and including Geology and Mineralogy, a group of subjects represented by eight different professors. To describe the situation in other words: Were tihe division made as herein recommended, the classes in German would constitute by themselves one of the four largest departments of thle University, the nmembership of the classes in German nlot differing materially from that of the classes in Mtathematics, English or History. The classes in German number twice as many members as in Greek, a third more than in Latin or Philosophy and from two to twenty times as many as in any one of the scientific de — partments. Your attention is further called to the fact that -there is no such relation between the French alnd German languages as rencers it necessary or even desirable to have them includlec uder a single professorship. The historical connection between them is less close than between the (Greek and the Latin, and either French or German alone presents to the scholar a field wlhich is certainly no less extensive and varied than that offered by either of the two classical languages. It is also true that in recent years no branch of scholarship has grown more rapidly in dignity and importance

Page  135 JULY 1MEETING, 1887, than Modern Philology. Both in Europe and in the United States there has been of late a notable movement for the elevation of standards of scholarship, and of the relquirements of academic instruction i the oden Lagun the n angges. n the better I niversities of Germany, the Romance Languages, with their history, comparative philology, and their literatures, are now usually grouped together as a single specialty, while the Germanic Languages with their history, comparative philology, and literatures, constitute anotlelr. In our own country a similar division of labor is rapidly cominlg to be the rule. Thus we find at the Johns IIopkins iUniversity an Associate Professor of Rom-ance Languages and an Associate Professor of German; at Bryn Mawr an Associate Professor of Rlomnance Languages and an Associate Professor of Germanic Languages; at Cornell, a Professor of Romance Languages and t\wo Professors of the German Language and Literature. At the University of Indiana we find a Professor of Romance Languages and a Professor of Germanic Languages. So far as our own lli versity is concerned, a considerable extension of the scope of its instruction is desirable. There should be cn tinuous instruction in both Italian and Spanish. Opportunity should also be offered as soon as possible to advanced students fur the study of Old French, Provencal and Portuguese, and also for work in the comparative philology of the 1,omance tongues. In the Germanic field, more work of a philological character for advanced students is needed. The first desideratum is probably a course in Gothic, the oldest known form of (ermanic speech. Scarcely less urgent than the Gothic, are the Scandivanian languages, the Old Icelandic, modern Swedish and Danish-Norwegian. The language of Bjhrnson and Ibsen, the language of Tegner and Iuneberg hiave, from a literary point of view, the very highest claims to scholarly attention, while to tne Germanist some knowledge of the Scandinavian languages is indispensable. Instruction in Gothic and in one or more of the Scandinavian languages, is now offered not only at all the well equipped universities of Germany, but also at many of the better institutions in our own country. The intrinsic importance of the modern languages in education is not a matter of dispute. While nothing, save perhaps a knowledge of the mother tongue, can in these days be called an indispensable element of liberal culture, yet a knowledge of French and German is more and mlore coming to be recognized as an exceed.

Page  136 i86 JULY MiFETING, 1887. ingly desirable element in such culture. Without these languages the scholar in almost any branch of inquiry is more or less crippled. Leaving aside any comparison with the ancient languages, the educational or disciplinary value of the study of 'he modern languages is admitted by all to be very great, and it is destined to become greater still through the enlargement of the scope of instruction in these studies and through the improvement of pedagogical methods. Unless all the signs of the times are illusory, the study of modern languages in school, college, and University has before it a future of greatly increasing value and importance. Wherever the elective system prevails, these subjects come to the front; there is a popular demand for them and that demand is not likely to diminish but rather to become stronger and more proriounced. Is it not time, therefore, in view of all the considerations above set forth, that the University of Miclligan should reorganize its work in Modern Languages to the extent and in the manner suggested at the beginning of this Memorial, and thus put itself at once upon the line whic4a the practice of the best institutions is pointing to as the true line of development for the future? Respectfully submitted, E. L. WALTEAl, CALVIN THOMAS. IRegent Clark submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the Department of Modern Languages be divided, and that, in lieu of the present single Professorship of Modern Languages, Professor Walter be appointed Professor of the Ilomance Languages and Literatures, anad Professor Thomas as Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literatures, each at a salary of 32,200 per annum. The vote on Regent Clark's resolution resulted as follows: Ayes — egents Shearer, (rosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays —None. On motion of Regent Whitman, John F. Eastwood, Ph. D., was appointed Assistant in Organic Chemistry for one year at a salary of *192, by the following vote:

Page  137 JUL Y MEETING, 1,(i'7,1 3- Sil Ayes —tegents Shearer, Grosvenor, T1Viair, Draper, Clailrk,.'ield and Whitman. Nays —None. A communication was received frolm Professor Langley relating to the proper ventilation of the Medical.Building, which was, on motion, referred to the (Committee on iBuildings and Grounds. Of the legislative appropriation of e5,00,) for the puirchase of books, $8,500 had been set apart for tlhe General Library at a previous meeting of the Board. iRegent G-rosvenor moved that the remaining 81,500 be divided as follows: To the Medical Library,1,000, ald to the Law Library;t500, The motion of Regent (4'rosvenor was carried unanimously. Regent Shearer, Chairman of Commtuittee on 1uildings and Grounds, submitted the following report: A.NN A iBOpR, MiCIIc-mAX, ( July 8, 1887, 5 The IHomorable the Boaril of Regents: GENTLSEMEN: —The Committee on Pluildilngs and Grounds and the Committee on Medical Department, to whom was referred the matter of the Scientific Laboratories aid who were asked also to report the most expedient and advisablel lan for the use of the thirty-live thousand dollars appropriated for said laboratories, would report as follows: viz. First, as to the proper uses of the appropriation, your comamittees are assured that the intention of the originators of the bill for the appropriation of,75i,000 -was for a new building and the equipment of Laboratories for Physics, Hyg'_iene, LPatlology, P)Ihysiology and Histology. Of this sum one-fifth appears to 1ave been intended for equipment and apparatus, and four-lifths (4-5) for a new buildilng. As the bill was passed the total sum allowed for the above named purposes was,35,000. It seems to your Commlittee a proper interpretation of the intention of the legislatcors to assumi.e, that the same proportion of the reduced appropria-tion should 'be set aside for equipment and apparatus as was includedl in the orig-i

Page  138 138 JULY MEETING, 18SRi nal sum asked for. That is to say, that 1-5, equal to $i7,000, be allotted to equipment and apparatus, and that this sum be divided by the Committee on Medical Department after consultation with the Professors in charge of the laboratories above named, in proportion to their several needs; and that the several portions be expended uinder the supervision of the Auditing Board. The above disposition leaves four-fifths, equal to $28,000, oi the appropriation to be applied to the erection and completion of a new building. As this sum is much too small to erect a building sufficient to accommodate all of the laboratories first proposed, your Colmmittees would recommend that a brick building be erected, three stories in height, and on a plan suited to accommodate at least two (2) of the laboratories, those of Hygiene and Physics, and that this proposed building shall be respectable and appropriate in design, and not to exceed in cost the sum of $28,000. Your Committee submit herewith rough plans for such a building, which can be modified to suit the several departments. Y our Committee would further recommend that the remaining laboratories be assigned rooms in the Medical College Building, selecting those that would be most conveniently served by the present arrangement of rooms in that building; and that said building be thoroughly cleansed, and be altered as to rooms, cases &c., to suit the convenience of these departments and their relation to each other. Also, that the rooms adjoining the elevator and the amphitheatre be thoroughly ventilated, and that all of the renovation, alterations, ventilation &c., of the Medical College SBuilding Ie made under the supervision of the Auditing Board, and that the expense of said works be paid from the Repair Fund. JAMES SHEARER, Chairman, Committee on Buildings and Grounds. E. (). GROSVENOR, Chairman, Committee on Medical Department, Pending the adoption of the report, Regent Whitman submitted the following amendment: Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings are authorized to expend a sum not exceeding 330,000 in the erection of a building for Scientific Laboratories, and that the balance of the appropria

Page  139 JULY MEETING, 1887. 139 tion be held for apparatus, and expended as recommended in. the report of the Committee. The vote on the amendment resulted in its adoption. A call vote was then taken on the adoption of the report as amended, which resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Grosvenor moved that Professors Vaughan, Prescott and Langley be a committee to present a scheme for the establishment of a Department of Hygiene in the University. Carried. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into Executive Session. At the expiration of half an hour the business of the open session was resumed. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the resignation of Professor B.1. C. Burt, which had been presented, was accepted. On motion of Regtent 'Draper the Board adjourned to tomorrow morningc at 8:30 o'clock, standard time. MORNING SESSION, July 9th, 1887, The Board reassembled at 8:30 o'clock. On motion of IRegent Draper the Board went into Executive Session. After some time spent therein, the business of the open session was resumed. On motion of Regent Clark the vote by which Professors Griffin, Walker and Knowlton were appointed Professors in the Law Department, was reconsidered. On motion of Regent Clark, Professor Griffin and Professor Knowlton were reappointed in the Law Department for one year, by the following vote.

Page  140 JULY MEETING, 18i7. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved that Professor William P. Wells be appointed Kent Professor of Law for one year at a salary of $2,000. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. Regent Shearer submitted the following report of the joint Committee on Buildings and Grounds, and on the Department of Medicine and Surgery. July 8th, 1887., The Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-Your Committee on Buildings and Grounds and that on Medical Department to whom were referred the plan of Dr. Herdnian, and that of Dr. Ford for the uses and the application of the appropriation of $35,000, would report that they have carefully considered these plans, and find that each has features to be adopted, but not as an entirety. As the result of the consideration of these plans, and as our report on the same, your Committees respectfully refer mainly to the report (herewith submitted) of the Committees on Buildings and Grounds, and that of Medical Department, on the resolution referring to the Scientific Laboratories, adding thereto a recommendation that a two storied building be erected at a cost not exceeding the sum of $6,000, for the uses of dissecting rooms and a dead room, and that said building be located conveniently to the Medical College, but not within 100 feet of the same. JAMES SHEARER, Chairman, Committee on Buildings and Grounds. E. O. GROSYENOR, Chairman, Committee on Medical Department. The above report and recommendation of the Joint Committee were adopted, as follows:

Page  141 JULY MEETING, 1887. 141 Ayes - Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. At the last meeting of the Board the Laws Committee were requested to consider, and recommend to the next meeting, a proper person to fill the chair in the Law Department made vacant by the resignation of Professor Hutchins. The Committee make the following recommendation, that for the coming year, the following gentlemen be invited to deliver courses of lectures as indicated below. Melville M. Bigelow, Ph. D., of Boston, Mrass. 40 lectures on Equity, at a salary of $1,000. Wim. G. Hammond, LL. D., of St. Louis, Mo. 15 lectures on "History of Common Law," at a salary of $300. B. M. Thompson, Esq., of East Saginaw. 40 lectures on "Real Property," at a salary of $1,000. On motion of Regent Draper the above appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. Nays-None. The question of continuing the use of the rank and title of Associate Professor was, on motion of Regent Grosvenor, referred to the Literary Committee for consideration with a request that they report their conclusion at the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Blair the Executive Committee were authorized to select and appoint an Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric in place of Professor B. C. Burt, resigned. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Finance Committee to whom was referred the following resolution, introduced by Regent Willett at the last meeting of the Board, "Resolved, That on and after October 1st, 1887, the Librarian receive a full Professor's salary, that the salaries of the Secretary and

Page  142 142 JULY MEE TING, 128;ii. Treasurer be increased to the same amoaunt, and that the salaries of all Professors, not now drawing a full Professor's salary, be in creased to that amount, all to date from October 1st, 188;" Reported for the Committee that they have had the same under consideration, and report the same back with the fol lowing resolution as a substitute, and ask to be discharged from the further consideration of the subject. Resolved, That from and after October 1st,:1887, and until otherwise ordered, the annual salary of Associate Professors Elisha Jones and Albert H. Pattengill shall be $2,200 each. And the salary of Professor Victor C. Vaughan, Professor VW. J. Herdman, and Professor Charles I. Stowell shall be $2,000 each, and that the salary of Professor James C. \Wood and Professor Daniel A. McLachlan shall be,2,000 each. Regent Blair moved that so much of the report of the Finance Committee as recommended the increase of the salaries of Professors Jones and Pattengill be adopted. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Field and Whitman. N ays-None. Regent Blair moved that the remainder of Regent Grosvenor's report lie on the table until the October meeting, Carried. The following communication was received from the Library Committee of the Faculty. [INI1VERlSITY OF MIClIGI'-AN, ) GENEIRAL LITII: ARI Y, Ann Arbor, Mich., 1887. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Applications are not unfrequently made to the Library Committee of the Faculty by post graduate students, and by teachers from various parts of the state, who are using the Library during the summer vacation, for permission to take books to their lodgings. As no fatal objection to doing so seemns to exist, the committee at a meeting held July 2d, after some discussion, passed the following resolution:

Page  143 JULY IMFIE TIaNG, 187.' 143 Resolved, That this (Coiommittee respectfully recommend to the Board of Regents at the meeting on July 8th, to add to bection t6 of Chapter XXI., of the Laws and By-Laws of the U-niversity, which reads as follows: "Members of the Faculties, the Librarian, the Secretary and Steward, the Treasurer, members and ex-members of the Board, resident Ex-Profetsors, resident Clergymen occupying pulpits, the Superinteudent of the City Schools, and the, Principal of the High S-chool, may draw books from the Libraries, subject to the restrictions contained in other rules," these words: And this privilege of drawing bookCs may, under special circuemstances, be extended to other persons at tthe discretion of the Library Conmmittee of the Acade.ic Faculty. Thle Commiittee do not jontemplate extending this privilege to any except deserving persons. nor do they contem-plate granting it in a way that shall interfere in the least with the prescribed uses of the Library. lRespectfully submitted. -. C. D)A.V.IS, Secretary of the Commlittee. Regent Blair moved that the lBy-Laws be modified to conform to the recommendation of the Library Committee as set forth in the foregoing comlmul-nication. The motion was carried by the full -vote of the 1Board( The Special Com.mittee to whom was referred the duty of preparing a scheme for establishing a IDepartment of liygiene in the University made the following report: UNIVrERXsrTY ()OF MI-C11IGAX, July 8, 1887 To the Honorable the Board of Regenlts: GENTLEMEN: —he ulndersigned, the Committee to whom was referred the question of the establishment of a Department of Hygene, beg leave to report as follows: (1). We believe that it is desirable to establish a departmlent of Hygiene in this ULniversity, (2) Inasmuch as hygiene is closely related to physiological chemistry, we recommend that these two subjects be united under one chair.

Page  144 144 JULY M.EETING, 1887. (3). We recommend that the title of the chair be that of Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry and Director of the Hygienic Laboratory. (4). It seems to us necessary that the chair so named be provided with adequate assistance, and we recomrnend the appointment of an Instructor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry. All of which is respectfully submitted. V. C. VAU(GHAN, A. 13. PRESCOTT, JOHN MW. LANGLEY. On motion, the report of the Special Committee was adopted unanimously. On motion of Regent Whitman, the title of Professor Vaughan was changed to Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry and Director of the Hygienic Laboratory, and the appointment of an Instructor in the Hygienic Laboratory was left with the Executive C()mmittee, with power. The following resolution introduced by Regent Shearer was adopted unanimously. Resolved, That the Committee on Buildcings and Grounds be and are hereby authorized to procure and decide on designs and specifications for the two buildings intended for Laboratories for Physics and Hygiene in the one case, and for Anatomy in the other; to approve contracts, &c, for all buildings; which contracts are then to be signed by the President and Secretary of the B1oard, after which said Committee are directed and authorized to proceed with the works of construction; to enforce the contracts; to approve the monthly estimates for payment and settlement of all contracts; and to control and do all things ththat the Board could do, that are necessary to the completion of all of the buildings ordered by the Board of Regents at this time. Ann Arbor, Michigan, July 9th, 1887. On motion of Regent Clark, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  145 OCTOBER MEETING. 1887 -UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Oct. 18, 1887. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P. m. Present-the President, Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Absent-Regent Draper. The meeting was called to order and opened with devotional exercises by the President. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the minutes of the two preceding meetings were approved as printed. A number of communications which had reached the President were, at his suggestion, referred to appropriate committees of the Board. The President stated that his annual report had been prepared and was held subject to the pleasure of the Board. Regent Shearer moved that the report be read by the President. The motion prevailed. PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: I offer you my annual report for the year ending Sept. 30, 1887. The following changes have occurred in the Faculties: October 12, Alviso B. Stevens, PH. C., was appointed Instructor in Pharmacy.

Page  146 146 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. December 7, the title of Acting Professor Spaldiing was changed to that of Professor of Botany. December 21, the Executive Committee granted leave of absence for the rest of the year to Professor T. M. Cooley, and appointed for the same time William P. Wells Lecturer on American History and Constitutional Law. They also appointed J. M. Schaeberle, who was Assistant in Astronomy, Instructor in Mathematics and Astronomy for the remainder of the year. At the March meeting of the Board the above action of the Executive Committee was ratified. At the same meeting the resignation of the Jay Professorship of Law by I1. B. Hutchins, was accepted to take effect on October 1st. It is with regret that we lose from our corps of teachers Professor Hutchins, who has rendered very valuable services as a member of the Law Faculty and in former years as a member of the Literary Faculty. Tle new law school of Cornell University is fortunate in securing him as one of its professors. At the June meeting of the Board, Henry C. Adams, PH. D., who as Lecturer in Political Economy had for six years given instruction for one semester of each year, was appointed Professor of Political Economy and Finance and required to give instruction through the whole year; Assistant Professor W;V.. Benan was appointed Professor of Mathematics; the title of Professor Morris was changod fiom Professor of Ethics and History of Philosophy and Logic to Professor of Philosophy; and Professor Steere received leave of absence for one year to conduct a scientific expedition to the Spanish East Indies. J. E. Reighard was appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Zoology during the absence of Professor Steere. The following appointments of instructors for one year were made: Arthur AV. Burnett, Instructor in English; Andrew C. McLaughlin, Instructor in History; Walter Miller, Instructor in Latin; S. W. Clary, Instructor in Modern Lan

Page  147 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 147 guages; J. M. Schaeberle, Instructor in Astronomy; Ludovic Estes, Instructor in Mathematics; F. L. Washburn, Instructor in Zoology. At the July meeting of the Board the resignation of B. C. Burt, Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric, was offered and accepted. The University sustained a heavy loss in the death of Professor Olney, which occurred on the sixteenth of January. He had filled the chair of Mathematics since 1863. He had thus given nearly twenty-four of the ripest years of his life to the service of this institution. Few of its professors have contributed more to its usefulness and its reputation. As a teacher of' Mathematics his gifts were remarkable. IHe awakened in his classes a genuine enthusiasm in his favorite science. The number of students who chose the elective courses which he offered was always large. His methods of instruction were so simple and lucid and charming that I have heard his pupils say thlat the art of teaching could nowhere be better learned than in his class-room. His mathematical writings won for him an enviable reputation, and reflected honor on the University. But his interest in the University was by no means confined to his class-room. He took broad views of the work and policy of the University. He was largely instrumental in introdlucing the various changes, which during thle last twenty years have so widened and enlarged and enriched the teachings in the Literary Department, and have brought that department into so fruitful relation with the schools and with the public. He was always among the foremost in laboring for the moral and religious upbuilding of his pupils. His activity both with voice and with pen in all moral and religious enterprises, whether designed for the welfare of the students or for tlat of the wider public, helped to win favor for the University which he represented. His earnest, positive, forceful character was a power for good

Page  148 148 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. which was recognized far beyond the limits of his personal acquaintance. It is such men as he who are the true builders of a University. Below is given the list of degrees which have been conferred. In accordance with the usage of Universities, we mark our semi-centennial year by bestowing a much larger number of honorary degrees than we are accustomed to confer. The policy of this institution in respect to honorary degrees has been very conservative. It has recognized the propriety of acknowledging distinguished merit by academic distinctions, as the great Universities of the world have long done, but it has selected a very small number in each year as the recipients of such an honor. For the past ten years it has abstained from giving degrees " in course." DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. Bachelor of Letters --—.- ----- -..... 10 Bachelor of Science (Course in Mining Engineering) -. 1 Bachelor of Science (Course in Mechanical Engineering) ---- 6 Bachelor of Science (Course in Civil Engineering) ---- - 10 Bachelor of Science (Course in General Science) --- —~ 9 Bachelor of Philosophy —.. 17 Bachelor of Arts — 42 Master of Science --- -. --- —----- -—. - 2 Master of Philosophy ----. ----.- __ 1 Master of Arts -.- --—. ---- -—. —. —. 5 Doctor of Philosophy-.- - 2 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery). 81 Bachelor of Laws.. -..-.-.. 154 Pharmaceutical Chemist —..- 31 Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic Medical College)-.... 13 Doctor of Dental Surgery 27 411 HONORARY DEGREES. Doctor of Philosophy - 1 Doctor of Laws- 19 Total -..._.- 431

Page  149 OCTOBER MEEZTNG, 1887. 149 The number of students in attendance was as follows; DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Resident Graduates -25 Graduates Studying in absentia ------- 17 Candidates for a Degree ---------- ----- 540 Students not Candidates for a Degree - - 111-693 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. Resident Graduate Third Year Students...-. —.. --- Second Year Students ---- ------- First Year Students -- 1 85 98 137-321 DEPARTMENT OF LAW. Seniors- -- - -- --- - 162 Juniors -— _ ----- -- 176-338 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. Resident Graduate.. Second Year Students — First Year Students. —..- -.. ---.. 1 30 36- 67 HOMICEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Students-Total in the College _ --- —--- --- 62 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Students-Total in the College 91 1,572 The number of students exceeded that of the year 1885-6 by 171, and that of 1884-5 by 277. The largest increase during the past year, as compared with the previous year, was in the Literary Department, 97, and in the Law Department, 52. There was, however, a gain in every Department except in that of Medicine and Surgery, which lost six. As in the year 1885-6, we were gratified by the large accessions to the Literary Department from other colleges. About fifty were received from other institutions

Page  150 150 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. of collegiate rank. No better evidence can be furnished of the reputation which our advanced courses of instruction are giving to the University. With our elective system, our laboratories, and our means of illustrating higher instruction, we may well hope to attract many students, who have completed the more elementary studies in the smaller colleges, and who desire to procure for the latter part of their course the ampler range which is afforded here. It is our true policy, indeed it is our duty, while abating no jot of our thoroughness in the fundamental work of the first two years, to do all in our power to enrich and enlarge the higher work of the undergraduates, and the work of our resident graduates. It should not escape our attention that the number of graduates studying either in residence or in absentia was forty-two. The stimulating and lifting power of the presence of a body of graduate students on the general spirit and life of the University is very considerable. It is highly gratifying to see so many of the scholarly graduates of this and of other institutions pushing their studies under our guidance far beyond the range of the undergraduate curriculunm. In this connection we may properly recognize with grateful appreciation the effort which the alumni are makilng to establish one or more fellowships, to be tenable by our graduates. The generous friends of the University can most effectively contribute to its usefulness and to the promotion of advanced scholarship by endowing fellowships, yielding from four hundred to six hundred dollars a year. Such assistance will enable a few gifted scholars to remain for a period after graduation and receive the amplest culture which we can here impart. It must, however, be remembered by us that the development of the post-graduate work makes larger demands on the time of the Professors and so increases the necessity of giving them more help for the instruction of the under

Page  151 OCTOBER MAEETING, 1887. 151 graduates. Indeed the increase of the number of undergraduates by nearly one hundred this last year has made this necessity so apparent, that the legislature has readily made a timely appropriation for an addition to our force of instructors. But an increase in the number of ograduate students, no two of whom, it may be, are pursuing the same line of studies, entails upon the Professors a much larger proportionate increase of labor than the addition of an equal or a much larger number of undergraduates. The number of women in attendance during the past year was as follows: Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts 175 Department of Medicine and Surgery --- — 51 Department of Law -- School of Pharmacy - 2 Hornceopathic Medical College- 27 College of Dental Surgery — 4 Total —. -—. 265 The number of women present was greater by 36 than in the previous year. The number in attendance in the Literary Department was greater by 40, and in the Homceopathic College greater by 7, and in the Department of Medicine and Surgery less by 10 than in the previous year. In the other Departments the difference was unimportant. The women form sixteen and eight-tenths per cent. of' the whole number of students. Last year they formed sixteen and three-tenths per cent. There is therefore the slight proportionate gain of one-half of one per cent. The largest absolute and proportionate increase we find in the Literary Department. Twenty-five per cent. of the students in that Department are women. That is a proportionate increase of two and a half per cent. as compared with the previous year. For a few years after women were admitted, it used to be said, and with some truth, that our students' of that sex

Page  152 152 OCTOBER MEETIING, 18S7. were women of exceptional ability and force of character, since others did not venture to come. Their success in study, which could not be questioned, was ascribed to this fact. It was urged by those who doubted the expediency of receiving women, that when young women should come in larger numbers, including those of average ability as well as those of exceptional talent, embarrassments would occur and the impolicy of admitting them would become manifest. It is apparent that we are now put to the test thus predicted. But the unfortunate results prophesied have not appeared. We have indeed some women, as we have some men, not eminent in scholarship. But no embarrassments of administration due to that fact have presented themselves. Nor can any inferences against receiving women into our class-rooms be properly made from the fact. The womei who partially or wholly fail in their work meet with the same fate as the men who have the same difficulties. They neither ask nor expect any discriminations in their favor because they are women. But the results of our experience has been confirmed at colleges and universities on both sides of the Atlantic-and strikingly so in the great English Universities recently-where women by their brilliant success have shown their ability without risk to their health to meet the severest tests of scholarship to which the male students are subjected. And what is perhaps of equal importance, the advantaes derived from the University courses have proved as helpful to the women in their lives subsequent to graduation as to the men. There is little in the history of the IHomoeopathic College, the School of Pharmacy, and the Dental College during the past year, which calls for special comment. They have each enjoyed a good degree of prosperity. I can only repeat what I have said in previous reports concerning the need of larger accommodations for the Dental

Page  153 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 153 College, if it is to receive all the students who desire to matriculate. Its rooms are now uncomfortably crowded. In the Law Department the experiment of grading the course has been successful in a gratifying degree. Both teachers and students heartily approve of it. More thorough, systematic, and efficient work is secured by it. The instruction is to be enriched during the coming year by brief courses of lectures on various subjects by distinguished specialists. We may well believe, therefore, that the reputation of the Law School, which had so prosperous a life from its foundation, will be deservedly enhanced during the coming year. The Department of Medicine and Surgery has had a fairly prosperous year. It has been somewhat agitated by the discussion in the public press and otherwise of the proposition to provide in Detroit for the chief part of the clinical instruction. Since a special committee of the Board is charged with the consideration of the subject, I refrain from a discussion of the proposition, but feel it my duty to say that in my judgment the good of the school requires that some decision should be reached by the Board as early as possible. While the matter is under discussion, the uncertainty concerning our future plans has an injurious effect on the school. The reports of the Curators of our Museums show a steady, but not very rapid increase of some of our collections during the past year. A very large accession of plants from the Lake Superior region, the gift of Mr. Frank E. Wood, a former student of the University, has been received. The Museum of Applied Chemistry has been increased by the addition of 417 specimens, chiefly articles which illustrate the more important chemical industries. There is a need of cases for the Materia Medica collections of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, which are now stored in closets in the Chemical Laboratory. The

Page  154 154 OCTOBER MIEETIANG, 1887. Curator of the mineralogical collection repeats a suggestion before made that a small sutm be annually placed at his disposal for the purchase of specimens. It is much to be regretted that we have so far been unable to purchase the very valuable Rominger collection of paleontological specimens. The Curator of the Art lMuseum reports tile following additions to the art collection: a portrait bust of the Hon. James McMillan, presented by himself at the request of the President of the University; a full length oil portrait of Dr. George P. Williamls, painted by A. 0. Revenaugh and presented by him; an oil portrait of Professor Olney, presented by the last graduating class of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts; an oil portrait of Professor C. L. Ford, presented by students of the Medical and Dental Departments; an oil portrait of Dr. H. S. Frieze, presented by Win. E. Quimby, Esq., of Detroit; a model in plaster of the Acropolis of Athens, made by Eichler, of Berlin, purchased by Prof. D'Ooge with an appropriation made by the Regents. We have received information that another installment of the Rogers collection of statuary may be expected during the coming year. A few facts from the Librarian's report which will be submitted to you may properly be given here. The total number of works in all our libraries is now 62,39S volumes, 12,411 unbound pamphlets, and 2G64 charts. Nearly twice as many volumes were presented last year as were purchased. The most important gifts were the GermanAmerican Goethe Library, containing now 760 volumes, and the collection bequeathed by the late W. W. IMurphy, Esq., formerly Consul-General of the United States at Frankfort-on-the-Main, which is especially rich in cartography. The total number of books drawn last year was 89,445 volumes. Few, if any, libraries are so much used. The revised card catalogue of authors is nearly completed, and that of subjects is now to be undertaken.

Page  155 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1887. 155 The Williams Fund, raised by alumni and friends of the University, primarily for assistance to the late Professor George P. Williams, and then to establish some memnorial for him, has by the action of the Alumni Association of the Literary Department become a virtual addition to the endowment funds of the University. At the request of that Association, the Regents voted in Mlarch to establish an emeritus Williams Professorship on the plan set forth in the following statement of the Association. "It seems desirable that a Professor who may have reached the period and condition for service at which Dr. Williams had arrived when he received the proceeds and income of this fund, should at the request of the Alumni or Board of Directors be transferred from his own chair to the Williams Professorship, which should be an emeritus professorship, and should thereupon receive the income of the said fund or so mnuch thereof as the Society of Alumni should annually vote to him, or the Board of Directors should deem advisable, and should there be more than one needing the benefit of this fund at the same time, the professor first transferred or appointed should hold the professorship and the others in order, first, second, and third assistants." About fifteen thousand dollars have been paid to the treasurer of the fund, and when other subscriptions thought to be good are paid, the fund will reach the sum of at least twenty thousand dollars. It is possible that the decision of the Alumni and the Board to use it for this worthy purpose may lead ultimately to the enlargement of the fund. We have several Professors who have given more than a quarter of a century to the service of the University. It mlust henceforth not unfrequently happen that of our large staff of teachers, some by reason of disease or accident, or the infirmities of years will be unable to discharge the full duties of Professors, and will yet find that at least a partial support for themselves and families must be had from some

Page  156 156 OCTOBER MEETING, 18S7. other source than from the increase of the scanty accumulation which meagre salaries have yielded. This fund will be used to render them assistance when aid is needed to cheer their declining years. It must be that so worthy an object will appeal to the generosity of the graduates who are inspired with affection and gratitude for their venerable teachers. The Legislature at its last session made appropriations as follows, in aid of the University: For repairs, 1887, $5,000; 1888, $5,000; for contingent expenses, 1887, $6,250; 1888, $6,250; for books for libraries, 1887, $5,000; 1888, $5,000; for the homceopathic college and hospitals, 1887, $6,200; 188S, $6,200; for the university hospital, 1887, $5,000; 1888, $5,000; for the dental college, 188S, $8,000; 1888, $8,000; for apparatus for the department of natural philosophy, 1887, $2,000; 1888, $2.000; for defraying the expenses of transportation and placing of the Rogers collection of statuary, 1887, $1,973.01; for reimbursing the University for expenses of transportation and placing of the Chinese exhibit, 1887, $1,792.93; for construction of a vault for the storage of chemicals, 1887, $400; for construction of rooms for forge and foundry and equipment of the same, 18S7, $5,000; 188S, $4,250; for machinery for engineering laboratory, 1887, $6,750; for the construction of a building for scientific laboratories and equipment of the same, 1887, $35,000; for the erection of a boiler house, the purchase of boilers and of steam heating connections, 1887, $15,000; for additional salaries and teaching force, 1887, $5,000; 1888, 5,000. The entire appropriation is, 1887, $108,365.94; 1888, $46,700. Total, $155,065.94. By this generous action of the Legislature we are enabled not only to carry on our varied work as we have done hitherto, but also to make much needed enlargements of our accommodations. The coimpletion of the engineering laboratory, according to the original plan, will

Page  157 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 157 enable us to provide for all our students of engineering the instruction in mechanical processes needed by them. The erection of a new boiler house makes it possible to furnish heat economically and safely to the group of buildings east and south of the library. The construction of the buildings, which shall contain the physical laboratory and the hygienic laboratory, will enable us to give in a more efficient manner than before the instruction in physics and hygiene. Our provisions for laboratory instruction in phlysics have been far inferior to those of many other institutions, and inferior to our provisions for instruction in other branches of science. It will be our duty now to see that our new laboratory is kept furnished with the appliances needed for the best instruction in this fundamental scientific branch. Researches, which have proved of the very highest importance to the public, have already have been conducted by our Professor of Hygiene, and we may confidently expect that our new laboratory of hygiene will not only be of great service in instructing our students, but will also be instrumental in promoting the sanitary interests of the state and the country. It having been found advisable to furnish in the medical building ampler accommodation for the physiological and microscopical laboratories, we were forced to erect a new building for our anatomical work, and to make large changes in the medical building. This has entailed an expense for which no provision had been made by special appropriation. But the necessity was so pressing that the wisdom of the step taken cannot be questioned. We gain the great incidental advantage of securing improved sanitary conditions for the medical building by the removal from it of all the work of dissection. Never before was it so well fitted for its purpose as it is now. Discussions in the Legislature and in the public press have called attention afresh to the question whether the fees of non-resident students ought to be raised. The Board has frequently considered this subject and has in

Page  158 158 OCTOBER 3MEETING. 1887. creased them from time to time. In my annual report for 1885, I set forth in detail the consequences of the increase which had been made in the fees in 1881. I may repeat here the figures then given and add the statistics for the last year. ATTENDANCE OF STUDENTS. Year. From Michigan. Non-Residents. Total. 1881-2 (old fees) 688 846 1534 1882-3 (increased fees) 671 769 1440 1883-4. 6 - 70 77 1377 1884-5 " " 644 651 1295 1885-6 " " 717 684 140t 1886-7 " " 791 781 1572 The fees paid by non-resident students in 1881-2 amounted to $21,100. In 1884-5, the rate having for three years been increased, the sum received from them was only $21,800. The number of non-resident students in 1881-2 has not yet been reached again, although the total attendance has been greater during the past year. That class of students numbered 65 less last year than it did five years before. The following tabular statement of students' fees for the past year is instructive in this connection. It comprises the matriculation an'd annual fees alone, but omits the laboratory and graduation fees. These two last are divided relatively between resident and nonresident students in substantially the same proportion as the two former kinds of fees. Departments. ~ ~ - ' j ~ kir,0~~ ^ fi T3a~~a 4 S- ~ 'C = ' "~ I ' ' Department of Literature, Science,and_ the A1rts- -.- —, 416 277 9 810 11 280 693 $21040 Department of Medicine and Surgery-.- 147 1741 4 2-25 8 155 321i 12 280 Deprt'nmelit of Law -------—. 108 230oi 3 160l 11 50U;138 14 6(;0 School of Pharmacy ---------- 43 24 1 245 1 215 67i 2 460 Hotnoeopathic Medical College - 321 30| 930 1 480 62i 2 410 Collee oi Dental Surgery — ----- 4 46 1 285 1 400 1 2 685 Total --- —--------- 7911 781 20 655 31 980 1 572 $55 635 Depl'tert o,ledi c ne eri Sugey__ 1~ 1~1 a35 7;J 31~, 1:

Page  159 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 159 These statements make it very clear that we may easily increase the fees of non-resident students so rapidly as to incur not only a serious loss in attendance, but an actual pecuniary loss. As a matter of fact, wherever instruction is given by lectures, as it is mainly in the professional schools and to a considerable extent in the Literary Department, the instruction of the non-resident students adds little or nothing to the expense required for thle instruction of the Michigan students alone. It is well known that almost without exception for many years the fees from the non resident students in the Law School have more than met the entire cost of instruction in the school. Take the figures in that school for the last year as an illustration. The fees of the non-resident law students amounted to $11,500, and the total expenditure for salaries of instructors in the Law Department was only $10,100. It will be observed, also, that in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, the fees paid by the non-resident students amount to nearly twice as much of those of the Michigan students, in the Law Depailrtment nearly four times as rimuch, a1nd in the whole University seventy-five per cent more. It is doubtful whether tile total expense of giving as good an education as we now give, would be diminisled by ten thousand dollars a year, if all the non-resident students were excluded and the present number of Michigan students were in attendance. Since the fees received from them last year were $34,980, it is clear that on0 tlie present scale of fees they are a source of profit rather than loss to the treasury. Nor in considering this subject can we ever permit ourselves to forget that our original and chief permanent endowmlent was the gift of the United States, and that therefore there rests on us the obligation to treat generously students from all parts of tlhe Union. Furthermore, the presence of students from other States than our own,

Page  160 160 OCTOBER 3EEETINVG, 1887. contributes very greatly to the reputation of the University, and awakens a pride in it among our own citizens, and so attracts to its halls many Michigan students, who would otherwise go elsewhere for their education. This cosmopolitan life which the presence of students from all parts of the world gives to the University, is of inestimable value to the Michigan student by giving him an acquaintance with men of so many varieties of early traiiing. In this microcosm he acquires a breadth of culture and fulness of experience which are of the greatest service in preparing him for his subsequent career. If unhappily a policy should ever be adopted which should deprive us of the presence of non-resident students, the University would then become a local school with a narrow reputation and a restricted influence. It may be thought, it has sometimes been said, that we do not now charge the non-residents as much as other institutions, and therefore that we may well raise our fees. On examination of the facts it will be found that we now charge higher fees than the other State Universities. Bearing in mind that our charges to non-residents are as follows: Literary Department, first year, $55, each subsequent year, $30; Professional Schools, first year, $t60, each subsequent year, $35, let us notice the charges at some other western universities. Ohio State University-_ $ 15 a year. Indiana " Iowa Iowa " Iowa " Wisconsin " Wisconsin " Wisconsin " Nebraska " California " Minnesota " Kansas " Illinois " "t _~ _ ~ — __- 15 a year. 6" Literary dept --- —----- 25 a year. Professional dept's. — 38 to 53, 1st year. " Professional dept's -33 to 48, 2d year. ( Literary dept --- 18 a year. Law dept 50, 1st year. i" Law dept- 25, 2d year. i" All dept's -- - - Tuition free. Literary and Law --- — Tuition free. " All dept's --- —- 5 a year. Literary and Law depts 10 a year. Literary dept —. 45 a year.

Page  161 OCTOBER MIEEYTING, 1887. 161 It will be readily seen that in most of the above institutions the fees are materially smaller than ours. Any important increase in our charges must tend to prevent students from most of the States in which they are established from coming to us. But we are told that whatever are the facts in the west, the fees in the eastern colleges are much larger than ours. Let us notice what are the fees in a few representative institutions. Cornell University $ 75 a year. Williams College ___90 a year. Brown University._.. 100 a year. Amherst College......-~~~ 110 a year. Yale College, Literary -- - 125 a year. "I " Law -.- 100 a year. " 'i Medical 125 a year. Harvard University, Literary -- 150 a year. iL 6" Law --- - 150 a year. " " Medical -- 200 a year. These charges are indeed larger than ours. But it must be remembered that all these institutions and the eastern colleges generally have funds for the pecuniary assistance of students and that in each of them a large proportion of the students receive enough to pay for their tuition, and in some cases more than that, while we have no provision for remitting the fees to any student. Cornell University, for instance, has 512 state scholarships, giving free tuition to the holders, nine university scholarships, yielding $200 a year, eight fellowships for graduates, ielding $400 a year, and tuition is free to graduate students. Williams College has funds which enable it to give to each of fifteen or twenty men $150 a year, to each of twelve more $105 a year, to each of eight more $120 a year, and to fifty or sixty others the tuition, $90 a year, About one hundred students of the entire number, two hundred and seventy, more than one-third of all, are thus aided. Other assistance is also given in certain cases. 2

Page  162 162 OC'TO BER IfEETING, 1887. Brown University has a fund of over $152,000, the proceeds of which are given in various ways in aid of students. Amherst College.distributes $8000 a year in scholarships and over $1,600 a year in prizes. Yale University aids 120 students annually with scholarships, yielding from $60 to $200, and 25 other students with scholarships or fellowships conferred for proficiency in studies, and yielding from $55 to $600 each9 and distributes $1,000 annually in prizes. Harvard- University now distributes to students $66,000 a year, a sum larger than our total receipts from students. The authorities of that institution announce officially that no young man of marked ability and good character need stay away from Harvard on account of poverty. Every such person who wishes to study there is assured that he shall receive the aid needed to enable him to complete his course. It will be seen from these facts that it is utterly misleading to infer from the published rates of tuition in the eastern colleges that they are receiving twice or thrice as much as we from their students because their nominal fees are twice or thrice as large as ours. It may well be that a student who receives the income from some of the scholarships or fellowships in one of these colleges is subjected to less expense than the average undergraduate here. Upon consideration of all the facts 1 think we must conclude that if we have regard to the fees charged by other colleges and Universities9 or to our own experience in rai-sing the -fees of non-resident. students we cannot safely ask more at present of our neon-resident students. It is sometimes said that t[le University is the school of the rich rather than of pupils in moderate circumstances. It is occasionally spoken of tauntingly by those not familiar with its interior life as "aristocratic"'~ I made an effort last autumn to gather statistics concerning the pu'rsuits of the parents of our students. I sent a circular to each student asking him to inform me what was the occu

Page  163 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 163 pation of his father. I received answers from 1,406 persons. Of the pursuits most largely represented I give the figures as follows: Farmers, 502; merchants, (the term is used in the west to describe retail tradesmen as well as wholesale dealers), 171; lawyers, (including six professors), 93; physicians, 83; manufacturers, 52; mechanics, 54; clergymen, 51; real estate and insurance agents, 33; bankers and brokers, 28; teachers, 26; lumbermen, 24; contractors and builders, 17; salesmen, clerks, and book keepers, 17; druggists and chemists, 16; tailors, 15; dealers in live stock, 14; millers, 14; commercial travelers, 14; dentists, 12; common laborers, 8. Most persons will be surprised to see how greatly the number of farmers' children exceeds every other class. If we assume that the farmers gain their living by manual toil, and add to them the other classes who unquestionably support themselves by physical labor, I estimate that the fathers of 45 per cent. of the students who reported may properly be considered as thus gaining their livelihood. Of course the classification thus obtained is only approximately correct. Some of the farmers probably are not subjected to strenuous toil. On the other hand, many of those classed as merchants, retail grocers, for instance, lead alife which is physically as fatiguing and as truly devoted to manual labor as is the life of the carpenter. But certainly the figures do show what everyone familiar with our students knows to be true, that the sons and daughters of the rich do not form a very large percentage of the whole number. A very large proportion of our undergraduates have by hard toil and great selfdenial earned the means to support themselves in whole or in large part while here. Not a few continue to remain here only by the practice of an economy which too often endangers their health. I desire to make grateful mention in this report of the efforts which Christian churches are making for the spirit

Page  164 164 OCTOBER MEETINGG,1887. ual culture of our students. The churches in this city have always manifested the warmest interest in the welfare of the students, and have spared no pains to make this place a home, in which wholesome and helpful, social and moral influences should be extended upon the great company of young men and young women who gather under our roof. But recently there have been manifestations of a wider and deeper interest in them. Large-hearted communicants of the Protestant Episcopal church have erected a fine building to serve as a special religious home for students and have provided for courses of lectures on religious themes by eminent men. The Presbyterians are making arrangements for occupying with a similar end in view a comodious house, which a generous woman has placed at their disposal. There is also good ground to hope that the efforts to secure the funds for the erection and endowment of a suitable building for the Students' Christian Association are soon to be crowned with success While we believe we are right in not compelling the attendance of students on religious services, we are pro foundly appreciative of all the assistance we receive in furnishing them with the means of spiritual culture, which is the crown of all culture. The conditions of life here now are, as we think, most friendly to the moral and spiritual growth of all connected with the University. The semi-centennial celebration of the founding of the University was a memorable occasion. The attendance of the alumni and friends of the institution equalled our highest anticipations. A considerable number of the most important American colleges and universities were represented by delegate's. Most cordial greetings were sent to us from the great universities beyond the sea. The devotion and enthusiasm of the many friends of the University were so pleasantly manifested that we cannot see her enter upon her second half century without new hope and cheer. The progress of the arts and the sciences, the

Page  165 OCTOBER MEETING, 1SS7. 165 improvement in methods of education, and the increasing number of students, are making larger and larger demands on her strength. But the generosity of the State has enabled us thus far to meet those demands in at least a fairly satisfactory manner. We have the fullest confidence. that we shall be properly sustained in all well considered efforts to make her future career worthy of her splendid. history, and worthy of the fame and intelligence of this prosperous commonwealth. JAMES B. ANGELL. Regent Field presented the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That the report of the President be accepted and printed in the minutes, and that one thousand extra copies be printed and bound in paper covers, for the use of the Board and of the University. Ayes.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Ncays.-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board listened to the foliowing report of the Librarian: To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Mlchigan: Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit for your consideraation my report on the Libraries of the University for theyear 1886-87. The University possessed, Sept. 30, 1887, 62,398 volumes, 12,411 unbound pamphlets, and 264 charts. Of these there are in the General Library, 48,971 volumes, 11,549 pamphlets, and 264 maps; in theLaw Library, 9,565 volumes; in the Medical Library, 3,447 volumes and 862 pamphlets; in the Library of the Dental College, 415 volumes. THE GENERAL LIBRARY. The additions to the General Library during the year have been 1,804 volumes and 245 pamphlets.' Of these, 419 volumes and 24 pamphlets were purchased; 1,093 volumes and 221 pamphlets were presented, and 292 were the result of binding periodicals. The expenditures, exclusive of bills of transportation which do not reach me, have been $1,802.17. Of this sum, $902.64 were

Page  166 166 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. paid for books and pamphlets, $4q3.93 for subscriptions to periodicals, and $306.55 for binding and mending. These sums were paid out of the special appropriation of the Legislature for the purchase of books for the year 1886. In addition there was paid out of the current expense fund for catalogue cards, tickets for readers, labels for books, etc., $129.05. The sum at the command of the Library Committee for the purchase of books during the year, was very small. The greater part of the appropriation for 1886 was expended during the early part of that year, and the appropriation for 1887 was not made early enough to be of any use before the closing of college. We owe it, therefore, entirely to the generosity of the friends of the University that our acquisitions for the year have been at all respectable in extent. Almost twice as many volumes were presented as were acquired in all other ways. The more important gifts are the " German-American Goethe Library," and the " Murphy Collection." The history of the Goethe Library -its inception, and the progress made in securing funds-was given in the report of last year. It numbers now 625 volumes, and there are on the way from Germany a case containing 135 volumes more. The "Murphy Collection " was bequeathed to the Library by the late W. W. Murphy, Esq., formerly Consul General of the United States at Frankfort-on-the-Main. The extent of the collection is 154 volumes, 8 pamphlets, and 51 loose maps. A great many departments of literature are represented. That in which there are the most books is cartography, and in this direction the collection may fairly be called rich. A list of all the persons who have made less important, but yet very valuable, gifts, would be too long for this report. ~ If it were given, however, nearly all the names that have appeared in this connection in former reports, would again appear, and there would also be new ones. I have in every case made that grateful acknowledgement that the rules require and that one's feelings prompt. It is proper to refer in this coilnection to what was revealed to the Board last summlner-viz.-that the unknown friend whose:renerosity supplied the volumes that fill the cases in the East Seminary Room, is Mr. James J. Hagerman, of the Class of '61. This is not the first time that Mr. Hagerman has given substantial proof of his interest in Alma Mater.

Page  167 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 167 The statistics show that the Library was used more this year than last. The number of books drawn and used in the Reading Room was ---------------- - 87,500 The number drawn out by Professors ------------- 1,945 A total of -- ---------— 89,445 volumes. Tickets of admission to the bookroom were granted to sixteen persons who made 388 visits to the shelves. In the course of the year 247 students were admitted to the Seminary 'Rooms -184 to the West Room for the study of English Literature, Latin, Greek, and Art, and 89 to the East Room for the study of History, Political Economy, Philosophy, and the Art of Teaching. A few volumes have disappeared, but their reappearance is hoped for. One of the seven reported missing last year, viz.: Fairbairn's " Studies in the Philosophy of Religion and History," was found when the last annual inspection was made. The books are, very generally, in good condition. The chief work of the year, outside of what may be called the routine of duties, has been on the catalogue. The new case, authorized by the Board, was ready for the reception of cards at the beginning of the year. The object to be gained by the construction of a new case, and by the transcription of the old cards, was a better working catalogue. The changes that have been made, both of a mechanical nature, and in the system, promise very good results. The revision and transcription of the catalogue of authors is nearly completed. In a few days we hope to place the case in position for use. The revision and transcription of the catalogue of subjects will constitute the chief work of the present year. The fact that this is thle semi-centennial year of the University will justify me, I think, in reviewing briefly the history of the Library, in this report. I shall also present, as definitely as I can, the present condition and needs of the Library, and make some suggestions for the future. The first period in this history of the Library was from 1837 to 1857., There were at the later date 6,000 volumes in the collection. It could hardly be said of them that they were shelved. The use made of them was small. Students were allowed to draw and have at one time ten volumes-provided, that the faculty had "directly specified" that the books drawn were

Page  168 168 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. suitable ones. It is on record that the members of the faculty of that time were of the opinion that there were very few books in the Library " which would be useful to students in their collegiate course." As far-as this first period can be characterized, it was a period of accumulation-but not very rapid accumulation, even for the time. There was no Librarian, in the proper sense of the word. The second period extended from 1857 to 1864. At the former' date the books were shelved in connection with a reading room, and the Library became one of reference. A librarian with regularly defined duties was appointed, and the Library opened for consultation every day. A voluntary use of the books by the students that was large and gratifying, began at once. Facilities for learning what was in the collection, however, there were none-no catalogue. This period may be characterized as a period of awakening. The librarians were Mr. John L. Tappan, 1857-63, and Mr. Datus C. Brooks, 1863-64. The library contained at the last date, 1864, 12,000 volumes. The third period extended from 1865 to 1877 and covers the time during which the librarianship was held by Professor Andrew Ten Brook. During this time a key to tie collection was prepared-a card catalogue. This increased, as might be expected, that voluntary use of the books to which reference has been made. It was in this period that the first important gift of books was made to the Library by an individual-viz., the Rau Library presented by Hon. Philo Parsons, and now known as the Parsons Library. I characterize this period as one of general growth-growth in facilities for learning what was in the collection-growth in use, and growth, in a moderate degree, in extent. The number of volumes in 1877 was 23,500, and 7,000 unbound pamphlets. The fourth period extends from 1877 to the present timejust a decade. It has been a period of accumulation. Care has been taken to keep up and to improve the catalogue, and the use of the books by the students has been in every way encouraged, but those charged with the interests of the Library have, for reasons to appear immediately, regarded accumulation as the duty lying most heavily upon them. The principal events of the ten years have been the regular annual appropriations by the Legislature of the State for the purchase of books; the erection of the Library building; large and valuable gifts of books

Page  169 OCTOBER M3EETING, 1887. 169 from individuals, singly and associated; and the beginning of a prescribed use of the books-a use required of the student by his instructor. To supply books for this use is the great function of a University Library. This fourth period is identical with my own connection with the Library as chief. Its history not only illustrates how necessary accumulation, which I have said has been foremost in our.minds, has been, but it illustrates also, how inadequate all the additions we have been able to make, are, to keep the Library up with the demands upon it that have been created by the growth of the University during this time. How great this growth has been is apparent from the following facts: In 1879 a "Chair of the Science and the Art of Teaching" was established; in 1880 a " Department of Music "; in 1881 a " School of Political Science," and a " Department of Mechanical Engineering;" and in 1885 a " Biological Laboratory " for experimental work. The Post Graduate work which was contemplated when the University began her career, and which has never been lost sight of, had its beginning practically in this last decade. The widest range is given to these students in their choice of work. But limitations in that choice are reached, as soon as, in arrangemnent of details, an account is taken of books. In some cases there is not a volume; in others only a few-in very few cases are there all that are necessary. Of this class of students there were resident in the city last year, twenty-four. This decade has also witnessed a great change in undergraduate work. The student instead of learning his lessons from one book which is his own property, learns it from a number of library books to which he is referred by his instructor. This is true in a large degree of the undergraduate pursuing the old prescribed studies, as well as true of him who pursues the more recent elective studies. Now there has been no proportionate increase of the library fund. The representatives of the new departments of Teaching, Music, Policical Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Biology, finding the literature on their subjects wanting, camne one after the other to the Library Committee for books. The Professors having in hand the work of the post graduates, and those who have adopted the new methods of seminary instruction, pressed, all of them, for more material. The committee, in consequence, has continually spread the fund over more and

Page  170 170 OCTOBER MEEIING, 1887. more ground, until it has become lamentably thin. Meanwhile, the committee has studied laboriously to make the money go as far as possible, and, I think, have performed miracles in that direction. They have vastly increased the tale of bricks-to use an old illustration-without much increase of clay and straw. It is on account of this conscientious labor of the committee, and its results, that I have characterized this period as one of accumulation. Everything has been done, except to go out on the highway with a pistol, and call on the passers-by to stand and deliver. I confess that it has occurred to me to do this. The needs of the Library at present are, in Literatnre, the best editions of the standard authors, and the critical literature that has grown up around the works respectively. Some authors we do not possess at all, of others only one or two works, of a very few only, full representations. In History and Political Science we lack especially serial publications and documents. Mr. Freeman, the eminent historian, says in his " Methods of Historical Study "-" The one foundation of learning is the mastery of original texts. That must come first; there is much for the student himself, much for the tutor and professor, to add in the way of comment and illustration and comparison of text with text. But knowledge of a man's books is the beginning, the foundation, the absolutely needful thing, without which all the rest is vanity."' He reiterates this, adding, satirically, that even all that the " newest German book" can tell himr, will not much avail the student without a knowledge of original authorities. We have portions of some of these authorities, but not the means of completing them. In the Sciences, pure and applied, the case is much the same. Now how shall our slender resources —slender for the demand that is made upon thern —be increased? I think a better knowledge of us on the part of the people of the State would help us. The general impression in regard to the Library at present is that it is restricted in its use to the officers and students of the University-or, if others are admitted to its privileges, it is on the payment of a fee-things that are true of many college libraries. I think our treatment by the public, directly, and indirectly through the Legislature, will be more generous if it is generally known that the Library is a free reference Library, and that it is open for consultation twelve out of the twenty-four hours of the day. The inventor working to

Page  171 OCTOBER IMEETING, 1887. 171 improve mechanical and chemical processes, needs access to the Patent Office Reports of all countries. If he knows that the Library is open to himn, and that he is welcome to the use of all the Reports we have-all the books that we have that can help him in any way,-he will feel a personal interest in the increase of the number of them. This is true of all who work with books for any purpose-and they are more or less numerous in any community. Really, the University Library is the Public Library of the State, for the increase of knowledge. The cooperation of all, in every effective way, is asked for making known this true character of the Library. If this is done, I predict for him who shall stand in my place fifty years hence, and report on the Libraries of the University on her Centennial year-I predict for him a pleasant duty, and for the Library under his charge, a proud record. THE MEDICAL LIBRARY. During the year just ended, the Medical Library has had only sufficient money to pay for its periodicals, its binding, and for the series of works, such as the Sydenham Society publications, and the Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, to which it has long been a subscriber. The additions for the year have been eighty-seven volumes and twenty pamphlets. Of these, fourteen volumes were purchased, eight volumes and twenty pamphlets presented, and sixty-five volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills paid has been $377.38. Classified, the sums of this were as follows: For books-whole volumes and parts of volumes ----------- $103.30 Subscriptions to Periodicals. — -------------------- 95.88 Binding ------------------------------- 78.20 The members of the Board will retmember that they assigned $1,000 of the Legislative appropriation for the present year, to this Library. With this we shall be able to extend and strengthen the collection not a little. The additions to the Law Library have been 315 volumes; to the Library of the Dental College, 11 volumes. Certain changes have taken place in the force e gaged in the General Library. Mr. G. F. James, general assistant, has been succeeded by Mr. F. N. Scott. Mr. A. J. Lovell and Mr. G. W. Lacea, assistants in charge of the Seminary Rooms, have

Page  172 172 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. been succeeded by Mr. P. M. Hickey and Mr. F. F. Lehman. Mr. D. C. Worcester and Mr. F. F. Lehman, desk attendants, have been succeeded by Mr. F. A. Waples and Mr. A. H. Hopkins. Very respectfully submitted, R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. On motion of Regent Clark the report of the Librarian was accepted and ordered printed in the proceedings. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Medical Department: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-At the meeting of the Medical Faculty, Oct. 5th, the following resolution was unanimously passed: "Whereas the Science of Pathology is at present regarded as one.of the most important branches of Medical Science, and, whereas instruction in Pathology should be largely given as laboratory work, and whereas the Department of Medicine and Surgery is greatly deficient in this branch, Resolved, that this Faculty earnestly petition the Board of Regents to establish and fill a chair of Pathology during the present school year." Also the following resolution: " Moved, that the Faculty ask the Board of Regents to 'appoint Dr Heneage Gibbes of Westminster College, London, England, as Professor of Pathology." The following resolution in regard to the appointment of an Instructor in Materia Medica was passed: " Moved, that the Faculty recommend Dr. Conrad George for appointment as Instructor in Materia Medica for one year at a salary of $500." At a meeting of the Faculty held Monday, Oct. 10th, the following resolution was unanimously passed: "To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: Believing that the Science and Art of Medicine in its present and prospective expansion, with the many specialties into which. it tends to be divided, requires a much longer period of study and of college and hospital instruction than is provided for by the common medical schools of this country, and that even the extended course of instruction in the Department of Medicine and Surgery of this University would, i practicable, be improved by its extension to four years of nine months instead of three years as now, thus bringing it nearer to the standard of the most advanced medical schools of Europe, we therefore respectfully request the Honorable Board of Regents to enquire into the possibility and expediency of providing for a course of instruction of another year, to be devoted chiefly to Clinical Specialties after the full three years course as now established with its work and honors is completed. In this connection we respectfully call attention to an inquiry into the facilities which may be made available for this purpose in Harper Hospital, and other institutions

Page  173 OCTOBER fMEETING, 188'7. 173 in the neighboring city of Detroit, with the view of utilizing these facilities at an early date if it is deemed advisable." Yours very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, M. D., Secretary of the Medical Faculty. The above communication was discussed by Dr. Palmer and Dr. Herdman before the Board, after which Regent Grosvenor moved that the matter be laid on the table for the present. It was so ordered. The President submitted the following report of the Executive Committee: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Oct. 13, 1887. The Executive Committee respectfully beg leave to report as follows: At the July Meeting of the Board (see Proceedings p. 141), this Committee were "authorized to select and appoint an Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric in place of Professor B. C. Burt, resigned." After careful inquiry the Cornmittee,on August 15, appointed to the place Charles M. Gayley, A. B., who for several years has been in the service of the University, first as Instructor and afterwards as Acting Assistant Professor of Latin. The salary was fixed at $1600. Mr. Gayley, who was in Europe pursuing his studies, has returned, accepted the position, and entered upon his duties. At the same meeting (Proceedings, p. 144) the Board voted to establish an Instructorship of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry, and authorized this Committee to fill the office. On July 9th, the Committee appointed Fred G. Novy, M. S. at the usual salary, $900 for one year. Mr. Novy was last year Assistant in Organic Chemistry. Very Respectfully, JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, CHAS. R. WHITMAN, E. O. GROSVENOR. The report of the Executive Committee was accepted and adopted by the following vote:

Page  174 174 OCTOBER PMEETING, 1887. Ayes.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. IVays. -None. Regent Shearer, Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds, made the following report which was adopted. Oct. 13, 1887. The Hon. Board of Regents: Gentlemen: The Committee on Buildings and Grounds to whom were referred at the June meeting, all matters connected with the designs, contracts, building operations, etc., for the new Boiler House, and for the Forge and Foundry rooms, would report: That they procured designs from Gordon W. Lloyd, Architect, of Detroit, advertised for proposals as hats been usual, and received two offers for each building, as follows, viz.: For the Boiler House, From Wm. Biggs, to build complete ------- ------ 10,148 " Dan'l J. Ross " -------------- --- 7400 And for the Forge and Foundry rooms, From Wmi. Biggs, to build complete --- —------ $15,007 " an'l J. Ross - - ------------------- 11,639 The contracts for both of the above named buildings were awarded to Daniel J. Ross, at his offers above mentioned. At the meeting of July 9th last, the Board referred the building of an,Anatomical Laboratory to the same Committee, under the conditions above mentioned for the Boiler House and Forge and Foundry Building. Your Committee procured the design from the same party, and advertised for proposals in the same manner as for the first above named buildings, and in due time received two proposals as follows, for the building complete of the Anatomical Laboratory, viz.: From Dan'l J. Ross for _ --- —--— $6 --- —------ 6,471 " Wm. Biggs " ---— __ __ ____ ____ --- —- ---------- 5, 987 The contract was awarded to Wm. Biggs at the amount of his offer. The contracts for the three within named buildings were signed by the President and Secretary of the Board of Regents, and the several contractors in due form, and provided that said

Page  175 OCTOBER M.IEETI1NG, 1887, 175 buildings should be completed on or before the dates following, for the several buildings, viz.; The new Boiler House, Oct. 1,1887, The Forge and Foundry Building, Jan. 1, 1888; and the Anatomical Laboratory, Oct. 1, 1887. All of which is respectfully submitted. JAMES SHEARER, Chairman. On motion of Reoent Blair the BoariJ adjourned to 8:30 o'clock tomorrow morning. MORNING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 8:30 o'clock A. M. Full Board present. Regent Willett presented the following communication from the Librarian. UNIVERSITY OF MIICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Oct. 13, 1887. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The officers charged with the care of the Libraries are agreed as to the division of the Legislative appropriation of $5,000 for the purchase of books for the year 1888. They respectfully reconmmend that the amount be applied as follows: For the General Library —, ---- ----------- La i Law " --------- ------— 1,000 M " Medical " ___ - ---- ---------- 500 For the Conimmittees on the respective Libraries, IR. C. DAVIS, Librarian. On motion of Regent Willett the recommendation of the Librarian with reference to the division of the money appropriated by the Legislature for the purchase of Books for the year 1888 was adopted by the following vote: A}es.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays.-None. The Committee on Buildings and Grounds, made the following report through their Chairman, Regent Shearer.

Page  176 176 OCTOBER LMEETING, 1887. Oct. 13, 1887. The Hon. Board of Regents: Gentlemen: The Committee on Buildings and Grounds, to whom was referred (at the Meeting of July 9th last) the duty of procuring designs, and all matters connected with the building operations for a Laboratory for the Departments of Physics and Hygiene, would report, that they accepted the design from Messrs. Pond and Pond of Chicago, who had consulted with Professors Carhart and Vaughan as to the planning of rooms, and interior conveniences. Proposals were advertised for in the usual manner, and on the 29th of August offers were received by your Committee, as follows, viz.: From Bartlett and Hardy for _ --- —---- -—. ---—. --- —------ $27,384 00 ' William Biggs ' _ --- —--------— 27 266 56 *' Dan' J. Ross "( -— __ ---- ------ 26,793 99 All ofthe above parties made offers on several modes of doing portions of the work, But the award was made on the offer of the several parties on the same specifications. Dan'l J. Ross being the lowest bidder, was awarded the contract which has been duly signed by the President and Secretary of the Board of Regents, and by Dan'l J. Ross, as contractor. The building is contracted to be completed on or before July 1st, 1888. Respectfully submitted, JAMES SHEARER, Chairman. On motion of Regent Clark the report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds was accepted and adopted. Regent Clark presented and read the following communication from the Librarian. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, Oct. 13, 1887. To the Honorable Board of Regents: A short time ago Professor V. C. Vaughan of the Medical Department wished to use a certain book that is possessed by the Library of the Surgeon General's Office at Washington. A communication addressed to the Surgeon General in regard to loans from that Library was answered by a printed copy of the conditions of loan, which is inserted here.

Page  177 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 177 CONDITIONS OF LOAN. "Books will be lent upon request of the librarian of a public library or university, that officer being held responsible for the safe return of the volumes within two weeks from the day of their receipt. Packages must be sent and returned by express, carefully packed, and the charges, both ways, must be paid by the borrower. Where there is no public library through which the application can be made, books will be lent directly to the individual upon his remitting to the librarian of this library a sum of money sufficient to cover their value in case of loss or injury. Certain valuable or rare books will not be permitted to leave the library." In a written communication forwarded at the samte time, the Surgeon General further states that books will not be loaned on the request of librarians of public libraries, or universities, until the Board of Trustees, or Governing Board, has authorized the librarian to borrow them and has made the library responsible for them, and this authorization has been filed in the Surgeon General's Office. I present this matter at this time at the request of Dr. Vaughan, who prefers that the Library should be the medium of this loan, and any future loans that he or others might wish to obtain from the Washington Library. The letter of the Surgeon General on the subject is herewith submitted, with other papers relating to the matter; and the desire is expressed that the Board will, in authorizing the librarian to borrow books, as contemplated, also state what security for the library, if any, the librarian, or other officer, shall exact from the Professor for whose accommodation the responsibility of borrowing is assumed. Very respectfully, R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. Regent Clark submitted the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That the Librarian be and is hereby authorized to borrow with consequent liability from the Surgeon General's Office such works as may be desired by members of the Faculty aud allow them the use of the same under the usual rules. Adopted. 3

Page  178 178 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. Regent Grosvenor, Chairman of the Finance Committee made the following report of the condition of the Finances: To the Board of Regents: The Finance Cornmmittee herewith present the Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1887, and their estimate of receipts and expenditures for the year ending September 30, 1888. The books and vouchers of the Treasurer and of the Steward have been examined in minute detail and the items included in the Treasurer's report have been carefully verified and found correct. The net cash balance in the Treasury at the close of the year is $21,929.09. But it appears by the Treasurer's report that a balance of $38,029.69 stands to the credit of special funds, which must be used for the purposes for which the appropriations were made; that three of the special funds are overdrawn $1,221.54; and that the general fund, on which the Regents have to depend to meet current expenses, is overdrawn $14,879.06. During the year to come large expenditures will have to be incurred. Several buildings are in process of construction, for which provision was made by the liberality of the legislature. But no provision was made for the Anatomical Laboratory, and the cost of this building must be defrayed from the general fund, and remain charged to that fund, until a reimbursement is obtained from the State. The estimated cost of this building is between seven and eight thousand dollars. The general fund will also have to bear the additional cost of heating, lighting, and caring for the new buildings, and will also have to carry the burden of all additions to current expenses caused by the enlargement of the work of the University. It is anticipated also that within the year additions and improvements, costing at least $3,000.00, must be made to the Dental College. The estimate of $148,000.00 for salaries is no larger than is needed to meet engagements already entered into. No provision has been made in this estimate for additions to the teaching force, nor for any increase of salaries beyond what has already been voted. By the exercise of close economy on the part of the Board

Page  179 OCTOBER MEETING, 1837. 179 of Regents, supported by a continuance of the praiseworthy watchfulness over all expenditures, that has been maintained by the Auditing Board, it is expected that the expenses of the University for the year to come may be kept within its income; but, as in previous years, the condition of the finances warns us against all outlays except such as are needed to meet the most pressing wants, that have not been provided for by special appropriations of the legislature. All.of which is respectfully submitted. E. O. GROSVENOR, Chairman. C. J. WILLETT, MOSES W. FIELD. ESTIMATE OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30th, 1888. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1, 1,887 _ --- —------ -------— __ --- 21,929 09 To be received from the State on the following accounts: University Interest --- —--------— $ 38,000 00 1-20 Mill Tax ---------- - --- 47,272 50 Homceopathic Department ---------- 12,400 00 University Hospital _ _- _ --- —- 5,000 G0 College of Dental Surgery ----- -- 8 000 00 Scientific Laboratories -------------- 25,000 00 Contingent ------------------- 6,250 t Books for Library - ----- - 10,000 00 Physical Apparatus --------------- 2,000 00 Forge and Foundry ---- _ ------ --- 4,250 00 Machinery for Engineering Laboratory ------ 6,750 00 Additional Salaries _ --- —- ---- - 5,000 00 Repairs ------------------- 5,000 00 -— $174,922 50 To be received frotm other sources as follows: Students' Fees and Laboratory Deposits _ --- — $ 70,000 00 Sale of Dental Supplies ------— _ 3,000 00 Sale of Anatomical Material - --- - 400 00 Sales at University Hospial --- —------- 700 00 Sales at Homoeopathic Hospilal ---------- 300 00 Matron of University Hospital _ ---- -- 700 00 Interest on Bank Deposits ---— _ --- __ 1,000 CO 76,100 00 $272,951 59 ESTIMATED DISBURSEMI ENTS. For Salaries of Professors, Officers, and Employees-__ —__. 148 000 00 ' Alterations and Repairs ---- ------ 7,000 00 Fuel and Lights -------------------- 12,000 00 Current Expenses of General Library ------- 400 00, "... k-Medical " _ --- — 50 00,,,< " " Law _ ------— _ - _ 50 00

Page  180 180 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. " Grounds --- —---- 500 00 " Postage ----------- ---------— _ __ 8 0 00 Insurance --- —------ 500 00 "Calendar, Regents' Proceedings, and Miscellaneous Printing -- _____ ---- __ _ --- — 2,000 00 ' Current Expenses of Museum_ _-_ --- — _ 300 00 Supplies for Chemical Laboratory ---- ______ 7,000 00 "" - " Botanical " ------------ 300 00 " 4" ' Histological " ---------- 400 00 'C t " Physiological ------ - --- 300 00 ' "c " Engineering " ------ 600 00 > — " "< Microscopical" --------- 200 00 " "( k' "Physical " --- —----- 400 00 " "( '" Zoological --------- 300 00 " "c General Chemistry ------- - 600 00 Current Expenses in the Engineering Department_ 400 00 " "t " " " Astronomical Observatory 300 00 "Anatomical Material - ------— 2,500 00 Advertising Literary Department ----- - 300 00 (" " Medical "' --- ----- 200 00 L" Law ------- -- 200 00 " ". School of Pharmacy --- - 200 00 " Transportation of Rogers Collection _ ------ 2,000 00 "Lease of Water Privilege -__ ------- - 125 00 "Purchase and Filling of Diplomas --------- 650 00 "C Commencement Exercises _ ------------ 1,200 00 Taxes on Lots in Springwells_ _ --- —- 100 00 "Purchase of Dental Supplies ----------- 2,5)0 00 Completion of Anatomical Laboratory _ --- —--- 5,000 00 Current Expenses of University Hospital ___ --- —-- 3,500 00, " ' " " HHomceopathic Departml entl- 4,000 00 6,,, '. ' College of Dental Surgery -— _ 2,000 00 " Purchase of Books for Library _ --- —------ 10,000 00 ( " " Physical Apparatus --------- 4,000 00 "Completion of Scientific Labooratories ------— __ 34,000 00 " " " t "Forge and Foundry — ------ 6,250 00 "Machinery for Engineering Laboratory _- - 6,75) (JO c Vault for Chemicals ---------------- -- 400 00 Contingent Expenses not included above -.._ ----.. 2,000 00 " Estimated Balance on Hand September 30,1888-_,__ 2,676 59 ----- 272,951 59 TREASURER'S REPORT. To the Finance Committee of the Board of Regents, University of Mlichigan: GENTLEMEN-Herewith I submit a statement of the receipts and disbursements of this office for aud during the fiscal year ending September 30th, 1887. Respectfully, H. SOULE, Treasurer.

Page  181 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 181 RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury October 1st, 1886 ___.. --- —From State Treasurer, account of Current Expenses_-$ (" " " " " Special " " Goethe Fund, Donations ---- -,..... --- ——." Earnings of the University _ _ --- —-- DISBURSEMENTS. Paid General Fund accounts -----—, —$-__ --- —- $ " Special " " - - --- ___ Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 ------ $ 17,173 71 82,487 76 66.165 94 1,318 00 60,641 74 210,613 44 $ 227,587 15 150,232 92 55,625 14 205,858 06 21,929 09 $ 227,787 15 The following classified and detailed statements exhibit the condition of the several funds: GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. From State Treasurer, account of 1-20 Mill Tax ---- $ r" " (" " "Interest Fund --— _ (t " " " " " *tChinese Exhibit --- " First National Bank of Ann Arbor, Interest ----- " University Hospital, Sale of Material --- —— _ " Homceopathic ". " ----- " Dental Operating Room, Sale of Material __ --- — " Insurance on Laboratory Supplies ----- _ —_.".".. Building ------ " Bequest from the Estate of Mary Porter ----— __ " Miscellaneous Sources __-. _ ----- " Students' Fees, Medical — _ --- —----— _ " ' " Literary _ _ _ --- —--.. ( " Law --------------------- " " " Dental -------- " " " Mecihanical Laboratory -_ --- — "' "t '" Physiology__ ____ t" " " Pharmacy_ ____ --- —-- "L " L" Homoeopath ic ---- ----.".. " General Chemistry -----— __ "t " " ( Practical Anatomy — _ ---"t~ " ' Microscopy ---- --- " (" Histology ------------- " " f." A. and A. Chemistry ---- tt'( Botany -------— _ _-__ 6" ( "t Zoology-,, __ _ --- " "r " Diplomas --------— ___.. " Key Deposits --- ------ Students' Fees Received___ _. --- —------ " " Refunded ------ Net -.. ----, --- —- $ --- — 43,886 25 38,601 51 1,792 93 1,093 68 1,118 81 399 66 3,550 55 1,729 07 500 00 500 00 1,349 46 94,521 92 6,065 00 16,985 00 5,890 00 1,620 00 368 00 15 00 1 520 00 1,785 00 224 00 2,270 00 201 00 638 00 8,245 51 51 00 63 00 4,216 00 244 00 50,400 51 50,40() 51 3,354 30 47,046 21 144,922 43

Page  182 182 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. Balance Overdrawn Sept. 30th, 1887 ------- ---- 14,879 06 $ 159,801 49 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. Balance Overdrawn October 1st, 1S86___ __ --- —---- $ 9,568 57 General Pay Roll, Salaries of Officers and Employees_ 120,545 84 Vouchers Paid, account of Students' Fees Refunded — _ 3 354 30 (" " ". F' Fuel and Lights --- —- 8,122 82 ' " " ". General Library ------ 347 37.. ". ". Advertising, Medical -— __ 118 76 ' <' " (6 " " Pharmacy_ —__ 96 15.. ".. " '. Law --- —----- 137 F3 " ".. iPostage _ ------ - 803 25 c" '* "t " Insurance _-___ --- —-- 1,166 00 ( A A "Museum — ----------- 241 50 " ".. " Chemical Laboratory ------ 4,482 63 " t" "l Botanical - --- 166 20 1" " " I" Microscopical _ — 25 79 " " ". " Zoological " - 249 34 t". " " Physical -" — 106 40 "t " " " Physiological ------- 91 95 ". " ".1 Histological " __ — 92 25 " " L. " Mechanical " - 674 21 " "9 " " General Chemistry _ --- —- 469 92 t " " " Anatomy ----- ------ 1,578 35 ~' " " " Dental Operating Room --- 2, 75 32 (" "( " "' Astronomical Observatory_- 32 80 'i " " c" Advertising and Printing_ 814 12 " - " " " IUniversity Calendar _ --- —_ 879 65 * " " <" Anatomical Laboratory ---- 3,298 77 " " ". L Surveying -------— _ 2i1 37 ---— $ 159,801 49 SPECIAL FUNDS. HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886- _ --- — -- 6,000 00 From State Treasurer _ --- —- ----- -------. 6,000 00 12,000 00 Disbursements. Salarlies of Professors and Employees ---------- 8,390 00 Paid Vouchers for Expenses ----- - 1,624 58 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887________ --- —-- - 1,985 42 12.000 00 HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886 _ — ___ --- — 1,378 37 Disbursements. Salaries of Professors and Employees- _ --- 550 00 Paid Vouchers for Expenses ---- _ ---- - 828 37 1,378 37

Page  183 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1887. 183 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886 --- ---- - 2,812 65 From State Treasurer ----.... — --------—.___ 5,000 00 7,812 65 Disbursements. Salaries of Surgeon and Employees ---- ---- 1,900 00 Paid Vouchers for Expenses_ _ - _ ___ --- — 2,787 88 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 --- —---— __- 3,124 77 7,812 65 REPAIRS AND CONTINGENT. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 18 86- ---— __ — 10,373 95 10,373 96 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses _ --- —-_ — ______ 10,373 95 10,373 95 GENERAL LIBRARY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886 _ --- —---— _ 3,303 27 3,303 27 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses -----------— _ _3,193 54 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 ---------- 109 73 3,303 27 PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886 - _ _ _ — _ 194 43 194 43 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses -------------- 37 31 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 ---------- 157 12 194 43 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. lst, 1886 --- —- --- 3,884 93 From State Treasurer_, - --- __.. --- —----- 8,000 00 11,884 93 Disbursements. Salaries of Professors and Employees - ____ --- —- 7,250 00 Paid Vouchers tor Expenses __ ----___ _ ---- - 670 47 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 -.. ------ 3,964 46 11,884 93 ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1886 _- - _ 771 69 Balance Overdrawn Sept. 30th, 1887-__ ____ ____ --- — 953 42 1,725 11 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses. 1,725 11 1,725 11

Page  184 184 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. ASSISTANT IN ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer - _____ --- —----------- 1,000 00 1,000 00 Disbursements. Salary of Assistant ------------ - 1,000 00 1,000 00 GOETHE FUND. Receipts. From Contributions -------- 1,318 00 1,318 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses -—. —__ --- —---- __ 654 83 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 _-_________ --- —-— _ 663 17 1,318 00 CONTINGENT. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn Sept. 30th, 1887 -------— _ ___ - 264 12 264 12 Disbursements, Paid Vouchers for Expenses __ --- —--- ----- 264 12 264 12 REPAIRS. Receipts. From State Treasurer --------- 5,000 00 5,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses - -------------- 3,163 38 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887___ ----------- ---- 1,836 62 5,000 00 PHYSICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer - _ _ --- —----— _ — _2,000 00 2,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses _ --- —--—._-__ __ --- —— _ 45 90 Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 ___ --- —--- 1,954 10 2,000 00 REMOVAL OF THE ROGERS GIFTS. Receipts. From State Treasurer ----- - ----------— __- 1,973 01 Balance Overdrawn Sept. 30th, 1887 --- —-------- 4 00 1,977 01 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn Oct. 1st, 1886 — ___ --- — -- 1,977 01 1,977 01 CHINESE EXHIBIT. Receipts. From State Treasurer --- —----------- 1,792 93 1,792 93 Disbursements. Transfer from General Fund acc't Vouchers paid in 1886 1,792 93 1,792 93

Page  185 OCTOBER IMEETING, 1887. CHEMICAL VAULT. Receipts. From State Treasurer _-__. --- —- -... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 --— _-_ —, BOILER HOUSE. Receipts. From State Treasurer. --- -----— ___-_ _ ---_.. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses _ _______ --- —--- Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1.87 --- — -------- SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES. Receipts. From State Treasurer ---------------— _______ Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses — ___ --- —----- Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 - ----------- ADDITIONAL SALARIES. Receipts. From State Treasurer.__,______ --- —--- Disbursements. Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1887 ----- FORGE AND FOUNDRY. Receipts. From State Treasurer___ ___ --- —--------- Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses — ____ --- —- _______ Balance in Treasury Sept. 30th, 1837 —._______ —_ The balances in the Treasury September 30th, 1887, are SPECIAL FUNDS. Homceopathic Medical College --- —__ __ --- —__ University Hospital _ —__.. ----__. --- —--—.General Library -------- --- Physiological Laboratory --- __ ___ --- —-_,_-_,-__ College of l)ental Surgery —_ ____ --- — __ —__ Goethe Fund ---- _ -----— __ __ -_____ —_ Repairs ___- __ __ Physical Laboratory — _ _______- ___________ Chemical Vault - ------- -_ —_ _ ___ Boiler House ----— _ --— __ 185 400 00 400 00 400 00 400 00 15,000 00 It 7,060 64 7,939 36 11 10,000 00 1( 1,113 80 8,886 20 1( 5,000 00 5,000 00 5,000 00 2,991 26 2,008 74 as follows: 1,985 42 3,124 77 109 73 157 12 3.934 46 663 17 1,836 62 1,934 10 400 00 7,939 36 i,0()0 00 5,000 00 ),000 00 1,000 00 5,000 00 5,000 00 5,000 00 5,000 00

Page  186 186 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. Scientific Laboratories -----— _ _ --- —---- 8,886 20 Additional Salaries -------------------- _ _ 5.000 00 Forge and Foundry_ -— __ ___ ----__ _- __ _ — - 2,008 71 _- 38,029 69 Less Removal of Rogers Gifts, Overdrawn ------ 4 00 " Engineering Laboratory " ___ --- 953 42 " Contingent Account -" _ --- ---- 261 12 1,221 54 $ 36,808 15 GENERAL FUND. Overdrawn _ _ _ --- —-- -- ---- 14,879 06 Net Balance __ --- —---------- $ 21,929 09 On motion of Regent Field the report of the Finance Committee was adopted. Regent Blair submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That a special Committee of three be appointed to consider the advisability of establishing a chair of Pathology in the University, and also to consider the request of the Medical Faculty on post graduate work, and to report their conclusions to the next meeting of the Board. The resolution was adopted and the President appointed Regents Blair, Draper, and Whitman as such committee. Regent Grosvenor moved that Doctor Conrad George be appointed Instructor in Materia Medica for one year at a salary of $500. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Cark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays.-None. Regent Clark submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously, and the secretary was instructed to send a copy to all Professors in the University: Resolved, That this Board disapproves of any discussion by Instructors in the class or lecture room, or in the press, of matters which are within the sole province of the Board. Regent Grosvenor introduced the following resolulutions which were adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board:

Page  187 OCTOBER MEETIVNG, 1887. 187 Whereas, President Angell has been invited by the President of the United States to take part as one of the representatives of our government in negotiations with commissioners from Great Britain on questions relating to the rights of fishery on the coasts of British North America. Therefore resolved, That leave of absence be granted to President Angell for such time as may be necessary for the discharge of the duties to which he has been called. Resolved, That Professor Henry S. Frieze be appointed Acting President to serve during any absence of President Angell's in this service. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the salaries of James H. Wade, " Secretary and Steward," and Raymond L. Davis " Librarian" be the same as full Professors in the Literary Department, $2,200. This resolution was adopted by the following vote: Ayes.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays.-None. Regent Willett, Chairman of speeial committee on salaries gave notice, that at the next meeting of the Board his committee would report a general plan for revising salaries, and then introduced the following resolution: Resolved, That the salaries of Professors W. J. Herdman, V. C. Vaughan, Charles S. Denison, J. C. Wood, Dan'l. A. Mc. Lachlan and V. M. Spalding be fixed at $2,000, commencing October 1st, 1887. The resolution of Regent Willett was adopted by the following vote: Ayes.-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays.-None. Regent Clark moved that Assistant Professor Charles N. Jones be appointed Professor of Applied Mathematics; salary to be $2,200, and that the Executive Committee be

Page  188 188 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. authorized to appoint an Instructor in Mathematics, if found necessary. The motion of Regent Clark was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays -None. The report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds changing the location of the building for Physics and Hygiene was adopted and ordered placed on file. The Medical Committee, through their Chairman, Regent Grosvenor, made the following report which was adopted. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen,-The Committee on Medical Department to whom was referred the matter of the division of the $5,000 remaining of the Legislative appropriation for Scientific Laboratories, would report, that after discussing the matter fully with the Professors most interested, it was decided to set apart $2,000 for the Department of Hygiene (Prof. Vaughan), for that of Physiology, (Prof. Sewall), $2,000, and for that of Histology and Microscopy, (Prof. Stowell), the sum of $600, leaving as a reserve of this fund $400, to be applied under the direction of the Board of Auditors, for the use of any of the three Departments within mentioned, as in their judgment seems best for the interests of these Departments, collectively. As the Department of Physics (Prof. Carhart) has for its exclusive use the appropriation of $1,000 for its equipment, your committee has not deemed it expedient to allot any portion of the above named sum of $5,000 to that Department. All of which is submitted, E. O. GROSVENOR, C. S. DRAPER[. MEDICAL COMMITTEE. JAMES SHEARER. Regent Clark presented and read the following communication from the Secretary of the Faculty of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

Page  189 OCTOBER 3MEETING, 1887. 189 ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 12th, 1887. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen,-I have the honor to inform you that the following persons, having completed all the requirements, were at the last meeting of the Faculty recommended to your honorable body for the degrees sought. NELLIE BARTLETT HAIRE, for Bachelor of Arts. GEORGE EDWARD FAIRBAIRN, for Bachelor of Philosophy. LAURA DONNAN, for Master of Arts. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Secretary. On motion of Regent Clark the Degrees indicated were conferred upon the persons named in the above communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Regent Clark presented and read the following communication from Prof. W. W. Beman: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 13, 1887. To the Honorable Board of Regents: For a long time the Mathematical Department has made no request for any sort of apparatus. Several years ago an appropriation of $500 was granted to secure a full set of Crelle's Journal, the leading mathematical journal of the world, but before your action was made public, the same amount was put into Prof. Olney's hands for the same purpose by E. C. Hegeler, Esq., of La Salle, Illinois. With characteristic generosity Prof. Olney turned your appropriation over to the General Library, and it was distributed among the various Departments. Inasmuch then as the Mathematical Department received no benefit from the only appropriation made for its exclusive use, it would seem that its present wants should have more than ordinary consideration. Just now it stands in urgent need of a full collection of models for teaching purposes,similar to those possessed by Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, Wellesley College, and other institutions. I would respectfully request your Honorable Body to place $500, the same amount as the one previously appropriated, at

Page  190 190 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. the disposal of the Mathematical Faculty for the purchase of a collection of models as specified. WOOSTER W. BEMAN, Professor of Mathematics. Regent Clark moved that the sum of $500 be appropriated for the Mathematical Department for the purposes named in the communication of Prof. Beman. The appropriation was made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. NNays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the sum of $75 was appropriated for the purpose of purchasing skeletons for use in the Zoological Laboratory, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field and Whitman. Noys-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, F. A. Johnson, M. D. was appointed Assistant to the chair of Surgery, and to the chair of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Homoeopathic Medical College, in place of R. C. Taylor, M. D. resigned, at a salary of $203, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the resignation of D. J. McGuire, Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Homoeopathic Medical College, was accepted. The following communication from the Dean of the Homoeopathic Medical College, was presented and read by Regent Grosvenor: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 13, 1887. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: The Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College beg leave to recommend the appointment of Dr. C. F. Sterling, of Detroit, as Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. In view of the

Page  191 OCTOBER M~EETING, 1887. 191. fact that the requirements of the clinical work of the chair are exacting, and that the success of this school imperatively demands careful attention to the clinique, the Faculty earnestly request that the salary of the chair be raised fronm $400 to $800 a year. HI. L. OBETZ, M. D., Dean. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, C. F. Sterling, M. D., of Detroit, was appointed professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, in the Homoeopathic Medical College, at a salary of $600, by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Ncys-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, the sum of $500 was appropriated from the Dantal College special fund, for the purchase of Operating Chairs, and other appliances, for use in that Department, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. The Faculty of the Dental College having requested the Board to purchase a collection of Anatomical specimens belonging to Dr. C. L. Ford, for use in the Dental Department, Regent Grosvenor moved that the matter be placed in the hands of Regent Draper to investigate and report to the next meeting of the Board. Carried. A communication was received from the Dean of the Dental Faculty, setting forth the necessity of additional assistance in the Mechanical and Clinical Departments of the Dental College. Regent Grosvenor moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint two assistants in the Dental Department, if found necessary, at salaries not exceeding $800 each. The motion of Regent Grosvenor was adopted, by the following vote:

Page  192 192 OCTOBER JIEETING, 1887. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the Board adjourned to 2:30. P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2:30 p. m. Regent Grosvenor submitted the following resolution which was adopted: WHEREAS, The method prescribed by resolution of this Board of July 12, 1877, in regard to the University printing, has proved inconvenient and unsatisfactory, therefore Resolved, That such resolution of July 12, 1877, be and the same is hereby repealed and that in future the Auditing Board be and they are hereby authorized and directed to contract for the University printing on such terms and in such manner as shall be deemed most for the interest of the University. Regent Grosvenor presented the resignation of Henry K. Lumr, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Physiology, and moved its acceptance. Carried. On motion of Regent Grosvenor, Elmer Sanford, B. S., was appointed Assistant to the Professor of Physiology at a salary of $400, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Charles K. McGee, Assistant in General Chemistry, was granted a leave of absence for one year from Oct. 1st, 1857, and Mr. George W. Whyte was appointed Assistant in General Chemistry for one year at a salary of $750. A call vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-None.

Page  193 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887. 193 The freshman class in General Chemistry being unusually large, Professor Langley asked the Board for some additional assistance during the first semester. Regent Draper moved that John F. Eastwood Ph. D., now Assistant in Organic Chemistry, be employed to aid the Professor of General Chemistry, and that he receive, in addition to his present salary ($192), the sum of $150 for such service; and that his title be Assistant in Organic Chemistry and Aid in General Chemistry. Thle vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays —None. The following commlunication from Professor. H. Payne was read by Regent Whitman: To JAMBES B. ANGELL, President of the University of Michigan: I hereby resign my position as Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching, this resignation to take effect at the close of the present semester. Very respectfully, W. H. PAYNE..ANN ARBOR, Mich., Oct. 5, 1887. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That it is the sentiment of the Board that in the resignation of Prof. W. H. Payne the University loses a valued instructor and accomplished gentleman whose labors have been of the highest service to the cause of education in the State; and that it is witl sincere regret that his resignation from the position of Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching, to take effect at the close of the present semester, is accepted. The following preamble and resolution introduced by Regent Whitman, was adopted and ordered spread upon the minutes: WHEREAS, Regents Shearer and Grosvenor came to'their duties upon this Board at a time of special difficulty; and WHEREAS, During their term of service, the development 4

Page  194 194 OCTOBER JIEETI:NG, 1887. of this institution has been very great in all directions and the consequent responsibilities heavy;and WHEREAS, They have given to their duties much more than [the usual attention; We, therefore, deem it proper to express upon the records of this Board our appreciation of their eminent services to the University and the State. C. J. WILLETT, ARTHUR M. CLARK, MOSES W. FIELD, CHAS. R. WHITMAN, C. S. DRAPER, AUSTIN BLAIR. The following resolution submitted by Regent Draper was adopted: Resolved, That the thanks of this Board be presented to William E. Quimby, Esq., of Detroit, for his gift of the portrait of Professor Frieze. Regent Shearer submitted the following resolution which received the unanimous endorsement of the Board: B. F. Sturtevant, Esq., of Boston, Mass., having presented to the University for use in the Engineering Laboratory, two steel pressure blowers valued at over one hundred and twentyfive dollars ($125); therefore it is hereby Resolved, That the President be requested to return the thanks of the Board of Regents.for the same. Regent Draper submitted the following: Resolved, That the Executive Committee be instructed to confer with the owner of the Rominger Collection with a view of securing the same for the University, and that the committee be authorized to enter into a contract with the owner for the paymenit to him of an annuity, equal to a fair interest upon the value of the collection, reserving the right to discontinue such annuity at any time and to acquire the ownership of the colleciinn by paymlent of such gross sum as may be agreed upon. The votee on'te resolution of Regent Draper resulted as follows:

Page  195 OCTOBER MEETING, 1887.:195 Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitmal. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the Special Committee, appointed to consider the question of establishing a Chair of Pathology in the University, and the request of the Medical Faculty on post graduate work, be relieved of so much of the work assigned them, as relates to the Chair of Pathology. The motion carried. Regent Draper submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That a Chair of Pathology be established in the University, and that Dr. Heneage Gibbs, of London, England, be employed as Professor of Pathology at a salary of $2,200. A call vote was taken on this resolution which resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Ncays-None. On motion of Regent Clark the Auditing Board were authorized to pay M. S. Stewart, of Duluth, Minn., a sum not exceeding $100 for specimens for the Museum. Ayes-Regents Shearer, Grosvenor, Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, and Whitman. Nays-No te. Regent Draper, Chairman of the Special Committee appointed at the last meeting of the Board to consider the question of' removing the Medical Clinic to Detroit, made the following report. Your Committee appointed to consider the question of the need of the Medical Department for greater clinical advantages,.etc., report: That they visited Detroit and met the representatives of Detroit Medical College and the Trustees of Harper Hospital. Nothing definite was accomplished, however, for the reason that the gentlemen whom we met had no proposition to make, nor

Page  196 196 OCTOBER MEETING. 1s87. were your Committee authorized to say what would be accept — able to the University. We were informed that the citizens of Detroit were anxious that a Clinical Department of the University, or a post-graduate Clinical School, as part of the University, should be established at Detroit; that the citizens of Detroit, the Trustees of Harper's Hospital, and the authorities of the Detroit Medical College, would aid any effort which the Regents might make to give to the University the clinical facilities which a considerable city like Detroit furnished; but before they could say what they would do for us, they must know what we required. In otherwords, if the Regents would advise then as to what would be required from Detroit, they would at once reply whether they could meet the demand. rThe impression ma(e upon the Committee is, that the persons in Detroit who are interested in the matter are ready to meet us with generous hands in reference to the matter in question. C. S. DRAPER. On motion of Regent Grosvenor the report of' the Special Committee was adopted and the Committee discharged from the further consideration of the subject. On motion of Regent Clark the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  197 SPECIAL MEETING. FEBRUARY, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ) Friday, Feb. 17th, 1888. The Board of Regents convened in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P. M. Present-the President, Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Absent-Regent Hebard. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Chair appointed Regents Blair, Draper, and Clark, a committee to prepare a recast of the standing committees of the Board of Regents, and present the same to the Board for their approval. The following is the report of the above Committee which, on motion of Regent Field, was adopted: Executive Committee:-The President, Regents Blair, Whitman, and Butterfield. Finance Committee:-Regents Willett, Field, and Hebard. Committee on Literary Department:-Regents Clark,Willett, and Whitman. Committee on Law Department:-Regents Blair, Willett, and Draper. Committee on Medical Department, Homoeopathic College, and Dental College:-Regents Draper, Field, and Butterfield. Library Committee:-Regents Willett, Blair, Field, and the President. Committee on Museum, School of Mines, and Astronomical Observatory:-Regents Blair, Clark, and Field. Committee on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Department:-Regents Draper, Clark, and Whitman. Committee on Buildings and Grounds:-Regents Whitman, Draper, and Hebard.

Page  198 198 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Field, the minutes of the last meeting were approved. The President stated, that as the new Committees were now organized and ready for business, he would proceed to place in their hands such papers as had come into his possession: for consideration by the Board. The President presented and read the following report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave to report as follows: They met at the President's office on December 28th, 1887. They approved the plan, submitted by the Fuculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, providing till the end of the semester for the instruction which the late Dr. Palmer had given. It was as follows: Dr. Dunster, Dr, Herdman, and Dr. Vaughan, were each to give one lecture a week on the Practice of Medicine; Dr. Herdman was to attend the Medical Clinic; and Dr. Blanchard was to render such assistance as he had given to Dr. Palmer, and was to receive one hundred dollars in full payment for his services from date up to Feb. 17th, next. The Committee voted also to call a special meeting of the Board for Friday evening, Feb. 3. The members of the Executive Committee have also approved, by correspondence with Acting President Frieze, the appointment of N. S. Hoff, D. D. S., on January 1st, 1888, for the remaindea of the year, as Assistant Professor in the College of Dental Surgery, at a salary of $1,200 per annum, and of Mr. H. C. Raymond, for one year from Oct. 1. 1887, Assistant to the chair of Prosthetic Dentistry. in the same Department, at a salary of $200 per annum. This arrangement has been substituted by the unanimous recommendation of the Dental Faculty for the two Assistant Professors, each at a salary of $800, previously agreed upon. Also the appointment of Mr. J. F. McCulloch, from Nov. 1, as Instructor in Mathematics, for the rest of the year, at $900 per annum. Also the appointment of two additional night nurses for the hospital, each to receive $150 per annum with board. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, CHAS. R. WHITMAN. Regent Willett presented and read the following cominunication from Librarian Davis: To the Honorable Board of Regents: I respectfully ask of you leave of absence from the University from about the 15th of April, until Oct. 1st. I have suffered considerably in health for the past two or three years, and my physician thinks a longer absence from the confinement of the Library than I am accustomed to get, is necessary. I also ask that my pay be continued, and that I be allowed to provide for the additional help made necessary, at my own expense-my arrangements to be subject, of course, to the approval of the Library Committee.

Page  199 SPECIAL AMEETING, 1888. 199 I will say in justification of my request, that I purpose to have the work of the Library, except the routine work, practically done for the year, before leaving. And I purpose, also, if my request is granted, to spend a portion of the time at one of the great book producing centres, where I can do very much to benefit the Library. R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, February 17, 1888. On motion, the request of Librarian R. C. Davis was granted on the conditions stated in his communication, by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Willett, the By-Laws of the University were amended to conform to the State law, requiring the fiscal year of all State institutions to close on the 30th day of June. [This changes the word October to June in Chap. V., Section 9, line 3, of the By-Laws.] The following communication was read by Regent Draper: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Jan. 2, 1888. President James B. Angell, Dear Sir:-I hereby tender my resignation as Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, and of Theory and Practice of Medicine, to take effect March 1st, 1888, or as soon as my successor may be appointed. Most respectfully, S. G. MILNER. On motion of Regent Draper the resignation of Dr. S. G. Milner was accepted. Regent Draper moved that the following appointments be made in the Homoeopathic Medical College, as recommended by the Faculty: Sara B. Armstrong, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine, and Harriet M. Allen, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children; each at a salary of $100 per year. The motion of Regent Draper was carried by the following vote: Ayes.-Regent Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays. —None.

Page  200 200 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Draper the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Sarah Idelia Leein accordance with the recommendation of the Iomnoeopathic Medical Faculty. Regent Blair presented the following memorial which was adopted by the unanimous vote of the Board, and the Secretary was directed to spread the same upon the records of the Board, and to send a copy to the family of the deceased. Intelligence having been received of the death, on the 30th of January last, of Asa Gray, LL. D., first professor in this University, and afterwards Fisher Professor of Natural History in Harvard University, the Board of Regents in view of the services rendered to this institution by Dr. Gray, in the judicious selection of books for its library and in other ways, during the period of his professorship here, desire to place on record such an expression of respect and honor as is due to his memory. Without attempting to recount his many contributions to the stock of human knowledge during his long life of tireless activity in the exposition of scientific truth, or to estimate the influence exerted by his profound knowledge and philosophical acuteness, not only in his special department but also in the discussion of those more difficult problems to which he so wisely and generously contributed, we may be permitted, in common with the wide circle that mourns his loss, to add our voice in honor of this great leader in the intellectual development of the period in which he lived. Especially do we recall with grateful appreciation his reverent love of truth in every form, his broadly catholic spirit, and the kindly helpfulness long to be remembered by so many who have looked to him as master and friend. We lament his unfinished work, but rejoice that such a man has lived, and we wish to be numbered with those who sincerely mourn his loss and rise up to honor his memory. To his family and friends we extend our deepest sympathy in this hour of their heavy affliction. On motion of Regent Draper, the salary of Dr. J. N. Martin, Lecturer in the Dental College, was increased to $500. Regent Draper presented the request of the Medical

Page  201 SPECIAL MEETLNG, 1888. 201 Faculty, that Prof. Chas. H. Stowell's salary be increased to $2,000. The request was referred to the Finance Committee. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board went into Executive Session. On motion of Regent (lark, B. A. Hinsdale, Ph.D., was appointed Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching, at the salary of $2,200, by the following vote: Ayes -Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays.-None. Regent Willett, chairman of special committee on salaries, made the following report: The special committee to which was referred the subject of the re-adjustment of salaries in the Literary Department, respectfully report that, having given the matter careful consideration, they have found it surrounded by many difficulties, chief of which is the money question. The past ten years has been a period of special development of the University in all its developments. This has been obtained by changes in the method of instruction, by widening out the course of study, and by such other means as as have seemed wise in order to keep our institution in the front rank of American Colleges. During this period also, the liberality of the legislature has added largely to the buildings upon the grounds, and each new building creates an annual expense. The extension of the course of study, and the change in the method of instruction from the merely didactic to the experimental, have called for a large increase in teaching force. The result of this advance in methods, etc., upon the pay-roll has been to increase it very largely; from $86,000, using round numbers, in 1878, to $158,000, in 1883, or an increase of $72,000. During the same period the stated income of the University has been enlarged, as follows: In students' fees, from $47,000 to $70,000, in the 1-20 mill tax, from $31,000 to $47,000, or a total increase of $39,000. Special appropriation, made from session to session of the legislature, have in the past, helped somewhat. An examination of the pay-roll as it exists now, and its comparison with that of ten years ago, will disclose the fact that the greater proportions of the present are dueto two causes; Ist., the increase in force, being fromn 64 in 1878 to 137, in 1888; 2nd, the advance in rank and pay of instructors and assistant professors. No doubt, the peculiar situation of our institution, of which we are all so proud, as a leader in educational methods, has compelled, in a measure, the condition of affairs as stated. It would seem, however, that the time had now arrived to advance somewhat the pay of those who have given their best years to the work on this Campus as full professors. We would gladly urge liberal things all along the line, and in this way, avoid difficulties which we do not wish to discuss in this report, but our financial condition, which we have endeavored to set forth, in brief, will not permit it.

Page  202 202 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. We recommend: First, that from and after the 1st day of October next, the annual salary of Prof. Frieze shall be the sum of $2,800. Second, that the an nual salary of Treasurer Soule be the sum of $2,200. Third, that from and after the date last above mentioned, there shall be added to the pay of those professors in the Literary Department who have the full rank and pay, ($2.200), the sum of $100 for each five years of such service and pay in this or any other college, until the sum of $2,500 is reached, which shall constitute a maximum salary, save as stated above. And the date from which to compute the five year period shall in all cases be the 1st day of October after appointment to the full rank and pay ($2,200) of a professor. This provision for increase shall not apply to the professor of Astronomy, as he is allowed, in addition to his salary, the use of house and grounds. Fourth, that no personal applications for increase in pay, or change of rank be received by the board, but that such changes as are thought wise shall be suggested in writing by the President and referred to the proper Standing Committee. C. J. WILLETT, I CHAS. R. WHITMAN, i COMMITTEE. ARTHUR M. CLARK,) The report of the Special Committe on salaries was adopted by the following vote: Ayes.-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays.-None. The following communication was read by Regent Clark: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Feb. 15, 188. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen.-Having been elected to the position of Astronomer in the Lick Observatory, of the University of California, I feel called upon to sever my official connection with the University of Michigan at the close of the present college year. I desire in this place to thank the various officers of the University, and in particular President Angell and Professor Harrington, for the many tokens of good will. That the University may ever continue to grow in power and usefulness is the sincere wish of her alumnus. Your obedient servant, J. M. SCHAEBERLE. On motion of Regent Clark, the resignation of J. M. Schaeberle was accepted. On motion of Regent Clark, the thanks of the Board were tendered to the following donors of valuable gifts to the University: A. L. Colton; for twenty-four Views of the University buildings and grounds. Middlebrook Ele

Page  203 SPECIAL M1PEETI.YNG, 1888. o20 Vator Mfg. Co., Detroit; for a No. 3 Aquapult Steam Pump. Defiance Machine Works, Defiance, 0.; for a Pully Balancing Machine. E. Harrington, Son & Co., Philadelphia; for a 3,000 lb. Screw Hoist for the Foundry. Pemberthy Injector Co., Detroit; for a Sectional Model of an Injector. On motion of Regent Clark, the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred upon Mary Emilie Holmes, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Regent Clark presented the following communication from Prof. J. W. Langley: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, Feb. 17, 1888. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen.-I have been in continuous service at this University for nearly thirteen years, during the first two of which I did virtually the work of two men in two chairs. The result is that for some time past I have greatly felt the need of change and a rest from teaching, but have not seen my way clear to secure it. Recently I have been asked to head an important scientific and technical mission in Europe, and, since this will give me the change desired, and also put in my way very unusual facilities for metallurgical study, which, I think, will increase my abilities as an officer of instruction on my return, I hereby ask for a leave of absence for one year from the first of October next. Owing to the necessary absence of President Angell, I have not been able to consult with him fully in regard to nominating a temporary suec cessor to my chair; I therefore refrain here from mentioning any name, but I have gathered a list of several persons who may be available, and therefore I beg that, if you grant my request, you will do so definitely at the present meeting, and leave the selection of my successor to the President and the Executive Committee. I have a further request to make, which is not a necessary part of the above. I should greatly prefer to have the leave of absence date from the first of next April, but recognizing that my leaving at that time might embar. rass the instruction in my department, I am ready to remain to the end of the college year, even at the expense of much personal inconvenience and loss. I now request that you empower the President and Executive Committee to confirm my leave of absence from April first next,provided, that they can find a suitable substitute for the remainder of the present (2nd) semester. This request is based strictly on the above condition. Respectfully yours, JOHN W. LANGLEY, Prof. Gen. Chemistry,

Page  204 204 SPECIAL 3MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Clark, the request of Professor Langley was granted, provided that no additional expense shall be incurred in providing for his work. On motion of Regent Field, Dr. Henry F. Lyster was appointed to the chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the Medical Department of the University, at the regular salary in that department, ($2,000. See Regents' Proceedings for 1887, page 125,) by the following vote: Ayes.-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Regent Willett was excused from voting. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  205 REGULAR MEETING. MARGH, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 27th, 1888. The Board of Regents convened in regular session in the room of the President at 8 o'clock p. m. The President in the chair. In the absence of the Secretary, Treasurer Soule was made Secretary pro tent. Present-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Absent-Regents Field and Blair. The President read from the scriptures and offered prayer. The President read the report of the Executive Committee as to their action since the last meeting of the Board as follows: In accordance with authority conferred upon them by the Board, on Oct. 13th, 1887, (see Regents' Proceedings for 1887, page 194), they have entered into a contract with Dr. Rominger, by which, on payment semi-annually of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ($125) from January 1st, 1888, by the University to Dr. Rominger, the latter binds himself to keep his palaeontological collection in the University Museum; and not to sell it without giving us one year's notice. The University may at any time terminate the leasing of the collection and may purchase the collection at any time for a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars. Professor Cheever having died suddenly on March 6th, it became necessary to provide at once for instruction in the branches which he had taught, Quantitative Analysis and Metallurgy. The Committee decided to ask Mr. Geo. W. Whyte, assistant of Professor Langley, to give instruction in Metallurgy for the rest of the year; and Mr. F. C. Smith, assistant in the Chemical Laboratory, to give instruction in Quantitative Analysis. The

Page  206 206 MARCH MEETING. 1888. additional compensation of each was fixed at one hundred and fifty dollars ($150). JAMES B. ANGELL, C. R. WHITMAN, Committee. R. W. BUTTERFIELD, The action of the Committee was approved by a full vote of the Board. The President presented and read the following communication: PRESIDENT ANGELL, Dear Sir:-In the summer of 1886, the Dowager Lady Vernon, through Mr. Henry Frowde of London, offered to present to the Libraries of certain selected Public Institutions of this country, among them the Library of the University of Michigan, copies of the magnificent edition of the Inferno of Dante, (3 volumes folio), compiled and arranged by George John Lord Vernon, and brought out two orthree years after his death by his son, Augustus Henry Lord Vernon. Lady Vernon also offered at the same time a copy of the large folio reprint of the Prime Quattro Edizione della Divina Conmmedia, published by George John Lord Vernon in 1858. These offers were of course gratefully accepted by the officials of the University Library. On account of some necessary preparation of the volumes and on other accounts they were not received here until last month. Their value is very great but as they were printed for presentation and not for sale, it is hard to represent their value in money. Still another gift to the Library, made March 15th, is the check of Mr. Edward C. Hegeler of La Salle, Illinois, for $275, which he wishes to have applied on the purchase of a complete set of Liebig's Annalen for the Chei - ical collection. I think these gifts of sufficient value to merit special acknowledgment by the Board of Regents. It gives me great pleasure to report them to you at this time for the consideration of the Board. Very Respectfully, R. C. DAVIS, Librarian. Regent Willett, moved that the donations be received with thanks, and the communication be spread on the records of the meeting. The motion was carried by a full vote. Regent Whitman presented a communication from the University Senate as to the annual Commencement Dinner. It recommended the essential features of the plan adopted last year, and suggested that a charge of fifty cents be collected from each person for admission to the dinner. Adopted by a full vote.

Page  207 fMARCH MEETING, 1888. 207 Regent Whitman moved that the appropriations made for the departments of Professors Vaughan and Carhart be placed in the hands of the Auditing Board, to be expended as may be necessary. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark. Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett the Board went into Executive Session. Regent Whitman presented the following communication: To the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: —The unanimous opinion of the Facnlty of the Dental Department is that the requirements for graduation should be extended to three terms of nine months, that such change should take effect in October, 1889, and that the statement of this intended change should be made in the next Announcement. Yours Respectfully, J. TAFT, DEAN. Regent Whitman moved that the plan recommended be adopted. Carried. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman presented the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Building Committee be empowered to extend the time for the execution of the contract for the completion of the Engineering Laboratory, until the necessary appropriation shall be made by the Legislature therefor, the contractors to receive upon such final completion sufficient with amounts already paid to equal the contract price. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. The President presented the following communication: To the President and Regents of the University of Michigan: Having been appointed to a position elsewhere, I hereby resign the Assistant Professorship of Philosophy in the University, the same to take effect Oct. 1st, 1888. JOHN DEWEY.

Page  208 208 MARCH MEETING, 1888. Regent Whitman introduced the following resolution: Resolved, That the resignation of Mr. John Dewey as Assistant Professor of Philosophy be accepted, though with sincere regret that the University is compelled to lose so bright a light from its body of instructors. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Mr. W. S. Hough, A. M. was appointed Instructor in Philosophy for one year from Oct. 1st, next, at $900 salary. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon Frank Euclid Beeman, as of the year 1887. The President made a statement that, through a misunderstanding, Professor Henry Gibbes had made expenditures for the use of the Pathological Laboratory somewhat in excess of the amount set aside for that purpose by the Regents at a former meeting. On motion of Regent Willett the Auditing Board were directed to audit and pay vouchers on such obligations as had been so contracted in excess, the goods purchased now being in the Custom House at New York. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. MORNING SESSION. WEDNESDAY, March 28, 1888. Adjourned meeting convened at 9 o'clock. Present-The President, Regents Draper, (lark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard.

Page  209 MARCH MEETING, 1888, 209 Executive Session was resumed. On motion of Regent Willett it was resolved as follows: Resolved, In order that there may be no misunderstanding about the matter it is hereby stated that the fourth recommen - dation of the special Committee on salaries,(Regents' Proceedings, 1888, p. 202), applies to all Departments of the University. On motion of Regent Willett the following resolution was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That Regent Whitman constitute a Committee to investigate the question of service in the different Departments with more particular reference to hours of work and concentrations of special lines of work. If thought desirable to tabulate the result of the investigation, the Auditing Board are hereby authorized to appropriate a sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars for such purpose. Regent Willett was added to the Committee by vote. Regent Willett moved and the motion was adopted, that Professors Walter and Thomas be requested to make a brief written statement of their recommendations with regard to courses in French and German, and that the subject be referred to the Committee on Literary Department. On motion of Regent Willett the following resolution was adopted: Resolved, That the Board appreciate the extreme necessity of more room for the Dental Department and would gladly remove the difficulty; but that the way does not seem to be open at present, as it is deemed unwise to anticipate appropriations. Adopted. On motion of Regent Draper it was Resolved, That the verbal communication of Professors Carhart and Vaughan relative to water supply for the Laboratories of Physics and Hygiene be referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to take such action as investigation shall show to be necessary. Adopted by a full vote.

Page  210 210 MARCH MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Whitman the Auditing Board were directed to place the name of Professor Henry Gibbes on the Pay Roll and compute his pay from January 1st, 1888. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett the Executive Committee were authorized to make such arrangements as may be found necessary relating to changes in the clerical force at the Library provided no increase of expenses were incurred. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark the Auditing Board were authorized to employ a suitable carpenter to work at pattern making till the end of June, if necessary. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nay-Regent Willett. On motion of Regent Clark it was voted that the machinist now employed be paid for the time he has already worked and for the time he shall work-as agreed -at the rate of three dollars a day while working. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman it was voted that the Auditing Board have published two hundred each of the semi-centennial addresses of Dr. Angell and of Dr. Frieze for distribution. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None.

Page  211 MARCH MEETING, 1888. 211 On motion of Regent Willett it was voted that the Auditing Board be authorized to procure the printing of Dr. Ford's Memorial Address of the late Dr. Palmer. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned. H. SOULE, Seedy pro tern.

Page  212

Page  213 REGULAR MEETING. JUNE, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 26, 1888. J The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-The President, Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Absent-Regent Clark. The meeting was called to order and opened with prayer by the President. On motion of Regent Field, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. The President stated that a large number of communications had been placed in his hands, and suggested that they be referred to appropriate committees of the Board. There being no objection, the papers took that course. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Director of the Chemical Laboratory: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, June 26, 1888. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: For the maintenance of the teaching force and dispensing service of the Chemical Laboratory for the University year 1888-9, I beg to submit to you the following recommendations: (1) That ALvIso B. STEVENS, Ph. C., be continued as Instructor in Pharmacy, with the salary heretofore granted him. (Minutes of the Board, June, 1887, page 124). (2) That FRANK C. SMITH be continued as Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, at the salary of his last year's appointment, $250. (3) After a service of ten years as accountant and dispensing clerk in

Page  214 214 JUNE MEETlNG, 1SSS. the Chemical Laboratory, Mrs. KATE C. JOHNSON has stated her purpose to be released from this engagement. Her services have been of great value to the Chemical Laboratory, in securing system in accounts with students and in preserving economy in control of the supplies. For the year 1888-9 I recommend the appointment of WILLIAM F. EDWARDS as Accountant and Dispensing Clerk in the Chemical Laboratory, at the salary of the previous incumbent, six hundred dollars a year. Mr. EDWARDS has been for one year the assistant in qualitative chemistry. (4) I recommend that DAVID H. BROWNE, Ph. B., (Univ. of Mich., 1885), chemist of the Lumberman's Mining Co., Iron Mountain, Mich., be appointed as Instructor in Quantitative Analysis, at a salary of nine hundred dollars a year, to succeed to the duties of laboratory instruction of the late Professor CHEEVER, leaving the lectureship of metallurgy to be otherwise provided for, without increase of expenditure in the total provision. (5) I recommend, that ERVIN E. EWELL, Ph. C., be appointed as Assistant in Qualitative Analysis, for the coming year, to succeed Mr. EDWARDS and at the salary of the previous incumbent. The above named recommendations propose no change in expenditure. Provision for continuing the present service of assistants in qualitative chemistry, pharmacognosy, organic chemistry, and physiological chemistry, will be recommended at a later date. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Director of the Chemical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Draper the recommendations of Dr. A. B. Prescott, Director of the Chemical Laboratory, were adopted, except number (4) relating to the appointment of David H. Browne, Ph. B., which was held in abeyance, awaiting the consideration of other matters bearing on the readjustment of the work in Metallurgy. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIIGAN, DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY, ANN ARBOR, June 26, 1888. To the Honorable, the Roard of Regents: GENTLEMEN: By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy I respectfully report that the following named persons have completed all the requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist:

Page  215 JVNE MEETING, 188. 215 Chalmers Pennington Allen, Charles Walter Allison, Charles Vincient Boetcher, William Frederick Eberbach, Ervin Edgar Ewell, Richard Ernest Hawkes, Dorsey Presley Horine, Samuel Kidder, Jr., Henry Levy, Albert Oechsler, Herman Adolph Passolt, John Elmer M. Pennington, Frank Bertrand Raynale, Andrew Edward Ruse, John Henry Shaper, Marie Rozinda Smith, Edward Soetje, Ezra Jones Ware, Chauncey Newell Waterman, John Alfonzo Wesener, Joseph Burgess Whinery, Frank Davis Wiseman, Karl George Zwick, Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Dean of the Faculty On motion of Regent Draper, it was voted to confer the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Regent Willett presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: By Direction of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, I have the honor to report that the following named persons are recommended to you for the degrees indicated: BACHELOR OF LETTERS. Carrie Ayers, Ida Ayers, Frank Elmer Converse, Cora May Chapman, Thomas Hart Gale, John Hubert Greusel, Richard Greene Inwood, Alexander Campbell Kiskadden, Jed Hannibal Lee, James Nathan McBride, Selby Albert Moran, Lizzie Herson Northup, Carrie Louise Paine, Clayton Albert Read, Moritz Rosenthal, Francis Leslie Stevenson, John Edward Stillwell, Laura Oliver Tupper, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN BIOLOGY.) Marietta Laughridge Knowles.

Page  216 JUATE MEETING, 1888. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN CHEMISTRY.) John David Riker, Willard Clark Sanford, Fred Fraley Sharpless, George Walton Whyte. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN MINING ENGINEERING.) Herbert Joseph Stull. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.) Edwin Hart Ehrman, Ross LeHunte Mahon, William Howie Muir, Walter Robert Parker, Charles Edward Roehl, Ralph Martin Shankland, Harry John Williams. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.) Albert Burnstine, Fred Calvin Davis, John Eugenius Hodge, James Allen Lewis, William Henry Pease, Willard Pope, Percy Hunt Richardson, Joseph Rusche, Edgar Ryan, John Ward Shotwell, Jr., Ernest Marshall Sprague, Ebenezer Franklin Walbridge. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN GENERAL SCIENCE.) George Arthur Brown, Frank Daniel McDonell, Solomon Eisenstdedt, Charles Orrin Townsend, Charles Harrison Hatch, Chester Wetmore, William Alfred Hutzel, Elmer Grant Willyoung, BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Laverne Bassett, Carrie Ellen Britten, Clarence Galen Campbell, Louella Chapin, David Kipling Cochrane, Rossetter Gleason Cole, Louis Kossuth Comstock, Rachel Ella Dawson. Walter Jones Hamilton, Leverge Knapp, Ray Dee Lampson, Morgan McMorries Mann, Charles Tyler Miller, Fanny Talcott Mulliken, Chester Harvey Rowell, Francis Morton Sessions, Henry Fish Shier, Edwin Elijah Washburn, Henry Kirk White.

Page  217 JUNE MEETING, 18S8. 217 BACHELOR OF ARTS, Mary Emma Ashley, James Harvey Beazell, John Noble Blair, Edward Boyle, Edgar Ewing Brandon, Gertrude Tamora Breed, Henry Herbert Brown, Joseph Beatty Burtt, Harvey Safford Bush, Elizabeth Rebecca Clark, Anson Bartie Curtis, Charles Henry Cushing, Herbert Fletcher DeCou, Ellsworth Thomas Derr, John Leander Duffy, Daniel Ephrair Ewald, Francis Chipman Ford, Albert Eugene Gebhardt, Caroline Louise Gelston, Katy Helen Gower, William Amasa Grace, Carrie Haigh, Preston M. Hickey, Hermann Charles William Hildnei Alice Minerva Hosmer, Elmer Ellsworth Hubbard, Elsie Jones, Franklin Harvey Kinn ey, Emory Davis Kirby, Franklin Frees Lehman, Armin Otto Leuschner, Lucian Hezekiah Emmett Lowry, Robert Douglas MacLeod, Martha Prentice Merwin, George Elmer Milliman, George Ralph Mitchell, Frank Irwin Muir, Achsa S. Parker, Paul Victor Perry, Frank George Plain, Erastus Francis Potter, Flora Mabel Potter, John Havard Powell, Harold Remington, Edwin Spencer Shaw, Clyde Slone, Honta Belle Smalley, Reuben Sherman Smith, Julia Ruth Tolman, Bert John Vos,,George Joseph Waggoner, Laura E Whitlcy, Bertha Hammond Wright. MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY. Henrietta Ash Bancroft, Gertrude Helen Mason. MASTER OF ARTS. Fred Converse Clark, Myron Oscar Graves, Susan Rachel Harrison, Myra Elizabeth Pollard, Fred Newton Scott. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Ludovic Estes, A. M., Fred Manville Taylor, A. M. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Secretary, Regent Willett submitted the following resolution. which was adopted: Resolved, That the degrees, as indicated in the communication just read, be conferred upon the persons named, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Depart ment of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

Page  218 218 JUNE MEETING, 1888. Regent Draper presented and read the following communication from the Auditing Board, and recommended its adoption.: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: In consideration for certain supplies furnished by the University, the Matron of the University Hospital is required to pay the Treasurer the sum of $700 per annum. (See Regents' Proceedings for 1885, Page 622). The Matron claims there have been fewer patients this year than usual, and that supplies and help have cost her more. She therefore asks that the above amount be somewhat reduced. The Auditing Board have had the matter under consideration, and agree to recommend to your Board a rebate of $100, for this year only. JAMES B. ANGELL, JAMES H. WADE, HARRISON SOULE. The vote on the above recommendation was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, Section 1 of Chapter XIV. of the By-Laws was amended by inserting the words Th/e President of the University, before " Professors," making the amended section read as follows: " The President of the University, Professors, Acting Professors, Lecturers, Assistant Professors of all the Faculties, and the Librarian shall constitute the University Senate." Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That Prof. Carhart be allowed for superintending the construction of the building designed for the Laboratories of Physics and Hygiene, the sum of $60 per month from April 25th ult., to the 1st of July, 1888, and the sum of $50 per month after the 1st of July, provided that the same shall be not paid for more than two months after July 1st, and that the aforesaid compensation shall be in full for the superintending by Prof. Carhart of said building until its completion. The resolution of Regent Whitman was adopted by the following vote:

Page  219 J UNE MEETINGG,1888. 219 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion, the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock p. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. Dr. Ford, Dean of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, being present, addressed the Board on the needs of that Department. Dr. Frothingham presented the recommendations of the Hospital Committee, and discussed the condition of the Hospital and its needs. Regent Clark presented the following communication from Professor Chas. N. Jones: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 26, 1888. HoN. JAMES B. ANGELL, LL. D., President of the University of Michigan: Dear Sir: Having accepted a position in the service of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, at Milwaukee, Wis., I hereby tender, through you, to the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan, my resignation of the position of Professor of Applied Mathematics, to take effect October 1st, 1888. In thus terminating my official connection with the University, I cannot forbear giving some expression to the feeling of sorrow with which I turn aside from its service, and from the work in which I have been engaged for fourteen years. It is with great pain that I break up relations that have been uniformly harmonious and a constant source of pleasure. I have been moved to take this step, that does violence to so many feelings, solely by a sense of duty, growing out of an opportunity to secure better financial returns for my services in other employment. Respectfully yours, C. N. JONES. On motion of Regent Willett, the resignation of Professor C. N. Jones was accepted. The following communication from the Dean of the Dental Department, was presented by Regent Draper:

Page  220 220 JUNE MEETING, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY, ANN ARBOR, June 26, 1888. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: The following named persons having complied with the requirements of this Department, are recommended by the Faculty of the Dental College for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Respectfully submitted, J. TAFT, Dean. Horace Albert Benson, Clarence Walker Berry, William Townsend Binzley, Harriet A. Parkes Brierley, Elwyn Butts, Rollin Edward Drake, William Fraser Dunlop, Frank Howard Essig, William Burton Flynn, Sherman M. Fowler, Jeronimo Jill Garcia, Arthur Newton Hart, Elmer Bertrand Hause, Oliver Wendell Huff, Egbert T. Lceffler, Otto Marx, Thomas Stuart Maxwell, Charles Edward Meerhoff, Richard Edward Moll, Irvin Myers, Rudolph Paul Nagle, Harry Cox Nickels, Charles Walter Nutting, Homer Ellsworth Parshall, William Orlando Randall, Henry Charles Raymond, Theckla Stein Renter, Henry William Riser, Martha Josephine Robinson, Henry Martin Seybold, Michael Cornelius Sheehan, Lucius Chipman Smith, Sherman M. Stauffer, Martin Dogener Van den Berg, Alfred Frederick Webster, William Holt Woodburn, Walter Thomas Wright. On motion of Regent Draper, it was voted to confer the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Dental Department. On motion of Regent Draper, the resignation of Geo. A. Hendricks, Instructor of Anatomy and Curator of the Medical Museum, was accepted. Regent Draper, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents; GENTLEMEN: At a meeting of the Medical Faculty, held Thursday, June 7th, the Secretary was instructed to cast a ballot for the following named candidates, who have fulfilled the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Medicine:

Page  221 JUNE MEETING, 1888. 221 Christine K. Anderson, James Henry Anderson, Hagop B. Asadoorian, Louis John Carrick Bailey, Coryadon Orlan Beardsley, Lewis Jerome Belknap, Alexander Jay Braden, Francis William Brewer, Fred L. Burdon, Frank Chaffee, Joshua Monocton Chesebro, Oramel Ozro Chesebro, Arthur Hamilton Coe, Frantz Hunt Coe, Madison James Conant, George Hall Conklin, Mary Maria Cutler, Mary Gage Day, Celia Louise Dowse, John Whalen Doyle, Herbert P. Ewell, Earl Fairbanks, Josa Theresa Fleming, Charles A. Fletcher, Zeri H. Fodrea, Paul Smith Fox, Benjamin Nathan Gardner, Elmer Daley Gardner, Jefferson Gould, James Grassick, Will Lyman Griffin, Frederick S. Heller, Nellie Anna Hollister, Clementine L. Houghton, Henry Hulst, James Gordon Jackson, Marcus Whitfield Jewell, Adrian Reginald Karreran, Horace Manley Lane, Lida Powers Leasure, Bradford Churchill Loveland, James Gifford Lynds, Charles Webster Macdade, William F. Metcalf, Delbert Joseph Miller, Mary Howell Miller, John Isaac Newcomb, Zeovia Owen, Frances Peele, Ida May Porter, Vernet Edward Prevost, Bert Bessac Rowe, Henry William Schmidt, Douglas Sewall, John Frederick Siefert, Belle Hamilton Smith, Kate Snyder, Willis Edward Sterrs, Mary Strong, Edith Estella Taylor, Thomas Henry Trainor, Bertha VanHoosen, Amos Solon Wlheelock, Seymour Syria Williams. On motion of Regent Draper, it was voted to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon the persons named in the above communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Permission being given, Dr. Prescott addressed the Board on the needs of the School of Pharmacy. He directed special attention to the readjustment of the work in metallurgy made necessary by the death of Professor Byron W. Cheever. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into executive session, after which the business of the open session was resumed. 2

Page  222 222 JUNE MEETING, 1888. Dr. Henry Sewall, Professor of Physiology, asked for and obtained leave of absence for one year, his salary to continue, provided he supplies necessary instruction in his department to the satisfaction of the Board. Regent Field moved that Professor Demmon be allowed one hundred dollars for editing the Semi-Centennial Commemorative Volume. A call vote being taken on this motion, resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, five copies of the Memorial Volume were reserved for each member of the Board. Regent Willett presented the resignation of A. Hennequin, Instructor in French and German, which was accepted. On motion of Regent Whitman, Walter Miller, Instructor in Latin, S. W. Clary, Instructor in German, and F. G. Novy, Instructor in Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry, were re-appointed for one year, at a salary of $900 each, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That Richard Hudson, Assistant Professor of History, be made full Professor of History, with a salary of $2,200. and that Andrew C. McLaughlin, Instructor in History, be made Assistant Professor of History, with a salary of $1,600, appointments to date from Oct. 1st next. The vote on Regent Whitman's resolution resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None.

Page  223 JUNE MEETING, 1888. 223 Regent Willett moved that the following appointments be made for one year: A. F. Lange, Instructor in English; W. W. Campbell, Instructor in Astronomy; Alexander Ziwet and Charles Puryear, Instructors in Mathematics; and that the Executive Committee be authorized to select and appoint another Instructor in Mathematics-the salary of each to be $900. The vote on Regent Willett's motion was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, Thomas C. Trueblood, Teacher of Elocution, was made Instructor in Elocution for one semester, at a salary of $1,000, his time to be equally divided between the Law and Literary Departments. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. B. T. Trueblood was appointed Lecturer on General Chemistry to the medical classes for one semester, at a salary of $1,000, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned to 7:30 o'clock P. M. EVENING SESSION. The Board re-assembled at 7:30 o'clock p. M. Regent Clark having arrived, the full Board was present. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board went into executive session, after which the business of the open session was resumed. The following communication from the Faculty of the Law Department was presented by Regent Butterfield:

Page  224 224 JUNE MEETING, 1888. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GEINTLEMEN: The following students in the Department of Law having completed the course of instruction in that Department t, the satisfaction of the Faculty, I am instructed to report their names toyour Honorable Body with the recommendation that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred upon them. Charles Ailing, A. B., Hanover College. Sumner Simpson Anderson, John Allen Bagley, William Weller Baylor, Norman James Beane, Att'y, Henry Clay Beitler, Joseph Edward Bell, Att'y, John Lee Benedict, Ph. B., De Pauw University. Harvey Lee Benschoter, Thomas Ashford Bogle, Att'y, Daniel Robert Burke, Thomas Glashan Campbell, A. B, Toronto University. Thomas Capek, Fred Cavanagh, Charles Upham Champion, Addison Braden Clark, Elmer Elsworth Clark, Russell Smith Clark, Robert Fremont Clever, Harrison Dygert Cole, James Thomas Cooley, Allen Foster Cooper, Att'y, William Francis Crockett, Lodowick Fitch Crofoot, Daniel Devine Cunningham, Att'y, Oliver M. Cunningham, Att'y, Charles Brookman Cushman, B. S., Knox College. Peter John Danhof, Att'y, Clyde C. Dawson, Att'y, David Barnes Day, David B. Decker, Att'y, Louis Lincoln Dennett, A. B., University of the Pacific. Lee DeVries, Ph. B, Att'y, San Joaquin Valley College. Marion DeVries, Ph. B., San Joaquin Valley College, William Pitt Dewey, Jr., Att'y, John Duff, John Herbert Duffie, Clarendon Bennett Eyer, Matthew Finn, Jr., William Simpson Frost, Jacob Burger Furry, Peter J. Galle, William Cornelius Gallagher, Att'y, Perley Francis Gosbey, A. M., Att'y, University of the Pacific. Franklin Israel Gosser, Henry James Grannis, A. B., University of Minnesota. Austin Edwards Griffiths, Att'y, Tyler Leslie Hagerthy, Edmon Grant Hall, Att'y, Theodore Daniel Halpin, William De Zeng Heise, John Maurice Herbert, A. B., Att'y, College of Christian Brothers. Hardin Helm Herr, Att'y, Edward Charles Higgins, Att'y, Almeda Eliza Hitchcock, Ralph Widden Hobart, A. B., Att'y, Kings College. Michael Henry Hoey, Joseph Howley, William August Hunneke, A. B,, German Wallace College. Charles Montgomery Irwin, Ernest Herndon Jackson, Alexander Johnson, Henry Zacharias Johnson, Att'y, William Lemuel Joyce, Edward Henry Kennedy, John Kirk, Elmer Kirkby, Att'y, Frank Herbert Knapp, A. B., Att'y, Acadia College. Ellery Elmer Kribbs, Peter John Lehman, Att'y, James Thomas Locke, William Osbert Lowden, Att'y Vincent Silas Lumley, Att'y, Ulysses Grant Martin, George Hamilton Mason, Att'y Yasukuni Matsudaira, Frank Malvern Mather, Fred Hamlin McDermont, Att'y, Michael Edward McEnany, Ph.B.,A'y,

Page  225 JUNE MEETING, 1888. 225 Matthew James McEniry, LL. B., Notre Dame University. Oscar Beaufort McGlasson, Josiah Slutts McKean, Francis McNulty, Jr., John Barton Mecham, Benton Middlekauff, Warren French Mills, Byron Clyde Mitchner, Att'y, Chilton Monroe, Frank Latham Moore, William Hickman Moore, A. B., State College of Kentucky. Hugh Coventry Morris, A. B., Albion College. Daniel Lawrence Morrison, Henry Mervale Morrow, Att'y, John William Mowen, August Edward Muenter, Att'y, John Allen Murphy, Att'y, William Monreith Murphy, Charles Solomon Northrup, Att'y, Charles Vincent O'Connor, Frederick Clayton Olney, Wilbur Owen, B. S., Coe College. Horace Mann Paget, William Lewis Parmenter, Newton Austin Phelps, Samuel Lawrence Philbrick, Att'y, Robert Frank Porter, Wilbur Byron Reading, Att'y, James Marion Reed, Alexander Frederick Reichmann, Charles Frederick Remy, A. B., Franklin College. Charles Leroy Richardson, William Henry Rote, John Rezin Sapp, William Devore Scott, Att'y, Charles McCorn Simpson, Wiley Edward So Relle, George Bourdillon Stewart, Amzi Wood Strong, Att'y, William Franz Struckman, Kiyotoshi Sugimoto, Jesse Taber, A. B., Wabash College. Alonzo S. Thomas, M. D., Rush Medical College. Alexander Rankin Thompson, Att'y, Charles William Thomson, Cyril M. Tifft, Merrill C. Tifft, Benjamin Johnston Tillar, A. B., Arkansas Industrial University. Tracy Lay Towner, Fred Townsend, Orra Milton Townsend, B. S., Att'y, Southwest Baptist College. Leander Theodore Turner, William IHarvey Turner, Mark Dayton Tyler, John Quincy Van Swearingen, Meade Vestal, Ernst Ludwig Von Suessmilch, Theodosius Wade, Price Donner West, A. B., De Pauw University. Nicholas Patrick Whelan Gardner Kessler WVilder, A. B.. Miami College. Milton Millard Wildman, Att'y, Henry Sigismund Woolner, George Bassett Yerkes, Respectfully submitted for the Faculty, HENRY WADE ROGERS, Dean. ANN ARBOR, June 26th, 1888. On motion of Regent Butterfield it was voted to confer the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recomendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. Regent Blair presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Law:

Page  226 226 JUNE SMEETING, 188S. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The Law Faculty respectfully recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred on Alfred Stillman Frost and on Harry Orlando Wilkinson, but that the degree be withheld from temrn until after Commencement and that their names be not printed on the Commencement programme. Respectfully submitted for the Law Faculty, HENRY WADE ROGERS, Dean. ANN ARBOR, June 26th, 1888. On motion of Regent Blair it was voted to confer the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon Alfred Stillman Frost and Harvey Orlando Wilkinson in accordance with the recommendation of the Law Faculty. On motion of Regent Draper the title -of Dr. H. R. Arndt was changed to Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics and Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System. The following communication from the Faculty of the Homneopathic Medical College was presented by Regent Draper: To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: The Faculty of the Homoeopathic College recommend the following candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. George Dute Arntt, John Hancock Lawrence, Wm. Frederick Brooks, Hutoka Lucy Porter, Mary Ann Cook, Eugene Woodman Ruggles, Edward Arthur Darby, Iarriet Swathel Sanborn, Ella Kyes Dearborn, Duacan James Sinclair, Lizzie Amanda Hendershott, Mary Ella Thompson, A. B. H. L. OBETZ, Dean. On motion of Regent Draper it was voted to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Homeeopathic Medical College. The following report of a committee appointed by the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery to consider and report on the condition of the University Hospital was received.

Page  227 JUNE MEETING, 18S8. 227 To the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: The undersigned, members of your committee to consider the improvements urgently needed in the hospital buildings and equipments and also in the future management of the same, respectfully submit that they have taken the matter into consideration and would recommend the following:First, That the buildings and the spaces under the floors of each be thoroughly disinfected and that the premises be cleaned as soon as possible after the close of the present term. Second, That all the bedding and other furniture that cannot be thoroughly disinfected be burned. Third, That the price of bard be raised to four dollars per week, all extras to be charged to the patient when able to pay. Fourth, That a competent matron and steward be engaged to conduct the culinary department, and that the University authorities be asked to assume the direct control of this matter, with the aid of the Hospital Committee, and that the present system of boarding patients by contract be abolished. Fifth, That the appointment of the House Physician, Wardmaster, and Wardmistress be for one year, and that the resignation of the present House Surgeon be requested in accordance with this new plan. Sixth, That the heating and ventilating be thoroughly investigated by an expert, and necessary improvements made to render them as perfect as possible with the means.at the disposal of the Regents. Seventh, That more help be engaged to attend to the office and amphitheatre and to keep the buildings and surroundings clean. Eighth, That each of the large divisions of the two wards be divided into two compartments, making three compartments in each ward, so as to allow of the proper disinfection of any one of them when needed during term time. Ninth, That the Board of Regents be asked to make the necessary appropriation for these improvements out of the Hospital Fund. Tenth, That the Regents be asked to have all moneys paid by patients for medicines and supplies furnished and paid for from the Hospital Fund returned to the Hospital Fund again, and not placed in the General Fund of the University as at present is done. Eleventh, That the Hospital Committee shall, before the commencement of another term, establish a proper dietary, and formulate rules for the general management of the Hospital, and appoint one of their number to see that the same be properly carried out. Twelfth, That the vacancies existing in the Hospital Committee be filled and that the committee be reorganized and enlarged. [Signed] G. E. FROTHINGHAM, ) JOHN NV. LANGLEY. >Committee. ALBERT B. PRESCOTT,) Regent Draper, Chairman of the Medical Committee, submitted the following report and recommendations, which were adopted by the full vote of the Board.

Page  228 228 JUNE MEETING, 1888. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Your Committee to which was referred the foregoing communication from the Medical Faculty, have considered the same and respectfully recommend that the 1st, 2d and 5th recommendations in such communication contained be concurred in, and that the 3d and 4th recommendations be referred to the Auditing Board and Hospital Committee, with authority to take such action as may be necessary in the premises. Your Committee further recommend that the same action be taken in reference to the Homceopathic Hospital by the Auditing Board and Hospital Committee of the Homoeopathic College. Your Committee further recommend that the expense incident to the work to be done be charged to and payable from the repair fund. C. S. DRAPER, June 26th, 1888. R. W. BUTTERFIELD. On motion of Regent Willett, Dr. W. A. Campbell was appointed permanent Secretary of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery at a salary of $200 per annum, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the following appointments were made in the University Hospital: Dr. G. W. Lacea, Resident Physician and Surgeon; salary, $500. Dr. E. D. Gardner, Wardmaster; salary, $300. P. H. Scully, Nurse; salary, $300. Miss M. M. Cutler, M. D., Wardmistress; salary, $300. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. The iHomeopathic Medical Faculty recommended the following appointments in their Department: John S. Campbell, AM. D., Resident Physician and Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, at a salary of $350. Harriet M. Allen, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, and to the Chair of Ophthalmology and Otology, at a salary of $200. George D. Arndt, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Surgery

Page  229 JUNE MEETING, 1838. 229 and to the Chair of Principles and Practice of Medicine, at a salary of $200. On motion of Regent Draper the above appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, Mr. Joseph E. Putnam was appointed Assistant in Physics for one year at a salary of $700 by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the sum of $100 was appropriated for the purchase of glass jars and glass models, needed in the Zoological Laboratory; and $50 for the purchase of Ellis's Sets of North American Fungi, needed in the Botanical Laboratory. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Professor Elisha Jones, being seriously ill, asked for and obtained leave of absence for one year, salary to lapse during his absence. On motion of Regent Willett, Mr. J. McCabe was appointed Instructor in French, for one year, at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board adjourned to 8 o'clock to-morrow morning. 3

Page  230 230 JUNE MEETING, 1888. WEDNESDAY MORNING. The Board reassembled at 8 o'clock. Absent-Regent Hebard. Regent Blair, Chairman of the Law Committee, recommended the following appointments in the Law Department: 1st. That Professors Levi T. Griffin and William P. Wells, and Assistant Professor J. C. Knowlton, be reappointed for another year*, at the same salaries as heretofore paid. 2d. That Bradley M. Thompson be appointed Jay Professor of Law, at a salary of $2,000. 3d. That Henry B. Brown be appointed Lecturer on Admiralty, for the ensuing year, at a salary of $350. 4th. That Melville M. Bigelow be appointed Lecturer on Insurance in 1888-9, at a salary of $300. 5th. That Wm. G. Hammond be appointed Lecturer on the History of Common Law during the year 1889-90, at a salary of $300. On motion of Regent Blair, the appointments recomniended by the Law Committee were concurred in by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Blair moved that the salary of Assistant Librarian J. H. Vance be made $700, and that the sum of $75 be appropriated for advertising the Law Department for the next year. Carried. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. D. A. Deucher was appointed Assistant in Physiology for one year, at a salary of $150, by the following vote: * See Proceedings of Meeting, July, 1888.

Page  231 JUNE MIEETING, 1888. 231 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Willett, Chairman of the Library Committee, reported as follows: The Library Committee take pleasure in reporting the donation of the Dorsch Collection of books to the General Library. It contains 1,676 volumes and 136 pamphlets, many of them immensely valuable. The Committee would recommend that the letter of Mrs. Dorsch, accompanying the donation, and the sketch of the life of Dr. Dorsch, prepared by Professor Thomas, be printed in the minutes, and that President Angell be requested to return to Mrs. Dorsch the thanks of this Board. Carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. MONROE, MICH., May, 1888. To the Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: It was the wish of my late husband, Dr.EDWARD DORSCH, that at his decease, his valuable private library should not be separated, but be given, as a whole, to some educational institution. Although in his last will and testament Dr. DORSCI has made no request regarding this library, in a conversation we had a few months before his sudden death, he indicated the wish to me that the University of Michigan should be the heir to his books. Therefore I am convinced that I carry out the spirit of his intentions by giving this library to the State in which the Doctor passed a greater portion of his life, and in whose educational welfare 1he was always deeply interested. I ask you, therefore, gentlemen, to accept the Collection upon the understanding that the books composing it shall be kept together and known for all time as the "Dorsch Library." Respectfully yours, MRS. DR. E. DORSCH. DR. EDWARD DORSCH. EDWARD DORSCH was born January 10, 1822, of Protestant parents, at Wiirzburg, in Bavaria. At the age of ten he was placed in a Catholic school in Munich, and there received his preparation for the university, which he entered in 1840. While a student of medicine at Munich he devoted much attention to Natural History, especially to Botany, which remained a favorite pursuit with him throughout his entire life. At the time of the revolutionary outbreaks of 1848, Dr. DORSCH was a young practitioner of Vienna. Here, as he tells us in a brief autobiographical sketch, his professional labors had often to be carried on amid scenes of carnage. Often he was awakened in the morning by the volley of musketry which terminated the existence of some one who had made himself an object of suspicion to the reactionary government. By nature and education a liberal, Dr. DORSCH had no sympathy with the regime then dominant in Austria; and when the horrors of military despotism were aggravated by

Page  232 232 JUNE MEETING, 1888. the breaking out of the cholera, he readily persuaded himself to join a company of emigrants that were just setting out for America, and were in need of a physician. He arrived with his family in this country in the autumn of 1849, and took up his abode in Monroe, Michigan. At Monroe Dr. DoRSCH soon developed a lucrative practice, and became one of the most prominent and respected citizens of that portion of the State. As his income increased, he indulged freely his appetite for books, and so accumulated gradually the fine private library which now passes into the possession of the University of Michigan. Although he had previously voted as a Democrat, Dr. DORSCH connected himself with the Republican party from the time of its organization. He was a delegate to the Republican convention at Coldwater, in 1854, and during the presidential elections of 1856 and 1860, he edited a Republican campaign paper at Monroe. During the war he was a government examiner of recruits and invalids. Later he was appointed a IU. S. Examining Surgeon, and in connection with his work for the Pension office he invented and introduced a new chart for use in describing graphically the course of a bullet through the human body. In the brief autobiography above alluded to, he remarks with evident professional satisfaction, that his invention is still used by the Pension office. From 1872 to 1878 Dr. DORSCH was a member of the State Board of Education-the last public office, he says, that he held or cared to hold. During his later years he took a somewhat gloomy view of the course of politics in his adopted country. He was a man of wide and varied intellectual interests, read books omnivorously in half a dozen languages, and exhibited, in writing his native tongue, a marked literary talent. In 1874 he published a volume of poems, some of which give evidence of poetic gifts of a really high order. He died in January, 1887. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Board went into executive session, after which the business of the open session was resumed. On motion of Regent Willett, the salary of C. G. Taylor was made $1.603, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the title of Prof. J. W. Langley was changed to Professor of General Chemistry and Metallurgy: George W. Whyte was appointed Lecturer on Metallurgy, to fill the temporary vacancy caused by Professor Langley's absence on leave, salary $900; and David H. Browne, Ph. B., was appointed Instructor in Quantitative Analysis for one year, salary $900.

Page  233 J UNE MEETING, 1888. 233 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett the Board took a recess to 3:30 P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. On motion of Regent Clark, Jacob E. Reighard was appointed for one year Instructor in Zoology, at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Auditing Board were authorized to pay the expenses incurred by James L. High, in coming here to address the Alumni of the Law Department; and also the expenses of Thomas C. Chamberlin, President of the University of Wisconsin, who delivered the Commencement Oration. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. In accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and on motion of Regent Draper, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Archibald Peterson. Also Doctor C. George was appointed Instructor in Materia Medica for one year at a salary of $500. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the Auditing Board were instructed to make such arrangements with John M. Smoots, Machinist in the Engineering Laboratory, as to

Page  234 234 JUNE MEETING, 1888. his salary, as would be satisfactory to him and for the best interests of the University. Regent Willett moved that the Auditing Board be authorized to pay from the General Fund, if necessary, the bills of Ransom & Randolph, of Toledo, for advertising the Dental College, amounting to $112. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Steward was directed to provide 40 feet of additional cases in the museum for the better display of the Rominger Collection. On motion of Regent Clark it was voted that Section I of Chapter VIII of the By Laws be so amended as to read as follows: " The President of the University, the duly appointed Professors, Acting Professors, Associate Professors, Lecturers and Instructors of any Department, College, or School of the University shall constitute the Faculty of Instruction in such Department, College, or School. But the right to vote in any Faculty shall be restricted to the President of the University, and to the Professors, Acting Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, and Lecturers appointed to the full duties of Professors, in such Faculty. This restriction, however, shall not apply to the present Secretary of the Literary Faculty nor to the present Secretary of the Faculty of Pharmacy, who have hitherto had the privilege of voting." Elmer Sanford, B. S., was, on motion of Regent Clark, appointed Instructor in Physiology for the year at the salary of $900, (to be provided by Professor Sewall under the conditions of his leave of absence. See above, page 222). Regent Draper, Chairman of the Medical Committee, presented the following report:

Page  235 JUNE MEETING, 1888. 235 To the Hon. Board of Regents: Your committee having had under consideration certain recommendations of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery and also a protest of a minority of the same Faculty against some of the recommendations respectfully recommend; 1st. That the matter of filling the chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, made vacant by the death of Dr. Dunster, be deferred until the next meeting of the Board. 2d. That Dr. James N. Martin be designated to perform the duties of Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children until the next meeting of the Board; his compensation for such service to be fixed by the Board hereafter, having reference to the services which he shall have performed. 3d. That Professor Ford be authorized to employ an assistant for one year at a salary of $500 per annum. The report was accepted and adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper it was voted unanimously that the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine be conferred on Professor Henry Sewall. On motion of Regent Clark it was voted unanimously that the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws be conferred on Professor Cleveland Abbe, of Washington, D. C., and also that the same honorary degree be conferred on William Harold Payne, of Nashville, Tennessee. On motion of Regent Willett the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  236

Page  237 SPECIAL MEETING. JULY, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, July 20, 1888. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P. M. Present-The President, Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Absent-Regent Whitman. On motion of Regent Draper, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board went into executive session. Regent Clark, Chairman of the Literary Committee, moved that Walter Miller, A. M., be appointed Acting Assistant, Professor of Latin for one year with a salary of $1,200; and that Joseph H. Drake, A. B., be appointed Instructor in Latin for one year, with a salary of $900. The motion of Regent Clark was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the resignation of C. B. Cady, Acting Professor of Music, was accepted, to take effect Oct. 1st, 1888. Regent Willett moved that Frank N. Cole, Ph. D., be appointed Instructor in Mathematics for one year, at a

Page  238 238 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. salary of $900; and that Lucius L. Van Slyke, Ph. D., be appointed Lecturer on General Chemistry in the Literary Department, for one semester, at a salary of $1,000. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Field, Joseph W. Warren, M.D., was appointed Lecturer on Physiology for the ensuing year, at a salary of $600-(to be provided by Professor Sewall, under the conditions of his leave of absence. See page 222.) Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved that Lewis A. Rhoades, A. M., be appointed Instructor in German, for one year, at a salary of $900. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Willett, Chairman of the Finance Committee moved that Instructor P. R. de Pont be made Assistant Professor of French, and Registrar of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, with a salary of $1,800. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfleld, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Field moved that the conditions under which Professors Griffin and Wells, and Assistant Professor Knowlton, of the Law Department, were appointed at the

Page  239 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 239 last meeting of the Board (page 230), be modified by striking out the words " for one year." The Board concurred by a full vote, thereby making these appointments permanent. Judge Harriman, E. B. Pond, A. W. Hamilton, and Otto Eberbach, a committee representing the citizens of Ann Arbor, were introduced and addressed the Board on matters relating to the Hospital accommodations of the University. They desired to inquire whether if the citizens of Ann Arbor should provide a Lying-in Hospital, the Regents would accept the charge of it and maintain it. On motion of Regent Field, the Board of Education of the city were granted permission to connect the High School building with the University sewer, without expense to the University, provided that the proper connections be made under the supervision of the Steward of the University. On motion of Regent Hebard, the Auditing Board were directed to pay the bill of M. E. Cooley for $106.25, for services as superintendent of buildings during the year 1887. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. A bill of Professor J. Taft, for $48.50 for desk and carpet furnished for the Faculty room of the Dental College, was presented by the Secretary, and on motion of Regent Blair, was laid on the table. The Finance Committee, through their Chairman, Regent Willett, presented and read the following report, together with an estimate of receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1889; and also the Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements from September 30th, 1887, to June 30th, 1888, which, on motion of Regent Blair, was adopted.

Page  240 240 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: The Finance Committee herewith present their estimate of receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1889, and also the Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the time between September 30th, 1887-being the date of his last statement-and June 30th, 1888, the latter date included. The books and vouchers of the Secretary and Treasurer have been carefully examined and checked, and the Treasurer's account verified in detail, and the same are substantially correct. The balance on hand June 30th, 1888, is 88,327.57, but it will be observed from the estimate of expenditures for the present fiscal year that, with a continuance of the stated appropriations by the legislature, there will still remain a deficit of $8,664.67. It will be noted also that the estimates are based upon present charges, and consequently that the increase of current expenses must swell the deficit. One of the causes of this expected deficiency is the extra expenditure for buildings, which it seemed impossible to avoid, and which has decreased our present balance. We may well hope that the coming legislature will reimburse the General Fund for the amount drawn from it for the above purpose. It would seem wise, however, to exercise a careful economy, and so guard against outlays, which are not indispensable, that if possible, the deficit may be less than estimated. A large sum is still due from the State upon building appropriations, but this will all be expended within the next few months in the completion of the buildings now under construction. It will be remembered also that these are special appropriations and cannot be diverted. While your committee regret that a deficit should appear in the estimates, and urge careful attention to the above suggestion as to economy, we still believe that this should not be pressed so far as to cripple the University: its necessities must be provided. Respectfully submitted, CHARLES J. WILLETT, Chairman. MOSES W. FIELD, CHARLES HEBARD. ESTIMATE OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30th, 1889. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888........................................................$ 8,327 57 To be received from the State on the following accounts: University Interest........................................................... 38,000 00 1-20th M ill Tax........................................................................... 47,272 50 Homceopathic Department.......................................................... 12,200 00 University H ospital..................................................................... 2,500 00 College of Dental Surgery............................ 4,000 00 Scientific Laboratories............................................................... 15,000 00 Contingent............................................,..................................... 6,250 00 Books for Libraries...................................................... 5,000 00 Physical Apparatus.................................................................... 1,000 00 Additional Salaries.................................................................. 2,500 00 Repairs.....................................................................5..,000 00 $147,050 07

Page  241 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 241 To be received from other sources as follows: Students' Fees and Laboratory Deposits...............$ 70,000 00 Sale of Dental Supplies.......................................... 3,500 00 Sale of Anatomical Material................................. 200 00 Sales at University Hospital................................. 700 00 Sales at Homceopathic Hospital........................... 300 00 Interest on Bank Deposits............................ 1,000 00 ----— $ 75,700 00 Amount of Estimated Receipts........... $222750 07 ESTIMATED DISBURSEMENTS. For Salaries of Professors, Officers, and Employees: In College of Dental Surgery............................... $ 8,466 68 "Homceopathic College....................................... 9,200 00 University Hospital........................................ 2,180 00 " Homceopathic Hospital.................................. 870 00 All other Departments.................................. 145,284 00 For Alterations and Repairs............................................ 5,838 44 " Fuel and Lights............................................ 12,000 00 "Current Expenses of General Library................... 400 00 Grounds..................................................... 500 00 " Postage....................................................................... 800 00 " Insurance................................................... 1,500 00 "Calendar, Regents' Proceedings, and Miscellaneous Printing......................................................... 2,500 00 Current Expenses of Museum.................................. 500 00 "Supplies for Chemical Laboratory............................ 7,000 00 * " L" Botanical ".............................. 400 00 " " Histological ".............................. 300 00, " l " Physiological.............................. 300 00 '" t" "( Engineering "............................. 800 00 "L " "( c Microscopical ".............................. 100 00 "" " " Physical "............................. 500 00 *" l " "ZoOlogical ".............................. 400 00 " " " General Chemistry............................. 600 00 "Current Expenses in the Civil Engineering Departm ent...................................................................... 400 00 "Current Expenses in the Astronomical Observatory............................................................................. 300 00 "Current Expenses for Anatomical Material............ 2,500 00 Advertising Literary Department......................... 300 00 ' "Medical "............................. 200 00 Law "............................. 200 00 1" " Pharmacy "............................. 200 00 "Transportation of Randolph Rogers Statuary..... 4,000 00 "Use of Water Privilege.................................. 125 00 "Purchasing and Filling Diplomas............................. 650 00 Commencement Expenses........................................ 1,200 00 "Taxes and Improvements on Springwells Lots...... 300 00 Purchase of Dental Supplies................................... 2,500 00

Page  242 242 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. For Current Expenses of University Hospital............ " " " "i - Homceopathic "............... L" " " "g Dental Department................ "Purchase of Books for Libraries................................ "Apparatus for Natural Philosophy........................... "Completion of Scientific Laboratories.................... " Chem ical Vault.......................................................... " Pathological Laboratory...................................... Completion of New Boiler House........................... " Completion of Engineering Laboratory................ ' G oethe F und............................................................. Hygienic Laboratory.................................................. "Miscellaneous Expenses........................................... Amount of Estimated Disbursements.......... Amount of Estimated Receipt s.....................$ 222,750 07 If the Legislature appropriates as heretofore we shall expect to receive for expenses of the next fiscal year, for Dental College........................................... 4,000 00 " University Hospital................................. 2,500 00 " Homo. College and Hospita..................... 3,100 00 " Contingent............................................... 3,125 00 " Repairs............................................... 1,500 00 -Estimated Deficit............................................. 3,150 00 2,000 00 1,000 00 4,500 00 2,052 40 13,927 19 400 00 500 00 500 00 1,096 03 200 00 1,000 00 2,000 00 $ 245.639 74 - $ 236,975 07 $ 8,664 67 TREASURER'S REPORT. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit my financial report from Oct. 1st, 1887, to June 30th, 1888, in accordance with a law of the last Legislature which requires all State Institutions to close ann ual reports at that date. Respectfully, H. SOULE, Treasurer. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.......................... $ 21,929 09 From State Treasurer, Acct. of Current Expenses.......$ 62,861 37,,, " * " Special Appropriations.... 54,450 00 " Goethe Fund-received from interest on deposit.. 34 42 Earnings of the University......................... 85,649 43 202,995 22 $224,924 31 DISBURSEMENTS. Paid General. Fund Accounts............................$125,254 68 " Special " "............................. 91,342 06-$216,596 74 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888.................... 8,327 57 $224,924 31

Page  243 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 243 The following detailed and classified statements exhibit the condition of the several funds: GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. From State Treasurer, Acct. 1-20th Mill Tax..............$ 35,454 37 " '... " University Interest......... 27,407 00-8 62,861 37 " First National Bank of Ann Arbor, Interest..... 2,063 35 " University Hospital, Sale of Material............ 827 23 " Homceopathic " " " ".............. 381 85 " Dental Operating Room, Sale of Material......... 3,504 54 " Anatomical Material sold to Medical Schools..... 417 15 " Miscellaneous Sources.............................. 1,466 44-$ 8,660 56 " Students' Fees, Acct. Medical Dep't............... 10,330 00 <( " " "( " Chemical Laboratory........ 9,812 87 " "t " " "Literary Dep't................ 22,555 00 " <" " " Law Dep't................. 14,680 00 c" " <" " Dental Dep't................. 3,970 00 "" " " " Homoeopathic Dep't......... 1,980 00 '" " ' k" Mechanical Laboratory..... 434 00 <l ( " " " " School of Pharmacy.........,835 00 " '"..' " Key Deposits................. 256 00 t" " '" " Botanical Laboratory....... 228 00 "( " " t " Physiological Laboratory... 66 00 " ( " " General Chemistry.......... 353 00 <(" " " " Zoological Laboratory...... 99 00 " " t" " Practical Anatomy.......... 3,010 00 ~" t '" " " Microscopical Laboratory., 177 00 <" " "( " Histological Laboratory..... 878 00 (" " "t " Pathological Laboratory.... 85 00 " " " ' Diploma Fees............... 4,240 00-$ 76,988 87 $148,510 80 Students' Fees, Total............................ $ 76,988 87 t " Refunded........................ 4,753 62 " " Net.................... 72,235 25 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND, Balance Overdrawn Oct. 1st, 1887..................... $ 14,879 General Pay Roll, Salaries of Officers and Employees.. $ 91,156 00 Vouchers Paid, Account Students' Fees Refunded....... 4,753 62 tl" " "( Fuel and Lights................. 8,760 12 cc" " " General Library............... 458 14 " " " M useum.......................... 119 66 t"l " 6 Advertising Medical Dep't...... 68 76.". " " Law "..... 61 50 11" " " " Pharmacy".... 18 00 " k " Insurance..................... 180 00 I" " k" Miscellaneous Printing......... 850 42 t" " (" Civil Engineering.............. 51 00 " " " Chemical Laboratory........... 6,436 76

Page  244 244 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. Vouchers Paid, Account General Chemistry............. "' " " Astronomical Observatory..... " " " I Histological Laboratory........ " " " Botanical Laboratory........... " " " Physical Laboratory........... (" " " Physiological Laboratory....... ("( " " Microscopical Laboratory...... "' " " Mechanical Laboratory......... "( " ' i" Zoological Laboratory.........,t" " Dental Operating Room...... 1" c" " Anatomical Laboratory.......,, " " t Anatomical Material..........,' " " t Postage..........................,' "c " < Pathological Laboratory...... " t l " Calendar........................ Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888..................... 190 08 23 51 106 20 423 61 26 75 123 25 51 42 675 60 330 96 2,394 24 4,481 13 1,488 64 683 20 342 11 1,000 00-$125,254 68 8,377 06 $148,510 80 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. HOM(EOPATH1C MEDICAL COLLEGE. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887......................... $ 1,985 42 From State Treasurer..................................... 6,000 00-$ 7,985 42 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees...............$ 6,900 00 " Vouchers for Expenses............................... 158 93 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888........................ 926 49-$ 7,985 42 HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL. Receipts. From State Treasurer..................................... $ 6,200 00-$ 6,200 00 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Hospital Surgeon and Employees.....$ 652 50 " Vouchers for Expenses............................... 1,729 57 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888...................... 3,817 93-8 6,200 00 GENERAL LIBRARY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.........................$ From State Treasurer...................................... Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888...................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................$ UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. Receipts. 109 73 5,000 00 438 79-$ 5,548 52 5,548 52-$ 5,548 52 Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887......................... $ 3,124 77 From State Treasurer...................................... 2,500 00 — 5,624 77

Page  245 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 245 Disbursements, Salaries of Resident Physician and Employees.......$ 1,530 0) Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. 3,468 55 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888....................... 626 22-$ 5,624 77 CONTINGENT. Receipts. From State Treasurer.....................................$ 6,250 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888..................... 426 11-$ 6,676 11 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn Oct. 1st, 1887.......................... 264 12 Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................ 6,411 99- 6,676 11 REPAIRS. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.........................$ 1,836 62-$ 1,836 62 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses..............................$ 998 18 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888....................... 838 44-$ 1,836 62 PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.........................$ 157 12-$ 157 12 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................$ 4 98 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888....................... 152 14-$ 157 12 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.......... $ 3,964 46 From State Treasurer..................................... 4,000 00-$ 7,964 46 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees..............$ 6,283 33 Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 1,185 85 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888............... 495 28-$ 7,964 46 BOILER HOUSE. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.......................$ 7,939 36 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888.................... 5,450 66-8 13,390 02 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses...............................$ 13,390 02-$ 13,390 02 ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer.............................. $ 6,750 00-$ 6,750 00 2

Page  246 246 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn Oct. 1st, 1887..........................$ 953 42 Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. 4,770 16 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888..................... 1,026 42-$ 6,750 00 GOETHE FUND. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887..................... $ 663 17 Interest on Deposit......................................... 34 42-$ 697 59 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses...............................$ 259 64 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888..................... 437 95-$ 697 59 DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. (PHYSICAL LABORATORY.) Receipts. Balance in Treasury (Physical Lab.) Oct. 1st, 1887....... $ 1,954 10 From State Treasurer.................................... 1,000 00-$ 2,954 10 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................$ 1,901 70 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888...................... 1,052 40-$ 2,954 10 REMOVAL OF ROGERS' GIFTS. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888...................... $ 4 00-$ 4 00 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn Oct. 1st, 1887......................... 4 00-$ 4 00 SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887..........................$ 8,886 20 From State Treasurer...................................... 10,000 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888........................ 1,003 20-$ 19,889 40 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. 19,889 40-$ 19,889 40 CHEMICAL VAULT. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.......................$ 400 00-$ 400 00 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888..................... 400 00-$ 400 00 ADDITIONAL SALARIES. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887....................... $ 5,000 00 From State Treasurer.................................. 2,500 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1888..................... 2,500 00-$ 10,000 00

Page  247 JUNE MEETING, 1888. 247 Disbursements. Paid.Pay Rolls............................................$ 10,000 00 — 10,000 00 FORGE AND.-FOUNDRY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury Oct. 1st, 1887.........................$ 2,008 74 From State Treasurer...................................... 4,250 00-$ 6,258 74 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................$ 6,258 74-$ 6,258 74 The balances in the Treasury June 30th, 1888, are as follows: SPECIAL FUNDS. Repairs.............................................. $ 838 44 Dental College............................................ 495 28 University H ospital....................................... 626 22 Physiological Laboratory.................................. 152 14 Homceopathic College..................................... 926 49 Goethe Fund........................................ 437 95 Natural Philosophy..................................... 1,052 40 Chem ical V ault.......................................... 400 00 Engineering Laboratory................................ 1,026 42 Homceopathic Medical College and Hospital.......... 3,817 93 $ 9,773 27 Less Overdrawn Accts. Contingent......................$ 426 11 " " " General Library.................. 438 79 ( " " t Removal of Rogers' Gifts....... 4 00 ( ' ". Boiler House................ 5,450 66, ' " " Scientific Laboratories............ 1,003 20 " L " "Additional Salaries............. 2,500 00-$ 9,822 76 Special Funds Overdrawn.............. 49 49 GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1888................. $ 8,377 06 Net Balance.......................... $ 8,327 57 Regent Draper, Chairman of the Medical Committee, submitted the following resolution,which was unanimously adopted: Resolved, That the proposition submitted by the Committee of citizens of Ann Arbor, looking to the establishment of a Hospital, which shall be turned over to the University, and continue in charge of its Department of Medicine and Surgery, meets with the hearty approval of the Board; and this Board will apply to the Legislature for the aid which may be necessary to maintain the Hospital, when it shall be placed under its control. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. Herdman was re

Page  248 248 SPECIAL MIEETING, 1888. quested to deliver the necessary lectures to the freshman medical class, during the next year, on the subject of Anatomy, without additional compensation. Regent Draper moved that the matter of filling the chair of the late Dr. Dunster be deferred until the next meeting of the Board; and that Dr. James N. Martin be continued in charge of the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, until that time. The vote on the above resolution resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nay-Regent Willett. On motion of Regent Draper, the Executive Committee was charged with the duty of selecting some competent person to deliver a course of Lectures on Obstetrics, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, during the coming year, provided the vacant chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children be not filled by the Board before October 1st, 1888. By permission, Dr. Frothingham addressed the Board on matters relating to the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Willett, Dr. Wm. A. Campbell was requested to act as Curator of the Medical Museum until the October meeting of the Board. Regent Willett moved that the Auditing Board be authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $100 in the purchase of material to be used by the Professor of Pathology in original investigation. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Butterfield, and Hebard. Absent-Regents Field and Whitman. On motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  249 OCTOBER MEETING. 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, October 12, 1888. The Roard of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 7 o'clock P. mr. Present -The President, Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Absent-Regents Blair, Clark and Hebard. The meeting was called to order and opened with prayer by the President. On motion of Regent Whitman, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. The President stated that he had received several communications, which he suggested should be referred to the appropriate committees of the Board. There being no objections the papers took that course. The President stated that his annual report had been prepared and was held subject to the pleasure of the Board. Regent Whitman moved that the report be read by the President. The motion prevailed. PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: I beg leave to present to you my Annual Report for the year ending September 30th, 1888. The following changes in the Faculties have occurred: At the meeting of the Board in October, 1887, Charles M. Gayley, A. B., was appointed Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric; Fred. G. Novy, M. S., Instructor in

Page  250 250 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry for one year; Conrad George, M. D., Instructor in Materia Medica for one year; Assistant Professor Charles N. Jones, A. B., Professor of Applied Mathematics; C. F. Sterling, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Honoeopathic Medical College in the place of D. J. McGuire, M. D., resigned; and Heneage Gibbs, M. D., Professor of Pathology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The resignation of William H. Payne, A. M., Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching was accepted. At the February meeting the action of the Executive Committee in appointing N. S. Hoff, D. D. S., Assistant Professor in the Dental College for the remainder of the year and in appointing J. F. McCulloch Instructor in Mathematics to serve from November 1st, 1887, to the end of the year, was approved; B. A. Hinsdale, Ph. D., was appointed Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching; Dr. Henry F. Lyster was appointed Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine in the Department of Medicine and Surgery in the place of Dr. A. B. Palmer, deceased; and the resignation of J. M. Schaeberle, Instructor in Astronomy, was accepted. At the March meeting the resignation of John Dewey, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, to take effect Oct. 1st, 1888, was accepted; and W. S. Hough, A. M., was appointed Instructor in Philosophy for the next year. At the June meeting the resignations of Professor C. N. Jones, Alfred Iennequin, Instructor in Modern Languages, and Dr. Geo. A. Hendricks, Instructor in Anatomy and Curator of the Medical Museum, were accepted; Professors William P. Wells, Levi T. Griffin, and Bradley M. Thompson,'and Assistant Professor J. C. Knowlton, whose terms had expired, were reappointed to their chairs in the Law Department, Hon. Henry B. Brown was appointed Lecturer on Admiralty, and Professor M. M. Bigelow, Lecturer on Insurance, for the coming year, and Pro. fessor Wm. G. Hammond, Lecturer on the History of

Page  251 OCTOBER MEETING, 1S88. 251 Common Law for the year 1889-90; Richard Hudson was promoted from the Assistant Professorship to the Professorship of History, and Andrew C. McLaughlin from the Instructorship to the Assistant Professorship of History; Barclay T. Trueblood, Ph. D., was appointed Lecturer on General Chemistry for one year to the Medical classes, George W. Whyte, Lecturer on Met allurgy for one year; and the following persons were appointed Instructors for one year: S. W. Clary, Instructor in German, F. G. Novy, Instructor in Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry, A. F. Lange, Instructor in English, W. NV. Campbell, Instructor in Astronomy, Alexander Ziwet and Charles Puryear, Instructors in Mathematics, and David H. Browne, Instructor in Quantitative Analysis. Professor Henry Sewall was granted leave of absence for the coming year. The title of Prof. Langley was changed to Professor of General Chemistry and Metallurgy and that of Dr. Arndt to Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics and Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nervous System. At the July meeting t fll g the following appointments were made for one year: Walter Miller, Acting Assistant Professor of Latin, Joseph H. Drake, Instructor in Latin, Lewis A. Rhoades, Instructor in German, F. N. Cole, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics; Lucius L. Van Slyke, Ph. D., was appointed Lecturer on General Chemistry for the Second Semester in the Literary Department, Instructor de Pont was made Assistant Professor of French and Registrar of the Literary Department; and the resignation of Calvin B. Cady, Professor of Music, was accepted. At a meeting of the Executive Committee on Sept. 17, N. S. Hoff, D. D. S., was appointed Assistant Professor of Practical Dentistry for another year, and Albert A. Stanley was appointed Professor of Music. During the year the University has been bereft of four Professors by death. In no previous year of its existence has it suffered so heavy affliction.

Page  252 252 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1888. On December 20,1887, Dr. A. B. Palmer died alter a brief period of confinement to his house, though doubtless the fatal disease had been for some time making inroads upon his vigorous constitution. He had been a Professor in the Department of Medicine and Surgery since 1854. He had occupied different chairs in the Faculty, and had for years been the Dean. A more devoted and industrious teacher has never been in the service of the University. The great purpose of his life seemed to be to secure the prosperity of the Institution and especially of the Department, for which he labored so faithfully during all the thirty-four years of his official connection with it. On March 6, 1888, Byron W. Cheever, Acting Professor of Metallurgy, died after an illness of only a few days duration. Dr. Cheever was a graduate of the Literary, Medical and Law Departments of this University. It need hardly be added that he was a man of varied attainments. He was rapidly making an enviable reputation as a metallurgist by his explorations and his writings. IHe was an exacting, faithful and successful teacher. On May 3, 1888, Dr. Edward S. Dunster, who had filled the chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children since 1873, yielded to the power of disease with which in one form or another he had for a long time contended. As a medical lecturer he had few equals. A charming personal address, a terse but graceful diction, a generous literary culture, an abundant learning in his profession, a lucid and systematic arrangement of his thoughts, gave a singular attraction to his public instruction. His writings had given him a wide reputation in his branch of the medical profession. In his mental constitution and his temperament he exhibited in a marked degree the traits of his distinguished ancestor, the first President of Harvard University. On August 16, 1888, Elisha Jones, Associate Professor of Latin, after an illness of several months, died in Colorado, whither he had gone in the hope that the climate

Page  253 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 253 might be beneficial to him. He had faithfully served his Alma Mater for some fourteen years as a teacher of the Latin and Greek classics. He was an accomplished scholar and most successful instructor. His sincere, frank and earnest character commanded the respect and won the affection of his colleagues and his pupils. The text books which he had prepared had made his name widely and honorably known. The University will hold in grateful recollection the faithful services of these men who have fallen at their posts of duty. Fortunate will she be, if she can make their places good. Professor C. N. Jones, who turns from academic to business pursuits, had been connected with the Faculty since 1874. He had the rather unusual gift of making the study of mathematics agreeable even to pupils who had not a special taste for that branch, while at the same time he held them to effective work. Professor Payne has accepted the very important position of President of the State College of Nashville, an Institution which by the aid of the Peabody Fund devotes its energies largely to giving southern students a Normal training of collegiate grade to prepare them for filling important positions us teachers in the Southern States. The Chair of the Science and the Art of Teaching in this University, to which he was called in 1879, was, I think, the first chair of the kind established in any American University. The Regents observed that we were annually graduating a considerable number of persons, who without having had any special training in pedagogy, were called at once to the responsible duties of principals of high schools or even of superintendents of the public schools of cities. Our relation to the public school system of the State and to these graduates seemed to lay on us the duty of giving them some special and adequate preparation for the important educational work which they were to undertake. In discharging this duty the Regents were singularly fortunate

Page  254 254 OCTOBER MEETING, 1S88. in securing the services of Mr. Payne as Professor. With no precedents in American Universities to guide him, he addressed himself to his new work with so much prudence, skill and enthusiasm that his instruction proved even more beneficial to the students and to public education than the Regents had expected such a course of teaching would be. The nature and the usefulness of his work have become widely known, and other leading Universities have imitated us in establishing chairs for instruction in pedagogics. Professor Cady, who has resigned after a connection of eight years with University, has rendered a most valuable service to us and to this community by elevating the standard of musical taste and by awakening an enthusiasm for the study of classical music. Upon him fell the somewhat difficult task of organizing the work of musical instruction in the University and of convincing men that such instruction was a proper and useful part of the work of a University. Assistant Professor John Dewey has left us to take charge of the department of philosophy in the University of Minnesota. He has shown by his ability, learning, and skill as a teacher that his promotion to a full chair is well merited, and our best wishes follow him to his new field. Mr. Hennequin had been a member of the Faculty since 1872. His linguistic talent and his familiarity with the principles and the art of dramatic composition should open to him a successful literary career. The change in Professor Langley's title indicates an important and useful change in the organization of the work in general chemistry, physics and metallurgy. The instruction in physics in the Literary Department was heretofore divided between the professor of physics and the professor of general chemistry, and the instruction in the latter branch was rather too limited in extent. On the other hand the instruction needed in metallurgy does not require the full time of a professor. Professor Langley,

Page  255 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 255 who has had large experience in metallurgy, being relieved of the duty of instructing in physics in the Literary Department, and of lecturing on chemistry to the medical classes, can give the needed instruction in metallurgy and enlarge his work in general chemistry in the Literary Department, and the teaching of physics will be left wholly in the hands of the professor of that branch. Provision will have to be made for securing lectures on general chemistry to the medical students. That work will naturally fall to one, who can also teach some of the applications of chemistry or electricity to the medical art. Professor Sewall having leave of absence for the coming year on account of impaired health, and Professor Langley, having permission to be absent in Europe on important scientific business, temporary provision has been made by appointments above named, to supply their places. Owing to these absences, to resignations of teachers, and to deaths, we have been called to make an unprecedented number of appointments. We trust however that they have been made with so much care that there will be no serious interruption of continuity in our work. The degrees conferred were as follows: DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. Bachelor of Letters — -- 18 Bachelor of Science (Course in Biology)- -- 1 Bachelor of Science (Course in Chemistry). ---- 4 Bachelor of Science (Course in Mining Engineering) — ---- 1 1 Bachelor of Science (Course in Mechanical Engineering) --- 7 Bachelor of Science (Course in Civil Engineering)-___ -.- 12 Bachelor of Science (Course in General Science) ---- -- Bachelor of Philosophy ----.- _ 19 Bachelor of Arts. --- —- 53 Master of Philosophy — 2 Master of Arts --- 5 Doctor of Philosophy 2 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery)- 65 Bachelor of Laws —. —. ---- ---- --- 145 Pharmaceutical Chemist -. --- —. --- —- —.- - 23

Page  256 256 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic Medical College) ----- 13 Doctor of Dental Surgery —...., — -- - 37 415 HONORARY DEGREES. Doctor of Medicine — ---------------- 1 Doctor of Laws —_- 2 418 The number who graduated with the Bachelor's degree from the Literary Department was 123, larger by twenty-two than the number in the class of 1875, which has heretofore borne the honor of being the largest graduating class. It numbered 101. The number of students in attendance during the year was as follows: DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Resident Graduates ---- ---- - 23 Graduates studying in absentia --- — - 36 Candidates for a Degree- ------- 563 Students not Candidates for a Degree -------- 126 - 748 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. Resident Graduates — - 2 Third Year Students --- 63 Second Year Students --- — 108 First Year Students -- 137- 310 DEPARTMENT OF LAW. Seniors --. - -------- - 154 Juniors --- —------ 181 Special Students 6 -- 341 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. Resident Graduate --- — -- 1 Second Year Students. — -—. -26 First Year Students.. —.. --- — 63 - 90

Page  257 OCTOBER JIEETING, 188o8 257 HOMIEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Students-Total in the College 74 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Students-Total in the College. — - 104 1667 The number of students was greater than that in 1886-7 by 105. It exceeded that of 1885-6 by 276 and that of 1884-5 by 382. The largest gain last year, as in the previous year, was in the Literary Department, 60; though there was an increase in every Department except in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, in which there was a loss of 8. The number of graduates stndying for higher degrees either here or in absentia continues to increase, having risen from 42 in the previous year to 59 in the last year. The number of women in attendance in 1886-7 and in 1887-8 was as follows: 1886-7. Department of Literature, Science and the Arts_- 175 Department of Medicine and Surgery. ---- 51 Department of Law --- —-........ 6 School of Pharmacy --- —---- 2 Homceopathic Medical College ---- 27 1887-8. 194 52 2 2 28 College of Dental Surgery --- - -- 4 6 265 284 The relative as well as the absolute number of women in the University continues to increase very slowly. Last year they formed sixteen and eight-tenths per cent, this year they form sixteen and nine-tenths per cent, of the total attendance. Last year they constituted twenty-five per cent, this year they constitute twenty-five and seven-tenths per cent, of the entire attendance in the Literary Department. Twelve of the fifty-three graduates studying for higher degrees during the year are women.

Page  258 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. The five hundred and sixty-three candidates for bachelors' degrees in the Literary Department are divided as follows in respect to their courses: Bachelor of Arts, 175 Bachelor of Philosophy, 112; Bachelor of Science (Course in General Science) 59; Civil Engineer, 61; Mechanical Engineer, 33; Mining Engineer, 11; Bachelor of Science (Course in Chemistry), 10; the same (Course in Biology,) 2; Bachelor of Letters, 100. Of late years there has been a relative and absolute increase of the number of studeuts in the English, Engineering and Scientific Courses, but the Classical Course still attracts a much larger number than any other. It may be of interest to see in what proportions the men and in what proportions the women choose the different courses. The following table shows the percentage of the men, and the percentage of the women, in both cases candidates for degrees in the Literary Department, who chose each course during the last year: Percentage Percentage of Men. of Women. The A. B. Course -.-. ---- 30.7 32.3 The Ph. B. Course 16.3 31.4 The B. SCourse - - -- 13. 9.3 The B. L. Course ------ 15. 27. The Engineering Courses --- —--- 25. None. 100. 100. The women have of course no practical inducement to enter on the engineering courses, though in years past now and then one has completed one of those courses. It will be observed that a larger proportion of women than of men are taking by choice the full classical course. They are led to this not alone by their literary taste, but also by the consideration that there is a demand for their services in teaching Greek in preparatory schools. As one fourth of' the men are drawn to the engineering work, the women naturally form a larger proportion than the men of the students pursuing the Ph. B. Course, which

Page  259 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 259 contains Latin and the Modern Languages, and of the B. L. Course, which also contains the Modern Languages and allows large liberty of choice in English Literature, History and the Sciences. The B. S. Course which is planned to train teachers of science and scientific experts attracts a larger proportion of men than women. The general order and spirit of study have been, as usual for some years, most commendable. One new offence has however been committed, of which a due regard for the friendly relations of colleges makes it wise to speak. Three students came here from a reputable college, and received credit for advanced standing in mathematics on the strength of forged certificates, purporting to be signed by the Professor' of Mathematics in that Institution. After a few months the forgery was discovered and the offenders were of course expelled. These cases show that precaution is needed in accepting students from other colleges and that it may become necessary to require the official seal of a college on papers that certify the standing of its students. During the year there has been a considerable increase in the numbier of schools which are maintaining the " diploma relation" with us. In 1886-7 there were 43; in 1887-8 there were 58. Among these are ten High Schools in Chicago and cities and towns adjacent to Chicago. That is an important field from which we ought to draw and may properly expect to draw a larger number of students than we have received in the past. Every year's experience adds strength to the conviction that few steps more beneficial both to the University and to the schools have been taken by the University authorities than the establishment in 1870 of the "' diploma system" of receiving students. If that system has met with less success in some other states, it is because the conditions under which we work do not there exist, or because the precautions which are here observed in making use of the plan have been there omitted.

Page  260 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. The very welcome pressure on us for instruction in the studies pursued on the courses leading to higher degrees still continues. It adds a considerable burden to some of our professors already heavily tasked in conducting the work of undergraduates. But one of the tests of a successful teacher is found in his power to stimulate pupils to push their studies beyond the limits of an undergraduate course, and one of his most gratifying rewards comes from seeing them fired with a zeal to pursue into the higher ranges the branches which he teaches. In this connection grateful mention should be made of the,action of the society of women graduates of various colleges, known as The Association of Western Alumnae, for assigning to this University for this year the use of a Fellowship which they have endowed. The holder will receive the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars to aid her in pursuing advanced studies here during this academic year. Could we have a few endowed fellowships, they would be of the greatest service in retaining here some of our most brilliant scholars for the pursuit of special studies. The Regents of the University of Wisconsin have established eight, yielding four hundred dollars each. The holders are required to teach certain branches in the University, if asked to do so. There is some subordinate work of instruction in which persons of such attainments as the holders of fellowships ought to be could be made useful. On this ground perhaps the use of our finds for the establishment of fellowships could be justified. Fellowships have been endowed in most of the stronger Universities of the country. They have been especially useful in training students for professorial chairs in our colleges. Our graduates have been for some time making praiseworthy efforts to establish fellowships here. Those who have been exerting themselves deserve more encouragement from other alumni and friends of the University than they have received.

Page  261 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 261 The Engineering Laboratory is now nearly completed, but a considerable addition to the equipment is needed. The accomodations it affords for shop-work are none too large for our present number of engineering students. The new building erected for the Physical and Hygienic Laboratories is now finished and occupied though not entirely furnished. It is with great satisfaction that we see at last adequate provision for teaching Physics. The Ilygienic Laboratory is, I think, the first established by any of our universities. We trust that it will prove of great service to the State and to the wider public by the investigations, which will there be conducted, of hygienic and sanitary problems. But already, at the very opening of instruction in this Laboratory it proves that the lecture room is not large enough to seat the students, who wish to attend the lectures. As our facilities for teaching science and its practical applications especially to Civil, Mining, Mechanical, Electrical, and Sanitary Engineering have been enlarged, the demand for such teaching has rapidly increased. Attention has already been called to the fact that one-fourth of our candidates for degrees are pursuing courses in Engineering. It is probable that the ratio will increase rather than decrease. The Department of Medicine and Surgery, although it has suffered the heavy loss of two of its older professors, and although it has been somewhat agitated by the continuance of the discussion of the question, of transferring a part of the medical instruction to Detroit. has had a fairly prosperous year. But, as I suggested in my last report, it is very essential to the good of the Department that the question of removing the clinical teaching be settled at an early day. If the removal is wise, the sooner it is effected the better. If it is not wise, the sooner that is declared to be the deliberate opinion of the Board of Regents, the better will it be for the internal harmony and prosperity of the department. I ask your

Page  262 262 OCTOBER MEETING, 1858. indulgence, while I present some considerations on the subject of the removal. The substantial import of the proposition which has been most strongly urged is, as I understand it, that our medical students, after spending two years here in pursuing what are called the more didactic branches, shall repair to Detroit where during the third year of their course they shall receive clinical instruction in connection with the hospitals of that city. At the outset it is obvious that there are very grave objections to the plan, which can be outweighed only by very great advantages to be gained. Let us notice briefly some of the objections, and then inquire what are the advantages. 1. It is clear that the administration of the Department will be made more complicated and difficult. There must be a special organization for the conduct and supervision of the work in Detroit. A considerable number of professors resident in Detroit, and not teaching on the University grounds, must be added to the Faculty. Questions not altogether easy to answer, concerning relative authority and power of resident and non-resident professors and concerning other points are not unlikely to arise. 2. It will, I think, be more expensive for our students and certainly for such of our resident professors as have clinical instruction to give. I doubt if students can find comfortable homes and board at Detroit for the same rates which are paid by them here, and their incidental expenses are in my opinion certain to be larger there than here. The resident professors could not be asked to go to Detroit to teach without having their additional expenses borne by the University. 3. The University would probably soon be called to make more serious additions to its expenditures than that just referred to. We have been told that Detroit physicians, who would be necessarily added to the Faculty, are

Page  263 OCTOBER IMEETIG, 1838. 263 willing to serve for little or no compensation. Possibly that would be the case at the outset. But we have a pretty large and suggestive experience which indicates that the University cannot be fortunate enough to secure the services of competent men for any considerable time on so favorable terms. Nor is this a fact to be complained of. We can hardly ask eminent practitioners in Detroit to take time from their remunerative professional work to serve us for less proportionate compensation than our resident professors receive. 4. The students would be deprived of the use of the University library and of the other incideutal advantages of University life. With no desire to overrate these, I believe that they have a very considerable value in enlarging and enriching the culture of the students. The undergraduates cannot as a class live here three years without catching something of the breadth and spirit of a true university training, which all will adcllit is far better than a mere narrow, technical, professional training. 5. But what assurance'can we have that the students will go to Detroit, if we make the proposed arrangement? The opportunities proposed to be offered for clinical instruction are now open to the students of the medical college already established in Detroit. Do these opportunities now attract our students in any considerable numbers? We know that they do not. Our students who wish for larger clinical advantages than we have offered pass by Detroit and go to New York or Philadelphia. Will they not continue to do so? Is there not good ground to fear that the very object for which the proposed change is suggested will not be attained even if we make the effort recommended? 6. It seems probable that if a part of the work of the Department is carried to Detroit, and is successfully prosecuted there, a strong pressure will be exerted on this Board to transfer the whole work of the Department there. The difficulties of divided administration, contrasted with

Page  264 264 OCTOBER MEETING, 18S8. the obvious advantages of concentration and unity, and the larger opportunities for remunerative practice of the professors in Detroit, the possibility, not to say the proba bility, that at no distant day a majority of the Faculty must be residents of that city, will inevitably produce a strong influence in that direction. The discussion of the subject would renew in the college the unrest which has been caused during the last few years by the debate upon the expediency of removing the clinical instruction to Detroit. To some the transfer of the whole work of the Department to that city may seem desirable in itself. To me it seems most undesirable, whether we consider the interests of the Department or of the whole University. Statistics show beyond dispute that the Department by its growth has contributed most powerfully to the growth of the other Departments, as they have contributed to its strength. Medical students who have pursued their course here on the ground have been instrumental in turning many students hither for work in other Departments as well as in their own, and in turn the students in other Departments have commended the Medical School to their neighbors and friends. But if it should ever come to pass that the medical students do all their work in Detroit, they will have none of the pride or interest in the general work of the University which now animates them and leads them to urge men to come here for collegiate or legal education. In fact they will have no opportunity to learn from personal observation and experience anything of the life and spirit of the University. On the other hand the students in the other Departments have here become familiar enough with the work of the Medical Department to direct the attention of their friends to it; but their knowledge of it and interest in it would be far less, if it were transferred to Detroit. 7. It must further be remembered that every argument which can be urged for removing the clinical instruction in the Department of Medicine and Surgery to De

Page  265 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 265 troit is equally valid for removing the Homoeopathic Medical College there also. A large hospital, to be placed in charge of Homoeopathic physicians, is in process of erection in that city. We may be sure that there would be a demand on us from friends of the Homoeopathic College that their students should have facilities for clinical instruction in Detroit, if the arrangement proposed should be made. This would be urged, and with justice, on the ground that both schools should be treated alike. The result would be that for a time at least we should have four medical schools or parts of schools to manage and maintain. Indeed it is not certain that in due time there would not be a demand by the dentists that a part at least of the work of the Dental College should also be transferred to Detroit, since the work of the dental students is closely associated with that of the medical students, since they must receive some instruction in surgery, and since also the Faculty could then be enlarged by the addition of Detroit practitioners who could assist in clinical teaching. Does not all this mean a dangerous disintegration of life and calamitous diffusion of force? 8. At present there is not a little valuaole assistance rendered by the Departments to each other, which would have to be surrendered in large degree or altogether. Professors in one Department give brief courses of lectures in one or more of the other Departments, and so supplement or enrich the instruction. This would be much more difficult, if it were at all practicable, in case of the disintegration suggested. 9. There is danger that the branch in Detroit and the fragment of the school here would soon come to have rival interests. It would be natural that the Detroit branch, having perhaps a larger number of professors connected with it and and emphasizing the value of its share of the work, which being clinical, impresses the public and impresses students more than the dryer, but not less important, didactic work, should claim more 2

Page  266 266 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. attention and more help from the Regents than the portion of the school which is here. At any rate, a stroug and troublesome difference of opinion on that point and on other points might easily spring up. 10. Is it not quite possible that if the Department, either in whole or in part, should be planted in Detroit, it might receive a less hearty support' from the State? Is it not altogether conceivable that the legislators would say? "Detroit has asked for the Department, Detroit is quite able to support it. Let her take care of it." Small and lacking in wealth as this city is, we have more than once heard from legislators when we asked for help the inquiry: "What has Ann Arbor done? Why does she not show some interest in the University?" How much more emphatically should we hear the inquiry concerning the populous and wealthy city of Detroit? These objections to the proposed scheme, I think it must be confessed, are serious. Are they outweighed by 'the advantages which may be secured by the adoption ol it? What are the advantages which are promised? 1. It is said that the hospitals of Detroit which would be made accessible to our students, furnish more cases and more valuable cases than our hospital to illustrate the instruction in surgery, gynecology and obstetrics. This is true. But it is possible to overrate the advantages which they offer in comparison with those offered here. If I am correctly informed, the average number of patients in Harper Hospital and in St. Luke's Hospital, which are the principal ones on whose help we should depend, is only two or three times as great as the number the University Hospital accommodates, and a considerable proportion of the persons in the Detroit hospitals are private patients, who would not be brought before the classes. When a committee of this Board visited Harper Hospital at the invitation of citizens of Detroit some months ago, they were surprised to find that it had not then as many patients as the University Hospital. The

Page  267 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 267 statement which the President of the Michigan Medical Association, a practitioner in Detroit, made in his address at the last meeting of that body, indicates that the condition of the hospitals in that city leaves much to be desired. He said, "'there is no hospital in this city (Detroit) which is properly equipped, or which has money enough to pay its running expenses without financial embarrassment.' It must be remembered also that the Detroit hospitals cannot be placed under the control of this Board. Is there not a possibility that under the influence of some rival medical school embarrassments might arise in our relations with one or more of the hospital boards? 2. It is argued that the transfer of a part of our medical work to Detroit would awaken a deep interest in the University in that city and would even secure large benefactions fiom its citizens. The interest and the benefactions would be most acceptable, and we are glad to say that the past generosity of some of the citizens of Detroit to the University makes such a result seem not improbable. But thus far no distinct propositions of assistance have been made to this Board. 3. It is predicted that the transfer would lead to the dissolution of any medical schools now existing in Detroit, and would prevent the establishment of new schools. Thus concentration in medical teaching in the State would be secured. It is also affirmed that the students who now attend the Detroit schools would be added to our number. I see no sufficient ground for assuming that there will be no other medical schools than ours at Detroit, especially if we do not remove the whole Department there. Wherever there are aspiring physicians in a city as large as Detroit, and particularly where medical schools have existed for some years, certain practitioners generally find it conducive to their own interests to join in carrying on a medical school. We can hardly expect that the accomplished physicians of Detroit, who

Page  268 268 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. have had the enterprise to conduct two medical schools for years, will refrain from maintaining a school because of our giving clinical instruction in Detroit to our senior class. Nor do I see any good reason to expect that if the schools in Detroit were abandoned, we should receive any considerable number of their students. For their classes are largely made up of those, who wish a short course in medicine, and are not willing to take our three years' coursp. They would be more likely to turn to somle school, which gives a degree on the completion of a briefer course. So far as I know, the advantages here considered are all which have been suggested as likely to accrue from the plan before us. It is for this Board to decide whether they so far outweigh the objections named as to make the adoption of the plan wise. My own conviction is that they do not, and therefore that it is inexpedient to transfer any part of our work to Detroit. The experience of the European Universities which are established in comparatively small cities sustains the view that it is not essential to the success of a medical school that the clinical instruction should be given in some great city, apart from the University. What. would be thought at Tiibingen or Bonn or Jena or Wtirzburg or Oxford of the proposition to divide the work in medicine and carry a part of it away from the rest and from the University? Yet these Universities and others situated in small cities are not without a good reputation for instruction in medicine and surgery. So far as I have heard, the experiment of making such a division of the medical work as is here proposed has not been attempted anywhere. So unprecedented a step should not be made without far clearer and more cogent evidence than has yet been presented that it will be beneficial to the Department and to the University. But meanwhile let the statement be emphasized, that if we are to depend solely on our own hospitals for aid in

Page  269 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 269 clinical instruction, we should have the means of making them as good as possible. It is most desirable to have a lying-in hospital. Our hospital buildings were not intended for long use. On every account we could wish that new buildings for hospital purposes might be erected on some site a little removed from the campus. If a suitable hospital should be built by the State, many patients now remaining in the county alms-houses, where they do not receive the care of skilled surgeons and opthalmologists, could be sent here for treatment, and soon restored to a condition of self-support. It would doubtless be a real economy for the counties, which may now be burdened with the cost of maintaining through life persons who have curable maladies, to send such patients here. To some extent they do this now. But with ampler accommodations more patients could be cared for, and the interests of the counties, of the patients, and of our medical school would at one be subserved. The Homceopathic Mledical College has had a prosperous year. It has enjoyed internal harmony and freedom from attack from without. We have reason to hope that the profession in the State are now generally prepared to give it that hearty support, which is essential to its highest usefulness. The work of the Law Department has been carried on in a very satisfactory manner. The experiment of em ploying a few non-resident lecturers for more or less extended courses of instruction has been tried with good results. Professor Hammond, Dean of the St. Louis Law School, gave a course of fifteen lectures on the History of the Common Law, Hon. H. B. Brown, United States District Judge, a course of twelve lectures on Admiralty Law, and Professor M. M. Bigelow, of the Law School of the Boston University, lectured during a large part of the second semester on Equity. These gentlemen will hereafter continue their lectures. The standard of work required of the students has been materially raised during the last

Page  270 270 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. two or three years, and the examfiinations for graduation are more stringent than they ever were before. The School of Pharmacy continues to deserve and to enjoy its pre-eminent reputation for thoroughness. By the courage with which its standard of work has been maintained and from time to time raised, it has been largely instrumental in elevating the standard of other schools in the country. For the accommodation of this school and of our great number of students of chemistry, drawing from every Department of the University except the Law Departmrnt, there is urgent need of another enlargement of the Chemical Laboratory. The Dental College in spite of the continual and rapid increase of requirements for graduation, attracts larger and larger classes every year. Three years' study, a longer course than that in any other Dental School, is now essential to graduation. The course will be graded. This elevation of our standard is warmly approved by the best members of the Dental Profession in the country, and is heartily commended in Europe, where the reputation of the School is well established. An enlargement of the building occupied by the Dental College can not much longer be delayed, unless we deliberately refuse to receive well prepared applicants for admission. Serious inconvenience in giving instruction to our students was caused last year by the inadequacy of our accommodations. It is a most embarrassing, problem how to care for the larger number in attendance now. The most.important facts concerning the collections in our Museums are these: Another shipment of the Rogers Statuary has been received from Rome. It consists of colossal figures, including the statues of Lincoln and Seward, those of Nelson and Lewis on the monument at Richmond, Va., the symbolical figures of Michigan on the Detroit battle monment, America on the Rhode Island monument, Victory

Page  271 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 271 on the Worcester monument, and the Sentinel on the Cincinnati monument. The casts of the bronze doors of the Capitol at Washington are yet to be sent. When they are received the collection will be complete, a worthy monument to the genius and the generosity of the artist. The value of these casts, especially of the casts of the statues, busts, and medallions of the great historic characters of the Civil War, will increase with the lapse of years. No collection worthy to be compared with it in this particular is found in any other University, if indeed there is any in the country. Our embarrassment in finding suitable places for the colossal figures just received strongly suggest our need of a more spacious Art Gallery than we now possess. Our Museum of Zoology is about to receive some important additions, the fruits of a scientific expedition which Professor Steere, accompanied by one of our recent graduates and by two of our undergraduates, has made during the past year to the Philippine Islands. It is believed that these naturalists have found a considera'ile number of new species of birds and even some of miammals, and have obtained evidence which may materially modify accepted theories concerning the distribution of the fauna of that interesting group of islands. From the Librarian's report it appears that the total number of volumes in all the libraries is now 67,759, and of pamphlets 13,892. During the year we have added to our collection 5,361 volumes and 1,278 pamphlets. The most important gifts were the Dorsch library, presented by the widow of the late Dr. Dorsch, of Monroe, in compliance with his wishes, 1,676 volumes and 148 pamphlets; a gift of 356 volumes and 90 pamphlets, mainly on Irish history, by George C. Mahon; and a complete set of Liebig's Annalen. presented by E. C. Hegeler. The total number of periodicals regularly received is 242. The volumes drawn during the year numbered 94,168. It is doubted if any other library is so much used.

Page  272 272 OCTOBER MEET1NG, 1888. Our annual finance report shows how severely our needs press upon our resources. It is only by the greatest watchfulness anct economy, by the unpleasant refusal to grant many reasonable requests for help from various departments of teaching, that we are able to accomplish our work with so small an outlay. We greatly need some provision for adding to our general fund. No similar institution of a magnitude comparable with ours is carried on without a much larger outlay than we make. Now, as always, we must rely on the State for aid. We entrust our fortunes to her appreciation and generosity with unabated confidence. JAMES B. ANGELL. On motion of Regent Field, the report of the President was accepted, and ordered printed in the minutes, and it was directed that the usual number be printed in pamphlet form for the use of the Board, and of the University. A call vote was taken on Regent Field's motion, which resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. The following annual report of the Librarian was accepted, and, on motion of Regent Willett, it was ordered printed in the minutes. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen-There were belonging to the University Sept. 30, 1888, 67,759 volumes, 13,892 unbound pamphlets, and 264 maps. Of these there were in the General Library 53,837 volumes, 12,776 unbound pamphlets and 264 maps; in the Law Library 9,783 volumes; in the Medical Library 3,707 volumes, and 913 pamphlets; and in the Library of the Dental College 432 volumies. During the year 245 periodicals have been regularly received, as follows: In the General Library, 170; in the Medical Library, 55; in the Law Library, 7; and in the Library of the Dental College, 13.

Page  273 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 273 THE GENERAL LIBRARY. The additions to the General Library during the year have been 4,866 volumes and 1,430 pamphlets. Of these 1,639 volumes and 203 pamphlets were purchased, 2,915 volumes and 1,430 pamphlets presented, and 312 volumes the result of binding periodicals. The total amount of all bills certified to by me, or my assistant, for purchases made, was $4,718.24. Of this sum. 23,696.49 were for books and pamphlets, 576,6() were for subscriptions to periodicals, and $445.15 for binding and mending. In addition to these sums which were paid from the special Library fund, $60.00 were paid from the current expense fund for catalogue cards, tickets for readers, etc. The year was an unusually fruitful one in gifts. Almost 3,000 volumes, (2.915); and 1,227 pamphlets were the gifts of individuals, of governments, and of learned societies. MoA(re than two-thirds of the volumes and many of the pamphlets were given by two persons, viz: Mrs. Dr. Edward Dorsch, in accordance with the wish of her late husband, Dr. Edward Dorsch, of Monroe, Michigan, and George C. Mahon, Esq., a resident of Ann Arbor when the gift was made, and now of Detroit. I will not rehearse the history of the acquisition of the "Dorsch Library." That history was fully set forth to you at the meeting in June. No indication of the character of the collection was given then, however, or has been given at any other time, and I think it proper that I should refer briefly to some features of it in this report. As might be expected from the nationality of Dr. Dorsch, there are many books in the German language-very nearly, if not quite, two-thirds of the whole number. And, as might be expected from a man of his linguistic acquirements there are books in languages other than German and English-the languages of his native, and of his adopted country. WVorks in French appear frequently: and occasionally, in purely literary forms of composition, works in Italian and Spanish. The briefest inspection of the collection, however, shows that the doctoi retained to the last a great fondness for his native tongue. Very many of the books in the German are translations from the English and other modern languages with which he seems to have been familiar. All departments of literature are represented-most fully those of pure Literature, (literature in the special sense of the

Page  274 274 OCTOBER MIEETING, 1888. word) and Art. In the former class there is a good representation of the best ancient authors. Here, too, the translations into German are frequent. Homer appears in German hexameters, and the page is a pleasant one to look upon. There is, also, a good representation of the best modern authors, in the original, or translated into German, as already stated. In Art the collection is especially strong. There are handbooks, treatises, histories, and catalogues with excellent reproductions, and descriptions, of the contents of great galleries. The following are particularly worthy of mention: London Art Journal, 1851-1854 inc., and 1865-1882 inc., H. Roux Aind's Herculaneum and Pompeii, 8vols., Jiennicke's Grundriss der Keramik, 1879. Theology and Philosophy are represented, but not by the volumes that ordinarily constitute collections of this kind in libraries. They are largely discussions of venerable and " outworn creeds," and elucidations of ancient and mediaeval mysteries, Their value is great to the student of the origin of things. Their presentation is a piece of great good fortune to us, for they are both rare and costly. In general Science the best modern writers are represented to some extent. One work of great value, but belonging to a single department of science, is Brehm's Thierleben, 2nd. Ed., 10 vols. In Medicine, the Doctor's own subject, there are about 150 volumes. Besides the treatises required by the general practitioner, there are complete sets of two very important works, viz.: Win. Wood & Co.'s, edition of Zieris-en's Cyclopredia of the Practice of Medicine, 18 vols., and index, and Eulenburg's RealEncyclopcedie der Gesammten Heilkunrde, 15 vols. There are a good many works of reference, of all descriptions, that we have not hitherto possessed, and that will be very useful to us. Two are specially important, viz: llhlstrirtes Conversations-Lexicon, 8 vols., 1870-80, and Gesqhichte der Erfindungen, edited by Bollner, Mothes and Luckenbacher, 2nd edition, 7 vols., and Ergdnzgnys-Bland, 1872-75. The Library is to be congratulated upon this large and very valuable accession. We shall endeavor to justify the donor's selection of a repository for his books by a tender care of them, and by conforming to his expressed wishes in the disposition we make of them. The books presented by Mr. Mahon, 355 in number, are

Page  275 OCTOBER JMEETlVNG, 1SSS. 275 about equally divided between Irish History, and practical works on Mining, Metallurgy and Geology. As regards the collection on Irish History it will be hard to match it in extent in this country, and harder yet to match it in the intrinsic value of the particular works. Mr. Mahon is a profound student of Irish History and Literature, and in the accumulation of books in these directions, rejected all ephemeral matter. This is not the first gift from Mr. Mahon. In 1882 there was received from him him a set of the Transactions, and also of the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, to that date. Other benefactors are E. C. Hegeler, Esq. of La Salle, Illinois, who, as reported to you at the March Meeting, contributed $275.00 towards the purchase of a complete set of Liebig's Annalen; Dr. L. (4. Doane, of New York City, a graduate of the Medical Department, of the class of '71, who has contributed very considerably to the dramatic collection, and has also given many miscellaneous books and pamphlets; and Ex Professor C. N. Jones, who, in leaving Ann Arbor, gave upwards of 100 vols., many of which are valuable additions to the library. It would swell this report to vast proportions to name all who have deserved, and have received, our thanks for timely and valuable gifts. A record of all gifts, and their sources, is kept, to which reference can at any time be made. The various statistics that show the amount of reading done during the year indicate a continuance in the growth of the use of the Library. The number of books drawn out and used in the Reading Room, was- ------ 91,712 The number drawn out by Professors,.2,456 A total of, -- -- ----- - 94,168 Tickets of admission to the book-room were granted to 46 persons, who made 783 visits to the shelves. During the two semesters 249 students were admitted to the Seminary Rooms189 to the west room for the study of English Literature, German Literature, Literary Criticism, and Art, and the Greek, Latin, Gothic, and Sanscrit languages, and 60 to the East Room for the study of History, Political Economy, and Philosophy. The books are generally in good condition. The great use to which many of the prescribed ones are subjected wears them out rapidly. They are mended as long as mending will avail,

Page  276 276 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. and then they are laid aside. I look with a kind of pride on those books worn out by constant and honest use.-They are in the nature of trophies —indisputable evidences of achievement. More than at any time before, the library force was last year disabled by sickness. On this account much less work was accomplished than was planned. The transcription of the Author portion of the Catalogue was completed, and the new Catalogue case brought into use in the Reading Room. T The progress made in the transcription of the subject portion, however, was not great. It remains as the important work of the year upon which we have entered. It is with regret and much sympathy with her, personally, that I report the serious illness of Miss Morrish, and her resignation of her position in the Library. Miss Morrish became connected with the Library in June, 1884, and since June, 1885, she has been the one on whom the clerical work mainly fell. She found herself compelled to cease work early in the spring, but left the Library with the hope of a restoration to health that would enable her to return for a portion of the vacation, and for the present year. The expected improvement did not come, however, and in June her resignation was sent to the President. I wish in this connection to express my hearty commendation of her service. All her duties were performed with conscientious care, and her spirit was excellent. It has been apparent for some time that with the increase of the material of the Library, and the extension of its field of usefulness, there should come a readjustment of the work that would better meet the new demands. With this end in view the Library Committee of the Faculty propose that, in providing for Miss Morrish's work, such a readjustment be effected. They recommend that Mr. F. N. Scott of the class of '84, and last year, and one year previously, general assistant, be made Assistant Librarian for one year at $900, and that a suitable person be employed as general assistant at $300 per year. Inasmuch as the salary of Mr. Scott is $600, and that of Miss Morrish was $600, this arrangement will leave the cost of administration unchanged. If this is done the skilled labor, and the responsibility, that the necessities of the case had divided between two persons, will be devolved upon one, with increased compensation, and the unskilled labor that the same necessities had divided between

Page  277 OCTOBER SMEETING, 1888. 277 the same two persons will be devolved upon one, with less compensation. The changes that have already been affected in the library force, for the year, are as follows: Mr. F. A. Leslie, and Mr. W. G. Adams are desk attendants in the place of Mr. F. A. Waples and Mr. A. H. Hopkins. Mr. A. H. Hopkins and Mr. Yeijiro Ono have charge of the Seminary Rooms in place of Mr. F. F. Lehman and Mr. P. M. Hickey. THE OTHER LIBRARIES. The Medical Library had assigned to it for the year 1887, $1,000.00 of the special appropriation for libraries, for that year. This made it possible to buy some sorely needed books, as well as to carry the periodicals and do the binding and mending. The two last things are all that can be accomplished with the usual, annual appropriation of $500.00. The additions for the year were 260 volumes, and 51 pamphlets. Of these 160 volumes were purchased, 25 volumes and 51 pamphlets were presented, and 75 volumes were the result of binding. The total of bills certified to by the librarian for this year, is 829.08. The directions of the expenditures were as follows: For books- - - - - --—.-. ---- $ 524.40 For periodicals ------ ---. — --. ----__ 227.03 For binding and mending -- --------- 77.65 Total --- —--------- - --- $ 829.08 To the Law Library there have been added during the year 218 volumes, and to the Library of the Dental College, 17 volumles. In my report last year I said that " the University Library is the Public Library of the State for the increase of knowledge.' I repeat it in this report. I do not mean-no one, I trust, will understand me as meaning —that knowledge is not increased by the other libraries, whether they are public, or proprietary libraries. But I am sure that I am right in saying that the especial purpose for which they exist is the diffusion of knowledge —the distribution of the general fund. That through facilities offered by them knowledge is increased, I do not doubt; but it is for its diffusion that they are particularly equipped. Now the especial purpose for which the University Library ex

Page  278 278 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. ists is the increase of knowledge —to add to the general fund by discovery and appropriation —thisfirst, diffusion second. In its equipment then, the University Library must differ not a little from the Public Library. It needs especially the results of all investigation-investigation of mind and investigation of matter. It needs all the books which record the application of principles in the regulation of human society, and all those which record the application of natural forces to production in the industrial world. And then there are the liberal arts to be taught —the aesthetic spirit in man to be guided, strengthened, cultivated. The modern University is a more practical institution than that from which it is descended, but it is still the seat of the literae humnaniores, as when the apostles of the Renaissance taught humanism from the chairs of the nlediaeval Italian Universities, The University Library needs, then, in addition to what I have already enumerated, the classics of all the languages, the dead and the living —all the best things of the world, said in the best way. These are "the True, the Beautiful and the Good " —the food on which the aesthetic nature must feed if it would grow. Therefore it would seem that to gather these is the peculiar function of the University Library, both in general as regards all Universities, and in particular as regards our own. Is our Library equipped for a proper discharge of this function? No, it has only the nucleus of such an equipment. The University, by its phenomenal growth has won, and maintains, a place, in numbers in attendance, and in the variety of instruction, abreast of the oldest and strongest Institutions of Learning in the Country. But in this particular and most important point of the possession of books, it is behind all its comnanions —behind in the number of volumes possessed, behind in the means of annual increase. Neither have we great libraries in our immediate neighborhood as Harvard and Columbia have. In the competition for students a comparison of library statistics hurts us, therefore, but it is not that we suffer in this comparison that is the grievous thing. The grievous thing is that every day, in every department, in the work that is carried on, some book is needed that we do not have, and for lack of money, cannot get. Whence is to come our help? Is it to come from the Legislature? If the members of that body can be made to see with clear vision, yes. Any plan that the Board may devise for securing an appropriation for the library larger than those recently

Page  279 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 279 made, will be joyfully received here, and all effbrts to carry the plan out to a successful issue cordially seconded. And at a time when men and women of wealth are giving money with a liberality hitherto unknown, in very many instances either to found, or to enlarge libraries —and when benefactors have begun to flow in upon ourselves, may we not hope that help is to come from private sources also? I am very confident that help from both of these sources waits upon a fuller knowledge of our necessities. I cannot believe that I am over sanguine or foolishly credulous in this. The teaching of experience as I read it, as I hear it, and as I prove it, is that we must work wisely and diligently, and that as our faith is, so our reward shall be, Respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, October 12, 1888. Librarian. The Executive Committee submitted the following report of their action since the last meeting of the Board. At a meeting of the Executive Committee, held on September 17th, there were present Regents Blair and Whitman and President Angell. On the recommendation of Professor Prescott, Charles P. Beckwith, B. S., was appointed Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry for the coming year at the salary of $250, and Julius 0. Schlotterbeck, Ph. C., Assistant in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacy for the ensuing year at a salary of $192. John F. Abbott, M. D., was, on the suggestion of Professor Maclean, appointed for one year Assistant to the Professor of Surgery and of Clinical Surgery in the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the salary of $100. N S. Hoff, D. D. S., was appointed for the ensuing year Assistant Professor of Practical Dentistry at the salary of last year, $1,200. Albert A. Stanley was appointed Professor of Music in the place of Professor Cady, resigned, at the salary of $1,200. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, CHAS. R. WHITMAN. On motion of Regent Willett, the report of the Executive Committee was accepted and adopted by the following vote:

Page  280 o80 O CTOBER MEE TNG, 1888 Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That it is neither practicable nor desirable to remove any portion of the Medical Department to Detroit, or elsewhere; and that it is the settled policy of the Board that the University shall be maintained in entirety at Ann Arbor as it is at present established. Regent Field moved to lay the resolution on the table. The vote resulted as follows: Aye-Regent Field. SNays-Regents Draper, Willett, Whitman, and Butterfield. The motion to lay on the table was declared lost. Regent Draper said that while he was entirely willing to vote for the resolution of Regent Willett, he felt bound to say that he would at any time favor the establishment of a post-graduate Course at Detroit. The vote on the. original resolution was then taken with the following result: Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Whitman, and Butterfleld. Nays-Regent Field. The following communication from the Secretary of the University Senate, was read by Regent Whitman: To the Honorable Board of Regents: I beg leave to call your attention to a copy of a resolution adopted by the University Senate at a meeting held on the 8th inst., as follows: Resolved, That in the opinion of the Senate it would be desirable for the Board of- Regents so to amend the by-laws as to change the time of the beginning of the spring recess from the Friday evening before the last Wednesday in March to the Friday evening before the third Wednesday in April. Very respectfully Yours, WM. H. PETTEE, OCTOBER 12, 1888. Secretary of the University Senate.

Page  281 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 281 Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution, which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That Chapter XV., relating to the division of the University year, be amended in the following particulars: (I.) Section 1 to be amended to read as follows: " The fiscal year of the University, except for the payment of salaries, shall begin on July first of each year and end on June thirtieth of the following year." (II.) In Section 2, for the first sentence the following to be substituted: " In all Departments of the University the regular work of the year shall begin on the first day of October, unless that day fall on Sunday, and then it shall begin on the second day of October." (III.) In Section 2; lines 6 and 7, the words " third Wednesday in April " to be substituted for the words "last Wednesday in March." (IV.) In Section 2, lines 7 and 8, in place of the words " The year shall end at the Commencement in June " the following to be substituted: " The year shall end at the Annual Commencement, which shall occur on the Thursday following the last Wednesday in June." (V.) Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 to be stricken out. (VI.) Sections 7, 8, and 9 to be renumbered, respectively, 3, 4, and 5. On motion of Regent Willett, the resignation of Miss Ida A. Morrish, Assistant in the Library, was accepted. On motion of Regent Willett, Mr. Fred N. Scott was appointed Assistant Librarian for one year at a salary of $900; and the Library Committee of the Faculty were authorized to employ a suitable person as general assistant at a salary of $300. Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Faculty of Law recommended that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred on George Henry Gable, he having completed all the requirements for said degree. 3

Page  282 282 OCTOBER.1fEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Willett, the President was authorized to confer the degree as of June 29, 1888, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. The following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, was presented: To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen: —I have the honor to report that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts have recommended the following persons to your H.onorable Body for their respective degrees, viz: (a) Bachelor of Science (in Civil Engineering), HENRY EDWARD WHITAKER. (b) Bachelor of Arts, STERLING PARKS. (c) Master of Arts, CARLos BINGHAkM COCHRAN, A. B. Respectfully Submitted, ANN ARBOR, October 8th, 1888. P. R. DE PONT, Registrar. On motion of Regent Willett, it was voted that the degrees be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. Win. A. Campbell was appointed Assistant to the Professor of Anatomy, at a salary of $500, and Curator of the Medical Museum at a salary of $100, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Mr. John D. Riker was continued as Assistant in Physiological Chemistry, for the year 1888-89, at his previous salary $192 a year, and Moses Gomberg was appointed Assistant in Organic Chemistry for the year 1888-89, at a salary of $192, by the following vote:

Page  283 OCTOBER MiEETING, 1888. 283 Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper, Chairman of the Medical Committee, moved that Dr. George H. Chaffee be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, in the Medical Department, for one year, at a salary of $100. Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Dr. H. R. Arndt, Professor of Materia Medica, and of Nervous Diseases in the Homceopathic College, asked for and obtained leave of absence for the first semester, without loss of salary, the other members of the Faculty volunteering to do his work during his absence. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. Geo. H. Conklin was appointed Assistant to the Professor of Histology and Microscopy for one year at a salary of $300 by the following vote. Ayes —Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. The request of the Homoeopathic Medical Faculty that the Hospital Steward be authorized to provide for and maintain five obstetrical cases in the Hospital for the instruction of the present senior class was, on motion of Regent Draper, laid on the table. On motion of Regent Draper the sum of $35 was appropriated for the purpose of printing one thousand copies of the address delivered by James L. High, LL. D., in June last before the Law graduating class and the Alumni. Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science

Page  284 284 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. and the Arts recommended that the requirements in Mathematics for graduation in the Bachelor of Letters course be made thrce-fifths of a Full Course instead of two-fifths as heretofore; and on motion of Regent Willett their recommendation was adopted. The request of the Engineering Department for an appropriation of $2,800 for the purchase of new instruments was laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. Regent Whitman moved that the appointment of Dr. N. S. Hoff in the Dental Department be made permanent. Carried. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into Executive Session. Professors Steere, Taft, Prescott and Vanghan addressed the Board on the needs of their several departments. On motion of Regent Butterfield the Auditing Board were authorized to employ a pattern maker for the Engineering Laboratory for this year only, at a salary not exceeding $3 per day, by the following vote. Ayes —Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the salary of Prof. Chas. H. Stowell be made $2,000, which was, on motion of Regent Butterfield, laid on the table. On motion of Regent Field, Doctor Herdman's title was changed to " Professor of Practical Anatomy, and of Diseases of the Nervous System." Regent Whitman moved that Dr. J. N. Martin be continued in charge of the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children in the Medical Department for the first semester, and that his salary be at the rate of

Page  285 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. 285 $2,000 a year, including his work in the Dental Department. The motion of Regent Whitman was carried by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Draper, Willett, Field, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the matter of providing additional assistance in the Dental Department be deferred until the next meeting of the Board. Carried. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  287 SPECIAL MEETING. DECEMBER, 1888. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 1888. C The Board of Regents assembled in special session in the room of the President, at 2 o'clock P. M. Present-President Angell, Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Absent-Regents Blair and Hebard. On motion of Regent Whitman, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. The President stated that several communications had been placed in his hands, and suggested that they be referred to appropriate committees of the Board. There being no objection, the papers took that course. President Angell presented the following report of the action of the Executive Committee: To the Hon. Board of Regents: The Executive Committee beg leave to report as follows: In October they appointed 'John F. Abbott, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, at the salary of $100 a year; and David M. Lichty, B, S., Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry from Oct. 17, 1888, to June 15, 1889, for the compefisation of seventeen dollars a month. JAMES B. ANGELL, CHARLES R. WHITMAN. On motion of Regent Willett, the report of the Executive Committee was approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None.

Page  288 288 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board went into Executive session. After some time, the business of the open session was resumed. The following communication from the Dental Faculty was read by Regent Draper: To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMIEN.-Dr. James S. Harris, having complied with the requirements of this Department, is recommended by the Faculty of the Dental College, subject to your approval, for the Degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. J. TAFT, Dean. On motion of Regent Draper, the Degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery was conferred upon James E. Harris, in accordance with the recommendation of the Dental Faculf y. On motion of Regent Draper, the appointment of Alviso B. Stevens, Ph. 0., as Instructor in Pharmacy, (See minutes of the Board, page 213), was made permanent. Regent Draper presented and read the following report of the Auditing Board. To the Honorable Board of RIegents: The Auditing Board beg leave to report as follows: At the last June meeting of the Board of Regents the Auditing Board were authorized, acting in conjunction with the Hospital Cominittees of the two hospitals, to raise the price of board in the hospitals to four dollars a week, and to appoint a matron and steward to conduct the culinary department of the hospitals. The Auditing Board accordingly conferred with the Hospital Committees, and raised the price of board at the opening of the University year, and selected Joseph Clark as steward of the hospitals, at a salary of $1,000 a year. It was not found necessary to make the appointment of a matron. Respectfully submitted, JAMES B ANGELL, JAMES H. WADE, HARRISON SOULE. On motion of Regent Draper, the action of the Auditing Committee, as set forth in the foregoing report, was approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None.

Page  289 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 289 On motion of Regent Draper, the following appointments were made in the University Hospital, for one year from Oct. 1st, 1888: James G. Lynds, M. D., Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, at a salary of $100; E. B. Rowe, M. D., Wa.rdmaster, at a salary of $300 and board; Miss J. Fleming, M. D., nurse, salary $300 and board; Mrs. E. W. Wilson, nitht nurse, at a salary of $175 and board; Mr. John Aten, night nurse at a salary of $1.75 and board; also Miss Bertha Van-loosen, M. D., to be Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, at a salary of $100. The above appointments were confirmed by the following votes: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whlitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Clark presented and read the following communication: To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigtan: GENTLEMIEN.-Mr. Fred. C. Hicks, who is a candidate for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, has taken charge of the quizzes in rny classes this semester, and had full charge of two of my classes during my absen(,ce iu Washington. For this service he receives payment, though urt frcmn the treasury of the University. It would seem to be just that his namLe should appear in the Calendar, as Assistant. in Political Economy," anud if there is no objection on the ground of general policy, I respectfully request that ihis be done. Respectfully yours, HENRY C. ADAMS. Regent Field introduced the followino resolution, which was carried by the full vote of the Board. Resolved, That Mr. F. C. Hicks be appointed as Assistant in Political Economy, without pay, for the academic year 1888 -89. Regent Willett offered the following resolution,which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That the thanks of the Board be extended to Mr. George C. Mahon, for the gift of books made by him to the University library, 355 in number, and particularly described in the last report of Librarian Davis.

Page  290 290 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. On motion of Regent Clark, the President was requested to convey the thanks of the Board to the Walker Manufacturing Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, for valuable gifts to the Department of Mechanical Engineering, as follows: One spur gear, one bevel gear, one worm gear, and three sets of shaft hangers. The request of Assistant Professor J. B. Davis, for an appropriation of $275, for the purchase of additional camp equipage for the use of the Engineering Class in the field, was, on motion of Regent Field, laid on the table. Regent Draper moved that Mary E. Thompson, A. B., M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Professor ot Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, and to the Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology, in the Homceopathic Medical College, for one year, at a salary of $200, vice Harriet M. Allen, M. D., resigned; and that Duncan J. Sinclair, M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery and to the Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine in the Homoeopathic Medical College, for one year at a salary of $200, vice Geo. D. Arndt, M. D., resigned. A call vote taken on the above motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Willett presented and read the following communication from Mr. Charles M. Hammond: ANN ARBOR, December 3d, 1888, To the Board of Regents, University of Michigan: On the 15th day of Sept., 1887, I forwarded my fees for matriculation in the Law Department. On the 17th of the same month my name was enrolled, and a seat was assigned to me. I left Canada on the 30th of Sept., 1887, en route for Ann Arbor, with the intention of becoming a citizen of the U. S. and a resident of this State. On the 22d of October, 18S7, I formally " declared my intention " of becoming such, before the Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court for this County. From that date till now, I have been in the State of Michigan. The summer months were spent by me, in the study of law, in the office of attorneys in Detroit.

Page  291 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 291 On the 1st of October, 1888, I returned to Ann Arbor, to complete my legal course. On the following day (2nd Oct.) I wished and applied to register as a resident of this State, but was denied the right by the Secretary, Mr. Wade. But on the 26th of Nov. 18S8, I paid full fees, under protest to the Treasurer. These facts being true, I submit to this Hon. Board, that I am a resident of this State and that being a resident am entitled to a rebate of ten dollars from the sum paid to the Treasurer of the University. Further, I may add that I have made arrangements to enter the same law office in Detroit, with the intention of becoming a permanent resident of Michigan in every sense of the word. Yours very truly,.CHAS. M. HAMMOND. The following resolution submitted by Regent Willett was unanimously adopted by the Board: Resolved, That the action of Secretary Wade in the matter of Chas. M. Hammond, be approved by this Board. On motion of Regent Willett, Regents Draper, Clark, and Butterfield, were appointed a committee to make such explanations of the memorial to the Legislature as may be found necessary. On motion of Regent Butterfield the Board adjourned to 7 o'clock P. i. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7 o'clock P. M. Regent Blair having arrived, the only member absent was Regent Hebard. The Board listened to the memorial of the Medical Faculties presented by Dr. Vaughan, urging the necessity of better hospital accommodations and asking the Board to memorialize the Legislature for an appropriation for that purpose. The request of the Medical Faculties was seconded by a committee of the citizens of Ann Arbor who were present, and, through their chairman, Mr. E. B. Pond, expressed the opinion that the City of Ann Arbor would give the sum of $25,000, provided the Legislature would appropriate $50,000, for the purchase of a site and the erection of a building for hospital purposes.

Page  292 292 SPECIAL MEETING, 188g. Dr. Taft, Dean of the Dental Faculty, was heard on the needs of the Dental Department. Dr. Prescott, Dean of the School of Pharmacy, was invited to address the Board on the needs of that Department, and on the necessity of enlarging the present Laboratory building. Mr. Otto Eberbach, President of the State Pharmaceutical Association,-addressed the Board, favoring the enlargement of the Laboratory Building as something required to meet the increasing demands of the State upon the University for better qualified pharmacists. Dr. Vaughan presented the wants of the Hygienic Laboratory. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board went into executive session. Regent Draper moved that an appropriation of $200 be made for the purchase of one microscope now the property of Professor H. Gibbes, and that $250 be appropriated for the purpose of enabling the Professor of Pathology to complete some original investigations in Bacteriology, in which he is now engaged. The vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the steward of the Hospitals, Mr. Clark, be instructed to procure for the instruction of the present Senior class of the Homoeopathic College, five obstetrical cases at an expense not exceeding $200. The resolution of Regent Draper was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None.

Page  293 SPECIAL MEETING, 1888. 293 On motion of Regent Draper the sum of $75 was appropriated for the purchase of one galvanic and one cautery battery tor use in the University Hospital by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Field, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Field submitted the following resolution which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That the Treasurer be instructed to keep a property book which shall contain an inventory of all instruments and other property now in use at the University and it shall be his duty to record all additions that may be made thereto from time to time, by purchase or otherwise; that no property shall be disposed of or dispensed with unless such disposition be sanctioned by the Auditing Board and duly entered upon the record book. The heads of the various departments are instructed to prepare and submit to the Treasurer a full and complete inventory of all property in their respective departments on or before the close of the current fiscal year. On motion of Regent Clark, Dr. T. N. Martin was continued in charge of the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children in the Medical Department for the full year with the title of Acting Professor. On motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  294

Page  295 MARCH MEETING. 1f889~ UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, March 27, 1889. The Board assembled in the Room of the President at 2 o'clock p. m. Present-the President, Regents Clark, Butterfield, Kiefer, and Whitman. Absent-Regents Blair, Draper, Willett, and Hebard. There being no quorum, on motion of Regent Clark, the Board adjourned to April 17th, at 2 p. m. JAMES H. WADE. Secretary.

Page  296 ADJOURNED MEETING. APRIL, 1889. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, April 17, 1889. The Board assembled in the Room of the President at 2 o'clock p. m. Present-the President, Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Absent-Regents Blair and Butterfield. On motion of Regent Whitman, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Regent Draper moved that Regent Kiefer be assigned to the same places on the standing committees of the Board which were held by the late Regent Field. It was so ordered. The President presented the following report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave respectfully to report that on February 22nd, they decided to allow Mrs. Stowell, absent on leave, to employ Mr. D. C. Worcester, at her own expense, to give a part of the instruction in. Botany, usually given by her. On February 27th, finding the classes in Drawing larger than could be properly attended to by Professor Denison, they appointed Miss Alice Hunt to assist him this semester, two hours a day, the compensation to be $175 for the semester. JAMES B. ANGELL. AUSTIN BLAIR. CHAS. R. WHITMAN.

Page  297 ADJOU RNED 3IEETING, 1889. 297 On motion of Regent Clark the action of the Executive Committee was approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-N-one. The following resolution was submitted by Regent Hebard, and was adopted unanimously. Resolved, that the thanks of this board be returned to Philo Parsons, Esq., the donor of the Parsons Library, for the portrait of himself, which he has presented to the University at the request of the President. On motion of Regent Willett the Board went into Executive session. The Board listened to Professors Rogers and Thompson in relation to changing the course of instruction in the Law Department. On motion of Regent Willett the matter was laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. The President, on behalf of Mrs. Elisha Jones, submitted to the Board a document relating to the endowment of a Classical Fellowship in the University, which was, on motion of Regent Draper, referred to the Committee on Finance, and the Committee on the Literary Department jointly. On motion of Regent Whitman the salary of the late Elmer Sanford, Instructor in Physiology, was continued to April 1st, 1889, by the unanimous vote of the Board. Regent Draper moved that the salary of the late Professor Morris be continued to April 1st, 1889. The lotion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitmnan, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman moved that the title of Assistant Engineer Leo D. Miner, U. S. N., be " Assistant Professor

Page  298 298 ADJOURINED MEETING, 1889. of Mechanical and Marine Engineering." The motion was carried. Regent Whitman moved that a committee of five, consisting of the President, Professors Pettee and Demmon, and two members of the Board, to be named by the President, be appointed, to consider and report at the next meeting of the Board the advisability of issuing a new edition of the University Book. The motion was carried and the President named Regents Draper and Whitman to act on said committee. Regent Willett moved that John Dewey, Ph. D., be appointed Professor of Philosophy, at a salary of $2200, services to begin October 1st next. Tie motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Auditing Board were authorized to secure lower rates of insurance. On motion of Regent Draper, Regent Whitman was appointed to act with the Secretary in distributing insurance on buildings and contents. On motion of Regent Willett, the Auditing Board were authorized to carry a line of $200,000 insurance on University property if they shall deem it advisable, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds made the following report: To the Honorable Board of Regents: Your Committee on Buildings and Grounds beg leave to submit the following report of M. E. Cooley, Superintendent of the Construction of the Anatomical Laboratory, and the New Boiler House. The work has been done in a workmanlike manner, and to the satisfaction of your Committee. The settle

Page  299 ADJOURNED MEETING, 188 9. 299 ment of these accounts with the contractors was made by the previous Committee on Buildings and Grounds. CHAS, R. WHITMAN, Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIIGAN, 1 ANN AImBOR, DEC. 10, 1888. HoN. CHAS. R. WHITMAN, Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds. SIR:-I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the expenditures incurred in the construction of the Anatomical Laboratory Building by Wm. Biggs, contractor. As reported by your Committee to the Board of Regents Oct. 13, 1887, the contract was awarded to Wm. Biggs, le being the lowest bidder. The work was begun without delay and pushed to completion in a manner reflecting much credit on Mr. Biggs as a contractor and builder. Statement. Amount of original contract - -5,987.55 " " subsequent " ----------- 4616.86 "" extras allowed ----------------- 97.5 $ 560.40 Allowance for water furnished and for unexecuted work ------------ 12,00 548.40 Total cost of Building _ --- — _ — $6,535.95 A settlement -was effected with Mr. Biggs Dec. 31, 1887, in which the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25 00) was retained, with his consent, to finish pointing cut stone work and grading about building the following spring. A final settlement was effected Aug. 3, 1888. Yours respectfully, M. E. COOLEY, Supt. HON. CHAS. R. WHITIAN, Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds. SIR: —I have the honor to submit also a report of the expenditures incurredin the construction of the New Boiler House Building by Daniel J. Ross, contractor. The contract was awarded Mr. Ross July 21, 1887, he being the lowest bidder. The building has been completed not without some delay in the execution of certain parts. A portion of the outside pointing and painting which was done late in the fall was thrown off by the frosts; this has, however, been made good during the past summer. Statement. Amount of original contract _ _ --- —-- --- 7,425.44 " t" extras allowed on settlement -- _ ---- $301.00 Allowance for water furnished, and for unexecuted work -------------- - 42.50 258.50 Total cost of Building ---------- 7,683.94 A settlement was effected with Mr. Ross Dec. 31,1887, in which the sum

Page  300 300 ADJO URNED 1i'EEITING, 1889. of one hundred and eighty-three dollars and fifty-five cents ($183.55) was retained, with his consent, to finish certain work the following spring. This work has been executed, but the final settlement has not yet been made. M. E. COOLEY, Supt. On motion of Regent Draper the Board adjourned to 7.30 p. m. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7.30 p. in. On motion of Regent Draper the resignation of Professor Chas. H. Stowell was accepted to take effect Oct. 1st, 1889. The following communication was received from the Board of Health. ANN ARBOR, MtICHi., March 4, 1889. DR. J. B. ANGELL, President of the University of Mich., Ann Arbor. DEAR SIR: —At a meeting of the Board of Health Feb. 28, 1889, the following resolution was adopted, and the Secretary was instructed to send a copy of the resolution to the University authorities. "Resolved, That all students hereafter admitted to the University shall present to the University authorities satisfactory evidence of vaccination within the five (5) years previous to such admission." And the Board of Health also recommend to the Regents to publish such requirenment in the Annual Calendar of the University. Yours truly etc., H. B. DODSLEY, See. Board of Health of the City of Ann Arbor. On motion of Regent Draper the coimmunication from the Board of Health was laid on the table. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Medical Faculty. UNIVERSITY OF MaICHIGAN, DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGEPR~Y, ANN ARBOR, February 7th, 1889. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: —At a meeting of the Faculty of the Depart

Page  301 ADJOURNED M-EETING, 1889. 301 ment of Medicine and Surgery, held Tuesday p. m., Feb. 5th, 1889, the following resolution was passed: Moved that the Faculty respectfully request the Board of Regents to make an appropriation to provide obstetrical cases for the instruction of medical students, the amount to be in proportion to the number of students in attendance and provided for in the same manner, as is the amount allowed the other department for that purpose. Very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, Sec. Dept. of Med. and Surgery. Regent Draper moved that the sum of $500 be appropriated for the purpose of securing and maintaining ob stetrical cases in the University Hospital for the instruction of the present graduating class, and that the Steward of the Hospitals be required to procure these cases, and to provide and care for them while in the Hospital. The motion of Regent Draper was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. The following communication from the Medical Faculty was read by Regent Draper. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, DEPARTMENT OF M[EDICINE AND SURGERY, ANN ARBOR, March 27th, 1889. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I am, instructed by action of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, to inform you that Mr. Horace Wilcox has completed the required work in this department and is hereby recommended to the Board for the degree of M.D. Very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, Secretary Dept. of Med. and Surg. On motion of Regent Draper, the President was authorized to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine on Horace Wilcox, according to the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery.

Page  302 302 A0DJOURNED IMEETING, 1889. Regent Clark presented the following comnmunication from Professor J. W. Langley: PITTSBURGH, PA., April 15th, 1889. To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN:-When I asked you for a leave of absence a year ago, I expected to return to duty at the expiration of the leave; but somewhat recently I have had such offers to take up a line of professional work in this city that I have decided to do so, and therefore I now tender you my resignation to take effect June 30th, next. While I make this request of you, I cannot do so without also expressing my great personal regret at severing the ties which have connected me with the University of Michigan for nearly fifteen years and at leaving a field of work which has been so long a source to me of both honor and pleasure. Respectfully Yours, JOHN W. LANGLEY. Prof. Met, and Gen. Chem. On motion of Regent Clark the resignation of Professor Langley was accepted. On motion of Regent Clark the resignation of Mrs. Louisa Reed Stowell was accepted to take effect Oct. 1st, 1889. On motion of Regent Clark, Mr. Albert C. Eycleshymer was appointed to do work in Microscopical Botany during the 2nd semester, his salary to be paid by Mrs. Stowell. Regent Whitman moved that a sum not exeeding $50 be appropriated for the purpose of enabling the Demonstrator of Anatomy to visit some of the counties in the State, and urge the proper authorities to comply with the State law in regard to the sending of anatomical material to the University. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the President was re

Page  303 ADJO URNED.MEETING, 1889. 303 quested to convey the thanrs of this Board for valuable donations made to the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the University. The Gordon Steam Pump Co., Hamilton, Ohio. For one duplex piston pump, 6 in. steam cylinders, 4 in. water cylinders, and 6 in. stroke; also, for several large framed photographs of pumping engines. James Clements & Son, Bay City, Mich. For one 1 pint Swift Lubricator. Edward Dewey & Co., Waters' Governor Works, Boston, Mass. For one 2 in. Governor, Class B. For high speed engine. Russell Engine Co, Massillon, Ohio. For complete set of working drawings of double valve engine. The joint committee to whom was referred the document relating to the endowment of a Classical Fellowship in the University, submitted the following preamble and resolutions which were unanimously adopted: Whereas, Mrs. Catharine E. Jones proposes to endow a Classical Fellowship in the University of Michigan, as a memorial to her husband, Professor Elisha Jones, on the terms and conditions named in the following statement: I, Catharine E. Jones, of the City of Ann Arbor, in the County of Washtenaw, and State of Michigan, do hereby promise and covenant to and with the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan, that I will establish in connection with said University a Fellowship in memory of my husband, Elisha Jones; said fellowship to be designated and known as the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship; it being my earnest purpose to encourage in my husband's name and memory as far as lies in my power, patient, honest, accurate study of the Languages, Literatures, and Archaeology of Ancient Greece and Rome; and that for the purpose of establishing and sustaining said Fellowship, I do hereby pledge myself and my Estate to the amount of ten thousand dollars as the principal sum of the Endowment, and until the whole of said sum shall have been paid to the Board of Regents, I further pledge myself and myEstate for the annual payment of the sum of five hundred dollars, or such a sum as with the income derived from the sum or sums that I may from tinle to time pay to the Board of Regents, shall make the a, nual

Page  304 304 ADJO URVNED MEETING, 1889. income of five hundred dollars. And I will pay the said annual sum in two equal semi annual installments at the beginning of each semester. When the Regents of the University shall have received the whole of the Endowment Fund of ten thousand dollars, the same shall be a perpetual and inviolable fund and be invested and from time to time reinvested by said Regents in good interest bearing securities with interest payable annually or oftener; said interest, and that only, to be devoted to and used by them in support of said Fellowship as follows: ---There shall be a Board of Examiners for the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship consisting of the President of the University, the Senior Professor of Greek, and the Senior Professor of Latin, and two other full Professors of the Academic Faculty, chosen by the above named appointees; the President of the University to be Chairman of the Board and in his absence the Senior Professor of Greek, and in the absence of both, the Senior Professor of Latin; a majority of the members of said Board constituting a quorum to transact business, and a majority of the votes of those present at any meeting being necessary to the decision of any question. The said Board of Examiners shall appoint candidates to the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship according to the following conditions 1. The candidate must have resided at the University of Michigan as a student in the Academic Department at least three entire semesters prior to the appointment; must have made distinguished proficiency in the Greek and Latin languages, such proficiency to be ascertained by tests agreed upon by the Examining Board; must be a Bachelor of Arts of not more than two years' standing, and must possess an unexceptionable moral character. 2. The holder of said Fellowship must make the Greek and Latin languages and literatures the special subjects of study during his, or her, incumbency, adding thereto such other branches of study as may be chosen by the incumbent and approved by the Examining Board. 3. The period of incumbency shall be limited to two academic years, but the incumbent may be removed by the Examing Board at-any time during this period, if said Board shall find in his or her conduct or scholarship good and sufficient ground for such removal; and therefore the incumbent shall at all timles be liable to be called upon by the Board for examination or inquiry as to habits of life and study.

Page  305 ADJO URNED MEETIVNG, 1889. 305 4. The two years of incumbency shall be spent at the University of Michigan unless at any time the Examining Board shall see fit to allow the second year to be spent by the holder of the Fellowship at Athens, or at Rome, or at some other place deemed by the Board equally favorable to classical study, in the systematic study of Classical Philology and Literature. If at any period hereafter the degree of Master of Arts or any other degree of the same significance shall take the place of Bachelor of Arts in the University of Michigan, then in the above condition numbered 1 the limitation expressed by the words, " A Bachelor of Arts of not more than two year's standing," shall be changed so as to read, " A Master of Arts (or its equivalent) of not more than two years standing." Of the candidates fulfilling the requirements specified in article numbered 1 of the foregoing conditions the one best qualified in the judgment of the Examining Board to hold the Fellowship shall receive from the chairman of the Examining Board a certificate of appointment to the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship, which shall entitle the holder thereof to be paid one-half the annual stipend of said Fellowship, to-wit, two hundred and fifty dollars, on presentation of the said certificate to the treasurer of the Board of Regents; and thereafter on the first day of each semester the incumben t shall be entitled to receive another installment of the same amount as the first on presentation of a certificate of satisfactory standing from the chairman of the Examining Board. Furthermore, if the income of the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship shall at any time be applied otherwise than as specified in the foregoing conditions numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4, then the Fund shall revert to the said Catharine E. Jones, or, in case of her death, to her heirs or legatees. But this forfeiture shall not be incurred in consequence of any necessary diminution of the semi-annual stipend under the circumstances hereinafter m-entioned or any necessary suspension of the Fellowship either on account of the removal of the incumbent, or of the want of a candidate properly qualified to hold it. Furthermore, when the Elisha Jones Classical Fellowship shall be fully established by the payment of the entire principal sum of ten thousand dollars, the provision for an annual payment on the part of the donor, and other than the income from the interest of the Endowment, shall cease and become forever inoperative and void. In the event of my decease before the payment of said principal sum of ten thousand dollars, I do hereby

Page  306 306 ADJOURNAED 3IEETING, 1889. promise and agree that said sum or such part of said sum as at the time of my decease may still remain unpaid shall be paid to said Regents out of my Estate for the purpose and under the terms and conditions above provided; and my Executor or Administrator is hereby directed to pay it accordingly. Furthermore, when the annual income of said Endowment shall exceed five hundred dollars, whatever excess there may be shall remain in the hands of the Regents and be added to the permanent Endowment Fund; and when the principal sum shall furnish the income for a second Fellowship of the same amount per annum as the first, a second Fellowship shall be established bearing the same name, organized on the same basis and with the same conditions and control as the first Fellowship already provided. In the event of the income from the Endowment Fund of ten thousand dollars exceeding the amount necessary to support the two Fellowships above mentioned, the surplus shall at the discretion of the Board of Regents either be added to the principal sum and constitute a part of it or shall be used to increase the semi-annual stipends of the two Fellowships; and if in the judgment of the Board of Regents the principal shall at any time have so increased as to justify, and provide for, the establishment of other Fellowships they shall be established, bearing the same name, organized on the same basis and with the same conditions and control as the two Fellowships above mentioned. If at any time the annual income of the Endowment Fund shall fall short of the amount necessary for the semi-annual stipends above mentioned, then and only during the period of such deficiency shall such stipends be diminished in amount in exact proportion to the amount of such deficiency. This instrument is to become valid and effectual whenever the said Board of Regents of the University of Michigan shall by vote at a meeting of their Board accept and ratify the same and the terms thereof and not until then. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal in the City of Ann Arbor aforesaid on the thirteenth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eightynine. CATHARINE E. JONES. [L. S.] Witnesses: HENRY S. FRIEZE. CARRIE ADELL JONES. FRANCES MAY JONES.

Page  307 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1889. 307 Therefore, Resolved, That with gratitude for the donor's generosity we accept the trust which she asks us to take, and ratify the instrument above copied and the terms thereof. Resolved, That the account of the. University with the Elisha Jones Fellowship Fund shall be kept on the Treasurer's books entirely distinct from the accounts with all other funds, and that no part of the principal or the income of that fund shall ever be used for any purpose except for the establishment and maintenance of the Fellowship or Fellowships designated in the statement above copied. Resolved, That we avail ourselves of this opportunity to express our willingness to receive and administer as trustees any funds which may be given us in trust for the endowment of scholarships, fellowships, or professorships, or for the aid by any means of the usefulness of the University. The Committee onBuildings and Grounds through their Chairman, Regent Whitman, made the following report: Hon. Board of Regents. GENTLEMEN:-Your Committee on Buildings and Grounds beg leave to report that the building known as the Physical and Hygienic Laboratories (the contract for which was let by a former Committee of this Board ) has been completed to the entire satisfaction of your Committee, and full and final settlement has been made with the contractor. The building has been turned over to the University, and accepted by your Committee. We invite your attention to the detailed report of H. S. Carhart, Superintendent, as shown below. CHARLES R. WHITMAN, Chm. Corn. on Buildings and Grounds. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ) PHYSICAL LABORATORY, ANN ARBOR, Dec. 12, 1888. To the Building Committee of the University of Michigan. GENTLEMEN:-I have the honor to submit the following report as Superintendent for the construction of the Physical and Hygienic Laboratories. A detailed statement of expenditures is enclosed, showing an unexpended balance out of the $30,000 appropriated of $176.93. The building has been constructed in accordance with plans and specifications except in so far as changes have been fully authorized and additions regularly made thereto. The work has been completed by the contractor in a substantial and workmanlike manner, and the

Page  308 308 ADJO URNED MIEETING, 1889. building has been already found excellently adapted to its proposed uses. The necessary equipment and fittings have not yet been completely furnished, but quite as much has been obtained within the appropriation as was expected. I have the honor to remain, Very respectfully yours, H. S. CARHART. BUILDING FOR SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES, Contract price of building --- — -------------------— 26,736 89 Extra foundation wall -- ----- ----- --- 37 35 1 stone corbel ------------------------------------- 3 50 Piers and Foundations -- -—.- --- - 7 --- — O 1 extra door ------------.. --- —--- 12 00 Tar and tarred paper ----—.- —..-..-.. - 15 00 3 days extra labor ----- -- ---------- 4 50 Plastering blackboards -.._ _ --- ----—. 5 50 125 lbs. copper nails, 23c._ ---. --- —. ---- --- 32 50 22 sq. ft. state slabs, extra ------------ 11 00 Architect's fees --, --- —- ---------- -- 935 79 Superintendent's salary — ------- -- ------ 480 00 Plans for steam heating -- ------ --- - 66 00 Seats for lecture room ------------------ 156 00 Cases for physical apparatus --- -- ------- -- 2: 00 Lecture table _ ----_ --- —--— 30 5 50 Desks for chemical work ------- __ --- — - 178 00 Extra painting and varnishing -------- -- ---- 44 70 Advertising ---------- -------- -------- 42 83 Copper anchors ---- ---- ---------- 30 52 Freight and express ------------ --- 10 65 Buscoe & Co., copper ------------ ------ 1 50 Tolbert -- --- -------- ------ - --- 1 28 Inland Publishing Co. -- ------- --------- 7 81 Flue linings --------- --- ------ 10 50 Electrical Supply Co., (wire) -_ --- — ---------- 1 71 Labor in placing wires — - - ---—. --- —--- 4 44 Lead weights (windows) ------- -- ----- 46 69 Hauling gravel --. --------- 1 t 50 Pulleys and butls (T. B. Rayl) ------- ------ 8 24 Asphaltum floors __ —_ -- _ --- _ ---- --— _- 829 62 Wire cables --- ---------- ------------ 3 61 Painting screens and blackboards _- _ — -- -- 16 06 American Express _______ --- —-------- _ 2 15 Stone in basement corridor — __ --- —-_-_ —__ 21 84 Zinc conductors --- —-- ------------ 7 20 Canvas for screens - _ ----... ---- -- - 7 38 Steam and water pipes ----—, — -------------- _ __.. 336 77 Plumbing in second story- _ --- —----- 117 47 Plumbing in first story and basement —. ---- - 80 51 Four laboratory tables, at $2.75 __ ----___ ___ — _. 11 00 Extra steam coils for H-ygienic Laboratory --— _ 26 00 Extra for waste for urinal stalls --------- 5 00 Extra galvanized iron ventilating flues --.. ----_..... ~ _ 27 00 $ 30,901 51

Page  309 ADJOURNED MIEETTNG, 1889. 309 REBATES. 720 Ibs. iron window weigh-ts. —. --- —-------- 8 64 Basement floor ------------ ---------- 856 11 Difference on hardware ----------------- 74 67 42 ft. flue lining --- —--------------- 5 00 Asphaltum floor for contractor -- ---------- 34 02 Superintendent's salary for 2 months ---- ---- 100 00 1,078 44 29,823 07 Balance to credit of appropriation ---------- 176 93 $ 30,000 00 The above balance has now been expended for appliances in the Hygienic Laboratory. The Committee on Buildings and Grounds submit the report of Prof. Carhart, Superintendent of construction of the Physical and Hygienic Laboratories. The work has been well and satisfactorily done and the appropriation has not been exceeded. CHARLES R. WHITMAN, Chn. Corn. on Buildings and Grounds. The special Committee on Salaries had under consideration the request of Professor M. E. Cooley for a readjustment of his salary under the resolution of the Board adopted at a special meeting held Feb. 17th, 1888. (See Regents' Proceedings, page 202.) The Committee reported that they saw no reason to change their former ruling in this case and their report was adopted. Dr. D. A. cLachlan being desirous of going to Europe for special study, was granted leave of absence from the 15th of May to the 1st of October. A commnunication was received from Professor L. D. Miner which was on motion of Regent Willett laid on the table until the next meeting of the Board. Reegent Whitman moved that the sum of $550 be appropriated for the purchase of tents and camp equipage, for the use of the class in Civil Engineering, and to defray the expenses of the Professor in charge, while engaged in work in the field. The motion was carried by the following vote:

Page  310 310 ADJO URNED MEETING, 1889. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Auditing Board were authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $100 in putting curtains in the Physical and Hygienic Laboratories by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that a sum not exceeding $50 be appropriated for this year only, to defray the expenses of the Professor in charge of the class in Mechanical Engineering, on their annual tour of inspection to Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Cleveland. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  311 JUNE MEETING. 1889. 1S89,> UNIVERSITY OF MrCHIGAN, ANYN ARBOR, June 25, 1889. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Absent-None. On motion of Re-ent Blair, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. A number of commnunications which had reached the President, were, at his suggestion, referred to appropriate commlittees of the Board. Regent Blair, chairman of tlhe Law Committee, presented the following comm1unication: To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan Gentlleen: The following named persons have completed the course of study prescribed for students of Law in this University, and passed examinations on the same to the satisfaction of the Faculty of Law: Thomas Jay Adams, William Grant Adams, Armand Albrecht, James Douglas Armstrong, James Jaquess Ashworth, Robert M. Barnes, Lloyd Warfield Bassett, Carl Louis Baumann, Vincent Earle Bayless, Raymond Walter Beach, B. S. (C.E.), Abraham Benedict, Frank Bennett, William Blincoe, A. B., B. S., Kansas Normal College. Louis Claire Boyle, Lincoln Ellison Bradt, Arthur Wolfe Brady, A. B., Yale University. Fordyce Wiswell Briggs, Frederick Anson Brown, Edward Anderson Burton, Joseph Beatty Burtt, A. B.,

Page  312 312 JUNE MEETING, 1889. Robert Milligan Carothers, ] Henry Manson Carr, Silver Chaney, B. S., Washington and Jefferson College. Charles Cameron Chappelear, Luke Henry Cheney, A. B., Nebraska State University. James Alexander Chiles, A. B., Lincoln University. James H. Clancy, Peter Daniel Connolly, James Lyons Cooper, John Harrod Couch, John Henry Coyne, Sanders Brownlow Cox. A, B., Kentucky University. William Elijah Cox, LL. B, Cumberland University. Robert Emmett Cresswell, Francis Marion Crum, William Harvey Dailey, August Bengtson Darelius, Elbert Russel Dean, John.Charles Dooling, Melvin Loring Douglass, James Nicholas Edmonson, Earle Edmundson, Frederick Stewart Fish, Charles Clifton Forry, Frederick Debow Fulkerson, Joseph Lawrence Glover, George Brenton Greening, William Wickware Griffin, Milton Samuel Gunn, Justice Uhler Haley, Charles Martin Hammond, John Dallas Harger, Charles Harshman, James Adelbert Harris, Charles Henry Hart, Harry C. Hayman, Henry Ward B. Hicks, Seward Higby, Volney Omeara Hildreth, A. B., lentucky University. John McClellan Hoel, Otho Ruby Hopson, Louis Edgar Howlett, George Washington Huston, Samuel Robb Ireland, William Hutchinson Jamison, Winfield Scott Johnson, William Patrick Kearns, George Lincoln Keeler, Ernest Robert Keith, William Carroll Henry Keough, John Albion Kimball, John Claus Kleist, M. S., Lawrence University. James Fremont Knight, Moses Barnett Lairy, James Porter Leasure, Grant Everett Lilly, James Allen Martin, Loyal Johnston Martin, John Wilbur Mathews, Charles Whitfield McAnn, A. B., Mount Allison College. James Francis McElroy, B. S., University of Washington. Josiah Wheeler McIntyre, Albert Edward McManus, Emil Adolphus Meyer, James Miles, Charles William Miller, Fred Hiram Mills, Charles Manley Moffet, Deane Stockton Monahan, James Guthrie Montgomery, James Archibald Muir, James Buchanan Murphy, B. S., University of the Pacific. Taijiro Nakagawa, James Carson Needham, Ph. B., University of the Pacific. Will Edwin Newlin, Louis Delevan Niles. B. S., M, D., Michigan Agricultural College. Stephen Robert Nisbet, John McFarland Ormond, Ph. B., University of Wooster. Gunrock Otsubo, John Hamilton Patten, B. S., Iowa Agricultural College. Edmond Kimball Pendergast, Fred Pennington,

Page  313 JUNE MEETING, 1889. 313 Harvey Arthur Penny, Earl Henry Prince, B. S., Norwich University. James Maxwell Proudfit, Frank Adgate Quail, A. B., Washburn College. John Francis Quinlin, Jesse Albert Rapley, Calvin Edgar Reed, Robie Lewis Reid, Crawford Scott Reilley, Oliver Samuel Riggs, William Vance Rinehart, Jr., Will E. Ryan, Fred Alfred Sabin, Charles Alexander Salyer, Archibald S. Sands, Albert Edward Seaman, Mark Roger Sherman, A. B., Robert Lee Simpson, A. B., Westminster College. George PrestOn Smith, Will Jackson Stanton, LaVergne Belden Stevens, Morton Edwin Stevens, George Stoneman, Jr., Douglas Jerrold Sullivan, Reitaro Takano, Samuel Lennon Thompson, A. B., Buchtel College. Richard Marvin Turner, Nathan Edwin Van Tuyl, Charles William Vermilion, Charles Winfield Waterman, A. B., University of Vermont. Morris Benjamin Wells, Thomas Henry Wheeler, Albert Stanton White, Charles William White, B. S., La Grange College. Orlando Blodgett Willcox, Samuel Law Wilson, A. B., Lenox College. Melvin Leonard Wines, Alva Firman Wingert, Edward Emmert Wingert, A. B., Northern Illinois College. Frederick William Wolluer, Richard Shedrach Woodliff; Samuel Marshall Wright, William Trott Wynkoop, Henry Martin Young, Oscar Robert Zipf. The Law Faculty therefore recommend that your honorable body confer upon the aforesaid persons the degree of Bachelor of Laws. All of which is respectfully submitted. HENRY WADE ROGERS' Dean. ANN ARBOR, June 25th, 1889. On motion of Regent Blair, the President was authorized to confer the degree of Bachelor of L iws upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. Regent Clark, Chairman of the Literary Committee, presented the following communication: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen: By direction of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, I have the honor to

Page  314 314 JUNE MEETING, 1889. report that the following named persons are recommended to you for the degrees indicated: BACHELOR OF LETTERS. James Ware Adams, Henry Towne Bannon, Blanche Kingsbury Barney Horace Van Birdsell, Charles Edward Everett. Belva Mary Herron, Kate Lincoln Johnson, Nellie Minerva Johnson, Bertha Joslyn, Carrie Marion Palmer, Lewis Wallace Parker, Harmon Chamberlin St. Clair, May Turner, Florence Ella Whitcomb,. Lewis Smith Young. 15 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN BIOLOGY.) Frank Alsworth Waples. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN MINING ENGINEERING.) 1 Homer Mason Sackett, Frank Clemes Smith, Otho Sibley Stull, Philip Robert Whitman. 4 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.) William Allan Livingstone, Frederick Homan Loveridge, Eugene Loring McAllaster, William Vaughan Moses, Ernest Blackman Perry, Gordon Edward Stannard. 6 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING.) Flavius Morse Crocker, Richard Khuen, Jr., Herbert Samuel Crocker, William Philander Rounds, Julius Weisbach Hegeler, Louis Henry Shoemaker, William J. Hussey, Miner Cole Taft, Gardiner Stewart Williams. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (IN. GENERAL SCIENCE.) Louis Begemann, Andrew McCormack Brown, Albert Morton Shaw, Will. Hittell Sherzer, Alva Beech Thompson, Horace Vaughn Winchell, fames Burris Wood. 7

Page  315 JUNTE MEE TING, 1889. 315 BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Fannie Barker, Willis John Beckley, Clarissa Sophia Bigelow, Hollie Broughton Bracewell, Allen Lysander Colton, William Herman Detwyler, William Worth Eagan, Charles Kirke Eddy, Effie Matilda Gaylord, Charles Edwin Goddard, Charles Alexander Green. William Welton Harris, Frank Winchester Hawks, Charles Sumner Hyde, B ACH Fred Hull Abbott, Isabella Montgomery Andrews, Virginia Beauchamp, Eugene Nimmons Best, Thaddeus Lincoln Bolton, Willis Elrner Bond, Benjamin Parsons Bourland, John Edward Boyer, Elmer Ellsworth Brown, Ellen Elizabeth Garrigues, John Greenshields, Julian Dana Harmon, Walter Simpson Holden, Phebe Anne Isadore Howell, Arthur Mekeel Hussey, Alfred Eugene Jennings, Hattie Crosby Jennings, Arlisl MAST Elisha Ai MIAST Henry Benner, B. S., MAr Ernest Alanson Balch, A. B., Mary Louise Jones, A. M., George Preston Hyde, Lewis Ralph Jones, Frances Charlotte Lennox, Lewis Murbach, Minnie Howe Newby, Charles Everett Rockwood, Lillie Emma Rosewarne, Arthur Eli Rowley, Oscar Frederick Schmid, Albert Laverne Shepard, Warren Hadley Smith, Eliza Read Sunderland, Charles Philender Taylor, Zada J. Wilson. ELOR OF ARTS. 28 Anna Susan Jones, Fred Sibley Loomis, Clyde Vallandigham Nafe, Robert Bruce Preble, Frederick Leroy Prentiss, Gertrude Belle Rose, George Frederick Rush, Thomas Chalkley Severance, Jr., Lizzie Ide Shiell, Josephine Eliza Sondericker, Fred Bernard Spaulding, Clement Richelieu Stickney, Albert Brodie Stone, James Ely Talley. Katherine Mary West, Sara Whedon, Dean Conant Worcester, e Margaret Young. ER OF LETTERS. Ionroe Hartman, B. L. 105 'ER OF SCIENCE. Charles Wright Dodge, B. S. (Biol.). STER OF ARTS. Ida Maria Street, A. B., William Michael Zumbro, A. B. 4 DOCTOR OF SCIENCE. Erwin F. Smith, B. S. (Biol.). 1 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Yeijiro Ono, Ph. B., Fred Newton Scott, A. M. 2 115 Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Registraro

Page  316 316 JUNE 3MEETING, 1889. On motion of Regent Clark, the Board authorized the degrees indicated in the foregoing colmmunication to be conferred upon the persons therein named, according to the recommennIdtion of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SCHOOL OF PHARMIACY, ANN ARBOR, June 25th, 1889.) To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen: By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy, I respectfully report that the following named persons have completed all the requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. They are now recommended to you for this degree Charles Coy Abbey, Christian Gottleb Jenter, Harry Andrews Allshouse, Burt Lemuel Johnson, James Edward Allworth, Franklin Ross Keith, Benjamin Thomas Barry, William Carl Kirchgessner, Leo Prosper Block, Leonard George Kramler, Edwin Timothy Boden, William Henry Krug. Thomas Worthington Bowen, William Squire Lockwood, Fred J. Chamberlin, Fred William Mehlhop, Starr King Church, Firdinand Edmund Parkinson, Charles Felix Crowley, Mark Rockwell, William LeRoy Dunn, Charles William Rowland, Julia Esther Emanuel, George Michigan Schettler. Merrill Stanton Flint, Oscar John Smith, Henry Franz, Louis Joseph Speuker, John Henry Frost, John Thompson, Truman Griffen, Harry Simmons VanEtta, Rolla Morgan Heath, Albert Frederick Vogel, Bernhard Conrad Hesse, Matthew Weightman, Jr., George Jacob Hirth, Jr., William Clapp Wheelock, Russell Lowell Janney, Joseph.Baldwin Wood, August Charles Zeig. 41 Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Dean of the Faculty. On motion of Regent Draper, the President was authorized to confer the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist upon the persons named in the above communication in accordance with the recommendation therein contained.

Page  317 JUNE MEETING, 1889. 317 Regent Draper presented the following communication: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen: I am instructed by the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, to inform you that the following named candidates have fulfilled the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and are hereby recommended: Christopher Adamson, Adrian Richard Alfred, Leighton Pine Alien, Bion Arnold, Eunice Jemima Avery, Thomas James Avery, Thomas Stewart Blair, John Alexander Blake, Carroll Osborne Boyce, George Johnson Boyd, George Alfred Bradburn, James Ritchison Breakey, Mary Brown, Mathilde Buck, Henry Clay Burcham, Charles Newell Burton, Francis Henry Callow, B. S., Hillsdale College. Harry Lee Canright, Charles Ogden Cartwright, Elizabeth Janette Child, James Edward Childs, Cassius Mentor Coldren, William S. Connery, David Goldthwait Coolidge, George Lan ning Cramer, Charles Stanley Crane, John Sedgwick Dean, Will Harry Dodge, Presca Isaac Edwards, William Charles Elliott, Fred W. Essig, Jessie White Findlay, Charles Henry Fowler, A. B., Lincoln University. Christian Seehuusen Fries, James Skiffington Grant, Fanny Sarah Crossett Hall, Franklin Pierce HIannon, Ernestine Julia Hicks, Elden William Hills, Andrew John Hoenes, Katherine Quane Holden, Peter William Holleman, A. B., Hope College. Alex F. Irwin, John Linn Irwin, Ph. C., George Orlo Jefferson, Cornelius Adrian Johnson, Walter James Johnson, Lewis Hasbrouck Kemble, Frances Elizabeth Kyle, Andrew Stewart Lobingier, A. B., Willis Alien McConkie, Archibald McEacheran, Harry McKennan, George Stewart McPherson, Andrew Milton Miller, Perry Harris Munger, Walter Starnes Nash, Mary Anna Norton, Clara Augusta Oswald, Ernest Henry Parker, John Allen Parks, Edward Peirce, Samuel Lee Probert, Frank Rainie, B. S., North Western Ohio University. Sylvanus W. Robillard, George Austin Rowe, George John Schneider, Scott Searles, Alobert William Sherman, Boghos Tevan Simonian, A. B., Armenia College. William Milton Slaght, A. B., Olivet College. John N. Green,

Page  318 JUNE M3EETING, 1889. George Slocum, Wadsworth Warren, A. B., Olivet College. Fred Heman Spaulding, Emanuel Slerman Wenger, Minnie Ellen Stacks, William Bennajah Watts, Hugh Seymour Townsend, Samuel Ellsworth Yoder, 80 Very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, Secretary of Faculty, Dept. of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Draper, it was voted to conlfer the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Regent Draper presented and read the following communication from the Secretary of the Hommoopathic Faculty: To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen,: The following named students have complied with the necessary requirements of the Honoeopathic Medical College for graduation, and the Faculty respectfully recommend them for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. JAMES C. WOOD, Secretary of the Faculty. Sara Bartlett Armstrong, M. D., James Nelson Ayres, Ph. C., Elizabeth Stacy Carey, Albert Britton Clark, Roy Samuel Copeland, William A. Cotton, Sallie Maria Davis, Denias Dawe, Walter Newton Fowler, Cora Yan Hill, Charles Albert Macrum, James Archie McLachlan, Laban HIenry Shank, Walter Longyor Slack, Rollin Howard Stevens, William Isaac Tyler, Boyle Vance, Annette Haseltine VWhteelock, Jerome Bonaparte Wheelock, Eli Cone Williams, A. B., Miranda Poyer Wiswell, B. L. 21 Regent Draper moved, that the degree of Doctor of Medicine be conferred upon the persons named in the fore going communication, in accordance with the recormmendation of the Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College. The motion was carried. Regent Draper moved, that George W. Whyte be ap

Page  319 JUNE MEETING, 1889. 319 pointed Itnstructor in Metallurgy and Assaying, for one year, at the salary of $900; David H. Browne, Instructor in Qualitative Analysis, for one year, at the salary of $900; and Professor John W. Langley, of Pittsburgh, nonresident Lecturer on the Metallurgy of Steel, the compensation to be $150 for a course of ten lectures. The motion of Regent Draper was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Blair submitted the following resolution, which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That the thanks of this Board be returned to Mr. D. C. French, sculptor, for the cast of his statue of Gen. Cass, presented by him to the University, and also to Mr. Philo Parsons for his kind services in procuring us the gift. Regent Clark moved that the following persons be reappointed in the Chemical Laboratory for one year: William F. Edwards, accountant and dispensing clerk, at the salary of $600; John D. Riker, B. S., Assistant in Physiological Chemistry, at the salary of $192; Charles P. Beckwith, B.S, Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, at the salary of $250; Ervin E. Ewell. Ph. C., Assistant in Qualitative Analysis, at the salary of $192; Moses Gomberg, Assistant in Organic Chemistry, at the salary of $192; David M. Lichty, B. S., Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, at the salary of $17 a month. The call vote on Regent Clark's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Clark presented and read the following request from the Professor of Botany:

Page  320 320 JU32ESI7 U 'T.aIAIJifG, 188ss. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, BOTANICAL LABORATORY, ANN ARBOR, MoIC!E, June 21, 1'39. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen.: With the approval of the members of the.Aud-c iting Board, I respectfully request that the sale of the old microscopes hitherto used by classes In Botany be authorized, and that new instruments of improved construction be purchased in their stead, at a co-.t not exceeding that for which the old ones may be sold. I also ask that an appropriatioa of one hundred and fifty dollars ($150) be made f)or thee purchase of instruments and tapparatus for use in the Botanicel Laboratory. Respectfully subrmitted, V. M. SPALDINCGL. ReCent C1ark moved that the request of the Professor of Botany be complied with, and that the Auditing Board be authorized to sell the old microscopes as recommended, and that new ones be purchased in their stead, at a cost not exceeding the price for which the old ones were sold; provided, however, that no new instlrument shall be purchased until the mioney to pay for it is provided by the sale of an old one. The motion of Regent Clark was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Clark, D. C. Worcester A. B., was appointed Assistant in Botany, for one year, at a salary of $750, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, ilett, Kiefer, Whhitman, Butterfield, and Iebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitrman read the following comm unl ication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts: To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GentleRien2: I have the honor to report to you that the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the A.rts, acting on suggestion of the Professors of Engineering, decided

Page  321 JUNE iMEETING, 1889. 321 that it is advisable and feasible to establish a course in Electrical Engineering leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and recommend to you the establishment of the accompanying course of study leading to the degree above mentioned. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Registrar. A COURSE OF STUDY IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. To obtain the recommendation of the Faculty for the degree of Bachelor of Science, for a course in Electrical Engineering, the student must complete twenty-five Full Courses. The prescribed portion of this work is as follows: In Mathematics, Courses 1, 5, 11, 13, 10, (22 hours). In French and German,four Full Courses to be selected by the student from ail the Courses offered in these two languages wich he is qualified to pursue- - - ---- -----— (20 hours). In English, Course 1, (2 " ) In General Physics, Courses 3, 10, 13, ---- --------- -- -— (13 ) In General Chemistry, Course 2, — (_ ---_- - --------- 3 " ) In Analytical Chemistry, Course 3 --------- -- ( 5 " ) In Drawing, Courses 1, 5,6, 9, ___ ---- ----- - - -(11 " ) In Civil Engineering, Course 1, ---— _ —( --- —--- ---- ( 2 ( ) In Mechanical Engineering, Courses 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, i2, ____ — (17 " ) In Electrical Engineering, four Courses, making at least -. --- — (1 " ) From the other Courses offered the student must choose and complete enough to make in all twenty-five Full Courses. He must also prepare a satisfactory thesis. On motion of Regent Whitman, the degree of " Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineerinq," was established, and the course of study leading thereto was approved, as recommended by the Faculty. On motion, the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock P. mI. AFTERNOON SESSION. The following communication was presented by Regent Draper: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, X ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1889. | To the Honorable Board of Regents: A year ago I felt compelled, for reasons then stated, to ask your, honorable body for a leave of absence. That was granted

Page  322 322 JUNE A3EETING, 1889. in the most generous manner; but I have come reluctantly to the painful consciousness that I can live and work here no longer; I therefore regretfully tender my resignation as Professor of Physiology in the University of Michigan, and seek an honorable discharge. Whether my lost health has had its recompense in any good wrought here by ie, others may judge; but, (luring a seven years' residence, there has surely been no more loyal member of the University than I. With the warmest appreciation of the consideration always shown me by your honorable body, I remain respectfully, HENRY SEWALL, Professor of Physiology, Univ. of Mich. On motion of Regent Draper, the resignation of Professor Sewall was accepted. Regent Draper presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Dental Department: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY, > ANN ARBOR, June 2.5th, 1889. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: The following named persons have complied with all the requirements, and are hereby recommended by the Faculty of the Dental College, [subject to your approval] for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, viz.: Albert Edward Anderson, Robert Burns Avery, Harry Fielden Briggs, Frank Seldon Buckley, A. B,, Oberlin College. Charles Surnner Buttolph, George Benton Chester, George Edward Courtney, Harry Goodrich Dunaven, Louis Phillips Hall, Frank Douglass Harding, George Byron Hayes, A. B., IWilliams College. Clarence Eugene Henderson, William Carley Herbert, George Arthur Holliday, Horace Nathaniel Holmes, Edy Randall Johnson, Jacob William Jungmarn, Oscar Calm Kerlin, Reuben John Kirk, Charles Shuter McIndoe, Edward Cook Mills, Frank E. Morey, Charles Franklin Noyes, Arthur Mowry Potter, John Scott Rice, M. D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College. Arthur Richardson, Sumner Oliver Sawyer, Henry Herman Schuhmann, DeWitt Spalsbury, Carroll Wesley Staples, Griffith Pritchard Terry, Frank Prescott Watson, Joe Welch, John H. Williams. 34 J. TAFT, Dean.

Page  323 JUNE MEETING, 1889. 323 On motion of Regent Draper, it was voted to confer the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Dental Faculty. On the recommendatiou of the Faculty of the De. partment of Medicine and Surgery, Regent Draper moved that all students who enter that Department after July 1, 1890, be required to pass four years of professional study before graduation. The motion was carried. John Wm. Keating, a senior student in the Medical Department. having failed to receive the recommendation of the Faculty for graduation, appealed to the Board to graduate him regardless of the decision of the Faculty. On motion of Regent Draper, Mr. Keating was notified that it would be necessary for him to submit to a re-exanination, and receive the recommendation of the Faculty before the Board could order the degree conferred. On motion of Regent Draper, Regent Whitman was requested to act as the attorney of the Board in an action brought by a patient in the Hommeopathic Hospital, named L'Amoureaux, for damages claimed to have been sustained by reason of incompetent nurses. On motion of Regent Whitman, the legislative appropriation of $1,000, for the purchase in 1889 of instruments for the Department of Civil Engineering, was placed in the hands of the Auditing Board for expenditure. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board went into Executive Session. On motion of Regent Clark, the following appointments were made for one year: F. G. Novy, M. S., Instructor in Hygiene; A. F. Lange, A. M., Instructor in German and Anglo Saxon; Wim. WV Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy; Alexander Ziwet, 0. E., Instructor in Mathematics; Charles Puryear, A. M., Instructor in M5athematics; P. B. Marcou, Ph. D., Instructor in French; Joseph

Page  324 324 JUNIE MEETING, 1889. H. Drake, A. B., Instructor in Latin; Frank N. Cole, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics; Lewis A. Rhoades, A. M., Instructor in German. The call vote on the above appointments resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved the appointment of Francis D. Kelsey, Ph. D., as Professor of Latin, at the salary of $2,200, servies to begin October 1st, 1889. Regent Whitman moved that Charles W. Belser, A. B., be appointed Instructor for one year in German and French at the salary of $900. The vote on these appointments was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays —Norne Regent Clark submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That C. G. Taylor, superintendent of shops, be regarded as a member of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, with the rank of Assistant Professor. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. MORNING SESSION. The Board re-assembled at 9 o'clock A. m,-full Board present. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board went into Executive Session. Regent Blair submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board Professors Mae

Page  325 JUNE IEETING, 1889. 325 lean and Frothingham have placed themselves in such antagonism to the policy adopted by the Board, both by their language and conduct, that their usefulness as professors in the Medical Department of the University has been so far impaired that it is not desirable that they should longer continue their connection with the University. Therefore, the President is requested to communicate to Professors Maclean and Frothingham the willingness of this Board to accept their resignation. A call vote was taken on this resolution, which resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Treasurer Soule asked permission to open an account with one of the Detroit Banks, where a small balance could be kept for the convenience of the business of his office. The Board decided that they would leave the matter entirely in the hands of the Treasurer. The Medical Committee, to whom was referred (by resolution of the Medical Faculty) the question of graduating Mr. Corydon L. Ford, 2d, as Doctor of Medicine, reported through their Chairmaan, Regent Draper, that the committee do not recommend him for the degree of M. D. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be, and are hereby authorized to procure and decide on designs and specifications for the addition to the Chemical Laboratory; and to approve contracts, etc., for said building; which contracts are then to be signed by the President and Secretary of the Board, after which said Committee are directed and authorized to proceed with the work of construction; to enforce the contract; to approve the monthly estimates for payment and settlement of all contracts; and to control and do all things that the Board could do, that are necessary to the completion of the building ordered by the Board of Regents at this time. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, June 26, 1839.

Page  326 326 JUNE MEETING, 1889. The special committee of five appointed at the March meeting to report upon the advisability of issuing a new edition of the University Book, made a report recommending the preparation by persons connected with the University of a general catalogue. Details of the plan and estimates of the cost were given. Regent Whitman moved that the present committee be retained, and that they be authorized to proceed with the work on the plan outlined in the report, and if practicable to include a list of those who had been students, but had not graduated, the Board undertaking to provide the necessary appropriation, and the necessary clerical help. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Blair, Chairman of the Law( Committee, to whom was referred the recommendation of the Law Faculty, that the course in that Department be extended to three years, reported that in the judgment of' the committee the time had not yet arrived to establish a three-year course in the Law Department, and that the matter be referred back to the Law Faculty for further consideration. The report of the Committee was adopted. The Law Committee, to whom was referred the request of the Law Faculty that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred upon George W. Radford, as of the class of 1875, recommended that the matter lie on the table. The Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the Medical Committee jointly, were requested to inspect the various sites proposed for the new hospital, and report their conclusions at the next meeting of the Board. Regent Blair moved that Assistant Professor J. C. Knowlton be made Marshall Professor of Law, at the salary

Page  327 JUNE MEETING, 1889. 327 of $2,000, with the understanding that he shall continue his present quiz work, and perform such other duties as the Law Faculty shall assign to him; and also that the salary of Assistant Librarian J. H. Vance be increased to $900. The vote on the above motion was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that J.. Reihard be made Assistant Professor of Zoology, at the salary of $1,600. Regent Clark moved that Professor Spalding's salary be made $2,200. Both motions were passed by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett. Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, Miss Alice Hunt was appointed, for the coming year, Assistant in Drawing, at a salary of $350, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were authorized to proceed at once to complete the Engineering Laboratory building, and the Auditing Board were authorized to expend the legislative appropriation for the purchase of equipment for the Mechanical and Hygienic Laboratories. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman moved that an appropriation of $100 be made for the purpose of purchasing a microscope

Page  328 328 JUNE,aEETING, 1889. for the use of the Professor of Gaology. The vote re sulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the matter of building a fence around a part of the campus was placed in the hands of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. On motion ot Regent Draper, and on the recommnendation of the Faculty of the Department of Mledicine and Surgery, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Dr. William Allen Baker, as of the class of 1870, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Clark, it was unanimously voted that the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws be conferred on Edward Howell Horton, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas; and on Elisha Williams MeKinstry, Professor in the Hastings College of Law in the University of California; and on Martin Luther D'Ooge, Professor of the Greek Language and Literature in the University of Michigan. On motion, the Board adjourned to Wednesday, July 17th, 1889, at 10 o'clock A. M. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  329 ADJOURNED MEETING. JULY, 1889. ---- ~ e --- — UNIVERSITY OF MNICHI-IlGAN, ) ANN ARBORI, July 17, 1889. o The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. -xI. Present-Regents Blair, Draper, Cla(rk, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Absent-None. Comimunications which had reached the President were referred to appropriate colmmittees of the Board. On motion of IRegent Buttterield, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Rlegent Draper, tlhe estimate of WVilliam Biggs, presented by the Delntal Faculty, Folr the erection of an addition to the Dental Bluildlin., was referred to the Colmmittee onl Buildings and Grounds, with power to act. On motion of Regent Willett., the suin. of $300 was appropriated and placed at the disposal of the Library Committee of the Faculty, for the purpose of completing the new Catalogue of Books, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Butterfield submitted the followintg resolution, which was unanimously adopted'

Page  330 ADJO UR NED f TI57T, N(s, /,(s, ]Re.solvedl, That we gratefully aceept,in behalf of tile University, the portrai t of Dr. Dunster, and ldirect tlhat the same be 11lun in the art gallery, and that the letter of Prof. Martin in reference thereto be spread on tile recorlls of this Bgoard in connection with tllis resolution. The letter referred to ill tlie Ilaove resolution is as follows ANN A. ' o), MiI(I( AN, July 1, 1889. To the Hionolable, the lBoardl of Regenlts: At tle meeting of the alumniii of tlhe NMedical Department of Michigaln University, held June 26(, 1889, funds were raised for the purpose of purchasing a portrait of the late Prof. E. S. Dunster. Said portrait has been procured and paid for, and the alumni desire to present it to the University, to be hung in the Art Gallery (with appropriate tablet), as a token of their affectionate regard and high esteem for Prof. Dunster, whose scholarship, courteous manners, and superior qualities as a teacher and a man were so well known; they respectfully ask the Honorable Board of Regents to accept tile gift in behalf of the University of Michigan. Very respectfully, J. N. MARtTIN, Committee in charge. Regent Draper, submitted thle follovwing' resolutionl which was, on a call vote, adcopted nllanimolusly. Resolved, That a chair to be known as the Chair of Ophlthalmology, Otology, and Ped(ology be, andl the same is hereby established in tihe Homceopathic Medical College. On motion of IRegent Draper, the B<oard went into Executive Sessionl Regent Clark presented and read the resigmiation of Charles NI. Gayley, Assistant lrofessor of Elnglish and Rhetoric, which was accepted. On motion of Regent Clark, tile title of Associate Professor A. IH. Pattengill was changed to Professor of Greek. Regent Draper presented the following, recoln-mmendations of the Medical Comlmittee, viz.: That the lChairs of

Page  331 ADJO URNVED AIJ1TINr, /).s. M3I1 Pathology and Histology obe combined undier Dr.I.Gibbes, and that Dr. G. C. Huber be appointed Instructor in Histology with tlhe salary of, $900, and thlat the Executive Committee be auth)orized to appoint an additional Assistant to the Chair, at the salary of' $300. A call vote on the above recommendllations resulted as follows Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whlitman, Butterfield, antd Hebardl. Nays-None. On1 m(otion of' ilerent Wil le tt the Boaild took a, recess unltil 2 ocldock P. Al. AFTERNOON SESSION. The resignlation of' DrI. It. I Alrn(lt, P'rof'esor of Mlateria Medica in tlie 1tIolmeopatiic Medical College, was received and accepted. Regent I)raper submlitted the followinl recommnlteda tions f'rom tile IIomx()opathic Medical Faculty: NIV lIIS'ITY ()1' 1C[l(;l(A\N, l ANN Ai Ol, I July 17Lt, l889). To the Honorable Board of legents: Gentlenmen. —The Faculty of tlle Ho()tnopaltllic Delplrtlllen t respectfully recoiimmend tlhe following: 1. That Prof. D. A. AMcLTcllan be transferre(d fronl tihe Clhair of Tlleory antl Practice of Medicine to tlhe Chtir of O(l)pithlalmology, Otology and Ptedology. 2. That Prof. Chas. Gatehell, M.. D., of Chicago, be tmtade Professor of the Theory and Practice of NMeliicile, t at salary of $2,000 per year. 3. That Chas. S. Mack,al. D., of Clhicag'o, e ade Professor of Materia Medica and( Therapleuties, vice Prof. H. IR Arndt, resignled, at a salary; of p2,(')() iper year. 1H. L. OI8ETZ, Dean.

Page  332 332 A DJO URNED MEETING, 18389. On motion of Regent Draper, the recommendations of the Holnmopathic Medical Faculty were adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On tmotion of Regent Draper, Dr. C. Georg was appointed Instructor in Materia Medica and Therapeutics, for one year, it being lunderstood that lhe is to do such work as may be assigned to him by the Faculty, at the salary of $900. The vote on this motion was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebardo Nays-None. Paul C. Freer, Ph.D., MA D.,was appointed Lecturer on General Chemistry, for one year, at the salary of $2,000, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Draper, Chairmian of the Medical Committee, presented and read the letter of resignation of Dr. Geo. E. Frothilngham Professor of Materia Medcica and Ophthalmology, and that of Dr. Donald Maclean, Professor of Surgery and Clini(cal Surgery in the Medical Department, which were accepted by a fuill vote of the Board. Regent Kiefer suilmitted the following resolution, whichi was unanimously adopted: i1esolved, That in accepting tle resignations of Professors Maclean and Frothilngham the Board of Regents expresses its appreciation of their scientific attainments, and of the ability and skill with which they have performed the duties pertaining to their respective Chairs,

Page  333 ADJOURNEID MEE;TING, 1889. 333 On motion of Regent Willett, the mnatter of electric lighting and water supply was referred to Regent Whitman, to report at the October meeting of the Board. Regent Draper moved that the following appointments be made in the Medical Department: Dr. C. B. Nancrede, Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, at the salary of $2,000; Flenmming Carrow, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, and Clinical Ophthalmology, at the salary of $2,000; William H-. Howell, Ph.D., Lecturer on Physiology, for one year, at the salary of $2,000; and that these gentlemen be required to live in Ann Arbor. Also, that Dr. James N. Martin be reappointed Acting Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, for one year, at the salary of $2,000. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved that T. C. Trueblood be appointed Assistant Professor of Elocution in the Literary Department, at the salary of $1,600, and that an additional compensation of $500 be paid him for services to be rendered in the Law Department. The following is the call vote on this motion: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the following gentlemen for valuable gifts to the Department of Mechanical Engineering: Frederick M. Wheeler, of New York City; Messrs. Hayden & Derby, of Brooklyn, N. Y., The Silsby Manufacturing Co., of Seneca Falls, N. Y.; and( Rumsey & Co., of Seneca Falls, N. Y.

Page  334 334 ADJOURNED MEETING, 188s9. On motion of Regent Whitman, Sec. 3, of Chapter VIII. of the By-Laws of the University, was amended to read as follows: SEc. 3. There shall be elected by the Board of Regents for each Department or School, a Dean, whose duty it shall be to preside at the meetings of the Faculty, in the absence of the President of the University, and to perform such other duties as shall be prescribed by the general rules and by the regulations of the Department. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Medical Committee were charged with the duty of revising the courses of instruction in the Medical Department. Regent Draper moved, that James G. Lynds be appointed Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics, ifor one year, at the salary of $100. Regent Butterfield moved that Frank N. Cole, Ph.D., be appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics, for one year, at the salary of $1,200. Regent Blair moved that the salary of Charles K. McGee be $900, with the title of Instructor in General Chemistry. Regent Clark moved, that the salary of Albert A. Stanley, Professor of Music, be increased to $1,600. And that Assistant Professor Otis C. Johnson be made Professor of Applied Chemistry, with the salary of $2,200. A call vote was taken on the several motions above, which resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the appointment of Assistants in the Dental Department was referred to the Executive Committee.

Page  335 ADJO URNED AIFETING, 18809. 335 ()On motion of' Regent Blair, tle Committee on Buildings and Grounds, together with Regent Kiefer and Dr. Nancrede, were authorized to visit Hospitals at the East with the view of embodying their best features in the construction of the one we are about to build. On motion, the Board adjourned. JAMES 1-. WADE, Secretary.

Page  336

Page  337 SPECIAL MEETING. SEPTEMBER, 1889. UNIVERSITY OF MVICHIGAN, t September 19, 1889. j The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. I. Present- IRegents Blair, (Clark, Whitman, Butterfield, and Ilebard. On motion of' ReIeent Clark, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. The President presented the followingo report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave to make the following report: They met on July 30th, and took the following action 11 accordlance with the recommendlation of the Medical Committee the title oivenl to Professor Gibbes att the last meeting of the Board, of Professor of Pathology and Histology, was changed to Professor of Pathology, anil the title given to Dr. W. H. Howell, of Lecturer on Physiology, was changed to Lecturer on Physiology and Histology; Dr. Win. A. Campbell was appointed Instructor in Anatomy for the coming year, with the understanding that for discharging the duties of Instructor, Assistant Demlonstrator of Anatomy, and Secretary of the Faculty hle is to receive i.31,200. It was decided that an Assistant should be appointed t tthe Professor of Pathology at a salary not to exceed S300. On the recoimnendation of the Hospital Coommittee, the following appointments on the staff of the University Hospital were made: B. B. Rowe, M. D., Resident Physician, salary,

Page  338 338 SPECIAL MEETI1NG, 1889 $500; G. G. Schneider, M. D., Wardmaster, salary, $300; Nurse in ward, P. Sculley, $300; Ward-mistress, Esther G.Willoughby, M. D., $300; Nurse, Mary A. Kendall, $200. Joseph Clark was reappointed Steward of the Hospitals for one year, salary $1,000 and the board of his family. Louis P. Hall, D. D.S., was appointed Assistant to Dr. Watling for the coming year, salary $300. Julius O. Schlotterbeck, Assistant in Pharmnacognosy, was appointed also to teach Materia Mledica to the Pharmacy students for the year to come, his salary for all his services to be $300. Dr. Vaughan was relieved of the duty of teaching Materia Medica in the School of Pharmacy. August 10th they appointed James Hayden Tufts, A. B., B. D., Instructor in Philosophy, for one year, at the salary of $900. It was voted to call a meeting of the Board for Sept. 17th, at 10 A. M., especially to consider the business of the new hospital. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, ROGER W. BUTTERFIELD, CHAS.. R. WHITMAN. The foregoing report of the Executive Committee'was adopted by a unanimous vote. On imotion of Regent Clark the resignation of Charles Puryear, Instructor in Mathematics, was accepted. On motion of Regenlt Clark, George H-empil A. B., was appointed Assistant Professor of Englishl for one year, at the salary of $1600; the salary to begin when he takes lip the work. The appointment was lmade by the full vote of the Board. David H. Browne, Ph. B., Instructor in Quantitative Analysis, presented his resignation, which was, on motion of Regent Whitman, accepted. On motion of Regent Whitman, Frank C. Smith, B. S., was appointed Instructor in Quantitative Analysis, for one year, at the salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Clark, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None.

Page  339 SPECIAL MEETING, 1889. 339 On motion of Regent Clark, Fred C. Hicks, A. M., was appointed Assistant in Political Economy, without salary. On motion of Regent Clark, George W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., was appointed Instructor in Electrical Engineering, for one year, at the salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Clark, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Professor of Physics was allowed to appoint an assistant, at a salary not to exceed $150. Regent Blair, Chairman of the Law Committee, submitted the following resoluiton, which was adopted: Resolved, That it is hereby made a part of the duties of the Law Librarian to render such assistance as may be required by the Law Faculty, to the Dean of the Law Department, in the matter of the correspondence of that Department, and to the Law Faculty in connection with the Moot Court Cases. Regent Blair submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That Hon. Henry B. Brown, LL. D., be reappointed Lecturer on Admiralty Law, in the Law Department, for the year 1889-90, at a salary of $350. The vote on Regent Blair's resolution was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Clark, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. in. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board re-assembled at 2 o'clock p. M., the full Board present.

Page  340 340 SPECIAL MEETING, 1889. The Board listened to the report of the Special Committee who were appointed to visit hospitals at the East with the view of embodying their best features in the construction of the one we are about to build. Dr. V. C. Vaughan presented the report of the Committee. On motion of Regent Kiefer the report of this Committee, together with the matter of procuring proper plans and specifications for the new hospital building, was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and the Medical Committee jointly, and Drs. Vaughan, Nancrede, and Obetz. Regent Clark moved that Dr. Obetz be invited to present his views in regard to a site for the new hospital. The motion was carried, and Dr. Obetz, being present, addressed the Board. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board went into Executive Session. The business of the open session was afterward resumed. Dr. Herdman addressed the Board in relation to his professorial work. On motion of Regent Draper, C. G. Darling, M. D., was appointed Assistant to the Chair of Surgery and Clinical Surgery for one year, at the salary of $100. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Blair submitted the following resolution,which was carried by the full vote of the Board: Resolved, That in the opinion of this' Board it is not expedient to locate the new Hospital upon the Campus. On motion of Regent Whitman, an appropriation of $25 was made for the purchase of a pneumatic apparatus

Page  341 SPECIAL MEElIING, 1889. 341 for the use of Dr. Georg, to illustrate the subject of Physical Therapeutics. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Auditing Board were instructed to pay the expense incurred by Regent Kiefer, amounting to $20, in procuring the translation from the German and the copying of an article on the best location for hospitals. A call vote on the question was unanimous. On motion of Regent Clark, the Auditing Board were authorized to employ an Assistant in the Dental Department, for one year, at a salary of $100. A call vote resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Executive Committee and the Chairman of the Finance Committee were requested to cooperate with the Committee on Buildings and Grounds in examining sites for the new hospital, and report their conclusions to the next meeting of the Board. Regent Whitman moved that the traveling expenses of Dr. Vaughan, when visiting hospitals at the East at the request of the Board, be paid. The motion was carried, as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebardo Nays-None. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board adjourned to October 15, 1889. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  342

Page  343 REGULAR MEETING. OCTOBER 15, 1889. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN October 15, 1889. J The Board assembled in the room of the President at 2 o'clock P. M. Present-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Absent-Regents Willett and Butterfield. The President stated that a number of papers and communications had reached him since the last meeting of the Board, which h'e would, if there was no objection, place in the hands of the appropriate coemmittees of the Board. There being no objection the papers took that course. On motion of Regent Blair, the Board went into Executive Session. Mr. Braun, representing the Washtenaw County Agricultural Society, by permission, addressed the Board in relation to the purchase of the Fair Grounds for a Hospital site. Regent Blair moved that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be authorized to purchase for a Hospital site the land, near Catherine street, upon which Professor Pattengill had secured options, and that the Colmmittee secure such adjoining land as in their judgment would be desirable, and can be bought at reasonable prices.

Page  344 344 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. A call vote being taken on the motion, it was carried unanimously. On motion of Regent Blair, it was unanimously voted that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be requested to procure plans for a complete Hospital Building, and to build such part of the whole as the appropriation will admit; that specifications be made so as to provide 40 beds for the Homceopathic Department, and at least 64 beds for the Department of Medicine and Surgery; and also that the relative size of the administrative buildings be 2400 feet for the Homceopathic Department and 3600 feet for the Department of Medicine and Surgery. On motion of Regent Clark, the matter of water supply on the campus was placed in the hands of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, with power to act; they were also requested to consider the question of providing better water closets. The President submitted the report of the Executive Committee, as follows: The Executive Committee beg leave respectfully to report that in September in accordance with previous instructions from the Board they appointed Fred N. Scott, Ph. D., Instructor in English for one year, and Mellen W. Haskell, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics for the same period; and also that owing to the great influx of students into the classes in Mathematics they deemed it necessary to appoint on Oct. 5th, W. J. Hussey, B. S., a graduate of this University, Instructor in Mathematics for the coming year at the salary of $900. Owing to the large number of students in the Engineering Laboratory, they also at the same date authorized the employment of another skilled mechanic in that Laboratory. JAMES B. ANGELL, AUSTIN BLAIR, CHAS. R. WHITMAN. The report of the Executive Committee was adopted by the following vote:

Page  345 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 345 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. The following communication was read by Regent Clark: ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 14, 1889. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen: I beg to ask that the subject of Applied Chemistry be dropped from the title under which I serve the University, so that this shall read "Professor of Organic Chemistry and of Pharmacy," etc. The promotion of Professor Johnson (Minutes, 1889, p. 334), enables me to make this request. Respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Clark, the request of Dr. Prescott, relating to change of title, was granted. On motion of Regent Draper, Frank A. Waples, B. S., was appointed Assistant in Physiology, for one year, at the salary of $300, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved, that Miss Vida A. Latham be appointed Assistant in Pathology, for one year, at the salary of $300. The appointment was made as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, the legislative appropriation of $7,500 for the year 1889, for the purchase of books, was divided as follows: To the General Library, $5,000; to the Law Library, $1,500; and to the Medical Library, $1,000. Regent Blair submitted the following reselution, which was adopted: Resolved, That this Board will confer the degree of Master

Page  346 346 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. of Laws on any graduate of the Department of Law who pursues the study of Law in this University for one year after graduation, and who completes to the satisfaction of the Law Faculty such a course of study as may be required; and that the privilege thus extended to graduates of the Law Department of this University is also extended to graduates of other Law Schools, who can satisfy the Faculty of the Department of Law that the course of study for which they obtained their degrees were equivalent to the course of study required for the corresponding degree at the Law Department of this University. At the request of the Law Faculty, and on motion of Regent Clark, Professor Thomas M. Cooley, (now on leave of absence), was requested to give a course of 10 lectures on Inter-State Commerce Law, to advanced law students. On motion of Regent Clark, the Board took a recess to 7 o'clock P. i. EVENING SESSION. The Board re-assembled at 7 o'clock P. BI.,-full Board present, except Regent Willett. The President submitted his Annual Report which was adopted. It was ordered that it be printed in the minutes, and that the usual number of copies be provided for the use of the Board and the University. THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: I present you herewith my Annual Report for the year ending September 30th, 1889. The following changes have been made in the Faculties: At the meeting of the Board in October, 1888, Albert A. Stanley was elected Professor of Music; N. S. Hoff, D. D. S., who had been appointed temporarily, was appointed permanently Assistant Professor of Practical Dentistry; and J. N. Martin, M. D., was appointed Acting

Page  347 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 347 Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children in the Department of Medicine and Surgery (at first for one semester and afterwards, in December, for the whole year). In December, A. B. Stevens, Ph. C., received the permanent appointment of Instructor in Pharmacy. In April, 1889, John Dewey, Ph. D., was elected Professor of Philosophy in place of Professor George S. Morris, deceased. In June, Francis L. Kelsey, Ph. D., was appointed Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, J. E. Reighard, Ph. B., Assistant Professor of Zoology, Jerome C. Knowlton, A. B., Marshall Professor of Law, and John W. Langley, S, B., Non-resident Lecturer on the Metallurgy of Steel. The following appointments for one year were made: George W. Whyte, B. S., Instructor in Metallurgy and Assaying; David H. Browne, Instructor in Qualitative Analysis; F. G. Novy, M. S., Instructor in HIygiene; A. F. Lange, A. M., Instructor in German and Anglo-Saxon; Wm. W. Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy; Alexander Ziwet, C. E., Instructor in Mathematics; P. B. Maroou, Ph. D., Instructor in French; Joseph H. Drake, A. B., Instructor in Latin; Frank N. Cole, Ph. D., Instructor, and afterwards (in July) Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Lewis A. Rhoades, A. M., Instructor in German: Charles W. Belser, A. B.. Instructor in German and French. It was also voted that C. G. Taylor, B. S., Superintendent of Shops, should be deemed a member of the Faculty of the Literary Department with the rank of Assistant Professor. At the July meeting Professors Frothingham and Maclean tendered their resignations which were accepted. The vacancies thus caused were filled by the election of C. B. Nancrede, M. D., as Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, and of Flemming Carrow, M. D., as Professor

Page  348 348 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. of Ophthalmic and Aural Surgery, and Clinical Ophthalmology. Paul C. Freer, Ph. D., M. D., was chosen Lecturer on General Chemistry in the Literary and Medical Departments, and William H. Howell, Ph. D., Lecturer on Physiology and Histology in the same Departments. The following appointments to the Homoeopathic Faculty were made: Charles Gatchell, M. D., Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, Charles S. Mack, A. B., M. D., Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the place of Dr. Arndt, resigned, and D. A. McLachlan, M. D., was transferred from the chair of Theory and Practice to that of Ophthalmology, Otology and Paedology. The title of A. H. Pattengill, A. M., was changed from Associate Professor to Professor of Greek, and that of Otis C. Johnson, A. M., from Assistant Professor to Professor of Applied Chemistry. T.C.Trueblood, A.M.,was appointed Assistant Professor of Elocution, and Charles K. McGee, A. B., Instructor in General Chemistry. The following appointments for one year were made: Dr. James N. Martin, Acting Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, Dr. C. Georg, Instructor in Materia Medica and Therapeutics, G.O.Huber,M.D.,Instructor in Histology. In the month of September the following appointments for one year were made: Hon. H. B. Brown, LL. D., Lecturer on Admiralty in the Law Department; George Hempl, A. M., Acting Assistant Professor of English and Rhetoric; Fred N. Scott, Ph. D., Instructor in English; James H. Tufts, A. B., B. D., Instructor in Philosophy; Mellen W. Ilaskell, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics; Frank C. Smith, B. S., Instructor in Quantitative Analysis; George W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., Instructor in Electrical Engineering; F. C. Hicks,A.M., Assistant in Political Economy; Wm. A. Campbell. M. D., Instructor in Anatomy. Elmer Sanford, B. S., Instructor in Physiology, died on February 15, 1889, after a brief illness. Both as a student and as a teacher his work had awakened in the

Page  349 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 349 minds of those most familiar with it high expectations of his success in science. The impression made by his talent was heightened by his great modesty, simplicity of character, and devotion to duty. The University has rarely, if ever, been called to a more serious loss than it sustained in the death on March 23, 1889, of George Sylvester Morris, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy. He was appointed Professor of Modern Languages in 1870, and held that position until 1879, when he resigned to take a lectureship in philosophy in the Johns Hopkins University. In 1884 he was elected to the chair of philosophy in this University, and filled it until his death. In both chairs he taught with eminent success. His learning in several fields was ample, in philosophy it may be regarded as pre-eminent. By his writings he was well and favorably known to scholars in philosophy on both sides of the Atlantic. As a teacher he impressed his pupils profoundly by his rich culture, the strength and elevation of his character, his reverent devotion to truth, and the inspiring ethical and religious spirit of all his philosophic thinking. He was cut down suddenly in the very prime of his strength, while large plans were yet unexecuted. We had hoped, as he had, that many years of his ripest and most fruitful work were before him. His name and his memory will ever be cherished as one of the choicest possessions of the University. John W. Langley, S. B., M. D., Professor of General Chemistry and Metallurgy, who has been a member of the Literary and Medical Faculties for about fifteen years, has resigned his office to engage in other pursuits in Pittsburg, Pa. -Imbued as he is with the true scientific spirit, he has by his skill as a chemist, a metallurgist, and a lecturer rendered most valuable service to the University. Our regret at his resignation is mitigated by the fact that he is to give a brief course of lectures here on the metallurgy of steel.

Page  350 350 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. Henry Sewall, Ph. D., M. D., has been compelled by ill health to resign the chair of physiology, which he had filled for seven years. Bringing the best methods of modern research and exposition to his work, he has by the organization of the Physiological Laboratory and by his lucid instruction awakened such an interest in his department that we greatly regret his resignation. The Board of Regents have expressed in fitting terms the appreciation which they and all connected with the University have of the ability, learning and professional skill of Professors Frothingham and Maclean, who have for many years been in the service of this institution. The following degrees have been conferred: DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. Bachelor of Letters- -- 15 Bachelor of Science (course in Biology) --- —. --. Bachelor of Science (in Mining Engineering)- 4 Bachelor of Science (in Mechanical Engineering) —___-. 6 Bachelor of Science (in Civil Engineering) 10 Bachelor of Science (in General Science) 7- 7 Bachelor of Philosophy ------ _ 28 Bachelor of Arts -.- 36 Master of Letters-.- -- - 1 Master of Science --- —- ------ 2 Master of Arts --- --. --- --—....- 5 Doctor of Science -- 1 Doctor of Philosophy --- -. --- ----. 2 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery)- 82 Bachelor of Laws - —. --... --- —. — 148 Pharmaceutical Chemist ---—. 41 Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic Medical College) ---- 21 Doctor of Dental Surgery 35 445 HONORARY DEGREE. Doctor of Laws — -------- ---. — - 3 448 The attendance of students was as follows:

Page  351 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889, 351 DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Resident Graduates --—...... —.......... ---. —... 41 Graduates studying in absentia — -- -. 24 Candidates for a Degree -. -- 631 Students not Candidates for a Degree ---- - 130 - 826 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. Resident Graduates- - 5 Third Year Students — 89 Second Year Students_ - 128 First Year Students-.- 149 - 371 DEPARTMENT OF LAW. Seniors- -- —. ----. -- ------ 149 Juniors.......... —.-...-.......j ---.. 244 Special Students —.. 8 - 401 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. Resident Graduates -- -, 1 Second Year Students-.- --.-. 48 First Year Students -- - -- —.. 57 - 106 HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Students-Total in College 73 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Students-Total in College. ---G...s 108 Total in the University — —.__- 1885 The following statement shows the increase in numbers since 1884-5. TOTAL ATTENDANCE. In 1884-5 — -- 1285 In 1885-6 -* —. —.. 1391 In 1886-7.- -- 1562 In 1887-8- — 1667 In 1888-9. — - --- 1885 The attendance this last year was jnst 600 larger, (46.7 per cent.) than it was four years ago. The gain last year over the preceding year by Departments was follows: Literary, 79; Medical, 61; Law, 59; Pharmacy, 16; Den

Page  352 OCTOBER MEETING, 1888. tal, 4; the Honoeopathic College lost one; total gain, 218. Of candidates for higher degrees in the Literary Department the number has risen from 59 last year to 65 this year. At the time of the closing of this Report it is clear that during the year just beginning the attendance will be much larger than ever before, and will considerably exceed 2000. The number of women in attendance during the last two years was as follows: 1857-8 1888-9 Department of Literature, Science and the Arts --- 194 207 Department of Medicine and Surgery —. — 52 59 Department of Law- 2 3 School of Pharmady-. —.- -- -- 2 3 Honoceopathic Medical College - - - - 28 23 College of Dental Surgery-.. 6 6 284 301 The proportion of women is smaller by nearly one per cent. than it was last year. In 1887-8 they formed sixteen and nine-tenths of the whole body of students; in 1888-9 not quite sixteen per cent. In the Literary Department they number twenty-five per cent. of the whole, which is the same proportion as in 1886-7 and seven-tenths of one per cent. less than in 1887-8. Of the 65 candidates for higher degrees 13 were women. The number of schools with which we have established the " diploma relation " continues to increase. Last year there were 58. This year there are 71, of which 46 are in Michigan; of those in other states, 19 are in Illinois, 3 in Minnesota, and one each in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. Several of the State Universities have imitated our example in setting up this kind of connection with the schools in their vicinity to their own great advantage and to the advantage of the schools. No other system of coaperation of school and university has been found, which brings them into so harmonious relations and which

Page  353 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 353 impresses both so deeply with the fruitful truth that their interests are in large part identical, and that in order to discharge their full duty to the public they must work heartily together. We have received this year one gift of peculiar interest and value. Mrs. Elisha Jones has placed in the hands of the Regents as trustees the sum of ten thousand dollars for the endowment of one or more classical fellowships. The holder of the fellowship is to receive five hundred dollars a year. He is to be appointed by a Board of Examiners, consisting of the President of the University, the Senior Professor of Greek, the Senior Professor of Latin, and two other Professors of the Academic Faculty, to be chosen by the above named appointees. To be eligible to the fellowship the student must have been for three semesters a member of the Academic Department, must have made distinguished proficiency in Greek and Latin, and must be a Bachelor of Arts of not more than two years standing. When appointed he must make the Greek and Latin languages and literatures his chief subjects of study. The fellowship is tenable by one person for only two years. The second year may, if the Board of Examiners permit, be spent in study at Athens or Rome. An appointment to the fellowship has already been made. We prize this gift by Mrs. Jones, because it is intended by her as a memorial of her husband, who gave so large a part of his life to the service of the University in instruction in the classics, because it will furnish such encouragement to advanced study of the ancient languages and literatures, and because as the first instance of the endowment of a fellowship in this University it may be reasonably expected to stimulate other large-hearted donors to endow fellowships. The Regents desire it to be understood, that as in this case they will whenever desired as trustees accept funds for the endowment of scholarships, fellowships, professorships or for aiding the University in any manner, and keep such funds forever entirely

Page  354 354 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. separate from all other funds of the University, and invest them to the best of their ability, and administer them so as to accomplish the objects of the donors. It is a great mistake to suppose that we have not sore need of private benefactions with which to enlarge the usefulness of the University. There is not a penny at our disposal for the aid in any way of a poor student, however needy and meritorious he may be. The endowment of some of our professorships, the establishment of a fund for the more rapid increase of our libraries, the purchase of a playground, the erection of a gymnasium, any or all these modes of assistance would be most welcome to us and most suitable for private beneficence. Our work so grows upon our hands, the demands upon our resources so rapidly multiply, we are now cramped at so many points that notwithstanding the great and continued generosity of the state, we cannot refrain from expressing the hope that our alumni and other generous men and women will from time to time supplement the legislative appropriations by donations for special purposes, as some of them have already done. The work of the various Departments has gone on smoothly and successfully during the year. The unprecedented number of new students, who have joined us, about four hundred, somewhat unduly crowded the sections in the more elementary studies, especially those beginning the modern languages and history. We have slightly increased the teaching force for the modern languages. It is certain that we must soon add to our corps of instructors. The completion of the Engineering Laboratory will now enable us to handle more efficiently the increasing number of engineering students. But the rooms assigned to the study of civil engineering in the south wing are inadequate to the proper accommodation of the large classes crowded into them. We must soon find ample space for them somewhere. The great interest in the application of electricity to the arts of life has led us to establish a spec

Page  355 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 355 ific course in electrical engineering, as most of the scientific schools in the country have done. The demand for young men well trained in this branch is rapidly increasing, and we have regarded it as our duty to meet the call which is made on us for thorough instruction in it. We have also decided to make a change of some importance in the requirements for admission. We have long desired to require some scientific training of students entering on the courses leading to the degrees of A. B. and Ph. B. We have delayed asking it, partly because some schools were ill-prepared to give the necessary instruction in science, and partly because it was thought difficult, if not impossible, for some schools which were prepared to teach elementary science to add it to the instruction we asked in other branches without unduly lengthening the period of preparatory study. But we believe the time has arrived when by slight concessions on our part in certain requirements and by some revision of the school courses, the result can be accomplished. Accordingly students entering as candidates for A. B. or Ph. B. next year will be asked to present preparation in physics and botany. Some of the advantages anticipated from this change are the following: The classical students will have had the disciplinary advantage of a little scientific training. They will be better fitted to make wisely their elections between linguistic and scientific studies, when the time for election comes. The elementary teaching of physics and botany can be dropped from the collegiate course, since the candidates for the degrees of B. S. and B. L. are already required to have the preparation in those branches now demanded of the students of Latin and Greek. The classical courses will be made more popular in the schools. Many persons object to them now, because they provide no instruction in science. For these reasons we regard the modification of our requirements as a marked improvement. We have also altered the requirements for admission

Page  356 356 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. to the course leading to the degree of B. L. We have decided to ask for preparation in three sciences instead of in two only, or for preparation inthe modern languages in lieu of that in the sciences. We find on inquiry that a pretty large number even of the high schools in the smaller towns can furnish good preparation in German, even when they are indifferently prepared to teach the sciences in the modern methods. We prefer to encourage them to do what they can do well rather than to attempt what they cannot do well. We do not desire to make frequent changes in our requirements for admission. But these now announced have been under consideration for some years and have been made only after very full consultation with a large number of superintendents, principals and other teachers in our high schools. A little time may be required for the schools to adjust their courses fully to our requirements, and during that time we shall be reasonable and generous in our interpretation of the requirements. Our fixed purpose is to work in the most harmonious cooperation with our schools and never to make any demands of them which they cannot fairly meet. We may at this time, as we have so often before had occasion to do, express our grateful appreciation of the heartiness with which they have attempted to comply with our request for a change in their courses. But we believe that the change will be as helpful to them as it will be to us. There has not been a single case in the Literary Department calling for discipline on account of misconduct. Indeed of late years such cases have become exceedingly rare. Nothing could be more gratifying than the general demeanor of the students and their relations with their teachers. The days when riotous behavior, gross immorality, and a spirit of insubordination were deemed necessary to prevent college life from becoming dull, if they were ever known here, as they certainly were in some colleges, are apparently gone, never to return.

Page  357 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 357 The Department of Medicine and Surgery, notwithstanding the absence of some of its regular professors, and the public discussion to which the policy marked out for it by the Regents has been subjected, has had a successsful year. The vacancies caused by the very unusual number of four resignations of professors during the year have been filled by men, who, we have good reason to hope, will do their full part in maintaining the reputation of the school. The curriculum has been very carefully revised and, it is believed, improved. Under the conviction that in order to raise the standard of medical education a more prolonged course than three years is necessary, the authorities have decided that students hereafter shall be required to have given four years to medical study before graduating, though for the present one of the years may be spent in the office of a preceptor. The legislature having granted us fifty thousand dollars for the erection of a new hospital on condition that the city of Ann Arbor should give twenty-five thousand dollars for the same purpose, the citizens of Ann Arbor voted almost unanimously to authorize the gift on which the legislative appropriation was conditioned. The vote was, ayes, 936; nays, 10. When we remember that the city has only about ten thousand inhabitants, and that among them are hardly any men of large wealth, it must be conceded that their act is one of great generosity. A gift proportionally great by a city as populous as Detroit would be more than half a million dollars. It is our purpose to build a good hospital, though of course the sum at our disposal will not suffice for the erection of a large one. We believe that on the completion of this new structure our clinical facilities may be made reasonably satisfactory. The Hygienic Laboratory. which holds a common relation to the Medical and the Literary Department and a certain public relation to the State, has received as many students as in its unfinished rooms it could accommodate.

Page  358 358 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. A considerable number of analyses, which were of importance in determining sanitary questions for towns and cities in Michigan, have been made, Important researches concerning the origin and cause of diseases, especially of typhoid fever, have been carried on. The appropriation made by the legislature has now enabled us to complete the furnishing and equipment of the Laboratory so that a much larger number of students can be accommodated hereafter, and research can be continued more advantageously. The Law Department has had a year of unusual prosperity. Never but once before in its history, even when the course was only two-thirds as long as it is now, and when law schools were few in number, did the attendance reach that of the year past. It is certain that during the coming year the number of students will be greater than ever before. The demands on the student for work are more exacting than they have been heretofore. The experiment of calling in non-resident lecturers for brief courses on special topics has been continued with satisfactory results. The question of extending the course to three years for such students as choose to take it, and to have their extended study recognized by some appropriate degree has been and still is under consideration. The ease with which students are admitted to practice in this and some other states after a briefer term of study presents some obstacles to requiring three years for graduation. But the fact that some of the leading schools in the country have extended their course to three years forces on us the inquiry how long we can afford to ask less work than they, as a condition of winning the degree of Bachelor of Laws. The work of the Homeopathic Medical College has been carried on quietly and successfully. Its requirements for graduation are so much higher than those of most of the Homoeopathic Schools of Medicine in this country that we need not be surprised that the number of its students is not yet so large as its friends had antici

Page  359 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 359 pated. But the sterling character of the instruction it gives must in due time attract such students as desire thorough training. The scope of its work is to be somewhat enlarged at once. The thorough course of our School of Pharmacy, which has given it a national reputation, draws to its classes a large number of well prepared students. To accommodate them and the increasing number of students from the other departments who engage in the study of chemistry, it has become necessary to make another addition to our Chemical Laboratory. Although we can now accommodate nearly three hundred students at our tables, we have been obliged for the past year to set apart a room in University Hall for chemical work. This has involved some risk from fire to that building, and has subjected the occupants of some of our recitation.rooms to inconvenience from the fumes and odors generated in the laboratory work. The enlargement of the Laboratory, which the generosity of the legislature enables us now to make, will not only furnish us the needed room for tables, but will also furnish another fine lecture room and accommodations for our pharmaceutical and chemical museum, which has never been properly provided for. The Dental College reaps the reward of a high reputation by being crowded with more students than it has room to take care of. Clearly, the enlargement of its quarters cannot be postponed much longer; unless we set a limit to the number of its students. The graded three years' course is now well organized. It is gratifying to be able to infer from the large attendance that the sense of the profession is favorable to our increase in requirements for graduation. The increase in the number of the students in our professional schools has been so great that in my opinion the time has come for us to raise the requirements for admission to them. It would not be expedient at once to lift the standard to the height which we may hope to attain 2

Page  360 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. in a few years. But we can make some decided advance. It is certain that the legal and medical and dental professions will sustain us in such an effort. We may temporarily sustain.some slight diminution in numbers- though that result is not certain. But we shall gain in quality more than we shall lose in quantity. It is to be hoped that the change here recommended may be undertaken with courage and zeal. The report of the Librarian shows that the total number of volumes in all our Libraries is 70,041, of pamphlets 14,626, of maps 514. 'The increase for the year has been, of volumes 2,282, pamphlets 734, of maps 250. So far as it has been possible to record the number of volumes called for during the year, it appears that 95,076 volumes have been used. Notwithstanding the appropriations made for the Library by the legislature we greatly need ampler means for the purchase of books. To supply the wants of a University like this we need at once at least twice as many volumes as we now possess. From the reports of the Curators of the Museums I gather the following facts. Considerable additions have been made to the Museum of Zoology. Chief among these additions are specimens brought from the Philippine Islands by Professor Steere last year. A valuable collection of several thousand beetles, chiefly North American, has been presented by Dr. Harold B. Wilson, of Detroit. A collection of Mexican birds (ten species) new to our museum was given by Mr. Arthur Moore. A considerable number of other donors have sent zoological specimens of interest. Some progress has been made in identifying and classifying our zoological collections. The need for supplying cases to our only remaining vacant room is urgent. We have abundance of material for filling them. It is highly desirable that new registration books should be provided and that the collections should be registered anew. The mineralogical collection has been enriched by a

Page  361 OCTOBER MEETIZNG, 1889. 361 valuable set of minerals from Colorado and: abjoining territories through the generosity of Richard Pearce, Esq., of Denver. The most important additions to the Art Museum are the oil portrait of IPhilo Parsons, Esq., of Detroit, the donor of the Parsons Library, and the cast of the statue of Gen. Cass, which was placed by Michigai in the rotunda of the Capitol at Washington. The sculptor is D. C. French. It is due to the kind offices of Mr. Philo Parsons and the generosity of Mr. French that we have received this cast of the statue, which does so high honor to the artist. Few, if any, more successful portrait statues have come from the chisel of any American sculptor. It is eminently fitting that the statue of Cass, who played so important a part in the early history of this State, and wlo was once a Regent of the University, should stand in our halls. Dr. Rominger has made some valuable additions to the Rominger collection of paleontology and has made several hundred thin sections of specimens for microscopic study. There is nothing of special importance to report from our other museums. The legislature evinced a sympathetic appreciation of our needs by passing a generous appropriation bill with very few dissenting votes in the House and not one in the Senate. It provided the following supplies for the calendar years 1889 and 1890. 1889. 1890. Repairs --— $ 4,000 $ 4,000 Homoeopathic College and Hospital ---- 8,200 8,200 University Hospital — ------ 6,000 6,000 Dental College -------------- 10,000 10,000 Rogers Collection-transporting and placing_ 5,000 Books for Libraries ---- 7,500 7,500 Contingent Expenses --- - 12,500 12,500 Completion of Engineering Laboratory --- — 2,000 Completion' of Boiler House and Steam Connections — - --- ---- 5,930 45 Construction of Anatomical Laboratory — 7,958.63

Page  362 362 OCTOBER _MEETING, 1889. Equipment of Engineering Laboratory ---- 4,000 3,000 Instruments for Department of Civil Engineering ----- 1,000 1,000 Furniture and Apparatus for Hygienic Laboratory --- — - - _ _ ___- 3,000 3,000 Enlargement of Dental College Building ---- 3,000 Fence around University Grounds ----_ 500 Addition to Chemical Laboratory ---- 10,500 10,500 New Hospital ---- - --- 25,000 25,000 $116,089.08 $90,700 That makes the total appropriation for two years $206,789.08. Our Finance Report shows that by great vigilance and economy and by the aid of large receipts from our exceptionally large attendance we have been able to keep our expenses within our receipts. The opportunities, we mlay say the necessity, for enlarging and improving our work are so constantly pressing us for larger outlay in one direction and another that our General Fund has always to be guarded with the greatest care. The Auditing Board who are charged with minor expenditures for the current supply of the needs of the several departments often find themselves under the unpleasant necessity of refusing requisitions which they would gladly grant. What has often been,,said in these Reports cannot be too often repeated or too deeply impressed on the friends of the University, namely, that however urgent are many special needs of this institution, its greatest need is a permanent addition to its General Fund. It is to be ardently hoped that either by private benefactions or by legislative action this result may be attained. JAMES B. ANGELL. The following report of the Librarian was presented, and adopted. It was ordered that it be printed in the minutes, and that 100 extra copies be bound for the use of the Board.

Page  363 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 363 To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit the following as my report for the College year, 1888-9: There were in the Libraries of the University, Sept. 30, 1889, 70,041 volumes, 14,626 unbound pamphlets, and 514 maps. Of these there were in the General Library, 55,703 volumes, 13,440 unbound pamphlets, and 514 maps; in the Law Library, 9,953 volumes; in the Medical Library, 3,903 volumes and 983 unbound pamphlets; and in the Library of the Dental College, 482 volumes. During the year 248 periodicals have been regularly received, as follows: in the General Library, 174; in the Medical Library, 54; in the Law Library, 7; and in the Library of the Dental College, 13. THE GENERAL LIBRARY. The additions to the General Library during the year have been 1,866 volumes, 664 pamphlets and 250 maps. Of these, 668 volumes, 168 pamphlets, and 1 map were bought; 1,025 volumes, 496 pamphlets, and 249 maps were given, and 173 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total amount of all bills certified to by me for purchases made was $2,547.83. Of this sum $1,693.58 were for books and pamphlets, $583.16 were for subscriptions to periodicals, and $271.09 tor binding and mending. In addition to these sums, which were paid from the special appropriation for the purchase of books, $76 50 were paid from the current expense fund for tickets for readers, catalogue cards, etc. While the gifts constitute the greater part of the accessions of all kinds, there have been no great benefactions, as last year. However desirable it may be on many accounts to mention all who have remembered us kindly, it is impossible to do so in a report of this nature. I will take time, however, to mention in the briefest way the more important gifts. Messrs. Longmans, Green & Co., Publishers, of London and New York have given 160 volumes of their publications. Through the late Professor Morris, from an unknown friend, sufficient money was received to purchase 95 volumes of important philosophical works. From Professor E. L. Walter were received 60 volumes of miscellaneous works. From Clarence M. Burton, Esq., of Detroit, were received 80 volumes of historical books, relating largely to the French Revolution and the first Empire. Other benefactors were Mrs. Palmer and Mrs. Williams. The 3

Page  364 361 OCTOBER JIIEETING, 1889. books given by them had belonged to the libraries, respectively, of Doctor A. B. Palmer, and Professor Geo. P. Williams. Others that should be named are Mrs. S. S. Garrigues, Mr. Howard Holmes, Dr. L. G. Doane, of New York City, Dr. S. A. Green, of Boston, Mrs M. C. Jordan, of Pittsfield, Mass., the Christian Association, of Chicago, (their publications) Dr. S. A. Jones, of Ann Arbor, and of the University, President Angell, Professors Demmon, Harrington, Hinsdale, Hudson, and Messrs. Burnett, and Estes, formerly instructors. The large increase in the number of maps is due to the receipt, from the Office of the United States Geological Survey, of the Topographical Map of the United States which is in course of publication at that office. Copies of the sheets of this map have not been widely distributed. The library owes its copy to the kind offices of Hon. E. P. Allen, Member of Congress from this district. We are able to make a record of some of the uses of the library, while of other uses it is impossible to do so. The following statistics show the recorded use: 'No. of volumes drawn out and used in the Reading Room —,.. ----— 92,628 No. drawn out by Professors -— _ --- —----------- - 2,448 A total of --- —---------------------— 95,078 Tickets of admission to the book-room were granted to 23 persons who made 390 visits to the shelves. During the two semesters 264 students were admitted to the Seminary Roonms-193 to the west room for the study of English, German and French literature, the Greek language and literature, and Art-and 71 to the east room for the study of History, Political Economy,, Philosophy, and the Art of Teaching. This is a gain in use over the previous year, except in the one particular of admission to the book-room. The falling off here is explained by the fact that admission was restricted. It had been found that books were misplaced on the shelves to such an extent as to affect unfavorably the service of the library. That this was owing in no small degree to the handling of the books by persons inexperienced and without particular responsibility, was probable, and made the restriction as to the number that should enter the book-room, necessary. As in previous years many of the books have been subjected to constant use and they are necessarily the worse for it. Constant repairs are made, but a number of works must soon be replaced by new copies. A few volumes have been missed, but

Page  365 OCTOBER MiEETING, 1889. 365 the misplacing to which I have referred may account for their disappearance-I am not yet ready to report them lost. The changes in the library force have been numerous. Mr. F. N. Scott, Assistant Librarian, was last summer transfered to the teaching force. This position of Assistant Librarian has not been filled. T'he duties of it, except cataloguing, have been assigned to Mr. A. H. Hopkins, general assistant, with an increase of pay. For the cataloguing, Mr. F. P. Jordan, of the class of 1879, and for several years librarian of the Public School Library at Battle Creek, has been engaged at $700 per year. Of the two attendants in charge of the Seminary Rooms, Mr. Leslie, and Mr. Yeijiro Ono, Mr. Leslie continues his service another year. Mr. Ono desired to remain, also, but was called home to Japan by the death of his father. His place has been filled by Mr. A. L. Colton. At the desk Mr. A. H. Veysey and Mr. C. L. Meader have succeeded Mr. I. G. McColl and Mr. J. L. McAllister. It is the policy of the Library Committee in making these appointments to prefer, other things being equal, students who are working their way through College. This policy is praiseworthy, but there is an objection to it when applied to positions other than those at the desk, and in the Seminary Rooms. It is that the term of service must be brief-one year, usually-and must be spent by the employee in learning his duties, rather than in performing them efficiently. The necessity for permanency in these more important places has now become very apparent. There should be a permanent assistant librarian, one familiar with all the affairs of the library, qualified by experience to share in all the routine duties and, also, able to assume the direction of affairs, if the necessity should arise. There is now much more cataloguing than one person constantly employed can perform. Mr. Jordan brings to his work an extensive knowledge of languages and no inconsiderable experience. His position, that of assistant in charge of the catalogue should be a permanent one, as well as that of assistant librarian. Circumstances make it impossible to recommend any specific action on the subject at this time; but I feel confident that the experiences of the year upon which we have now entered will enable us to make recommendations at its close in June next.

Page  366 366 OCTOBER MEETIG', 1889. THE OTHER LIBRARIES. The additions to the Medical Library were 196 volumes and 70 pamphlets. Of these 86 volumes and 50 pamphlets were bought, 24 volumes and 20 pamphlets were presented, and 88 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to for this library, for the year, was $449.07. The items were as follows: For books and pamphlets -- --------------— 127 52 For periodicals --- —------------- 259.10 For binding and mending --- —--------- ----- 62.45 Total --- —-------------- $449.07 To the Law Library there have been added during the year 170 volumes, and to the Library of the Dental College 50 volumes. Very respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Oct. 15, 1889. Librarian. Regent Draper moved that the following appointments be made in the Homoeopathic Medical College for one year: R. S. Copeland, M. D., to be Resident Physician and Surgeon, at the salary of $350; V. D. Garwood, M. D., to be Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, at the salary of $100; and also to be Assistant to the Chair of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, at the salary of $100. The vote on this motion was as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. By request, Professors Ford, Nancrede, Howell and Herdman addressed the Board on matters pertaining to the Medical Department. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into executive session, after which the business of the open session was resumed. Regent Hebard presented the report of the Finance Committee, which was adopted and ordered printed in the minutes.

Page  367 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 367 To the Honorable Board of Regents: Your Finance Committee herewith respectfully submit their estimate of receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1890, also the Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements for the year ending June 30th, 1889. Your committee has caused the books and vouchers of the Secretary and Treasurer to be carefully examined, each item checked and verified and are pleased to report that only slight errors have been found and those of a character almost impossible to avoid in such a mass of accounts and separate transactions. It will be noted that the expected deficit at the close of the last fiscal year does not appear. This fact arose partly from the increase in students' fees and partly on account of certain unexpended balances. In this connection your attention is called to the fact that notwithstanding the large increase in receipts estimated for the present fiscal year, they are nearly equalled by the expenditures as estimated. The only point of elasticity in our finances appears to be in the students' fees. It is suggested as unwise to draw too heavily upon the estimated increase in these fees by permanent appropriations. All which is respectfully submitted. CHARLES J. WILLETT, Chairrman. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, July 1st, 1889 --- —---------— $ 15,617 93 To be received from the State on the following accounta: To be received from University Interest --- —------------------ 38,000 60 " " ' 1-20 Mill Tax ___ --- —- -_ __ — 47,272 50 6 "( t I-IHomo. College and Hospital ------ --- 14,200 00 " " " University Hospital _ --- —--------- 6,000 00,( <(" " College of Dental Surgery ---_ --- —___ - 10,000 00 "l " " Equipment for Hygienic Laboratory-., --— _ 3,000 00 "' " " Contingent Expenses --- ----------- 12,500 00.l..." Books for Libraries. --- —----— 7 --- —-___ 7,500 00 " " c" Repairs ---- --------- ------ - 4,000 00 (" " " Fence ----------------------- --- -- 500 00 LL ". Purchase of Instruments ffor,Engineering Department -------- -- 1,000 00 6" " " Addition to the Chemical Laboratory -- 10,500 00... " Completion and Equipment of Engineering Laboratory- ____ --- —-- 6,000 00...;.. Enlargement of Dental College Building -.._ 3 3 000 00 " (" for Purchase of a Site and Erection of a Hospital Building ------------- - 25,000 00 "1 "( " Transportation of the Rogers' Collection ---- 5,000 00 (" " "L' Overdraft on Steam Heating Plant -— __ — _ 5 930 45 "((. " Cost of Anatomical Building —__ ---- 7,958 63

Page  368 368 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. To be received from Sale of Dental Supplies ---- --- 2,500 00 (" " " Sales at University Hospital —8 --- —-- 00 00." " " Sales at Iomoenpathic Hospital __-.- __ - 200 00 c" " " Interest on Bank Deposits — ------ 1,000 00 "" " t( Students' Fees ~. ----—.. --- — 85,000 00 $312,479 51 ESTIMATED DISBURSEMENTS. I I I For salaries of Professors, Officers, and Employees: n the College of Dental Surgery -_____-__-__-_ --- —-- --— _ 8,850 00 Homceopathic College — ___- ------ -- 11,200 00 " University Hospital - --- ---- ---- 2,500 00 n all other Departments _ _ ___ --- -- - -----— _- 148,144 16 For Alterations and Repairs --- —---- ------------ 4630 00 " Current Expenses in General Library_. --- —------ 500 00 " Fuel and Lights --- —---------------- 12,000 00 - Care of Grounds --------------- 500 00 Postage ------------------------- 1,000 00 "Insurance -------------------- - 2,000 00 Calendar, Regents' Proceedings, and Miscellaneous Printing-_ 2,500 00 "Current Expenses of Museum ------- --------- 300 00 " Supplies for Chemical Laboratory -- - -------- 9,000 00 " "' " Botanical " -— _- 500 00 '" ' Histological L" _ --- — -- - __ - 300 00,' " Physiological _____ --- —--------------- 500 00 (" " Engineering " ----- 1,000 00 " L Physical --- —-- 500 00 Z Zoological " - - — _-_ -_ -_- 6 00 00 " " " General Chemistry --- —------- 1,000 00 Current Expenses in the Department of Civil Engineering-_ 500 00 " t' " Astronomical Observatory -------- 300 00 "Anatomical Material __ --- — --------- _- 3,000 00 Advertising the Literary Department- ------------- 400 00 " kt ". Law - --------- ---------- 400 00 " ' " tlMedical --- ---- ----- 200 00 " " " Pharmacy -" ----— ____ - 200 00 Use of Water Privilege -------- -- ---------- 125 00 " Purchasing and filling Diplomas ----------- 800 00 " Commencement Expenses ----------, 1,200 00 " Taxes and Improvements on Lots in Springwells --— _ ___ — 300 00 "Expenses on General Catalogue ------------ 1,000 00 "Purchase of Dental Supplies ---- - ------------- 2,500 00 Current Expenses of University Hospital. _ —.-_ — 4,500 00 ' " Li "' Dental Department --- —- ----- 1,150 00 " Current Expenses of Homo. College and Hospital ----- 4,000 00 Purchase of Books for Libraries ---- ---------- 8,353 20 " '; " "lApparatus for Natural Philosophy ---_ ----— _ 992 65 "Equipment of Hygienic Laboratory --- —--- ----- 3,000 00 "Current Expenses of Pathological Laboratory --- —------ 600 00 "Completion and Equipment of Engineering Laboratory --— __ 6,000 00

Page  369 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 369 For Purchase of Instruments for Civil Engineering_ --- —----- 1,000 00 ' Addition to the Chemical Laboratory__ _ --- —--------- 10,500 00 Purchase of Site and Erection of a Hospital Building --— ___-__ 25,000 00 "Enlargement of Dental College Building ---------- 3,000 00 Fence -_ _ __ --- —------------ 500 00 Scientific Laboratories — _ --------------------- 925 00 "Apparatus for Physiological Laboratory-___ ---- ---- 152 00 " Contingent Expenses -------------------- ]2,500 00 Estimated Balance on hand June 30th, 1889 — ____ ---- 11,857 50 $312,479 51 TREASURER'S REPORT. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit my annual report for the year ending June 30th, 1889. Respectfully, H. SOULE, TREASURER. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, July 1st. 1888 ---------- $ 8,37 57 From State Treasurer Account Current Expenses-.. —_ 85,729 37 From State Treasurer Account Special Appropriation-_ 50,450 00 From Goethe Fund. Interest on Deposit ---- - 46 71 From Earnings of the University --- —--- --- 101,873 92 $246,427 57 DISBURSEMENTS. Paid General Fund Accounts _ ----$ --- —167,068 70 Paid Special Fund Accounts --- —--------- 63,740 94 Balance in Treasury, June 30th, 1889 --------- 15,617 93 $246,427 57 The following detailed and classified statements exhibit the condition of the several funds: GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 ------------ 8,377 06 From State Treasurer Acct 1-20 Mill Tax $_ ---- 47,272 50... " "t University Interest _ --- —- 38,456 87 " Auditor General Acct University Hospital ---- 111 85 " Sale of Material " " " 2,408 52 '" "' " "( t Homceopathic Hospital _- 351 91 " " " " t" Dental Operating Room —. 3,056 22 ". '" " " to Medical Schools ___ --- —-.- 143 50 " First National Bank of Ann Arbor, Interest — __ 2,587 33 ' Miscellaneous Sources__- _ ___ ___ --- 582 75 94,971 45 Students' Fees, Acct. Medical Department --— __ 15,055 00 6" ".." " Literary " -- 25,815 00 '"l "(< " Law c ------ 18,910 00 "< " i '6 Dental " - 4,470 CO " " " t" Homceopathic Departm't _ 2,580 00 "t " Chemical Laboratory -— _ 10,806 65 t" " " " Mechanical Laboratory -- 631 00

Page  370 370 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. From Students' Fees Acct. Pharmacy- -- - 4,285 00 "c " ' " Key Deposits -,__ --- —-- 258 00 "s n o " L General Chemistry -- ---- 130 00 " ".(. " " Practical Anatomy -___ ---- 3,270 00 " " Botanical Laboratory- 219 00 " " " " Physiological Laboratory-_ 90 00 " " "L " Zoological " - 90 00...... 6" Microscopical " _ 201 00 " A " " Histological " _ 741 00 r " i; " Pathological " _ 236 00 c" 't " "t Hygienic " _ 354 19 ".. " "' Diplomas.__., --- —------ 4,490 00 92,631 84 $195,980 35 Students' Fees, Total --- 92,681 34 " " Refunded ----- 5,465 96 Net -------- 87,215 38 DISBURSEMIENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. General Pay Roll of Officers and Employees --- ---- $136,144 16 Vouchers Paid Account Students' Fees Refunded _ ---- 5,465 96 1( " " " Fuel and Lights.___ --- —-— _ - 7,986 66 " " " General Library ------- 192 85 " " Museum --- --- 381 24 " "L Advertising Medical Dept --- 209 13 "L "t (" " Law " -_L- 119 00 * " " i '( " PaPharmacy Dept__ 54 50 "... " Miscellaneous Printing --- —- 408 30 ("" " Civil Engineering ----- 632 86 c{ o '6 ~Chemical Laboratory ----- 8,337 17 " Histological " _- _ 117 06 * * "L' " Botanical - 104 03 "( " t" Physical " 19 03 " "L "s Physiological " ---- 90 31 Vouchers Paid Account Microscopical Laboratory_ --- 34 95.( t" '. M.echanical " -- 666 81 l" "( " Zoological ( — _ 212 86 " " " Pathological ____ --- 653 25.." i' Hygienic - __ --- 33 48 ".. " Anatomical ----- 178 73 "," " General Chemistry- ___ ---- 267 76 " "< " " Astronomical (bservatory _ — 78 63 "t "..Dental Operating Roomr ---- 2,395 64 Anatomical Material ------- 1,604 53 ".. " Postage ---- — __ 629 80 ( " " t Calendar --- —--- - 50 00 167,068 70 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 ---- ---—. 28,911 65 $195,980 35

Page  371 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 371 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888- ------- 926 49 From State Treasurer ----------------- 3,000 00 3,926 49 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees --- —- 2,300 00 " Vouchers for Expenses --- —-------- -- 153 81 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 ------ 1,472 68 3,926 49 HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 --------- - 3,817 93 From State Treasurer -, --- —------- - 6,200 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 - ____ --- — 1,972 49 11,990 42 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees ------ 7,640 00 " Vouchers for Expenses __, ---_ --- —----- 4,350 42 11,990 42 GENERAL LIBRARY. Receipts. From State Treasurer _ ---- - ___ —__ —_. 5,000 00 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1888. --- —_ __ --- - - 438 79 Paid Vouchers for Expenses_ ----------- --- 3,708 01 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 ____ --- —- 853 20 5,000 00 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888- ------ -- - 626 22 From State Treasurer --- —------------ 2,500 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 --- ------- 2,050 40 5,176 62 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Resident Physician and Employees-. 2,015 00 Paid Vouchers for Expenses - -------------- 3,161 62 5,176 62 CONTINGENT. Receipts. From State Treasurer ----6 --- —----- --- 6,250 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 ------------ 423 44 6,673 44 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1888 ----------- - 426 11 Paid Vouchers for Expenses ------ --- 6,247 33 6,673 44

Page  372 372 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. REPAIRS. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888_ ---------- - 838 44 From State Treasurer -—. --- —----------- 5,000 00 5,838 44 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses ___ ---- _ --- 5,209 09 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 -------- 629 35 5,838 44 PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 ---- --- ---- 152 14 152 14 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889_ ---___ _ ---- - 152 14 152 14 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888__ - ____ --- 495 28 From State Treasurer_ ----- ------- -- 4,000 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 —__ ---_ --- — - 4,503 48 8,998 76 Disbursements. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees --- ---- 8,441 67 " Vouchers for Expenses -------------- 557 09 8,998 76 ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 --—.. --- —-------- 1,026 42 1,026 42 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses ------------ 80 38 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 ---... --- 946 04 1,026 42 GOETHE FUND. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 ----- ---- 437 95 From Interest on Deposits... --- —------ - - 46 71 484 66 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses --- ---------- 21 25 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 --- —----- 463 41 484 66 DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. (PHYSICAL LABORATORY.) Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 -- 1,052 40 From State Treasurer --- —---------- -- 1,000 00 2,052 40 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses --- —-------- 1,059 75 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 ---- ------ 992 65 2,052 40

Page  373 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. REMOVAL OF ROGERS' GIFTS. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 ---------- Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1888 ---- ------ 4 00 Paid Vouchers for Expenses ---_ --- —--- --- 4,837 81 SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES. Receipts, From State Treasurer — --—. ------ Disbursements. 373 4,841 81 4,841 81 15,000 00 15,000 00 Balance Overdrawn July Ist, 1888 --- — -------- Paid Vouchers for Expenses ____ ---_ --- —-- Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 --- -------- CHEMICAL VAULT. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1888 ---------- Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Construction --- —-----------—.. 1,003 20 13,071 50 925 30 400 00 400 00 400 00 400 00 BOILER HOUSE. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1889______ — __ --- Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, L888 —_. --- —--------- Paid Vouchers for Expenses --- ---------- HYGIENIC LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1?89 -------- Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses — --------------- ADDITIONAL SALARIES. Receipts. 5,934 92 5,450 66 484 26 5,934 92 1 95 1 95 1 95 From State Treasurer --- —------- 2,500 00 Disb ursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1888 --- — -- 2,500 00 The Balances in the Treasury June 30th, 1889, are as follows: SPECIAL FUNDS. 2,500 00 2,500 00 Homceopathic College General Library — Physiological Laborat( 1,472 68 853 20 152 14 )ry --- -----

Page  374 374 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. Natural Philosophy --- —- -- ----------- 992 65 Engineering Laboratory --- — ---------- 946 04 Repairs -_ --- —------------------ 629 35 Goethe Fund (this is a Donation Fund) -------- 463 41 Scientific Laboratories --- —- ------ 925 30 6,434 77 Less Overdrawn Acct's Honmoeopathic Coll'ge & Hosp'l. 1,972 49 " " "University Hospital- ---- 2,050 40 " ' " Dental College --- ---- - 4,503 48 " "b Removal of Rogers' Gifts --- — 4,841 81 tt" " " Contingent --- —-- -- 423 44 '" " " -Boiler House ------- 5,934 92 "' " " Hygienic Laboratory ---_- _ 1 95 $ 19,728 49 Special Funds Overdrawn June 30th, 1889 ------ -- 13,293 72 GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1889 --- —--------- 28,911 65 Less Amount to Special Acct's Overdrawn --------- 13,293 72 Net Balance June 30th, 1889 --- —----- 15,617 93 Estimate of receipts and disbursements for the year ending June 30th, 1890: A communication was received from Corydon L. Ford, 2d, asking that the Board confer upon him the degree of M. D. On motion of Regent Whitman the communication was referred to the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Regent Blair moved that the matter of repairing the dome of the Observatory be referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, with power to proceed to make the necessary repairs. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved the appointment of Fred Morley, B. S., to be Assistant in Drawing and Surveying for one year, at the salary of $300. The motion prevailed by the following vote:

Page  375 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 375 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the Auditing Board were authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $200 in providing additional assistance in the Zoological Laboratory by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman moved that the sum of $340 be appropriated for the purchase of apparatus for the Department of General Chemistry. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that D. G. Coolidge,-M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of the Nervous System in the Department of Medicine and Surgery for one year, at the salary of $100; And Regent Butterfield moved that F.W. Brewer, M. D., be appointed Assistant in the Hygienic Laboratory for one year, at the salary of $400. The above appointments were made by the following votes: Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman presented the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That when the Building Committee is in readiness to purchase the site for the University Hospitals, the Treasurer shall make requisition upon the City Treasurer of the City of Ann Arbor for the twenty-five thousand dollars contributed by

Page  376 376 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. said City for the purchase of site and construction of said Hospitals. Ou motion of Regent Clark, Dr. Albert Shaw, of Minneapolis, was invited to give five lectures on Municipal Government in Europe. Regent Kiefer submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the thanks of the Board be returned to the Curatorium of the Kaiser Wilhelm University in Strasburg for furnishing the statistics, regulations and other documents of said University. On motion of Regent Draper the following appropriations were made: For the purchase of skeletons, $75; for the purchase of manikins, $375, for use in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and $200 for the purchase of models for the Physiological Laboratory, and $200 for the purchase of photographic apparatus for the Pathological Laboratory. Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the Executive Committee take such action as may be deemed necessary to induce the superintendents of the poor throughout the State to comply more fully with the requirements of the State Anatomical Law, and that Regent Whitman be designated as the attorney of the Board in matters relating thereto. Carried. Regent Draper moved that the sum of $500 be appropriated for the purpose of procuring obstetrical cases in the University Hospital, and that the Steward of the Hospitals, Mr. Clark, be instructed to procure and provide for such cases in the Hospital, for the instruction of the present senior class in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The motion of Regent Draper was carried as follows:

Page  377 OCTOBER MEETING, 1889. 377 Ayes-Regents Blair, Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Hebard. Nays-None. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution, which was adopted unanimously. Resolved, That the Board. in appointing Dr. McLachlan as successor to Dr. Sterling as Professor of Opthalmology and Otology in the Homoeopathic Medical College terminated the appointment of Dr. Sterling as of that date; and that the appointment of Dr. Sterling to such Professorship is terminated. Communications were received from the Faculties of the Department ot Medicine and Surgery, the Homoeopathic Medical College, and the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts, concerning the proposition to locate the new Hospital upon the Campus. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  378

Page  379 SPECIAL MEETING. NOVEMBER 22, 1889. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, l November 22, 1889. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 2 o'clock P. M. Present-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Absent-Regents Blair, Willett and Hebard. On motion of Regent Clark the minutes of the two previous meeting were approved as printed. The President submitted several communications which were referred to appropriate committees of the Board for consideration and future action. On motion of Regent Draper Miss Mary Knauf was ppaointed Assistant to the Demonstrator of Anatomy, at the salary of $25 per month for the time employed, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, W. H. Hodge, M. D., was appointed Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine, and to the Chair of Surgery in the Homoeopathic Medical College, at the salary of $200. The vote on this motion was as follows:

Page  380 380 SPECIAL MEETING, 1889. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that R. S. Copeland, M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Homceopathic Medical College for one year, without salary. The motion was carried. On motion of Regent Draper the Committee on Buildings and Grounds were requested to consider the matter of more perfect ventilation in the Law Building, with power to act if practicable. Regent Draper presented the following resolution: WHEREAS, It now appears that the number of students in the post-graduate course in the Law Department will hereafter be much larger than during the present year, and it may be desirable to have additional assistance, therefore, Resoved, That the matter of appointing additional lecturers in the Law Department be referred to the Law Committee, with power to act. On motion of Regent Draper, the above resolution was referred to the Law Committee, with instructions to report their conclusions to the next meeting of the Board. Regent Butterfield moved that two post-graduate students be appointed to assist in quizzing classes in the Law Department. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. H. Gibbes, Professor of Pathology, was directed to take charge of the Pathological Museum, and also to have charge of all post-mortem cases on the campus. On motion of Regent Whitman, the tittle of F. W. Brewer, M. D., was changed from Assistant in the Hygienic Laboratory to Assistant to the Professor of Hygiene. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution:

Page  381 SPECIAL MEETING, 1889. 381 Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be requested to procure plans for a Hospital building for the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and a Hospital building for the Homceopathic Department, and to build such parts of the the same as may be effected upon an expenditure not exceeding the sum of $85,000; that the immediate structure of the Homceopathic Department shall contain 40 beds, and that for the Department of Medicine and Surgery at least 64 beds; and also that the relative size of the administration buildings be as stated in the resolution of Regent Blair at the last October meeting. The resolution of Regent Whitman was adopted as follows: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Charles McGregor, to date as of October 15th, 1889, he having prior to that date completed the required work in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Regent Clark submitted the following resolutions, which were adopted: Resolved; That this Board have received with pleasure the proposition of Mrs. Clara Harrison Stranahan for the establishment of a fund of twenty-five thousand dollars, to be invested, and the income to be appropriated toward the education, in this institution, of such descendants of Seth Harrison as shall desire to avail themselves of the benefit of such fund. Resolved, Further, that the matter be referred to Regent Whitman, as attorney for the Board, to draft the proper papers and submit them to Mrs. Stranahan and this Board. The President stated that the Brush Electric Company had presented to the University one ten-light arc dynamo, and ten double lamps for use in the Department of Electrical Engineering. On motion of Regent Whitman, the President was requested to transmit to the Brush Electric Company the thanks of the Board for their valuable gifts, which will be

Page  382 382 SPECIAL MEETING, 1889. of great service as a means of illustrating the important subject of electricity. Mr. Hosmer, of Toledo, was present and addressed the Board on the merits of the Smeed Ventilating System for our New Hospital. Regent Clark moved that the Auditing Board be instructed to pay Prof. I. N. Demmon $150 for taking charge of Prof. HemplPs classes during his absence, from October 1st to December 1st. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the Homceopathic Medical College, and the Department of Medicine and Surgery, be each allowed to expend an additional $100 in advertising their respective Departments. Carried. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the Executive Commitmittee were authorized to appoint Hamilton Reeve, Jr., of Brooklyn, N. Y., as Assistant in the General Offices and also to superinten.d the construction of new buildings, provided he will accept the position at the salary of $1,400. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  383 SPECIAL MEETING. FEBRUARY 13, 1890. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, February 13, 1889. } The Board assembled in the room of the President at 2 o'clock P. M. Present-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Butterfield and Hebard. The President reported that the Executive Committee had made the following appointment; Dr. L. Burrows, Jr., as assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the salary of $100. The action of the Executive Committee was approved by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board went into executive session. Regent Draper presented and read a communication from the Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College in reference to the new hospital buildings which was, on motion, received and placed on file. On motion of Regent Draper, the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Howard Sedgwick in accor

Page  384 384 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. dance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. By request of the Board, the Faculties of the Medical Departments were present and discussed the plans for the new hospital. On motion of Regent Draper, the President was directed to execute a release of guarantee to A. H. Pattengill on certain lands needed for a hospital site. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was unanimously adopted; Resolved, That the Beard of Regents appreciate fully the labor of Prof. Albert H. Pattengill ir procuring title to the new hospital grounds, and hereby tender their thanks for such service. On motion of Regent Clark, the Finance Conmmittee were authorized to make such arrangements as they shall deem best in the matter of depositing University funds in bank, and of agreeing to the rate of interest it shall draw on daily balances. The University owns twenty lots in West Detroit upon which it has been paying taxes for some years. On motion of Regent Whitman, Regent Draper was requested to take such action as may be necessary to secure the exemption of this property from taxation. On motion of Regent Draper, the Auditing Board were instructed to pay Regent Whitman the sum of $50 for services as the attorney of the Board in securing the enforcement of a better observance of the Anatomical Law throughout the State. Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was adopted. Resolved, That Treasurer Soule be authorized to transfer from the General Fund all monies heretofore covered into that

Page  385 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. 385 Fund as gifts, to a special fund to be known as the " Gift Fund," or by other appropriate title as may be determined by the Auditing Board. On motion of Regent Wiliett, the Legislative appropriation of $7,500 for the purchase of books was divided as follows: General Library, $5,000; Medical Library, $1,500; Law Library, $1,000. Regent Whitman moved that a sum not exceeding $150 be appropriated for the purchase of a microscope and accessories for the use of the Professor of Mining Engineering. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Draper, Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the following persons for valuable gifts to the Department of Mechanical Engineering: Schaeffer and Budenberg, of New York City; Detroit Radiator Company, Detroit, Mich.; Edward Germain, East Saginaw, Mich.; Westinghouse Air Brake Company, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Grand Oil Stove Company, through Samuel W. Winchester, Jackson, Mich.; Detroit Vise Company, Detroit, Mich.; Pelton Water Wheel Company, San Francisco, California; Chas. H. Strellinger and Company, Detroit, Mich.; Putnam Machine Company, Fitchburg, Mass.; The Stratton Separator Company, New York City; And the Hersey Meter Company, Boston, Mass. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  386

Page  387 REGULAR MEETING. 16890 UNIVERSITY OF MICIIGAN, March 18, 1890. J The Board assembled in the room of the President at 2 o'clock P. m. Present —Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Clark and Hebard. On motion of Regent Draper, Regents Willett, Butterfield, and Kiefer, were appointed a committee to make a recast of the Standing Committees of the Board and report their action for the approval of the Board. Regent Willett, Chairman of the special committee, to revise the standing committees of the Board, submitted the following report: Executive Committee-The President, Regents Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Finance Committee-Regents Willett, Hebard, and Kiefer. Committee on Litercry Department-Regents Clark, Willett, and Whitmian. Committee on Law Department-Regents Willett, Butterfield, and Draper. Committee on Medlcal Department, Homceopathic College, and Dental School-Regents Draper, Kiefer, and Butterfield. Library Comnmnittee-Regen ts Butterfield, Kiefer, Cocker, and the President. Committee on 1Maseum, School of Mines, and Astronomical Observatory-Regents Clark, Kiefer, and Cocker. Committee on 6Chemiccal and Pharmaceutical Department — Regents Draper, Clark and Whitman.

Page  388 388 MARCH RLMEETIVNG, 1890. Conmittee on Baildings arnd Grounds-Regents Whitnman, Draper, and Hebard. On motion of Rergent Whitman, the report of the above committee was accepted and adopted. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Several communications which had reached the President were, on motion, referred to appropriate committees of the Board for consideration. Regent Draper presented and read the following communications from the Faculties of the School of Pharmacy, and of the Department of Medicine and Surgery. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, } SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, ANN ARBOR, March 18, 1890. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Dear Sirs-The Faculty of the School of Pharmacy beg leave to recommend the appointment, by your Honorable Body, of the following named delegates from this Department of the University, to the Decennial Convention for the Revision of the United States Pharmacopoeia, to be held in Washington, D. C., beginning May 7, 1890: Albert B. Prescott, Otis C. Johnson, Principal Delegates. Alviso B. Stevens, Frank A. Thompson, Wilbur F. Jackman, Alternate Delegates. Julius O. Schlotterbeck, By order of the Faculty, Respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Dean. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY, ANN ARBOR, March 17, 1890. To the Honorable, the Bonard of Regents: Dear Sirs-The Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery beg leave to recommend the appointment by your Honorable Body, of the following named delegates from this Department of the University, to the Decennial Convention for the Revision of the United States Pharmacopoeia, to be held in Washington, May 7, 1890:

Page  389 MARCII MEETING, 1890. 389 Henry F. Lyster, M. D., Henry M. Hurd, M. D., Principal Delegates. Paul C. Freer, M. D., Ransom H. Stevens, M. D., Byron F. Dawson, M. D., Alternate Delegates. James H. Dawson, M. D., In behalf of the Faculty, Very respectfully, C. L. FORD, M. D., Dean of the Faculty. On motion of Regent Draper, the appointments recommended above were made. Prof. J. B. Steere, Curator of the Museum, requested the Board to provide cages, to be placed in the vacant room on the third floor in the museum, for the reception of specimens, and stated that there was material enough on hand to fill all the cases that could be placed in that room. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the Committee on Museum were requested to ascertain the cost of doing the work, and the kinds of specimens it was proposed to place in the cases, and to report at the next meeting of the Board. Regent Draper presented and read the following communication from Dr. A. B. Prescott, Director of the Cherm ical Laboratory: CHEMICAL LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF M ICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH., March 17, 1890. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-I beg leave to recommend to your honorable body that opportunity be granted to Professor S. F. Peckhanl, of Providence, R. I., to prosecute a research for the Geological Survey of the United States, in the Chemical Laboratory of this University, for two years, in consideration of the payment of one hundred dollars a year, and of the regular fees for the use and consumption of chemicals and apparatus, such as are paid therefor by students. I recomrllend this action to enable reply to be given to inquiries extended in detail by Prof. Peckhall, in the interest of the U. S. Geological Survey.

Page  390 390 MA RCH MEETING, 1890. The subject of the research will be the Bituminous Deposits and Petroleum Sources of the United States. Prof. Peckhar had charge of this branch of the Geological Survey of California, and was employed for the Petroleum Products in the work of the last census. Maj. Powell, the director of the United States Geological Survey desires to engage Prof. Peckham in this research, and looks with favor upon this laboratory as a suitable point for the work. Prof. Peckham expects the services of an assistant, who, as a college graduate, would register in the University as a resident graduate, classify as a graduate student in a single branch of research, not being a candidate for any degree, and comply with all regulations for students in the Chemical Laboratory, paying for material in the same way that other students pay. In the enlarged Chemical Laboratory there are four, indeed five small roons, each designed for one or two or three advanced students in research, also a room for from four to eight special workers. It will, therefore, be entirely feasible to give place to Prof. Peckham's work without interfering with University students. Prof. Peckham and his assistant can be given place among other workers in research, on equal terms' Prof. Peckham, or the U. S. Geological Survey, will pay for all special apparatus they employ, so far as the same is not used by other workers and required by these. Prof. Peckham expects his work will continue more than two years, and the undersigned believes it will be advisable to continue this proposed permission to him, but the term of two years is named as a limit, lest a longer term be objected to. A. B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Draper, the recommendation of Prof. Prescott, in the foregoing communication, was adopted. Dr. A. B. Prescott submitted the following scheme for a Summer School of Chemistry: A SUMMER SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY. For six weeks (July 7 to August 16, 1890). Students to be registered by the secretary. The fee for instruction in the course to be $25. The instruction to be under general charge of the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, and the work to be done in this laboratory.

Page  391 IAP ROIt IlEETIxNG, 1890. 391 The instructor or instructors to be appointed by the Board of Regents, and to receive in compeansation not exceeding 80 per cent. of the amouut received as fees for instruction, and not to exceed $300. The Lfees for use of chemical material to be the same, and under the same rules and conditions, as are the fees of students for use of chemicals in the college year. The registration of students to be upon written permission of the chief instructor. The University to advertise by a card in a few periodicals of public schools, and to print an announcement in a leaflet. [Students of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts not to receive credit, in the same Department, for work in the summer course.] Mr. W. F. Edwards is nominated by the Director of the Laboratory as Instructor for 1890. [The work of the students to be restricted to one room of the Laboratory.] On motion of Regent Draper, the general scheme was approved, and the arrangement of details was placed in the hands of the Executive Committee, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. Dr. C. L. Ford, Dean of the Medical Department, presented the needs of that Department, and urged an appropriation of $1,500 for the purchase of material for illustrating lectures, and for the medical museum. The request was referred to the Medical Cooimmittee. On motion of Regent Clark, the Secretary was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to W. R. Coats, of Kalamazoo, Mich., for the gift of two large stone vessels, of aboriginal manufacture, to the museum. On motion of Regent Draper, Dr. J. C. Wood was granted leave of absence, commencing M~ay 10th, for the purpose of visiting Europe for study during the summer,

Page  392 392 MARCH MEETING, 1890. it being understood that his work in the College was to be provided for. On motion of Regent Draper, an appropriation of $200 for the purpose of securing obstetrical material for the instruction of the senior class in the Homoeopathic Medical College, was made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Whitman presented and read the following communication from the Professor of Music, A. A. Stanley: ANN ARBOR, March 18, 1890. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN:-The Choral Union of the University have in preparation " The Light of Asia" which it is desired to produce on Wednesday evening of Commencement week. An adequate performance of this, one of the greatest works of an American composer, will not only be an interesting feature of the Commencement exercises, but will also serve to increase the interest of our students in good music, an interest which has already manifested itself in many ways. In order that the Choral Union may engage such artists and such an orchestra as the work demands, the Board of Regents is respectfully petitioned to appropriate a guarantee fund of $500. Very Respectfully, ALBERT A. STANLEY, Professor of Music. The provision for the guarantee fund was made in accordance with the above request, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Butterfield submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be, and are hereby authorized, to procure completed plans and specifications for two hospital buildings as shown on the plans

Page  393 MAARCH M3EETING, 1890. 393 submitted by Chamberlain and Austin, and marked A and D, respectively; to approve contracts, etc., for said buildings,which contracts are then to be signed by the President and the Secretary of the Board, after which said Committee are directed and authorized to proceed with the work of construction; to enforce the contract; to approve the monthly estimates for payment and settlement of all contracts; and to control and do all things that the Board could do, that are necessary to the completion of the buildings ordered by the Board of Regents at this time. Regent Whitman, to whom was referred the proposition of Mrs. Clara Harrison Stranahan, to establish certain Scholarships in the University, submitted the following report and resolution, which were adopted by the Board unanimously: WHEREAS, Mrs. Clara Harrison Stranahan proposes to endow certain Scholarships in the University of Michigan as a memorial to her father, Seth Harrison, on the terms and conditions named in the following statement: 1. I, Clara Harrison Stranahan, of the City of Brooklyn, in the State of New York, do hereby promise to and covenant with the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan. that I will establish in connection with said University Scholarships in memory of my father, Seth Harrison; said Scholarships to be designated and known as the Clara Harrison Stranahan Scholarships; and that for the purpose of establishing and sustaining said Scholarships I do hereby pledge myself and my estate to the amount of Twenty-five Thousand Dollars as the principal sum of the endowment. When the Regents of the University shall have received the above named endowment fund of Twenty five Thousand Dollars, the same shall be a perpetual and inviolable fund, and shall be invested and from time to time reinvested by said. Regents in good interest-bearing securities, with interest payable annually, or oftener, said investment to be made in such a manner as to produce as large an income as shall be compatible with safety; and said Regents shall apply the entire amount of income thus obtained, without any emolument to themselves or charge for their services, to furniishing the means of education in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, to the descendants of Seth Harrison, father of Clara Harrison Stranahan, wife of J. S. T. Stranahan, of Brooklyn, New York, provided that a sufficient number of such descendants to exhaust the income who are properly qualified under the rules and regulations of the University to enter the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, shall each year present themselves for admission. 2. The whlole amount of income derive! fro n this fund shall be divided into as many portions for any one year as the number of descendants of said Seth Harrison, fitted to become beneficiaries of this fund, who may apply for scholarships under it. The portion assigned to any one beneficiary shall

Page  394 394 MARCH. MEETING, -1890. not exceed the sum of six hundred dollars. If at any time the number of beneficiaries shall be so large that in the opinion of the Auditing' Board of the University the portion for each shall be inadequate for proper suppf)rt, then said Auditing Board may at its discretion increase the portion of some of the beneficiaries and diminish the portion of others, being guided in their action by their best judgment of the means and the needs of each applicant. 3. If the money derived as income from the fund of Twenty-five Thousand Dollars, or the principal sum,whatever it may becolme, provides a surplus for any year over and above the amounts supplied to the proper beneficiaries of this fund, such surplus shall be held for a period of three years to meet the needs occuring when a larger number of beneficiaries present themselves. But at intervals of three years any unexpended portion of the income shall be added to the principal. 4. As some education is far better than none, no one entitled and proposing to become a beneficiary of this Clara Harrison Stranahanl Fund shall be prevented from being received as a beneficiary by the sole reason that his or her plans shall not look to the completion of such a full course of study as is required for graduation at the University. Furthermore any beneficiary may be supplied from this fund with the means to take a postgraduate course of one or two years, it the income from the fund shall permit this without depriving of the use of the fund any other beneficiary who may desire to take some one of the usual undergraduate courses or any part of such courses. 5. Any beneficiary of the fund who shall incur the penalty of expulsion from the University shall be forever debarred any benefit from the fund. But genuine repentance and contrition may duly restore him at the discretion of the Regents. 6. Any beneficiary of this fund whose scholarship has, in the opinion of a committee consisting of the President of the University, the Senior Professor of English Literature, the Senior Professor of HIistory, and the Senior Professor of Mathematics, been conspicuously excellent, and whose conduct has, in the opinion of the same commnittee. been highly commendable, shall be entitled to receive at the time of hi — graduation with the degree of Bachelor, the sum of Fifty Dollars for each year of his undergraduate life in the University, during which his scholarship and conduct have been thus praiseworthy. 7. If at any time there shall be a period of seveu years during which there are no qualified applicants for the benefit of this fund, the Regents may employ the income for scholarships by appropriating it for the aid of such deserving and needy students as they rmay select, provided, however, that such appropriation of the income for the aid of others than the descendants of Seth Harrison shall cease when applicants present themselves legally qualified to become beneficiaries under the terms of this agreement. 8. This instrument is to become valid and effiectual whenever the said Board of Regents of Lhe University of Michigan shall by vote, at a meeting of their Board, accept and ratify the same and the terms thereof, and not till then. In witness whereof, I have hereutto set my hand and seal, in the city of

Page  395 MARCH MEETING, 1890. 395 Brooklyn, aforesaid, on the Fourth day of March, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ninety. CLARAt HARRISON STRANAHINN. [SEAL.] Signed in the presence of each other as witnesses: P. D. BURKE, 275 Union Street. M. C. BURKE, 275 Uaion Street. JAMES S. BURKE, 275 Union Street. Therefore, Resolved, That with gratitude for the donor's generosity we accept the trust which she asks us to take, and ratify the instrument above copied and the terms thereof. Resolved, That the account of the University with the Clara Harrison Stranahan Scholarship Fund shall be kept on the Treasurer's books entirely distinct from the accounts with all other funds, and that no part of the principal or the income of that fund shall ever be uned for any purpose except for the establishment and maintenance of the Scholarships designated in the statement above copied. Regent Willett moved, that the Auditing Bo-ard be authorized to pay Prof. W. S. Hough $]50 for extra service, which owing to the death of Professor Morris he was called on to render. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, B itterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, the Board adjourned to 7 o'clock P. M. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7 o'clock P. M. Present-The President, Regents Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Willett and Hebard. On motion of Regent Clark, Professor M. L. D'Ooge was made Curator of the Art Museum. The University of Toronto, Canada, having been destroyed by fire, Regent Whitman moved that this Univer2

Page  396 396 MARCH MEETING, 1890. sity send to the University of Toronto such duplicate books and duplicate specimens from the zoological collection as this University can, in the opinion of the Committees on the Library and Museum, spare. The motion of Regent Whitman was carried by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Draper, Edward D. Campbell, B. S., was appointed Assistant Professor of Metallurgy, for three years from. October 1st, next, at the salary of $1,600 a year, it being understood that he is to give instruction not only in metallurgy, but also under the direction of the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, in quantitative analysis, blowpipe analysis, and assaying. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint a Dean of the Literary Faculty in place of the late Professor Frieze; and that the Faculty be requested to indicate their choice by nomination. The motion was carried. Regent Draper moved that Instructor J. H. Drake be appointed Assistant Professor of L ttin for three years from Oct. 1st, 1892, at a salary of $1,600, and that he be granted leave of absence for two years from Oct. 1st, 1890, to go abroad for study, his salary to lapse during his absence. The motion of Regent Draper was carried by the fol - lowing vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Butterfield, of the Law Committee, announced that he had received a communication from the Law Fa

Page  397 MARCH MEETING, 1890. 397 culty, but owing to the absence of the chairman of the Committee, they were unable to give the matter proper consideration at this time; by consent, the matter was left in the hands of the Committee until the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Whitman, Mr. A. C. Angell, attorney in Detroit, was requested to act for the Board of Regents in an effort to secure the exemption from taxation of certain lots in West Detroit, owned by the University. On motion of Regent Clark the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  398

Page  399 REGULAR MEETING. 1890 -UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 24,1890. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-The President, Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Draper and Hebard. On motion of Regent Whitman the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Certain communications and other documents which had reached the President were referred to the Standing Committees of the Board for consideration. Professor Winchell, being present,was invited by the Board to present the requests of the Professors of Geology, Zo6logy, Botany, and Biology, for more commodious laboratories in which to do their work. He urged the enlargement of the Museum building for that purpose. By permission, Professors Thomas and Kelsey presented the views of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts in regard to the publication of a quarterly journal by the University. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the matter was referred to the Committee on the Literary Department for consideration with instructions to report their conclusion at the next meeting. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board took a recess to 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  400 400 J JUNE MEETING, 1890. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. ri. On motion of Regent Whitman, the consideration of matters pertaining to the New Hospital was made the special order for this evening. Regent Willett presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I have the honor to report to you that the persons mentioned in the following list have been recommended to your Honorable Body for the respective degrees indicated. BACHELOR OF LETTERS. Charles Town Alexander, Mary Blanche Briggs, Mary Barbour Brown, Sally Brown, James Eugene Duffy, John Evans Gernand, Louis Edward Gossman, LL. B., Grace Ella Harrah, William Pickett Harris, Lydia Eleanor Kniss, Irving George McColl, Frank Thomas Merry, Aura Mlaud Miller, Warren French Mills, LL. B., Fanny K. Read, Ada Knight Terrell, Ph. B., Harry Wiburt Wakelee, Charles Albert Wheat, (19) Nathan Putnam Wood. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN BIOLOGY). Lewis Murbach, Ph. B. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CHEMISTRY). Moses Gomberg, Charles Jason Greenstreet, John Randolph Rogers. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING). William Dearborn Ball, Winthrop Enoch Gastman, Louis Clarence Hill, B. S. (C. E,). BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING). Ernest Ben Conrad, Henry Woolsey Douglas, John Reuben Kempf, Elmer Hartson Neff. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN MINING ENGINEERING). Walter John Baldwin.

Page  401 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 401 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (IN CIVIL ENGINEERING). Frank Anderson, Frank Seymour Baillie, Andrew Renick Benson, Charles Adam Fisher, Joseph Kendall Freitag, Willis Boyd Hayes, Rollo Glenroy Manning, Edmund Schuyler Colfax May, James Burton Nelson, Louis Carlton Sabin, George Bowditch Springer, Irving Mason Wolverton. (12) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. John Burns Alexander, Frank Swift Bourns, Benjamin Clulf, Jr., William Frank Edwards, 'Harold Wellman Fairbanks, Frances Hinkley, Pomeroy Ladue, Frederick Charles Newcombe, Filibert Roth, Henry Porter Stearns. (10) BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Anna Howard Adams, Franc Arnold, Arthur Hurd Bannon, Harry Moore Bates, Martha Anna Catton, Stanton Walter Clarke, Loretta Crissman, Mary Edna Dowdigan, Robin Ernest Dunbar, Guy Dale Duncan, Ruth Gentry, Faith Helmer, Percy Benjamin Herr, Francis Alexander Leslie, Walter Leeman Mann, Oscar Wood Moyle, B. S., Robert Kennicott Reilly, Jacob Ringer, Cora Maria Rowell, Harry Rogers Seager, Frederic Latta Smith, George Herbert Snow, Forest Glenwood Sweet, Horace Van Deventer, Frank Banghart Walker, Ruth Anna Willoughby, Florence Edna Wilson, Jenny Louise Wire. (28) BACHELOR OF ARTS. James Rowland Angell, Edith Emma Atkins, Mary Sophie Barry, Dora Bennett, Flora Bennett,. Mary Victoria Cady, Katherine Campbell, Warren John Clough, William Gibson Cockburn, Allen Lysander Colton, Ph, B., Alice Harper Damon,. Cora Armenia Deake, Henry Bingham Dewey, Edgar Millard Doughty, Nelson Curtis Field, George Mygatt Flsk, Grant Martin Ford, Herbert Martin Frost, Charles Byron Garrison, William Ellis Goddard, Hugh Andrew Graham, Paul Robert Gray, Jacob Leonard Haner, David Bill Hempstead, Jonathan August Charles Hildner, Margaret Milicent Hunt, Harry James Kennedy, Genevieve Kinne, Ella Alferetta Ludwig, Arthur MacNeal, Edgar Withrow MacPherran, William Kilpatrick Maxwell, Eloise Mayham, George Edward Mcllwain,

Page  402 402 JUNE MEETING, 1890. Edwin Lillie Miller, Leon Josiah Richardson, Owen Lambe Miller, Edward VanDyke Robinson, Loren Douglas Milliman, Merib Susan Rowley, William Lloyd Page, Henry Arthur Sanders, Caroline Crosby Penny, Evelyn Amanda Smith, Harry Nelson Quigley, Walter Savage Stillman, William Butterfield Ramsay, John Howard Todd, Oswald Daniel Vandersluis. (49) MINING ENGINEER. Frank Clemes Smith, B. S. (M. E.). CIVIL ENGINEER. Fred Morley, B. S. (C. E.). MASTER OF SCIENCE. Nathan Davis Corbin, B. S., Elsie Hadley, B. S., Will Hittell Sherzer, B. S. MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY. Lucy Castiny McGee, B. S., Henry Alvin Parker, Ph. B. MASTER OF ARTS. Benjamin Parsons Bourland, A. B,, Caroline Miles, A. B., Herbert Fletcher DeCou, A. B., William Francis Palmer, A. B., Mary Louisa Hinsdale, A. B., Flora Mabel Potter, A. B., Ella Adelaide Knapp, A. B., Aldred Scott Warthin, A. B., William Clarence McCollough, A. B., Arlisle Margaret Young, A. B, DOCTOR OF SCIENCE. Frederick George Novy, M. S. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Hagop Harutune Acterian, A. B., Ephraim Douglass Adams, A. B., Frederick Charles Hicks. A. B., Total, (151) Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Registrar. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the degrees, as indicated in the communication just read, be conferred on the persons named, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. The President presented and read the following report of the Executive Committee.

Page  403 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 403 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, June 23, 1890. l The Executive Committee beg leave to report as follows: On May 5, Geo. W. Whyte, Instructor in Metallurgy and Assaying, resigned. We accepted his resignation and provided for the continuance of his work by dividing it between M r. F. C. Smith and Mr. M. M. Gomlberg, paying Mr. Smith $112.50, and Mr. Gomberg $37.50, in addition to the remuneration they were already receiving. JAMES B. ANGELL, for the Committee. On motion of Regent Clark the report was accepted and adopted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. The Steward of Hospitals submitted his annual report, which was accepted and ordered placed on file. The following communication was received and read: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY, ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1890. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I am instructed to inform you that the following named persons have completed the required work, and are hereby recommended to the Board for the degree of M. D. Edwin Sawyer Antisdale, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. Lotta Ruth Arwine, Lyle Cholwell Bacon, Oscar Baert, John A. Barnette, Merritt Grant Bassett, George Bates, Thekla Natalie Bengel, Joseph D. Bennett, Joseph Estabrook Bennett, Ada Fennimore Bock, John Ackley Boylan, Milo Jason Bradley, Frank Homes Brown, Delia Lucretia Chapin, Daniel Conley, William Cleland Conley, George Clinton Crandall, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. Elmer Arpad De Lipcsey, Charles Faber, Robert Cleland Fair, George Hill Ferguson, Mary Graves Finch, Arthur Ferdinand Fischer, B. S., German-English College. Willie Clarence Gates, George Clifton Gay, Charles Augustus Gottuman, John Gould, Samuel H. Graham, Mary Theresa Greene, Elmer Ellsworth Hagler, Emmett Austin Hall, Delphine Hanna, John Daniel Hare, M. S., Iowa Wesleyan University.

Page  404 404 JUNE MIEETING, 1890. Emma Wheat Hastings, Wilber Stephen Henderson, Minnie Agnes Howard. John Gerrit Huizinga, George Malcolm Hull, Albert Milton Humber, John H. Hunt, William Levi Moore, Mary Elizabeth Newcomb, Edgar Warren Oswald, Judson Albert Palmer, William Mason Payne, Francis Malcolm Phillips, Adelle Priscilla Pierce,A. M., Albion College. George William Ingham, John David Riker, B. S., Joseph Philip Jones, Arthur Sidney Rogers, Ph. Napoleon Dudley Kean, Arthur Shoudy Rowleyo George Frederick Keiper, A. B., Walter Neale Salisbury, De Pauw University. Mary Knauf, Arthur W. Scidmore, Milton Jennea Longsworth, Charles Schickle, Asbury Nelson Loper, M. S,, Roland Edward Skeel, Iowa Wesleyan University. Frank D. Lydick, James Ephraim Smedley, Lily MacGowan, Patrick Joseph Sullivan, William Goldsmith MacLachlan,A.B.,William Sherman Taylor, Toronto University; John Jacob Marker, William Evart Visscher, A C.,. B], Etta McCanghna, Mary McConahy, Allan J. McDonald, Eva Elizabeth McKnight, Malcolm Graeme McNiven, Elizabeth McNutt, Louis Kuichling Mezger, David Henry Miller, Robert Eugene Miller, Hope College, James Henry Waite, Fred Eugene Warren, Agnes Clara Weaver, Ph. B., Stephen Andrew Whinery, Everett Jerome Whitehead, A. B,, Curtls Carrington Williams. Clarence Benjamin Wilson, William D. Wood, Henry Middleton Woolnan, B. S, Burlington College. (88) Very respectfully, WM. A. CAMPBELL, Secretary. On motion it was voted that the degrees indicated be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing coommunication in accordance with the recommendations of the Medical Faculty. The following communications also were presented: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1890. f To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-The Law Faculty recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred on the following named per

Page  405 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 405 sons, who have completed the course of study prescribed for that degree: BACHELOR OF LAWS. John Craig Abel, Charles Edward Adams, B. S., Hesperian College. David Roscoe Anderson, John Wendell Anderson, Fred Lewis Alger, Att'y, Allan Beham Angney, Perry John Ashdown, Wilbur Edwin Baily, Henry Ward Baird, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. James Everett Ball, A. B. John Barrow, Henry James Barton, Roscoe Charles Barton, Laverne Bassett, Ph. B., William Theodore Behne, Frank Allison Bell, Rufus Henry Bennett, James Edwin Bohart, Perry Calahan Booth, Benjamin Jones Boutwell, John Franklin Buckner, Van Renselaer Brown, Benjamin Wade Burleigh, A. B., Yankton College. Ulysses Grant Butcher, James Paul Byrne, Robert Joseph Byrne, John Francis Calhoun, Henry Ward Canfield, John Mlousley Cannon, William Edward Carroll, William Francis Carter, John Benjamin Chaddock, Hannibal Greenwood Coburn, Jr., Oliver Darling Comstock, Jerome Franklin Cooke, John Leonard Copeman, Elmer Ellsworth Corfman, Linton Alden Cox, Anthony Michels Crafton, George Louis Crocker, Daniel Webster Crockett, John Dailey, Jr., Brode B. Davis, David Jones Davis, Hiram Griswold Davis, Anthony Deahl, Louis August Dennert, Simon Peter Domer, Albert Arthur Dorn, Francis William Duha, Daniel Edward Dwyer, Jr., Everett E. Ellinwood, Att'y, Hallie C. Ellis, William Sherman Emmons, Charles Place Evans, Joseph Feltwell, John Alexander Ferguson, William Sheridan Ferguson, Leo Helfrich Fisher, John Perry Flournoy, A. B., Missouri State University. Joseph R. Foltz, William Henry Foster, Att'y, Tomosaku Fukuda, Corbus Plummer Gardner,, Albert Eugene Gebhardt, A. B., Hugo Peter Geisler, Samuel Nelson Gerber, Sue A. Getchell, Samuel Henry Goodall, James Willis Goodwin, William Amasa Grace, A. B., James Knox P. Grider, Michael Francis Griffin, A. B., St. Bonaventures. John Washington Hall, Robert Gerry Harman, Att'y, James Ellingham Hart, Gisan Hashimoto, Charles Higley, James Robertson Hile, Gontaro Horio, Frank Oliver Housken, Thomas Webster Hoyt, Mortimer Leonard Hudson, Edward Albert Huene, Burdge Hamilton Hurd, Charles Hutchinson, Ph. M., Silas Paul Hutchinson, Thomas Wesley Hutchison,

Page  406 406 JUNE K~EETING, 1890. Daniel Henry James, Anderson Bartlett Johns, Elias Finley Johnson, B. S., Franklin Charles Johnson, George Austin Johnson, B. S., Waynesburg College. Bamlet Edward Johnston, Att'y, Rodolphus Waite Joslyn, Kiichiro Kambe, George Anthony Katzenberger, Camden Warren Keen, Ph. B., San Joaquin Valley College. Edgar Elmer Kelsey, George Marshall Kendall, Edward Joseph Kent, James Wilson Kern, A. B., Eureka College. Charles Theron King, Charles Allee Kinnear, B. S., University of Washington. Lee Rockwell Kinnear, John Kinsella, Julian Ambar Knight, Seth Wells Knight, Edgar Frederick Koehler, Brick Pomeroy Kuhn, Shigetame Kumai, Thurlow W. Lane, Washington Drennen Latimer, Edward Raymond Learned, Edmund Lockwood. William Charles Malley, William Albert Marsh, Edward Cooke Mason, A. B., Clarence Monaghan, Charles Marion Morgan, John Vincent Morgan, Lloyd Walker Moultrie, Thomas Mulvihill, Orrice Abram Murdock, George Murray, Shotaro Ozawa, Charles Anson Palmer, Ph. B., San Joaquin Valley College. Lewis Wallace Parker, B. L., Walter Cornelius Parmenter, Horace Edwin Partridge, Henry Frank Pennington, Jr., Carl Sigfrid Peterson, William Wallace Phelps, Edward White Philbrick, Byron Luther Pierce, Frank Pierce, Waldo Theodore Potter, Arthur Eugene Pratt, U. Grant Race, George Quayle Rich, Daniel Brigham Richards, Benjamin Franklin Richardson, Jesse Winfleld Riddle, Francis Marion Robles, George William Roth, William Richard Runlmler, B. S., Michigan Agricultural College. Nestor Rummons, A. B., Central Wesleyan College. Francis Aloysius Schilling, University of Colorado. Edwin Foushee McCausland,B.S.,,Att'y, William Schlagenhauf, B. S., Westminster College. German College. Tom Elwood McClelland, John Welton See, Marshall Gwinn McClung, Thomas Wheatley Shackleford, A. B., State College of Kentueky. James Shields McCreary, George Brace Shattuck, John Morton McDonald, Frank Marion Sheridan, Richard James McNally, 'Jesse Hiram Sherman, Wade Watts Meloan, Charles J. Shoemaker, Clarence Mercer, Alvah G. Smith, George Edward Miller, Andrew Jackson Smith, John Hunter Miller, Byron Franklin Smith, Frank D. Miracle, Hiram Emery Starkey, John Ausburn Mitton, Alvin Curtis Spindler, Torajiro Mogi, John Charles St. Clair,

Page  407 JUNEt MEETIXNG, 1890. 407 Robert Lee Stephens, Lambert Sternberg, B. S., University of Colorado. William Alexander Stolts, Edgar Ellsworth Stone, Edmund Sullivan, Edmund Eugene Sullivan, A. B., Detroit College. John Robert Sutton, James Swan, George Adam Sweigert, B. S., University of the Pacific. Glare Palmer Tallman, William Robert Taylor, Jacob John Thomas, Guy Bradley Thompson, William Mitchell Thompson, Flora V. Woodward Tibbits, Joseph Newton Tillet, B S., Wabash College. Philip Hamilton Travis, Att'y, Will Hendricks Trook, Henry Clinton Van Meter, Edward Minock Vining, Att'y, Orlando Chester Volkmor, Will Hatch Walden, Percy Ansel Walling, Arthur James Waters, Archie E. Watson, John David Wendorff, Att'y, Frederick Curtenius Wetmore, Philip Wilkinson, Att'y, Samuel Williams Widney, Charles Albert Wilson, Horace Duke Wilson, George Webster Wiltse, Conrad Wolf, Att'y. Joseph Church Wood, Judd Yelland, Att'y, John Frank Ziegler. Respectfully submitted, HENRY WADE ROGERS. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1890. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemeen-The Law Faculty recommend that the degree of Master of Laws be conferred on the following named persons, who have completed the course of study prescribed for that degree: Takanosuke Iriye, LL. B., University of Tokyo. Warren French Mills, LL. B., Harvey Arthur Penny, LL. B., To the Honorable, the Board of Rego William Vance Rinehart, LL. B., Reitaro Takano, LL. B., John Herbert Winans, LL. B., Columbia College. UNIVERSITY OF MICI-tGAN, SCHOOL OF PHARIMACY, ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1890. Gentlemen-By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy, I respectfully report that the following named persons have completed all the requirements for the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist. They are now recommended to you for this degree:

Page  408 408 JUNE MEETTINGL, 1890. Robert Bruce Armstrong, George Henry Daniel Baert, Charles Wilson Baker, Fred Wilford Baker, Samuel Robert Boyce, William Elbert Collins, George Spencer Hawes, Charles Wrilliam Hollis, Louis Henry Huber, William Ilhardt, Ph. G., St. Louis College of Pharmacy. Ernest Myers Jarman, Lyman Frederick Kebler, Maurice Sheehan Kirby, Thomas Edward Kirby, Theophil Klingmann, Charles Edward Martzloff, Ben. J. McGuire, Otto Paul Meyer, Thomas Jonathan Milner, Herman George Niermann, Vallace Palmer, Christian Purtscher, Will Mathias Scheuerman, Oscar Frederick Schmid, Ph. B., Charles Cornell Sherrard, Henry Alonzo Thayer, Williams Isaac Tibbals, Cora Louisa Wait, Dean M. Westfall, Clarence H. Wise, Homer R. Wood, Roy Demas Young. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, HIOMoEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE, - ANN ARBOR, June 24, 1890.) The following named candidates, having complied with the requirements of the Homoeopathic College, are recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine: James Cordon Avery, Leigh Yerkes Baker, William Colfax Brownell, Ernest Albert Clark, Anna Calista Clark, Eva Alice Cunningham, Mary Denison, Francis Chipman Ford, A. B., Harvey Elmer Hoffman, Leslie Allen Howe, Amelia Johnston, Alfred Bernard Jordan, Alice Keefer, Frances Jennings Miner, Mary Anna Morley, Andrew Bodwell Nelles, Grant Sherman Peck, Paul Augustus Perrenoud, Everett Jay Phelps, Lewis Frank Rice, Fred Clyde Sanford, Harriet Augusta Spinney. H. L. OBETZ, Dean. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIIGAN, 1 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SU -GERY, ANN ARBOR, June 24th, 1890. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GentGemen-The following named persons having completed the prescribed course of study and work in the College of Dental Surgery, are recommended by the Faculty for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, subject to your approval. J. TAFT, Dean.

Page  409 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 409 William R. Calhoun, Leo David Camp, Ernest Catt, Charles Eli Collamer, Charles Floyd Cook, George Howe Copp, Norman Kershaw Cox, Charles Hugo Farman, Fred Dawson Fisher, Ida Gray, John Jarius Green, John Joseph Giusti, Bertrand Francois Hall, Edgar Allen Honey, WVilliam George Howley, John Barnet Keesing, Melville Arthur Mason, Carolyn Murray McElroy, Chester Cleveland Merriman, Eli Louis Moore, George Northeroft, Henry Turner Osborne, James Andrew Oswald, Albert John Rust, Charles B. Scudder, Alice Lovyse Sherman, William Hall Sieberst, Fred Cameron Sizelan, Mortimer F. Stever, Fritz Bernhart Tegener, George T. Thuerer, Howard Devon Van Antwerp, Gerrit Henry Veldhuis, John Hardin Waterhouse, Charles Elmer Welch, Gordon William Welch, Harry Lloyd Williams, Paul Woolsey. On motion, it was voted that the degrees indicated be conferred on the persons named in the foregoing communications in accordance with the recommendations of the several Faculties. The following minute was ordered spread upon the record: Resolved, that the Regents of the University hereby express their appreciation of the liberality of the Sperry Electric Co., in placing in the Physical Laboratory for the use of students in Electrical engineering, a dynamo electric machine, electric arc lamps and other accessory apparatus. Regent Whitman, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, submitted the following report on the erection and completion of the addition to the Chemical Laboratory, which was on motion accepted and adopted. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: Gentlemen-As Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, I beg to submit the following detailed report, relating to the erection and completion of the addition to the Chemical Laboratory. Mr. E. W. Arnold, of Detroit, was engaged as the Architect. The site was fixed upon early in July, 1889; the plans were completed in August; and the contract for the building (save the fixtures hereinafter specified) was given in September

Page  410 410 JUNTE MEEYTING, 1890. to Mr. James B. Palmer, of Detroit, who had offered lowest proposals received after public notice. The apparatus for heating and ventilating was contracted for, on Dec. 21, by the Buffalo Forge Company. Thanks are due to Professor M, E. Cooley for the plans for the flues, and for counsel upon tlhe apparatus for heating and ventilation. The chemical. tables were contracted for by Mr. A.. Hammond, who offered the lowest proposals upon the specifications for this work. Mr. Wm. Biggs was engaged as superintendent of the building under Mr. Palmer's contract. The building was inclosed early in January. During the month of March chemical tables were erected on the floor of the recitation rooms of the old building; the new lecture-rooms were completed so far as to be used by classes on April 2, and the work under Mr. Palmer's contract was brought to a settlement at the beginning of May. The carpenter's work of the chemical tables, so far as undertaken under the appropriation, has been completed. The plumber's work of the larger number of these tables has been finished, that of the remainder is to be done during the vacation. About ninety of the tables have been in use by students since March. In the Museum hall, on the third floor, temporary shelving has been placed, one alcove has been fitted with permanent shelving removed from below, a storeroom has been prepared, and substantial tables for class-work have been erected. The working collections of the Museum have been mainly removed to the new quarters, and are so placed that they can be used by students in presence of a teacher. The common use of the collections cannot be granted until closed cases are constructed, for which no means are included in this appropriation. There are new chemical tables for 148 workers, 68 of these being in the old building. The lecture-rooms of the new building, three in number, are capable of seating respectively, 120, 80, and 36 persons, 236 in all. They have been fitted with blackboards and with seats. The chemical building now has separate tables for over 400 workers, and furnishes a fair supply of the small rooms necessary for important special and advanced chemical work. The expenditures for this building, as shown on the books of the Treasurer and by vouchers in his hands, in account for this appropriation, have been as follows: To James B. Palmer, contractor, (original schedule being $16,590)__$ 16,536.84 To E. W. Arnold, architect, and Wm. Biggs, superintendent ---- 612.50

Page  411 JUNTE MEETING, 1890. 411 To Buffalo Forge Co., on their contract for $1400 --- —-- --- To Hutzel, for Plnmbing and Gas-fitting materials ----- For Plumbing, Steam-mains, Lecture-room seats, etc. --- —--- For carpenter's work, chemical tables and fittings, old building 1000.00 368,90 704.06 and new, A. R. Hammond ----- --------- 867.00 For Black-board concrete --- —---------------- 17.00 For Locks for the chemical tables — _ —. --- —--. ---- 110.50 For Window Curtains. D. Kierstead --- —--------- 39.18 Advertising, $30; sundry expenditures,.90 ----------- 3490 Total paid expenditure up to June 14, 1890 --------— _ $20,290.88 Balance available to be expended --------- 709.12 $21,000.00 Expenditures contracted for, or estimated, are to be made as follows: To Buffalo Forge Co., on completion of their contract -------— $ 400.00 Bill payable, Schuh & Muehlig, door-springs -------— 1 ---- 12.00 Bill payable, A. R. Hammond, carpenter work on third floor, shelving, etc.- -- -------------------------------- 78.00 Plumbing to be done, estimate of Sanford ----------- 150.00 Leaving, for Hoods at the Flues and other fixtures for immediate use — ___ --- —------- ------ -- 69.12 $709. 12 The General Fund has not been indirectly drawn upon, either in the way of labor of employees, or for furniture of the rooms. When the heating apparatus is completed, as provided for by the unexpended balance, and as contracted for, the building will be in working order throughout, basement included. The only considerable expenditure for the new building, not provided for, is that for the cases in the Museum. The construction has been satisfactory. In the schedule of wants calling for the appropriation only $500 was named for repairs for the old buildingo Somewhat more than this has been expended in these repairs and the needed changes. The Chemical Laboratory has been in use forty-four years, always to its utmost capacity. It has been an inexpensive building in cost of construction, not exceeding, in total, $56,000. It needs radical repair throughout, and of both exterior and interior. With such repair it becomes a serviceable and creditable building. CHAS. R. WHITMAN. Chairman of Committee on Buildings and Grounds.

Page  412 412 JUNE MEETING, 1890. On motion of Regent Willett, Professor Martin L. D'Ooge was appointed Dean of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts for one year. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board adjourned to 7:30 P. Mr. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7:30 P. M., and on motion of Regent Willett went into executive session. Regent Butterfield submitted the following resolution which was adopted. -Resolved, That the plans for a new hospital be returned to the architects, with the request that they eliminate from the plans such parts thereof as can be eliminated, so as to reduce the cost of the buildings as far as possible; that in case such corrected plans shall meet the approbation of the Building Committee, they be directed to advertise for bids for the construction of the hospital buildings, boiler house and heating apparatus, with the right to reject all bids. On motion of Regent Whitman, Regents Butterfield, Willett, and Kiefer, and Dr. Nancrede were appointed a special committee to visit hospitals in the state, and report the result of their observations to the next meeting of the Board. The Board requested Mr. A. C. Angell, of Detroit, to act as their attorney before the Supreme Court, in the case in which they ask the State to relieve from taxation certain lots in West Detroit owned by the University. On motion of Regent Clark the Board adjourned to 9 o'clock to-morrow morning. MORNING SESSION, The Board reassembled pursuant to adjournment, and on motion of Regent Whitman went into executive session.

Page  413 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 413 After a discussion of the changes and additions necessary in the teaching force in the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, it was moved that the following appointments be made. Appointments for three years, at the salary of p1600. Fred. N. Scott, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. F. N. Cole, Ph. D, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Appointment for two years, at the salary of $1600. Joseph C. Rolfe, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. Appointment for one year, at the salary of $1200. Alexander Ziwet, C. E., Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Appointments for one year, at the salary of.900. M. W. Haskell, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics, (reappointed). W. J. Hussey, B. S., " i " " F. G. Novy, D. Sc., Instructor in Hygiene, (reappointed). William W. Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy, (reappointed). C. W. Belser, A. B., Instructor in German and Hebrew, (reappointed). James HE. Tufts, A. Bo, B. D., Instructor in Philosophy, (reappointed). Geo. W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., Instructor in Physics, (reappointed. Joseph H. Markley, Ph. D., Instructor-in Mathematics. Willard K. Clement, A. B., Instructor in Latin. E. W. Fay, Ph. D., Instructor in Ancient Languages. J. V. Denney, A. B., Instructor in English. J. H. T. McPherson, Ph. D., Instructor in History. C. C. Marden, Ph. D., Instructor in French. Moritz Levi, A. B., Instructor in French. G. A. Hench, Ph. D., Instructor in German. Max Winkler, A. B., " ( F. C. Newcomb, B. S., Instructor in Botany. Permanent Appointments. Paul C. Freer, M. D., Ph. D., Professor of General Chemistry, salary $2200. William H. Howell, M. D., Ph. D., Professor of Physiology and Histology, salary $2200.

Page  414 414 JUNE MEETING, 1890. The vote on the above appointments resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the Executive Committee were authorized to employ assistance in the Department of Civil Engineering at a cost not exceeding $900, by the following vote: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Professor H. C. Adams was granted a leave of absence for one year. His salary was continued on the condition that he provide for the payment of the teachers of Political Economy and Finance for the year. Under this action Professor F. N. Taylor, Ph. D., was appointed Lecturer on Political Economy for the first semester, and Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., was appointed Instructor in Political Economy for the second semester. On motion of Regent Whitman the salary of Professor Charles S. Denison was fixed at $2200, by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion, Professor H. S. Carhart's title was changed to Professor of Physics and Director of the Physical Laboratory, and Professor F. W. Kelsey's title was changed to Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. On motion of Regent Clark, the title of Instructor A. B. Stevens was changed to Lecturer on Pharmacy, and his salary was fixed at $1400, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None.

Page  415 JUNE.3EETYING, 1890..415 Regent Clark presented and read the following communication from Professor A. B. Prescott, Director of the Chemical Laboratory. CHEMICAL LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH., March 17, 1890. To the Honorable Board of Regents: Gentlemen-I beg leave to recommend that William F. Edwards be appointed as accountant and dispensing clerk in the Chemical Laboratory for 1890-91, at the salary he has received in the present year, namely, $600. That Ervin E. Ewell be reappointed Assistant in Qualitative Analysis at his previous salary, $192; and Moses Gomberg be reappointed Assistant in Organic Chemistry at the same salary heihas received, $192; each for the year next following. That Mr. Stillman G. Jenks be appointed Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, to follow the expired term of Mr. Charles P. Beckwith, and at the same salary, $250 a year, for 1890-91. And that Christian G. Jenter, Ph. C., be appointed, ror the year 1890-91, Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, at a salary of $200. This is the Assistant for Asst. Prof. Campbell, to be appointed with him (see page 396 of the Minutes, March), the services of the two to take the place of the services of Instructor F. C. Smith and Instructor G. W. Whyte, and the compensation of the two former (Messrs. Campbell and Jenter) to be the same as the compensation of the latter two (Messrs. Whyte and Smith. No change of expenditure is proposed in the above reconmmendations. Respectfully submitted, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Clark the appointments recommended in the foregoing communication were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark the title of Professor A. B. Prescott was changed to Director of the Chemical Laboratory, Professor of Organic Chemistry, and Dean of the School of Pharmacy. On motion, Regent Willett was appointed a special committee to investigate and report as to the best method

Page  416 416 JUNE 3MEETING, 1890. of caring for, and investing any Gift or Trust funds, that may come to the University. Regent Willett, Chairman of the Law Committee, moved that the following named persons be appointed as special Lecturers in the Law Department for the year 1890-91. M. M. Bigelow, A, M., as Lecturer on Insurance, at the salary of $400. Wm. H. Howell, M. D., Ph. D., as Lecturer on Microscopy in its Medico-Legal Relations, without compensation. Marshall D. Ewell, LL. D., of Chicago, as a Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, at a salary of $350. Henry B. Brown, LL D., of Detroit, to deliver fifteen lectures on Admiralty and Patent Law at a salary of $450. A call vote on Regent Willett's motion resulted as follows: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, Samuel Maxwell, Chief Justice of Nebraska, was appointed special Lecturer in the Law Department for one year, on Code Pleading and Practice, at a salary of $100, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, WYillett, Kiefer, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-Regent Whitman. Regent Willett moved that James L. High, LL. D., of Chicago, be appointed a special Lecturer on Equity Jurisprudence for one year, at a salary of $400. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-Regents Clark and Whitman. Regent Whitman moved that two graduates be appointed to assist in quizzing classes in the Law Department at a salary of $100 each. The vote was as follows:

Page  417 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 417 Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Keifer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett presented and read a communication from John F. Lawrence in recard to the proposed sale of certain lands to the University for Athletic Sports, which was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. On motion of Regent Kiefer the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. M. On motion of Regent Whitman, the salary of R. F. Sanford, Chief Engineer, was increased to $1400 to take effect October 1st. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the Auditing Board be authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $1100 for the purchase of Preparations which the Medical Faculty desire for use in their department. Also the sum of $200 for additional shelving in the Library building. And the further sum of $100 for the purpose of properly lighting the micrometers and microscopes at the Observatory. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the Battle Creek Machinery Co., for one Boiler Feed Pump, and to the Buffalo Forge Company for one Pressure Blower, presented to the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Page  418 418 J JUNE MEETING, 1890. The following resolution adopted by the Medical Faculty unanimously,f was presented and read by Regent Kiefer. Resolved, that this Faculty request the Board of Regents to appoint Dr. J. N. Martin Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. Regent Keifer moved that the name of Dr. E. W. Jenks, of Detroit, be inserted in place of Dr. J. N. Martin's. The vote on Regent Kiefer's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Kiefer and Cocker. Nays-Regents Willett, Whitman and Butterfield. The motion was declared lost. Regent Clark moved that Dr. J. N. Martin be reappointed Acting Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children for one year. A call vote resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays.-None. Regent Clark moved that the Auditing Board be authorized to expend the sum of $375 for the purchase of specimens and appliances for use in the Zoological Laboratory, $250 for mounting specimens for the Museum, and $10;) for the purchase of Pathological specimens. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Kiefer, Professor Howell was allowed the use of the camera in the Pathological Laboratory for the purpose of making diagrams and charts for use in his department. Regent Kiefer moved that Dr. B. B. Rowe be appointed Resident Physician and Surgeon in the University Hospital for one year, at the salary of $600; and that the

Page  419 JUNTE MEETING, 1890. 419 Hospital Committee of the Faculty be authorized to appoint a Wardmaster, a Wardmistress, and nurses in the Hospital at the salaries heretofore paid for the same service. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Kiefer it was voted to ask the Privy Council of Great Britain to extend the Act of 1886 (Section 17, Medical Act, 1886) to the University, so that our medical degree may be recognized in that country. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the secretary was directed to send the diploma of N. D. Kean, M. D., to him at his home, he having been called away on account of the death of his mother. On the recommendation of the Medical Faculty, Regent Kiefer moved that Dr. Wm. F. Breakey be appointed a special Lecturer, to give a course of 25 lectures in the Medical Department on the subject of Dermatology, and that the compensation be $100. The following is the vote on the above motion: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the title of Joseph Clark was changed from Steward of Hospitals to Superintendent of Hospitals, and his appointment was made permanent. Duplicate books from the General Library of the value of $60 and specimens from the Museum of the value of $50 were, on motion of Regent Butterfield, presented to the University of Toronto, Canada, on account of its great loss by fire during the past winter. Regent Willett moved that the Auditing Board be authorized to pay Regent Whitman the sum of $150, for legal services rendered in the case of Lamoreaux vs. the University, in the Washtenaw Circuit Court.

Page  420 420 JUNE MEETING, 1890. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. The President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the following persons, for gifts to the Laboratory of Electro-Therapeutics: Eberbach & Son, of Ann Arbor, 1 Small Galvanic Cell; Otto Randa, New York City, 1 Portable 4 Cell Medical Battery; Dr. John L. Gish, of Jackson, Mich., for 1 Combined Rheostat and Resistance Box. On the recomlmendation of the Homceopathic Medical Faculty, Regent Kiefer moved that the following appointments be made in the Hommeopathic College for one year: H.E.. Hoffman, M. D., to be House Surgeon, at a salary of $350. E. A. Clark to be Assistant to the Chair of Surgery, at a salary of $100, E. A. Clark to be Assistant to the Chair of Opthalmology and Otology, at a salary of $100. A. B. Nelles, Assistant to the Chair of Theory and Practice of Medicine, at a salary of $100. And that the Superintendent of Hospitals be authorized to appoint three nurses for this Department at a combined salary not exceeding $500. The vote on Regent Kiefer's motion resulted as follows: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays —None. The Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery presented a scheme for a four year graded course in that Department, which was, on motion of Regent Kiefer, adopted, and the schedule was referred back to the Faculty for a more complete arrangement of the matter for the printer. President Angell announced that he had just received, by telegraph, the resignation of Dr. Henry F. Lyster as Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine in the

Page  421 JUNE MEETING, 1890. 421 Department of Mledicine and Surgery, which he would place in the hands of the Board. Regent Willett moved that the resignation be accepted, and that the Executive Committee and the Medical Committee jointly be requested to recommend to the next meeting of the Board, a suitable person to lill the vacancy. The motion was carried. It was unanimously voted that the following honorary degrees be conferred: The degree of Master of Arts on Henry Briggs Baker, M. D., Secretary of the State Board of Health; the degree of Master of Arts on Albert Angustub Stanley, Professor of Music in the University of Miichigan; the degree of Doctor of Philosophy on Lucinda Hinsdale Stone, of Kalamazoo, Mich; the degree of Doctor of Laws on lHon. Austin Blair, of Jackson, Mich. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board adopted a vote of thanks to Andrew D. White, LL. D., for his scholarly and eloquent Commencement Address, ancd requested a copy of the manuscript for publication. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  422

Page  423 ADJOURNED MEETING. 1890 -UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, July 29, 1890. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 11 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regent Hebard. On motion of Regent Clark the minutes of the last; meeting were approved as printed. Several communications which had reached the President, were on motion referred to the appropriate committees of the Board. Regent Whitman stated that he had negotiated for the purchase of two lots at the northwest corner of the new hospital site which the Board desired to purchase, and that the consideration was $650. Regent Draper moved that the sum of $650 be appropriated to complete the purchase of the above mentioned lots. The vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board went into executive session. The Secretary (at the request of Dr. J. Taft) presented

Page  424 424 ADJOURNED M3EETING, 1890. a bill for $48, expended by the Doctor four years ago, in the purchase of a carpet and desk for the Faculty room in the Dental Department. The Board at that time declined to pay this bill, on the ground that the purchase was made without proper authority. Regent Draper moved tlat the bill be referred to the Auditing Board to be disposed of as they may deem best. The vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-Regent Willett. Regent Clark presented and read the resignation of Instructor M. W. Haskell, Ph. D., which was on motion accepted. Regent Clark moved that Miss Alice Hunt be appointed Assistant in Drawing, for one year at a salary of $350; also Robert P. Lamont, B. S., Assistant in Drawing, for one year at a salary of $300; and that Fred Morley, B. S., be appointed Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing, for one year at the salary of $900. The vote on the above motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett of the Committee appointed to visit hospitals reported that they had visited Grace and St. Mark's Hospitals in Detroit, the Wayne County Hospital and the hospitals at Grand Rapids, and he was of the opinion that buildings could be erected within the appropriation, that would largely increase our present hospital accommodations. The Committee then submitted the fol] lowing recommendation which was adopted by the full vote of the Board: The Committee recommend that the Secretary advertise for bids upon the plans for a hospital now submitted; that in case

Page  425 ADJOURNED MAEETING, 1890. 425 the bids are within the original appropriation of $75,000, then the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be instructed to make the usual contracts; should the bids be above that amount, that the Secretary advertise for competitive plans based upon the above amount stating the number of bids recognized and the special sanitary measures expected. On motion of Regent Butterfield the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock P. Im. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. Professor Carhart addressed the Board on the wants of the Physical Laboratory, and asked that two Assistants be appointed at a salary of $150 each. The request was referred to the Literary Committee. Dr. Gibbs, Professor of Pathology, asked the Board to increase the salary of his Assistant to $500. This request was referred to the Medical Committee. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into executive session. Regent Butterfield moved that W. C. Dabney, M. D., be appointed Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the salary of $2,000. The vote on this appointment resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-N one. On motion of Regent Willett, Professor R. Hudson was appointed to give a special course of lectures in the Law Department, on Comparative Constitutional Law, without compensation. On motion of Regent Draper, the appointment of Julius 0. Schlotterbeck, as Assistant in Pharmacognosy, was continued for one year at the salary of $300. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays.-No ne.

Page  426 426 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1890. The department of Civil Engineering requested an appropriation for the purchase of drawing tables. Regent Butterfield moved that the matter be referred to the Auditing Board with power to act, not expending more than $500. The vote on Regent Butterfield's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the Board establish a Chair of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. The motion was carried by the full vote of the Board. Regent Draper moved that John J. Abel, Ph. D., M. D., be appointed Lecturei on Materia Medica and Therapeutics for one year, at a salary of $2,000, to begin his work January 1st, 1891; and that John D. Riker. Assistant in Plysiological Chemistry, be requested to give instruction in Materia Medica until January 1st, 1891, for the additional compensation of $208. The vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays —'on e. On motion of Regenlt Clark. Glen P. Swigget, A. B., was appointed Instructor in German and French for one year, at a salary of $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clarlk, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regentt Clark, Chlairman of the Literary Committee, to whomn was referred the memorial of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts, in regard

Page  427 ADJOURANED MEETING, 1890. 427 to the publication of a quarterly journal by the University, reported that the Board looks with favor upon the project, and advises, that the more detailed statement mentioned in said memorial be prepared and submitted. The report was adopted. Regent Draper moved that the sum of $300 be appropriated for the purchase of special optical instruments for use in the Chemical Laboratory. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays —None. Otn motion of Regent Draper, Dr. Herdman was relieved from all work in Anatomy, and his title was changed to Professor of Nervous Diseases and ElectroTherapeutics. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  428

Page  429 SPECIAL MEETING. SEPTEMBER 16, 1890. UNIVERSITY OE MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, September 16, 1890, The Board assembled in the room of the President, and was called to order at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Willett, Clark and Butterfield. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board went into executive session on the Hospital matters. After a full exchange of opinions, it was agreed to still further reduce the cost of the Hospital building, by eliminating certain other parts of the work. Whereupon, Regent Draper moved that the three lowest bidders be asked to submit amended bids, in view of the proposed changes, and that upon the receipt of the amended proposals asked for, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be authorized to make a contract and proceed with the work. The vote on Regent Draper's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Whitman, Draper and Hebard. Nays-Regents Kiefer and Cocker. Dr. Dabney having declined to accept the chair to which he was elected at the July meeting, Regent Draper, chairman of the Medical Committee, recommended the appointment of Walter S. Christopher, M. D., of Cincinnati,Ohio, as Lecturer for one year on the Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the Department

Page  430 430 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. of Medicine and Surgery, at the salary of $2,000. A call vote resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None, The following communication was read by the President: ANN ARBOR, Mich., Sept. 15, 1890. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN-Mr. Ervin E. Ewell has found himself obliged to resign the appointment given him for the coming year (Miinutes, June, 1890, p. 415), desiring to accept a position as chemist in the U. S. Department of Agriculture, offered him a few weeks since. I beg leave to recommend the appointment of Bernard C. Hesse, Ph. C., ('89), to fill this vacancy, namely: aa assistant in Qualitative Analysis for 1890-91, at $192, the salary previously paid. Also, I desire to recommend that the appointment of John D. Riker (Minutes, June, 1889, p. 319), be continued at the previous salary for the year 1890-91. Very respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Draper, the appointments recommended in the foregoing communication were made as follows: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds inquire into the condition of the water closets on the campus, and if in their judgment new ones are needed, to report the fact to the next meeting of the Board, with plans and estimates. The motion was carried unanimously. The President presented and read the following communication from Prof. Henry Wade Rogers: ANN ARBOR, Mich., Sept. 15, 1890. Hon. James B. Angell, LL. D., President, etc. MY DEAR SIR-It being my Intention to accept the Presidency of the Northwestern University, to which I have been

Page  431 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. 431 elected recently, I hereby transmit to you, and through you to the Honorable Board of Regents, my resignation as Tappan Professor and Dean of the Department of Law in the University of Michigan. I cannot take this action without saying that I sever my relations with the University with many regrets. The University from which I was graduated, and which has since so highly honored me, possesses-my warm affection, and I shall ever watch her continued development with intense satisfaction. Respectfully yours, HENRY WADE ROGERS. The resignation of Professor Rogers was accepted, and the following resolution, submitted by Regent Whitman, was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That we deeply regret the departure of Professor Rogers from the Law Department of the University. His ability, scholarship and energy have been of invaluable service to us. We congratulate the University to which he goes as President, and predict for him a brilliant future in the broader field of usefulness opened to him. Regent Whitman moved that a sum not exceeding $50 be appropriated for the purpose of publishing 1,000 copies of Justice Harlan's address before the Law Alumni last June. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, the Secretary was requested to notify the Law Faculty to nominate an acting Dean for the coming year. On motion of Regent Draper, Patrick Scully, nurse in the University Hospital, was allowed $100 extra compensation for his mechanical services in making appliances for the department. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None.

Page  432 432 SPECIAL MIEETING, 1890. A communication wrs received from Dr. Winchell, asking for additional assistance in the department of Geology, which was, on motion, referred to the Literary Committee. The Board adopted the following schedule of fees to be paid by the students taking courses in the Physical, Laboratory: For courses requiring one hour's work in each week, a fee of $1 shall be required; two hours per week, a fee of $2; three hours per week, a fee of $3. Regent Whitman, acting chairman of the Literary Comrmittee, to whom was referred the request of the Professor of Physics for additional assistance in his department, moved that two student assistants be appointed for one year, at a salary of $150 each. A call vote being taken, resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper, the Board adjourned to October 15th, at 10 o'clock A. n. JAMES H. WADE, SECRETARY.

Page  433 OCTOBER MEETING. 1890. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, f ANN ARBQR, October 15th, 1890. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Absent-Regents Hebard, Draper, and Cocker. On motion of Regent Whitman the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Sundry papers which had reached the President were, at his suggestion, referred to appropriate committees of the Board for consideration. The President stated that his annual report had been prepared, and was held subject to the pleasure of the Board. Regent Clark moved that the report be read by the President. The motion prevailed. THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable Board of Regents: I herewith offer to you my Annual Report for the year ending September 30th, 1890. The following is the list of the appointments, resignations and changes of titles in the faculties. In October, 1889, W. J. Hussey, B. S., was appointed instructor in Mathematics for one year. In March, 1890, Edward D. Campbell, B. S., was appointed Assistant Professor of Metallurgy for three

Page  434 434 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. years from October 1, 1890; and Instructor J. H. Drake, A. B., was appointed Assistant Professor of Latin for three years from October 1, 1892, with leave of absence for two years from October 1, 1890, for the purpose of study in Europe. In June, 1890, appointments were made as follows: PERMANENT APPOINTMENTS. Paul C. Freer, M. D., Ph. D., (Lecturer in 1889-90), Professor of General Chemistry in Literary and Medical Departments; William H. Howell, M. D., Ph. D., (Lecturer in 1889-90), Professor in Physiology in Literary and Medical Departments; A. B. Stevens, Ph. C. (previously Instructor), Lecturer on Pharmacy in School of Pharmacy. APPOINTMENTS FOR THREE YEARS. Fred. N. Scott, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Rhetoric. F. N. Cole, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. APPOINTMENT FOR TWO YEARS. John C. Rolfe, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. APPOINTMENTS FOR ONE YEAR. Alexander Ziwet, C. E., Acting Assistant Professor of Mathematics. M. W. Haskell, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics, (reappointed). (Resigned in July). W. J. Hussey, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics, (reappointed). F. G. Novy, Sc. D., Instructor in Hygiene, (reappointed). William W. Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy, (reappointed). C. W. Belser, Ph. D., Instructor in German and Hebrew, (reappointed). James H. Tufts, A. M., B. D., Instructor in Philosophy, (reappointed).

Page  435 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 435 George W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., Instructor in Physics, (reappointed). Joseph L. Markley, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics. Willard K. Clement, A. M., Instructor in Latin. E.. W. Fay, Ph. D., Instructor in Ancient Languages, J. V. Denney, A. B., Instructor in English. J. H. T. McPherson, Ph. D., Instructor in History. C. C. Marden, A. B., Instructor in French. Moritz Levi, A. B., Instructor in French. G. A. Hench, Ph. D., Instructor in German. Max Winkler, A. B., Instructor in German. F. C. Newcombe, B. S., Instructor in Botany. James N. Martin, Ph. M., 1. D., Acting Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children (Department of Medicine and Surgery). W. F. Breakey, M. D., Special Lecturer on Dermatology (Department of Medicine and Surgery). The following special lecturers were appointed in the Law Department for one year: M. M. Bigelow, A. M., Lecturer on Insurance. Wm. H. Howell, M. D., Ph. D., Lecturer on Microscopy in its Medico-Legal Relations. Marshall D. Ewell, LL. D., of Chicago, Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. Henry B. Brown, LL. D., Detroit, Lecturer on Admiralty Law and Patent Law. Samuel Maxwell, Associate Justice of Nebraska, Lecturer on Code Pleading and Practice. James L. High, LL. D., of Chicago, Lecturer on Equity Jurisprudence. Professor H. C. Adams was granted leave of absence for one year, and Professor F. M. Taylor, Ph. D., was appointed Lecturer on Political Economy for the first semester, and Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Instructor in Political Economy for the second semester. Professor Carhart's title was changed to Professor of

Page  436 436 OCTOBER MEETINYG, 1890. Physics and Director of the Physical Laboratory, and Professor Kelsey's to Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. Henry F. Lyster, A. M., M. D., resigned the Chair of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine in the Department of Medicine and Surgery. In July John J. Abel, Ph. D., was appointed Lecturer on Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the Department of Medicine and Surgery for the coming year; Dr. Herdman's title was changed to that of Professor of Nervous Diseases and Electro-Therapeutics, with a corresponding change of his duties; Fred Morley, B. S., was appointed Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing for one year; Glen P. Swiggett, A. B., Instructor in German and French for one year; and E. P. Lyman, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics for the same period. In September W. S. Christopher, M. D., was chosen Lecturer on the Theory and Practice of Medicine and on Clinical Medicine for the year 1890-1. Severely as the 'University has been afflicted during the past few years in the death of some of its most eminent teachers, it has suffered no heavier loss than in the decease of Professor Henry S. Frieze on December 7, 1889. For five and thirty years he had served this Institution with a fidelity and devotion never surpassed by any one of the many noble men, whose names adorn the roll of her Professors. No man since the days of Dr. Tappan has done more, perhaps none so much, to shape the policy of the University and to insure its success. His last days were made happy by the spectacle of its prosperity. He has gone to his rest, rewarded with the gratitude and affection of the many pupils, who had been fortunate enough to sit under his teaching. The results of his inspiring labors and the memory of his beautiful life will long remain as the priceless possession of the University. To our great regret we are called to lose the services

Page  437 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 437 of Henry Wade Rogers, LL. D., Tappan Professor of Law, Professor of Roman Law, and Dean of the Law Department, who has been chosen to fill the important post of President of the Northwestern University. We appreciate the honor which is conferred upon this University by this honor bestowed upon one of her sons, who has rendered so valuable service in the discharge of his official duties as teacher and as executive officer of our great school of Law. To his enterprise and ability the rapid growth of that school in recent years is in no small measure due. Our best wishes for his success follow him to his new and important field of labor. The following degrees have been conferred: DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. Bachelor of Letters.......................................... 20 Bachelor of Science (in Bliology).............................. 1 Bachelor of Science (in Chemistry)............................ 3 Bachelor of Science (in Electrical Engineering).............. 3 Bachelor of Science (in Mining Engineering).................. 1 Bachelor of Science (in Mechanical Engineering)............ 4 Bachelor of Science (in Civil Engineering).................... 12 Bachelor of Science.......................................... 10 Bachelor of Philosophy....................................... 28 Bachelor of Arts.................................... 51 Mining Engineer.................................. 1 Civil Engineer............................................. 1 Master of Science................................... 3 M aster of Philosophy................................... 2 M aster of A rts.......................................... 10 Doctor of Science........................ 1 Doctor of Philosophy.................................. 3 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery).... 88 Bachelor of Laws.......................................... 209 Master of Laws............................................. 6 Pharm aceutical Chemist...................................... 32 Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic Medical College).......... 22 Doctor of Dental Surgery..................................... 37 548

Page  438 438 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. HONORARY DEGREES. D octor of M edicine........................................... 1 M aster of A rts............................................... 2 D octor of Philosophy......................................... 1 Doctor of Laws.......................................... 1 Total number of degrees conferred....................... 553 The number of graduates on examination was larger by 103 than in the year preceding, much larger than in any year previous to that, and much larger than the number of graduates from any other American university at any time. This fact is the more striking and gratifying when we remember that we have during the past few years largely increased the requirements for graduation in most of the departments. The atteidance of students was as follows: DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS. Resident Graduates.................................. 45 Candidates for an Advanced Degree, enrolled in other D epartm ents............................. 6 Graduates Studying in absentia................... 33 Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree....... 7............ 777 Students not Candidates for a Degree................. 148 -1009 DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. Resident Graduates.................................. 3 Third Year Students................................. 94 Second Y ear Students................................ 121 First Year Students.................................. 157 - 375 DEPARTMENT OF LAW. Resident Graduates.................................. 5 Seniors.............................. 219 Juniors.............................................. 277 Special Students...................................... 21 Students enrolled in Department of Literature, Science and the Arts........................ 11 -533

Page  439 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 439 SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. Resident Graduates.................................. 3 Second Year Students............................... 33 First Year Students.................................. 47 - 83 HOM(EOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Resident Graduate................................... 1 Third Year Students............................ 23 Second Year Students................................ 23 First Year Students.................................. 26 - 73 COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. S en iors.......................................... 41 Jun iors.............................................. 26 F reshm en............................................ 36 - 103 2176 Deduct for names counted twice............... 17 T otal.......................................... 2159 That is a larger number than has ever before been enrolled in any American university. The increase in total attendance during the last five years is shown by the following statement: TOTAL ATTENDANCE. In 1884-5...................................... 1285 In 1885-6...................................... 1391 In 1886-7.................................... 1562 In 1887-8...................................... 1667 In 1888-9...................................... 1885 In 1889-90..................................... 2159 The number of students present during the past year was larger by 874 than the number five years ago. The attendance by Departments during the last two years was as follows:

Page  440 440 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 1888-9 1889-90 Literary Department............................ 826 1009 Department of Medicine and Surgery............... 371 375 Department of Law................................ 401 533 School of Pharmacy................................ 106 83 Homceopathic Medical College...................... 73 73 Dental College......................... 108 103 1885 2159 The large increase, it will be seen, was in the Literary Department, 183, and in the Law Department, 132. There was a slight gain in the Medical Department, and a slight loss in the School of Pharmacy and in the Dental College, while the number in the Homceopathic College was unchanged. As the number of Pharmacy Schools in the country is increased, the relatively high requirements of this school keep the number of students within moderate limits. With the great demands made upon our Chemical Laboratory by students from other departments this result is not deplored. The Dental College is also overcrowded. The number of women during the past two years has been thus: 1888-9 1889-90 Literary Department.................. 207 284 Medical Department................................ 59 57 Law D epartm ent.................................. 3 2 School of Pharmacy................................ 3 1 Homceopathic Medical College..................... 23 20 D ental College...................................... 6 5 301 369 There has been a slight decrease in each Department except in the Literary, where there was a very large increase, 77. This carries up the percentage of women to the whole number of students a little more than one per cent. over the previous years. In 1887-8 the women formed sixteen and nine-tenths per cent. of all the students; in 1888-9 not quite sixteen per cent.; in 1889-90 very nearly seventeen and one-tenth per cent. Of the 84 resident graduates and candidates for higher degrees 22 were women.

Page  441 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 441 Of all the students in the Literary Department twentyeight and one-tenth per cent. were women. Forty-three of the States and Territories are represented here. Michigan sends 1,019 students. Next comes Illinois with 223, then Ohio with 175, and then Indiana with 103. New York has 84, Iowa 65, Pennsylvania 62. Japan has 21 of her sons with us. Other foreign provinces and states represented are Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba, New Zealand, Porto Rico, Hungary, Germany, England, Russia, Italy, Mexico, and the Hawaiian Islands. It is indeed a cosmopolitan company that assembles in our halls. At this time it appears highly probable that the number of students for the current year will exceed 2,400. Not the least of the advantages afforded by life at the University is the enlarging and broadening influence of contact with these students drawn from all parts of the country, we might almost say, from all parts of the world. The presence of these representatives of so many states and nations attests in a most impressive manner the far-reaching power of the University. The following facts concerning the students who entered the Literary Department are of interest: The unprecedented number of 479 persons applied for admission during the year, 450 in the first semester and 29 in the second. After deducting the names of those rejected and of those who withdrew almost immediately after admission, there remained 436 new names on our rolls. Of those admitted to full regular courses, Entered on diploma.................................. 164 Entered on examination.............................. 131 - 295 From other colleges................................ On advanced standing........................ 32 Graduates.................................... 11 43 Select students...................................... 98 436 Total.........................................

Page  442 442 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. E ntered for A. B..................................... 74 " P h. B.................................... 35 " B. S.................................. 35 B. S. (Chemistry)........................ 3 B. S. (Biology). 3... B.S. (Biology)............................ 3 " B. S. (Civ. Eng.).......................... 28 " B. S. (M ech. Eng.)........................ 32 B. S. (Mining Eng.)..................... 2 " B. S. (Electr. Eng.)...................... 15 ". L..................................... 34. A. M.................................... 3 i' Ph. M................................... 2 (( P h. D.................................... 3 " Select.................................... 98 - 436 It will be understood that our own graduates who pursued studies for higher degrees are not included in the above enumeration. During the year a large addition to the Chemical Laboratory has been completed and occupied. It was built without exceeding the legislative appropriation of $21,000. It improves the external appearance of the Laboratory and furnishes much needed accommodations. It contains tables for eighty students, three lecture rooms and a Pharmaceutical and Chemical Museum. There are now in the whole Laboratory tables for 400 students. Last year I had the pleasure of announcing the establishment by Mrs. Elisha Jones of a Classical Fellowship as a memorial of her husband. In March last Mrs. Clara Harrison Stranahan, of Brooklyn, N. Y., executed a covenant to place the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars in the hands of the Regents to establish scholarships for the education at the University of the descendants of her father, Seth Harrison. The Regents desire it to be known that they are ready to accept funds in trust for the aid of the University or of students, to keep such funds apart from all other funds of the Institution, and to administer them with care. The visit of the Pan-American Congress to the Uni

Page  443 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 443 versity last autumn was a noteworthy event in our history. The students cooperated heartily with the Faculties in making preparations for a becoming reception of the distinguished guests. We have every reason for supposing that our visitors carried away a pleasant impression of the University. In the earlier weeks of the year, the Literary Department was somewhat embarrassed by the unprecedented number of new students. It became necessary to make some addition to the teaching force. Until the engineering classes can be accommodated in some other building than University Hall, the serious inconvenience experienced last year in finding room for all our classes will continue and probably increase. No considerable relief is practicable, until our new hospitals are finished, and the old hospital buildings are available for some of the collegiate or professional work. Some further increase of the number of instructors in the Literary Department has wisely been made in anticipation of another large entering class this year. In the professional schools, in which instruction is given chiefly by lectures, an addition to the number of students does not create a necessity for so large an increase in the corps of teachers as the same addition to the number in the Literary Department calls for. In a large part of their work, especially in the earlier part of the course, the students in the Literary Department must be taught in sections of not more than thirty. It was necessary, for instance, to divide the lowest class in mathematics last year into thirteen sections. The number of graduate students continues to increase. This last year it reached 84. I need hardly say that, while we deem it fortunate to have the inspiring presence of so many students pursuing advanced work, the instruction of them lays a heavy load on a number of our Professors. It is genuine University work in the best sense of the expression which is done by these earnest graduates.

Page  444 444 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. From their ranks is drawn every year a considerable number of instructors for institutions of collegiate rank. They represent us most creditably. Through them the University confers some of its chief blessings upon the public. We must therefore do all in our power for this class of students. But it should be understood that in so far as the time and strength of the Professors are devoted to these, they must be relieved of work with the undergraduates. The relative number of engineering students increases from year to year. We had 160 pursuing engineering courses during the last year. While the number of those choosing civil engineering does not diminish, there is a rapidly increasing desire for instruction in mechanical and electrical engineering. Our shops are crowded, and we bid fair to be confronted soon with the question whether we shall enlarge our shops or refuse the application of students. During the year the Literary Faculty has given consideration anew to a question which has engaged their attention more or less for the last ten years, namely, whether we shall make the bachelor's degrees attainable by three years of study instead of requiring four years. Acting President Frieze in his Annual Report in 1881 presented in a most cogent form the principal arguments in favor of such a change. The subject has within the past few months been brought into the field of public discussion by the action of the Faculty of Harvard College in recommending such a plan to the corporation and overseers of that institution. The overseers have not yet adopted it. There is a wide-spread and deep-seated conviction that one ought to be able to begin his professional career at an earlier age than is possible to most men who take the full college course and the full course of study in a professional school. Both courses require from six to eight years. The student who does not get to college until he is

Page  445 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 445 eighteen, cannot enter on his professional work until he is twenty-four or twenty-six. As some years of waiting are generally required before he is well started in his business, he is not fairly launched until he is thirty or more years old. It is therefore argued with great force that some way should be found to abridge his term of study. Furthermore, it is contended that many men who intend to study law or medicine are deterred from entering on college studies by the length of the period now required for procuring a bachelor's degree, and many others are obliged to content themselves with a part of a college course, while if the curriculum were shortened by a year they could take the whole of the college work. Thus, it is claimed, a higher average grade of culture would be secured in professional life than that which we now find. It certainly is desirable and I believe possible to save some time in the education of the men who take four years work in college and then their professional training. I am convinced that considerable time can be gained in the better arrangement of the work in schools. After the student is prepared for college, two plans for completing his education in briefer time than has usually been consumed are possible. First. Only three years of college work may be asked for the bachelor's degree. In that case the student must be required to do more work in each year than he has done heretofore in college, or the standard of attainment for graduation must be reduced. Secondly. Substantially the plan which we have followed for several years may be adopted. The condition of attaining the bachelor's degree is not meeting a requirement of time, but of work. One must complete so many courses of study, a part of which are fixed, a part elective. While in order to avoid cramming there is a limit to the number of courses which a student may undertake at once, still, with the liberty given, a capable and industrious man

Page  446 446 OCTOBER.MEETING, 1890. may easily meet the requirements for the degree of bachelor of arts in three and one-half years, and a few exceptionally strong men in each class may do it in three years. But in case they are within half a year of graduation at the beginning of their fourth year, we allow them to enter any one of our professional schools and continue half work in the Literary Department. Having planned their course in advance, they have always elected some studies-the law students, constitutional history, the medical students, biology and chemistry,-which either form a part of the professional course or are closely allied to it. Thus they are able without overwork or cramming to complete the college course and the first year's course in the law school or the medical school. This plan which has been followed several years, has worked on the whole satisfactorily. Of course, it could be followed only by a university which has upon the same grounds its collegiate and its professional departments. A careful inspection of certain statistics of this University seems to indicate that the number of men who leave the college to go to professional study is not so great as some have supposed. A collation of the records of classes graduating from 1870 to 1877 inclusive, shows that 31 per cent. of those who were graduated bachelors of arts went afterwards to the professions, while only 14 per cent. of those who did not remain to graduate, or who entered as select students, did so. Our records show plainly also that in recent years the proportion of our students, whether having graduated or not, who go to the professions, is considerably smaller than it was from 1870 to 1877. In determining on a policy for the University it is not necessary to give so much relative weight as formerly to the needs of the students who are to take a profession. The engineering students, who form nearly one-sixth of our number, cannot have their course abridged by a day. It might rather be lengthened with profit. We must con

Page  447 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 447 sider also with special care the needs of the students, who are seeking large general culture, especially of those who are to become teachers in our higher schools and in colleges. These now form a very large part, probably a majority, of every graduating class. Their fourth year is undoubtedly their most profitable year of study. Not a few of them remain for a fifth year, and gain the master's degree. If they were graduated bachelors in three years, they might, if they chose, remain a fourth year in graduate work. But the temptation to leave would doubtless be too strong to be resisted by a majority of them. In considering whether we could easily reduce our course by a year, we cannot neglect to consider what would be the effect of such action on education in the west. Without assuming too much for ourselves, we can hardly doubt that if we made the proposed change, our example would compel the smaller colleges in this region and probably tend to bring all the State Universities in the west to make the change also. One whq is familiar with the range of work now generally done in the western colleges and universities can hardly think that it would be beneficial to the west to reduce the standard of graduation by a year's study, at least until the requirements for admission are considerably raised. If we were organizing anew a system of education in the west, we should doubtless construct one differing in many particulars from the present. We should be likely to establish secondary schools resembling the German gymnasium, and do in them the work now accomplished in the first year of college, perhaps even that of the second year. The University might then complete its work, as the German university does, in three years. But we must for the present accept the organization of the secondary schools as we find it. If by the adoption of better methods in the lower grades the high schools can receive their pupils at a higher stage of advancement, they may perhaps in due

Page  448 448 OCTOBER MEETI~VG, 1890. time take off from the hands of the colleges the work of the first year. In this State they have made marked progress in the last few years. It is quite possible that at no distant day the work of the schools will carry the pupils so far that three years may suffice for the University course. But at present it seems best for us to continue our present policy by which students generally continue their work three and a half or four years in the collegiate course, and yet provision is made for allowing competent students to gain a year in the aggregate time usually required for collegiate and professional study. It is interesting to observe in this connection that the average age of the students who entered the regular courses in the Literary Department this last year is less by a full year or more than the average age of the Freshman classes fifteen years ago. In the decade 1870-1880 the average age on entrance was from nineteen to nineteen and a half years. Last year it was eighteen years and one-eighth of a month. The average age of the nien who entered in 1889 was seventeen years seven and a half months, that of the women nineteen years one and five-ninths months. The average age of the students entering on select courses was twenty-four years and three months. That of the men was twenty-three years, three and four-fifths months, that of the women twenty-five years and five months. The decrease in the age of matriculating students entering on regular courses is due to two causes, first, the improvement in the high schools, and secondly, to the better financial condition of the parents, which enables the students in larger proportion than formerly to come to college without waiting to earn the means of defraying their expenses. The average age of the select students is high, because a very large part of them are teachers, who with praiseworthy zeal, come here to supply the defects in their early education by studying for one or two years. A

Page  449 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 449 considerable number of them conclude after remaining here a while to complete their preparation and take the full course and graduate. The Department of Medicine and Surgery has had avery prosperous year. The Faculty have with much energy labored to improve the curriculum in order to meet the ever advancing demands on the part of the medical profession and of the public for more extended and complete medical training. This school has ever been among the foremost in the country in enlarging the scope of medical education. While beneficial changes have been made in the arrangement and organization of the work heretofore done, it has been decided to ask four years professional study as the condition of graduation. For the present, one year of that study may be pursued in a preceptor's office. But students entering on and after 1893 will be required to spend four years in the Medical Department. I am not clear whether the requirement of a year more of preparatory study in certain sciences and the continuance of the old three years' course might not have been better. But the alternative was not open to us. The state of Illinois and some other western states, in which many of our graduates settle, have passed laws requiring four years of medical study as the condition of being admitted to practice. It is probable that the better and stronger schools in the country will generally provide a four years' course. It is gratifying but not surprising to know that every extension of our course has had a decided influence in bringing us students with better and better preparation. Nearly all who applied for admission this. year had at least completed a good high school course. Since many schools will not establish a four years" course, and since indeed many will continue to graduate students as doctors of medicine, who have had only two courses of six months each or even less, we had expected for the present a considerable falling off in attendance.

Page  450 450 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. But it is gratifying to be able to say that in this respect we have been disappointed and surprised. The number of medical students will be larger this year than it was last year. There can be no doubt that the sentiment of the medical profession has been in advance of that of most of the schools in respect to the proper standard of medical education. But so long as the professors are directly dependent for their salaries on the fees of students, many schools will give insufficient training by short courses in order to draw students. The Board of Regents have spent much time and labor during the year in securing plans for the new hospitals, which are to be erected during the coming year. Through the liberality of the last legislature which appropriated fifty thousand dollars, and of the city of Ann Arbor which appropriated twenty-five thousand dollars, the sum of seventy-five thousand dollars was available for the purchase of a site and the construction of the buildings. An excellent site, comprising nearly ten acres, has been secured at an expense of only nine thousand nine hundred and ninety-one dollars. It has been found impossible to contract for proper buildings without exceeding somewhat the sum furnished us by the State and the city. But the need of the buildings is so urgent that the Board has felt itself constrained to begin the construction. It is hoped the buildings may be ready for occupancy a year hence. It should be remembered that our hospitals have a double function. They are primarily intended to' furnish illustrations of disease and treatment to our medical students. But they are also in some sense a public charity. Patients are received and treated simply on the payment of their board. Not a few are sent here, who are a public charge on the counties, and who are restored to health and thus enabled to support themselves. There can be no question that it would be a real economy to the State, if provision were made for the care of many more such

Page  451 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 451 patients, and if the counties should then avail themselves of the opportunities to make self-supporting citizens of the many now dragging out useless lives in the county almshouses, who could be cured by propel treatment. The Law School has had an attendance, which is altogether unprecedented, 533 students. It is becoming a serious question whether it will not soon be necessary to provide ampler accommodations than the Law Building affords, or reduce the number of students by increasing materially the requirements for admission. It must be admitted that the question of what policy a Law School in this part of the country should adopt in fixing the requirements for admission and the requirements for graduation is not so simple as it might at first seem. In Michigan and in several other western States students are admitted to the bar on so easy conditions that if a Law School sets up very high standards the great mass of students may go to the bar after brief and perfunctory study in offices and with very little systematic training. It may be argued that the School thus misses its aim of improving the bar, and that it would better accomplish its legitimate end by receiving even illiterate men, who will at any rate find their way into the profession, and by giving them the best training they are capable of receiving. This argument is not without plausibility. But if applied logically to the whole work of the University, it would lead to the lowering of our requirements for admission and for graduation to those of the weaker institutions in the west. We profess and aim to be an institution of higher learning. We have already a reputation which gives weight and influence to our example. If we courageously, but not too rapidly, elevate our stand. ards, we can hold as many students to them as we need care to have. The attainments and the mental discipline of the men we graduate will commend our work to all men of proper aspirations. By sending men of good general, as well as professional, education through all the west, we

Page  452 452 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. shall most effectively do our part in creating a sentiment in the profession which will insist on substantial requirements everywhere for admission to the bar. Nothing in the condition of the other Departments calls for special comment here. The work of them all has gone on quietly and successfully. In our scientific laboratories a considerable amount of research has been carried on. The results have been made public through professional and scientific journals. Our professors, we are glad to say, recognize the fact that they owe a debt, not only to their classes, but also to the sciences which they cultivate. They aspire not only to teach, but also to extend the boundaries of knowledge by original investigation. If a university like this is to fulfill its true function, and maintain a worthy reputation as a home of learning, it must aim to leave to its teachers some time and opportunity for original research. Such men bring to their class-room the inspiring enthusiasm of those who have knowledge at first hand. They stimulate their pupils to work with the same fresh and robust spirit. Their scholarship is eminently reproductive. From the report of the Librarian the following facts are gathered. The number of volumes in all the libraries is 74,599; of unbound pamphlets 14,907; of maps 571. The increase during the University year has been 4,558 volumes, 281 pamphlets, 57 maps. The number of volumes drawn for use in the room of the General Library was 131,874, an increase of 46,000 over the preceding year. This number does not include the books used in the Seminary rooms. Of these no record can be kept. I believe that no other library of its size is so much used as ours. The report of the Curator of the Museum of Zoology, Archaeology and Ethnology shows that there has been a considerable addition to the collections, due to the generosity of several persons and to the expenditure of a moderate sum in purchases. Valuable work has been done in

Page  453 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 453 the identification of shells and in preparing a catalogue of our birds. The unoccupied room in the third story of the museum should be at once provided with cases for the reception of specimens now packed away in boxes. The museum of the Department of Medicine and Surgery is in sore need of ampler accommodations. An addition to the medical building may be necessary to afford the needed room. Concerning the other museums there is nothing of special importance to report. In previous reports I have made grateful mention of the efforts which various branches of the Christian church have made to assist in providing for the religious wants of students by the establishment of guilds or societies and by other appropriate means. These efforts have attracted much attention from those who have been interested in the problems of religious life in universities and especially in state universities. It gives me pleasure to say that the Presbyterians, through the generosity of one of their laymen, to whose liberality the university has been largely indebted heretofore, Hon. James McMillan, are now erecting a fine building to be connected with Tappan Hall, which has been in use during the past year for the religious assistance of students. A considerable number of distinguished preachers have been brought to the pulpits of the city by the different churches. I am also very glad to report that a new General Catalogue of the graduates of the University is far advanced towards completion. During the past year Professors Demmon and Pettee, with the aid of clerks, have been engaged in the difficult and laborious task of preparing this work and carrying it through the press. No pains have been spared to make it as accurate as such a catalogue can be. Our records have been most carefully collated and extensive correspondence has been carried on in order to obtain the information needed. The work has been so

Page  454 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. thoroughly done that a large part of the matter will be available without change for all future editions. It will appear from this volume that (without counting the recipients of honorary degrees) more than ten thousand persons have been graduated here. The record will furnish most impressive evidence of the greatness of the work already accomplished by the University. I beg leave to speak briefly of some of the pressing needs of the University. We still need an ample field for the athletic exercises of the students. Ten or fifteen acres should be secured. As one or two opportunities now present themselves to procure land not very far from our grounds, it is to be hoped that means will be found for the purpose. Some expenditure would have to be incurred in enclosing the field and preparing it suitably for use. It is superfluous to sayin this connection that a spacious gymnasium would also conduce greatly to the health of our students. But I trust we shall not make the mistake of accepting even as a gift an inadequate sum for such a building. A structure too small or unsuitably equipped would be worse than none. It must also be remembered that a considerable annual expense, at least three thousand dollars, possibly four thousand, will be needed to pay the salary of a suitable director, and to meet the cost of maintenance of such a gymnasium as we ought to have. If, as seems to me wise, on the completion of the new hospitals, the Dental College is removed to the building now used as the University Hospital, the engineering work at present mainly done in the south wing of University Hall should be transferred to the building now occupied by the Dental College. The proximity of that building to the Physical Laboratory and the Engineering shops, makes that arrangement judicious. These removals will involve considerable expense, as special adaptations of the buildings to their new uses will have to be made.

Page  455 455 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. One of our most pressing needs is the lack of suitable zoological, botanical, and geological laboratories. In all good institutions the laboratory method of the study of the biological sciences and of geology have supplanted the old methods, certainly for advanced students. We are carrying on this laboratory work under serious disadvantages from limited and inconvenient quarters in rooms which were not constructed for such purposes. We must soon have more room somewhere, and the laboratories should be near the scientific collections. When our museum building was erected, it was planned with the view of receiving an addition for such purposes. It is believed that laboratories could be added upon the east side suitable to meet our wants for some years at a cost of about $50,000. It is hoped that at an early day the Regents will have the means at their disposal for these much needed accommodations. Perhaps nowhere else are we so weak just now in comparison with the better Universities as in the means for teaching the branches referred to in the most effective manner. So far as the attendance of students is concerned, the prosperity of the University exceeds any expectation which we cherished a few years ago. We cannot but be gratified. We cannot but think that the State of Michigan, whose liberality has made this success possible, is gratified. But we who are charged with the administration of the Institution find ourselves somewhat embarrassed by its rapid growth. The large increase in our classes make a call for more room and for more teachers. The conspicuousness which it gives to this University makes it, if possible, a more imperative need than existed before, that we should in no branch of instruction fall behind. We are confident that Michigan expects that we shall prove ourselves worthy of the eminence which we have attained, and furnish to her sons and daughters opportunities for thorough and generous training second

Page  456 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. to none which are offered by the foremost schools of America. Remembering with grateful appreciation what she has done to aid the University in the past, we cherish no doubt that she will with generous hand aid it in the future to secure and maintain that pre-eminent position among the Universities of this country which is so easily within its reach. JAMES B. ANGELL. On motion of Regent Clark the annual report of the President was accepted, and it was ordered that it be printed in the minutes, and that 1,200 extra copies be bound for the use of the Board. On motion of Regent Clark, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Mr. Frederick Stearns of Detroit for a fine collection of bird skins for the museum. The Board then adjourned to 2: 30 o'clock P. x. The Board reassembled at 2:30 P. M. The Finance Committee through its chairman, Regent Willett, presented and read their annual report which is as follows: To the Honorable Board of Regents: Your Finance Committee would herewith respectfully submit the annual statement of the treasurer, showing receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30ch, 1890, and with the same, the estimates of receipts and expenditures for the ensuing year. Your committee has caused a careful examination to be made of the books and vouchers of the treasurer by a competent expert, and the same have been found substantially correct. The errors, very few in number, considering the large variety of transactions, are not such as to cause loss to the institution, and have been duly corrected in his accounts. Owing to the large increase of receipts from students' fees, the balance on hand at the end of the year was larger than estimated. Your committee would, however, remind the board that a very large increase of expenditures for the

Page  457 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 457 ensuing year has already been made necessary by appropriations voted by the board since the opening of the present fiscal year, and that every session brings its necessities. We believe that it cannot be too carefully borne in mind that an important element of our strength before the legislature and the people of the state has been the unusual care exercised by this Board in the expenditure of its funds, both general and special. Respectfully submitted. CHARLES J. WILLETT, Chairman. I-ERMAN KIEFER. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, July 1st, 1890..................................... $ 82,134 84 To be received from University Interest.............................. 38,500 00 " " " 1-20 M ill Tax...................................... 47,272 50 " 'for HomCeopathic College and Hospital........... 14,200 00 " " '. College of Dental Surgery...................... 10,000 00 " Contingent Expenses............................ 8,000 00.".... Books for Libraries.............................. 7,500 00.;' '; Repairs...................................... 5,000 00 "' "* " Erection of New Hospital (From State)......... 40,000 00.........i '';4 (From Ann Arbor City) 25,000 00 " " " Interest on Bank Deposits...................... 3,000 00 " " from Sale of Dental Supplies.......................... 3,000 00 r" " " Sales at University Hospital.................... 1,500 00 ".'.. " at Honmoeopathic Hospital................ 200 00 " " " Students' Fees................................... 100,000 00 $385,307 34 ESTIMATED DISBURSEMENTS. Salaries in Dental College............................................... $ 8,250 00 " "Homoeopathic College and Hospital....................... 11,200 00 " " University Hospital......................................... 2,500 00 " all other Departments...................................... 155,000 00 For Alterations and Repairs............................................ 5,000 00 " Fuel and Lights..................................................... 12,000 00 " Care of Grounds................................................... 500 00 4 Postage............................................................. 1,200 00 " Insurance............................................................ 2,000 00 " Calendar, Regents' Proceedings, and Miscellaneous Printing... 3,000 00 ' Current Expenses for General Library........................... 500 00 " " " " i M useum..................................... 700 00 "..'. in Department of Civil Engineering.......... 1,000 00... ".. of Astronomical Observatory.................. 3,000 00 ' ". ".Hygienic Laboratory....................... 1,000 00 """......Dental Department......................... 1,750 00 Supplies for Chemical Laboratory................................ 10,000 00 " Botanical "......................................... 600 00 " " H istological "................................ 500 00

Page  458 458 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. For Supplies for Physiological Laboratory............................ 500 00 " " " Engineering "............................ 1,500 00 " " " Physical "............................ 800 00 " " " Zoological "............................ 600 00 "..' General Chemistry................................... 1,000 00 (" " " Dental College....................................... 3,000 00 " " "University Hospital................................. 3,500 00 " " "tHomceopathic College and Hospital................. 3,000 00 " c" " Pathological Laboratory............................. 600 00 " Anatom ical M aterial............................................... 2,500 00 " Use of W ater Privilege............................................. 600 00 Purchase and filling of Diplomas.................................. 1,000 00 Commencement Expenses.......................................... 1,200 00 " Taxes and Improvements on Lots in Detroit..................... 400 00 Expenses on General Catalogue................................... 3,000 00 Purchase of Books for Libraries.................................. 7,500 00 "Erection of New Hospital.......................................... 65,000 00 " Contingent Expenses............................................... 8,000 00 Balance on hand June 30th, 1891....................................... 61,907 34 $385,307 34 TREASURER'S REPORT. To the Finance Committee, Board of Regents, University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: Herewith I submit my annual report for the year ending June 30th, 1890. Respectfully, H. SOULE, TREASURER. RECEIPTS. Balance in Treasury, July 1st, 1889........................ $ 15,617 93 From State Treasurer Account Current Expenses....... $ 85,923 50 From State Treasurer Account Special Appropriations. 147,589 08 From Earnings Account Special Funds................... 14 90 From Earnings of the University......................... 111,162 75 344,690 23 $360,308 16 DISBURSEMENTS. Paid General Fund Accounts............................. $175,813 83 Paid Special Fund Accounts.............................. 102,359 49 278,173 32 Balance in Treasury, June 30th, 1890..................... 82,134 84 $360,308 16 The following detailed and classified statements exhibit the condition of the several funds: GENERAL FUND. RECEIPTS TO THE GENERAL FUND. Balance in Treasury, July 1st, 1889....................... $ 28,911 65 From State Treasurer Account 1-20 Mill Tax............. $ 47,272 50 ( " " " " University Interest..... 38,651 00 Sale of Material " University Hospital..... 2,299 38.". "... " tt1Homoeopathic Hospital. 249 80

Page  459 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 459 From Sale of Material Account, Dental Operating Room. 3,795 70 " " ". " to Medical Schools................. 242 47 " First National Bank of Ann Arbor, Interest....... 3,194 73 " Miscellaneous Sources............................... 565 75 96,271 33 " Students' Fees Account Medical Department...... 14,630 00 S" C " " Literary "...... 30,870 00 (" " " " Law "...... 23,720 00 <(" " " " Dental "..... 3,740 00 '" " (" " EIHomceopathic"..... 2,665 00 ' '" " " Chemical Laboratory..... 9,595 40 (" "( " " " Mechanical "..... 972 00 '.".t' " Pharmacy "..... 3,345 00 c".. ' " Key Deposits............... 193 00 ( ".".." General Chemistry........ 198 00 " " " c " Practical Anatomy........ 2,750 00 " " " " " Botanical Laboratory..... 345 00 " " ".." Physiological ".... 63 00 6" "C " " Zoological "..... 114 00 ((" " " " Histological "..... 693 00 c" " t" " Pathological "..... 323 00 4" "< "4 " Hygienic "..... 957 52 " " " " Diplomas................... 5,641 00 100,814 92 Students' Fees, Total................. $100,814 92 ( " Refunded............. 4,932 13 Net.................... $ 95,882 79 $225,997 90 Cost of Anatomical Laboratory Refunded (transfer from Special Account)............................... 7,958 63 $233,956 53 DISBURSEMENTS FROM THE GENERAL FUND. General Pay Roll of Officers, Professors, and Employees. $137,782 96 Vouchers Paid Account Students' Fees Refunded....... 4,932 13 c" " c" Fuel and Lights................. 8,602 99 " " " ' General Library................. 254 23 " (" " Museum.......................... 223 53 "c "6 " Advertising Medical Dept...... 127 49 " " " 4" Law "...... 149 51 " " ' " " Pharmacy Dept... 51 00 <"( " " Miscellaneous Printing......... 1,199 23 " "< " Civil Engineering................ 197 05 is" " " Chemical Laboratory........... 8,226 19 cc~" " " Histological............ 250 00 c" " " < Botanical ".......... 366 58 " < " "c Physical......... 40 92 " "( " Physiological ".......... 91 57 cs" " "c Mechanical........... 1,254 11 " " "' Zoological "........... 262 12 " <" " tPathological........... 357 04

Page  460 460 OCTOBER IVEETING, 1890. Vouchers Paid Account Hygienic Laboratory........... 81 74 " " " Anatomical ".......... 1,852 44 "( " " General Chemistry.............. 897 56 " " " Astronomical Observatory..... 61 08 44"." Dental Operating Rooms....... 2,825 98 "..'; Dental College................... 25 00 " * "..Postage............................ 1,192 22 " " " Calendar......................... 2,340 34 i" " " Contingent Expenses............ 645 82 ( " " " IInsurance........................ 1,523 00 $175,813 83 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 58,142 70 $233,956 53 SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS. HOMIEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st. 1889......................... $ 1,472 68 From State Treasurer...................................... 3,000 00 $ 4,472 68 Disbursemernts. Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees............... 3,867 50 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 605 18 4,472 68 HOMI0OPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL. Receipts. From State Treasurer................................... 12,200 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1890....................... 757 97 12,957 97 Disbursem7ents. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889.......................... 1,972 49 Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees............... 7,122 50 Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 3,862 98 12,957 97 GENERAL LIBRARY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889......................... 853 20 From State Treasurer...................................... 7,500 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1890........................ 529 68 8,882 88 Disbursemients. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 8,882 88 8,882 88 UNIVERSITY JOSPITAL. Receipts. From State Treasurer....................................... 6,000 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1890........................ 1,347 07 7,347 07 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889.......................... 2,050 40 Paid Salaries of Resident Physician and Employees..... 1,968 75 Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 3,327 92 7,347 07

Page  461 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 461 CONTINGENT. Receipts. From State Treasurer........................... 17, Disbursementts. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889............... Paid Vouchers for Expenses......................... 14, Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 2, REPAIRS. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889......................... From State T reasu rer..................................... 4 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1890............... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. 5 PHYSIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889......................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889......................... Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890........................ DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. (PHYSICAL LABORATORY.) Receipts. Balance in Treaury July 1st, 1889........................ Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... GOETHE FUND. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889......................... From Interest on Deposit.................................. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY. Receipts.,500 00 17,500 00 423 44,845 80 230 76 629 35,000 00 799 40 17,500 00 5,428 75,428 75 5,428 75 152 14 152 14 137 17 14 97 152 14 946 04 946 04 605 81 340 23 946 04 992 65 992 65 790 68 201 97 463 41 10 43 992 65 473 84 473 84 473 84 From State Treasurer....................................... 15,000 00 15,000 00

Page  462 462 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889..................... Paid Salaries of Professors and Employees............... Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889.................. Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... REMOVAL OF ROGERS' GIFTS. Receipts. From State Treasurer............................... Disbursements. 4,503 48 8,650 00 947 40 899 12 15,000 00 925 30 925 30 150 02 775 28 925 30 5,000 00 5,000 00 Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889.......................... 4,841 81 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 158 19 COMPLETION OF ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer................................... 2,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 1,866 37 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 133 63 COMPLETION OF BOILER HOUSE AND STEAM CONNECTIONS. Receipts. From State Treasurer....................................... 5,930 45 From Earnings............................................. 4 47 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889......................... CONSTRUCTION OF THE ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer................................. o... 7,958 63 Disbursements. Transfered to and Accounted for in General Account... 7,958 63 EQUIPMENT OF ENGINEERING LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Tre reasurer..................................... 7,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................. o,215 80 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890..................... 1,784 20 6,000 00 2,000 00 2,000 00 5,934 92 5,934 92 7,958 6S 7,958 en 7,000 00 T,000 89

Page  463 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 463 CIVIL ENGINEERING. Receipts. From State Treasurer....................................... 2,00 00 2,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Instruments........................... 802 50 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890..................... 1,197 50 2,000 00 ENLARGEMENT OF DENTAL COLLEGE. Receipts. From State Treasurer..................................... 3,000 00 3,000 00 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890...................... 3,000 00 3,000 00 UNIVERSITY FENCE. Receipts. From State Treasurer...................................... 500 00 500 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................ 500 00 500 00 ADDITION TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer.................................. 21,000 00 21,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses.............................. 20,302 66 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890..................... 697 34 21,000 00 HYGIENIC LABORATORY. Receipts. From State Treasurer.................................... 3,000 00 Balance Overdrawn June 30th, 1890......................... 539 21 3,539 21 Disbursements. Balance Overdrawn July 1st, 1889.......................... 1 95 Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................... 3,53 26 5,539 21 NEW HOSPITALS. Receipts. From State Treasurer.................. 25,000 00 25,000 00 Disbursements. Paid Vouchers for Expenses............................. 9,072 90 Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... 15,927 10 25,000 00 SPECIAL FUNDS. The balances in the Treasury June 30th, 1890, are as follows: Homoeopathic Medical College.......................... 8 605 18 Contingent................................................... 2,230 76 Physiological Laboratory........... 14 97 Engineering Laboratory.................................... 340 2$ Dept. of Natural Philosophy (Physical Laboratory)..... 201 97

Page  464 464 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. College of Dental Surgery.............................. Scientific Laboratories..................................... Removal of Rogers' Gifts.................................. Completion of Engineering Laboratory................... Equipment................... Civil Engineering (Instruments)........................... Enlargement of Dental College........................... Addition to Chemical Laboratory......................... New Hospitals.............................................. Less Overdrawn Acc'ts Homceopathic College and Hosp ital.................................................... Less Overdrawn Acc'ts University Hospital................ " " General Library................ ( " " Repairs............................". " 'Hygienic Laboratory............ Amount of Special Funds in Treasury.................... Amount of General Fund in Treasury..................... June 30th, 1890, Total............................ GIFTS. 899 12 775 28 158 19 133 63 1,784 20 1,197 50 3,000 00 697 34 15,927 10 $ 27,965 47 757 97 1,347 07 529 68 799 40 539 21 3,973 33 $ 23,992 14 58,142 70 $ 82,134 84 The Regents have from time to time received in various forms valuable gifts from friends of education, and in later years money gifts for stated special purposes. These gifts have been until this time merged with and accounted for in all reports as of and with the General University Moneys. This not being in accord with the wishes of the donors, these sums have been withdrawn from the General Fund and made a special account, which will be kept separate and administered under direction of the Board of Regents, and agreeably to the wishes of the donors. The account is as follows: PHILO PARSONS FUND. Receipts. Balance received by the Treasurer March 20th, 1886..... Interest on the same to March 30th, 1890...................... " " June 30th, 1890...................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890........................ MARY J. PORTER FUND. Receipts. Proceeds of Mary J. Porter Fund received March 24th, 1887...................................................... Interest on the same to March 30th, 1890................... " " " " June 30th, 1890.................... Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890....................... $ 80 95 1112 92 $ 92 99 92 99 92 99 500 00 53 75 5 54 559 29 559 29 559 29

Page  465 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 465 GOETHE FUND. Receipts. Balance in Treasury July 1st, 1889. (Unexpended balance of collections made by Professor Calvin Thomas).. 463 41 Interest on the same to March 30th, 1890................... 10 43 " " " June 30th, 1890................... 4 73 478 57 Disbursements. Balance in Treasury June 30th, 1890............... 478 57 478 57 ELISEHA JONES CLASSICAL FELLOWSHIP. Receipts. From Mrs. Elisha Jones October 2d, 1889................... 250 00 " " " February 17th, 1890............... 250 00 500 00 Disbursements. Paid Voucher to Herbert De Cou October, 1889........... 250 00 ~" " " " " March, 1890............ 250 00 500 00 BALANCES IN TREASURY. Philo Parsons Fund......................................... 92 99 Mary J. Porter "........................................ 559 29 Goethe "........................................ 478 57 1,130 85 On motion of Regent Butterfield the foregoing report of the Finance Committee was accepted and adopted. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That Henry Wade Rogers be appointed Lecturer in the Law Department for the first semester of the year 1890-1, to have charge of one-half the subjects heretofore in charge of Professor Rogers as Tappan Professor, at a salary of $1,000. That Melville M. Bigelow be appointed Lecturer in the Law Department for the second semester of the year 1890-1, to have charge of one-half the subjects heretofore in charge of Professor Rogers, at a salary of $1,000. The resolution of Regent Willett was adopted by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that the following named persons be appointed as Assistants in the Law Department for one year, at a salary of $100 each; Elias F. Johnson, Michael F. Griffin, Rodolphus W. Joslyn and Samuel H. Goodall. The motion was carried by the following vote.

Page  466 466 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, Professor Jerome C. Knowlton was appointed Acting Dean of the Law Department for one year, with the salary heretofore paid to Professor Rogers as Dean of the Department. Regent Clark moved that Frank P. Huested be appointed an Assistant in the Chemical Laboratory for the ensuing college year, at a salary of $17 per month. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark an appropriation of $150 was made for the purchase of apparatus needed in the Botanical Laboratory. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Clark moved that Frank C. Wagner, A. M., be appointed Acting Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering for one year, at a salary of $1,000. The vote on Regent Clark's motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Executive Committee reported that, acting under the authority of the Board, they had appointed E. P. Lyman, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics for one year at a salary of $900. The action of the Executive Committee was approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None.

Page  467 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 467 Regent Butterfield submitted the following resolution: Resolved, That the sum of two hundred dollars heretofore appropriated to place shelves in the library be appropriated to pay such contingent library expenses as shall be incurred by the Library Committee of the Faculty. The following was the vote on the above resolution: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Butterfield presented the Librarian's Report, which was, on motion, accepted and ordered printed in the minutes. It was also ordered that 100 extra copies be printed for the use of the Librarian. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents of the University of Michigan. GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to submit the following as my report for the College year, 1889-90: There were in the Libraries of the University, Sept. 30, 1890, 74,599 volumes, 14,907 unbound pamphlets, and 571 maps. Of these there were in the General Library 59,735 volumes, 14,708 unbound pamphlets, and 571 maps; in the Law Library 10,218 volumes; in the Medical Library 4,146 volumes and 996 unbound pamphlets; and in the Library of the Dental College, 500 volumes. During the year 260 periodicals have been regularly received, as follows: In the General Library, 184; in the Medical Library, 56; in the Law Library, 7; and in the Library of the Dental College, 13. THE GENERAL LIBRARY. The additions to the General Library during the year were 4,032 volumes, 268 unbound pamphlets, and 57 maps. Of these 2,875 volumes and 107 pamphlets were bought, 722 volumes and 161 pamphlets were given, and 435 volumes were the result of binding periodicals. The total amount of bills certified to by me for purchases, for this Library, was $5,095.23. Of this sum $3,758.16 were for books and pamphlets, $808.27 were for subscriptions to periodicals, and $528.80 for binding, rebinding, and mending. In addition to these sums, which were paid from the special appropriation by the Legislature for the purchase of books, $81.91 were paid from the current expense fund for reader's tickets, order slips, etc.

Page  468 468 OCTOBER MEETING; 1890. In June, 1887, the Board, moved by special considerations, appropriated from the current expense fund the sum of $250 for the purchase of books on Systematic Zoology. There remained of this sum Oct. 1, 1889, $83.18. Of this balance there was expended during the year $42.25. GIFTS. We have again been debtors to the general government and to the State government for public documents. Senator McMillan has enabled us to add to the Shakespeare collection that bears his name two rare and costly works-one an exhaustive manuscript catalogue of Shakesperian literature, made by the late Mr. Frederick Hawley, librarian of the Shakespeare Memorial Library at Stratford-on-Avon, the other the rare Second Folio Edition of Shakespeare's Plays, or Folio of 1632. Four publishing houses have given copies of certain works published by them. They are Messrs. Ginn & Co. of Boston, who have given 36 volumes and 3 pamphlets; Messrs. Allyn & Bacon of Boston, who have given 19 volumes and 2 pamphlets; Messrs. D. Appleton & Co. of New York, who have given 12 volumes; and Messrs. Longmans, Green & Co., who have given 11 volumes. Into this list falls, also, Mr. F. A. Brockhaus of Leipsic, of whom we have bought our German and other continental books, for more than ten years. He has presented to the Library a fine copy of the last edition of his excellent encyclopediaBrockhaus's Conversations-Lexicon, 17 volumes. Mr. Ono, the Japanese student who received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University two years ago, gave us, on taking his departure for Japan, 12 volumes of historical and statistical works, relating to his country. The government of Switzerland, through its minister at Washington, gave 11 volumes relating to the political history of that country. Mr. Robert N. Cust, an English author, presented 8 volumes of his own works, chiefly relating to the oriental languages and religions. Dr. Samuel A. Green of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and many others, whose names have appeared in former reports in this connection, have continued to remember us. Two other gifts reached us too late to be included in the number of books reported as added to the Library during the year; I desire, however, to allude to them here. One was from Mrs. Frieze and her daughters, and consisted of about 300 volumes from the library of Dr. Frieze. Many of them are books with which the Doctor habitually worked, and, on this account, they cannot

Page  469 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 469 fail to excite, when handled, lively emotions,both in his colleagues and in the students who have enjoyed his instruction. The other gift was, also, one that touches our sensibilities. It consisted of 22 volumes of standard medical works, and had formed the working library of Mr. Takeishi, the Japanese student of the Medical Department who died in this city last summer. The books were received from his fellow-students and countrymen, Messrs. T. Iriye and G. Tanoka. THE USE OF THE LIBRARY. I have explained in former reports that we are able to make a record of only about two thirds of the use actually made of the Library. The record for the year under consideration was as follows: Number of volumes drawn for use in the Reading R0oom1............................ 126,960 Number of volumes drawn by Professors and used at their homes.............. 4,914 A total of.................................................................................. 131,874 At the beginning of the year a rule was made by the Library Committee of the Faculty by which admission to the Book-room was restricted, as regards students, to a number not to exceed ten at one time, and this permission to be for two months only, to each person, unless formally renewed. Under this rule 41 persons were admitted to the shelves. During the year 375 persons were admitted to the Seminary Rooms-207 to the East Room for the Study of History, Political Economy, Philosophy, Education, Literary Criticism, Mathematics and French Literature, and 168 to the West Room for the study of English, German, Greek, and Latin Literature. CONDITION OF THIE LIBRARY. The great use of the books made it necessary to rebind and mend many of them. A few were entirely worn out, and have been withdrawn from the hands of readers. Nevertheless I can report the collection as a whole in very fair condition. A thorough cleaning of the books and the cases was begun by the janitor last winter, and the work completed on the first floor. He has now begun work on the second floor, and will probably be able to finish that and the third floor, also, in the course of the year. THE LIBRARY FORCE. The changes in the Library force have been fewer than usual. Mr. Jordan and Mr. Hopkins remain in the administrative rooms.

Page  470 470 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. At the delivery desk Mr. Veysey remains, and Mr. Meader has been succeeded by Mr. C. C. Spencer. The increase in the reading made it necessary early in the last year to employ a third person at the delivery desk. Mr. Spencer was so employed, giving fewer hours than the other desk attendants, and receiving less compensation. His place for the coming year has been taken by Mr. J. E. Church, Jr. In the East Seminary Room Mr. Colton has been succeeded by Mr. S. W. Norton, and in the West Room Mr. Leslie has been succeeded by Mr. E. V. Robinson. In my report for last year I referred to the fact that the places in the Library, except those requiring trained service, are given by preference to students who are dependent upon their own exertions for their maintenance here. Those I have named as serving at the desk fall into this list, and the same is true, but in a less degree, of those in charge of the Seminary Roomrs. THE WORK OF THE PRESENT YEAR. With the increase of the Library and of its use, has come, of course, a corresponding increase in the routine, or regular work. This must be'done. What time remains after its performance we propose to give-as we have been giving it for the last two or three years-to the perfection of the catalogue. The catalogue of a library is comparable to the directory of a city. Without the one it is well nigh impossible to find a place in a city; without the other it is well nigh impossible to find a book in a library. And as these guides, the directory and the catalogue, are more or less well executed by their makers, they are more or less useful to their users. The card catalogue of the University was begun when the collection numbered about 16,000 vols., and when about 700 vols. were acquired annually. Special appropriations were made at different times by the Board to supplement the work of the regular library force in this direction, and in 1869 the work was completed to date in the manner then in vogue. For a number of years it was kept up in this manner by the regular force, without extra assistance, but when the acquisitions became 4,000 volumes yearly, instead of 700, and the use of the library had very largely increased, without anything like a corresponding increase in the Library force, the work of cataloguing began to fall behind. Another reason, besides the increased number of books, contributed to this failure to keep up. In making the index of subjects it had been the vogue to catalogue a mono

Page  471 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 471 graph, or work on one subject, only under the one head named in the title. It often is the case that topics, not directly suggested by the title, may be treated in the work with fullness and ability. Now it is important for the student-and by student I mean not only the matriculate of the University, but all who study-it is important for the student that he have reference to these topics, some of which cannot fail to be helpful to him, and which by some means should be pointed out to him. Year by year as new methods of instruction have sent students more and more to books, this fact has become apparent, and librarians are meeting it by closer cataloguing. This change from the old way increases both the mental and the mechanical labor of cataloguing in a great degree. It involves on the part of the cataloguer an examination of all books that is almost equivalent to reading them. In many cases it is actually reading-or, I may put it more strongly still, actually studying them, in order to decide upon the true catch word for the matter contained in the volume. There is still another reason for our slower progress. There is a class of books which have heretofore been regarded as lying outside of the pale of literature, viz: Public Documents. These have come, in the course of the change in methods'of education, to be of the greatest importance the study of political and economical questions. In past times these were not indexed as to their subjects; now however, they are carefully analyzed, and all there is in them that can possibly be useful-and that is much-is indexed. It is not necessary to specify farther in regard to classes of books. The method of close cataloguing indicated is applied to every book, pamphlet, and broadside. At the same time with this increase in the work of cataloguing, arising out of more books and a closer analysis, we have been obliged to carry on, with what despatch we might, a transcription of the cards which constituted the catalogue of the Library up to its transfer to the new building, in 1883. At that time the old case for containing the cards was full, and there was an overflow into trays. A new case was absolutely necessary, and we set about planning it. Then it was found that if the catalogue should contine to be made on the size of card on which it had thus far been made, that drawers to contain it would, in a few years, if the Library continued to grow, require more space than could be found for them. The best remedy for this state of things, was a smaller card, and it was determined upon, and the new case constructed in accordance with the new needs. On account of the difference of

Page  472 472 OCTOBER MEETINGB, 1890. size of the drawers we could not, of course, transfer the cards bodily from the old ones to the new. The change could only be accomplished by a transcription of the matter on the smaller cards About one-half of this work of transcription has been done. We have, before rewriting, verified the old writing and that has really more than doubled the labor. Now, for all this exhaustive cataloguing of 3,000 or 4,000 volumes and pamphlets annually, and for this transcription, we had last year, and have this year, one person who, nominally only, gives all of his time to this work-and until last year there was not this one person. I have wished very much to represent this matter to the Board-not to complain, and not even to ask for additional help, except as I shall specify immediately, but to explain a state of things in regard to the catalogue that grieves me, but for which I cannot feel that I am to blame. The present year will be a " lean " one as regards additions to the Library. We have practically expended the appropriation for 1890, and we can have no more money for the purchase of books until it is provided by the Legislature of 1891, and that will hardly be available before the close of the College year in June. The time gained in this way we shall use for remedying deficiencies in the catalogue, and I am hopeful that a considerable advance may be made. The additional help to which I alluded is this. At the June meeting of the Board an appropriation of $200 was made for additional shelving in the Library. Unfortunately in presenting the wants of the Library to the Chairman of the Library Committee of the Regents, I did not make quite clear for which one of several wants named the appropriation of $200 was required. I should have made it clear that I wished it to be placed at the disposal of the Library Committee of the Faculty to use, if necessary, in providing more help, or a. better quality of help, for the work of the Library during the year. The cost of the shelving was slight, inasmuch as the work was done by the University carpenters. I, therefore, respectfully ask that the sum referred to, 8200, not having been required for additional shelving, be put at the disposal of the Library Committee of the Faculty for any emergencies that may arise. THE OTHER LIBRARIES. The additions to the Medical Library were 243 volumes and 13 unbound pamphlets. Of these 176 volumes were purchased; 11

Page  473 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 473 volumes and 13 pamphlets presented; and 56 volumes the result of binding periodicals. The total of bills certified to for this Library for the year was $930.11. The items were as follows: For books...................................................................................................... $589.67 For subscriptions to periodicals........................................................... 268.69 For binding and mending.............................................................................. 71.75 $930.11 To the Law Library there were added during the year 265 volumes, and to the Library of the Dental College, 18 volumes. Very respectfully submitted, RAYMOND C. DAVIS, Librarian. Oct. 15, 1890. Regent Butterfield moved that Frank A. Waples, B. S., be appointed Assistant in Physiology for one year, at a salary of 8300. A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that Louis P. Hall, D. D. S., be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Clinical and Mechanical Dentistry for one year, at a salary of $300. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays —None. Regent Kiefer moved that a Laboratory Assistant in General Chemistry (a student) be appointed for one year, at a salary not exceeding $150; and that the sum of $100 be appropriated for the purchase of additional apparatus for General Chemistry. Also that the following appointments be made in the Homceopathic Medical College for one year: A. B. Nelles, M. D., to be Assistant to the Professor of Materia Medica, at a salary of $100; and Mary E. Denison, M. D., to be Assistant to the Professor of Diseases of Women and Children, at a salary of $100.

Page  474 474 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. A call vote on Regent Kiefer's motions resulted in each case as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that Professor D. A. McLachlan be appointed Secretary of the Homeeopathic Medical Faculty, at a salary of $100. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the sum of $175 be appropriated for the purchase of apparatus and supplies for the Laboratory of Physiology; and that Francis W. Brewer, M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry for one year, at a salary of $600; and that O. F. Chadbourne, M. D., be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Theory and Practice in the Medical Department for one year, at a salary of $100. The vote on these motions resulted in each case as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Medical Faculty requested the Board to appoint Professor N. S. Hoff as Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, to instruct the Dental students in Practical Anatomy, and that he be allowed $300 for such service. This request was laid over until the next meeting of the Board. Regent Clark moved that the sum of $110 be appropriated for the purchase of apparatus to be used in illustrating Physiological Psychology. The vote on this motion was as follows:

Page  475 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 475 Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Cocker. lNays-None. Regent Kiefer submitted the following resolution which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That the respective Faculties, as also each individual Professor of any Faculty, having any communications, applications or demands to make to the Board of Regents (routine matters excepted) are requested to submit such petitions in writing to the President to be forwarded to the Chairmen of the Committees at least ten (10) days before the coming meeting of said Board in order that such Committees may have time to examine carefully into the facts of each case and report in consequence accordingly and intelligently. Regent Clark submitted the following: WHEREAS, Professors Pettee and Demmon have devoted much time during the past year, including almost the entire vacation, to collecting materials for the new General Catalogue of the University, and to the editing of it; Therefore, Resolved, That the Auditing Board be authorized to draw a voucher in favor of Professor Pettee for $300, and one in favor of Professor Demmon for $400, as a recognition of the valuable services rendered by them, rather than as adequate compensation for their services. The resolution was adopted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Board directed the Auditing Board to send Chamberlain and Austin, architects, of Boston, $1800 on account, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the Superintendent of Hospitals be authorized to use, if necessary, the sum of $500 in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, and $200 in the Homceopathic Medical College, for the purpose of procuring and maintaining obstetrical cases for the

Page  476 476 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. instruction of the Senior classes. It was so ordered as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Kiefer, the Executive Committee were authorized to make the following appointments if found necessary: One Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy (a woman) at a salary of $25 per month for time employed. One Assistant in the Engineering Laboratory. And an Additional Assistant in the Law Department at a salary of $100. Ayes-Rteents Clark, Willett, Kiefe r, Whitmlan and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Whitman, chairman of the Building Committee, to whom was referred the question of water closets on the campus, reported that there was great need of two new closets, and submitted plans and estimates for the same. Regent Kiefer moved that the Committee on Buildings be requested to erect two new water closets at once, according to the plans submitted, at a cost not exceeding 82,000, and that Dr. Vaughan be requested to act with committee: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Keifer, Whitman, and Butterfield. Nays-None. The Building Committee, to whom was referred the matter of obtaining an adequate supply of wvater for the Campus, reported through their chairman, Regent Whitman, that the Ann Arbor Water Company offered to furnish all the water needed for the buildings on the Campus at the present time, including the two closets just ordered, for the sum of 8500 per annum, with the privilege of putting in asmany fire hydrants as the Board may desire. For all buildings erected after this date they will furnish water for the additional sum of ten cents per thousand gallons.

Page  477 OCTOBER MEETING, 1890. 477 Regent Whitman was authorized to make contract with the Ann Arbor Water Company, on the terms and conditions named above by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Keifer, Whitman and Butterfield. N ays-None. On motion the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to Professor Alfred Hennequin for his valuable gifts to the University Hospital of two invalid chairs, and an apparatus for lifting invalids. On motion of Regent Willett, Regent Whitman, chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, was authorized to purchase of John F. Lawrence ten acres of land on South State Street, to be used for Athletic Grounds at a cost not exceeding $300 per acre. A call vote taken on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Keifer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. A communication was received from Mrs. Lucinda H. Stone, in behalf of the Woman's Auxiliary Association, proposing to undertake the work of procuring funds for the payment of salaries of women as teachers in the University, if the Regents see fit to appoint them to chairs of instruction. It was decided to postpone the consideration of the communication to some meeting, at which there should be a fuller attendance of Regents. Upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts., the Degree of Bachelor of Arts was ordered to be conferred upon Edwin Francis Gay, and on Edwin Abraham Zumbro, and the Degree of Bachelor of Letters upon Robert Henry Wolcott. On motion of Regent Clark the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  481 SPECIAL MEETING. 1890. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, December 12, 1890. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regents Butterfield and Hebard. On motion of Regent Clark the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. At the June meeting of the Board the honorary degree of M. D. was conferred upon Dr. W. H. Howell, Professor of Physiology, but by some oversight the fact was omitted from the record. Regent Draper moved that the action of the Board be recorded in the minutes of the present meeting, and it was so ordered. On motion of Regent Willett it was voted that the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy be conferred upon Ormond Oscar Lyons, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science and the Arts. The Executive Committee submitted the following report: The Executive Committee beg leave to report: That under instructions from the Board they appointed Melville M. Bigelow, Esq., of Boston, to give a half-year's lectures in the Law Department during the second semester of the current

Page  482 482 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. year. The compensation for this duty and for the special lectures which he had already engaged to give was fixed at $1,200. JAMES B. ANGELL, CHARLES R. WHITMAN, W. J. COCKER. The report of the Executive Committee was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman and Butterfield. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that the following appointments be made: Professor Edmund J. James, Ph. D., of Philadelphia, Pa.; Hon. Carroll D. Wright, of Washington, D. C., and Professor E. IR. A. Seligman, Ph. D., of New York, each to give a course of lectures on Political Economy during the second semester of the present academic year; their compensation to be paid by Professor Henry C. Adams, who was granted a leave of absence on the condition that he would furnish the necessary instruction in his department during his absence. George Hempl, Ph. D., to the permanent position of Assistant Professor of English at a salary of $1,600. REAPPOINTMENTS FOR ONE YEAR FROM OCTOBER 1, 1890. Professor John W. Langley, S. B. M. D., of Pittsburgh, Pa., as non-resident Lecturer on the Metallurgy of Steel, at the salary of $150. James G. Lynds, M. D., to be Assistant to the Chair of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, at the salary of $100. Cyrenus G. Darling, M. D., to be Assistant to the Chair of Surgery in the Department of Medicine and Surgery at a salary of $100.

Page  483 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. 483 APPOINTMENTS FOR ONE YEAR FROM OCTOBER 1, 1890. Arthur S. Rogers, M. D., as Assistant to the Professor of Pathology, at a salary of $300. William L. Moore, M. D., as Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of the Nervous System, at a salary of $100. Elmer E. Hagler, M. D., as Assistant to the Chair of Ophthalmology, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, at a salary of $100. Rufus H. Bennett and Guy B. Thompson, to be Quiz Masters in the Law Department at a salary of $100 each. The vote on Regent Willett's motion resulted as follows: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett it was voted that the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist be conferred upon Mr. Moritz M. Levy, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Regent Willett moved that John B. Clayberg, LL. D., be appointed to give a special course of lectures in the Law Department during the second semester on Mining Law, the compensation to be $300. A call vote on the motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett it was voted that the degree of LL. B. be conferred upon Robert Hess, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Law. Regent Willett moved that the Auditing Board be instructed to pay the Hon. Thomas M. Cooley $300 for a course of eight lecthres on Inter-State Commerce Law, delivered before the classes in the Law Department.

Page  484 484 SPECIAL MEETIING, 1890. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. A communication was received from the Homoeopathic Medical Faculty suggesting a change in the Deanship of that Department. On motion of Regent Draper the paper was laid on the table. The following communication was received from the Dean of the Homoeopathic Medical Faculty, and the permission asked for was granted: To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: The Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College unanimously request permission to invite Dr. O. R. Long, Superintendent of the Asylum for Insane Criminals, at lonia, Mich., to deliver a course of lectures upon mental diseases before the students of the Homceopathic College during the present college term without expense to the Board. H. L. OBETZ, Dean. The Board authorized the purchase of a testing machine for the use of the engineering departments, at a cost not exceeding $1,000; payment for the same to be made from the legislative appropriation for the equipment of the Engineering Laboratory. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. The following communication was presented and read by Regent Draper: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, December 11, 1890. To the Honorable Board of Regents: In response to the request contained in the resolution of Regent Clark, adopted by the Board at its meeting of July 29, 1890 (Regents' Proceedings, page 427), I beg leave to present a communication from the University Senate. At a meeting of the Senate held on the first of December, a communication was received from the Faculty of the Department

Page  485 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. 485 of Literature, Science, and the Arts, accompanying a copy of recommendations that had been adopted by that Faculty in relation to the establishment of the proposed University publication. The recommendations above referred to were as follows: 1. That the issuance of the proposed publication be begun as soon as practicable on the general lines already laid down in the Faculty's memorial to the Regents. 2. That the editorial management and control of the journal rest with an Editorial Board of eight, which shall be constituted as follows: The President of the University, chairman, ex officio; two editors from the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts; one from the Department of Medicine and Surgery; one from the Department of Law; one from the School of Pharmacy; one from the Homceopathic Medical College, and one from the College of Dental Surgery; these editors to be chosen annually by the several Faculties concerned. Under this head it is further recommended that the Editorial Board thus constituted, have power to choose from its own number an executive committee of not less than three, who shall be more immediately responsible for the conduct of the journal; and, finally, that no names of editors be published, and that the journal be regarded as the impersonal organ of the University. 3. That all financial questions relating to the management of the journal be left to the Regents. The above recommendations of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, were approved by the Senate, and are now respectfully referred to the Board of Regents. WM. H. PETTEE, Secretary of the University Senate. Regent Draper moved that the foregoing communication be placed in the hands of the Executive Committee with power to act, provided the expense to the University shall not exceed the sum of $500 per year. It was so ordered by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. A communication was received from Dr. Winchell, proposing to sell the University a certain collection of

Page  486 486 SPECIAL MEETING, 1890. charts, of which he was the owner. The matter was on motion laid on the table. Regent Draper moved that the sum of $100 be appropriated for the purchase of apparatus for use in the Physiological Laboratory. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion the following committee was raised for the purpose of looking after the University Appropriation Bill before the Legislature: Regents Clark, Willett and Draper. Regent Kiefer submitted the following resolutions: Resolved, That Dr. W. A. Campbell be appointed as instructor in Osteology and Demonstrator of Anatomy for one year, beginning the first day of October last, with the special duty of superintending daily and regularly the work in the dissecting room, at a salary of $1,200 a year, including the secretaryship of the Medical Faculty. Resolved, That Dr. G. C. Huber be appointed as Instructor inAnatomy, excepting Osteology, for Sophomores and Seniors for one year, beginning the first day October last, with a salary of $300 a year. The above resolutions were adopted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Wiliett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  487 REGULAR MEETING. 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN,? ANN ARBOR, March 25, 1890. The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock a. m. Present-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regents Clark, Butterfield and Hebard. On motion of Regent Whitman the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Sundry papers which had reached the President were referred to appropriate committees of the Board. Professor Demmon, who is editing the new General Catalogue of the Alumni, having asked if the Board desired the names of the non-graduates printed in the work, Regent Draper said it was very desirable that the work should be completed, and the book ready for distribution by Commencement, and moved that the names of the non-graduates be printed in the General Catalogue, provided the work can be issued by the twenty-fifth day of June next, otherwise that they be omitted. The motion of Regent Draper prevailed by the full vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Draper, Acting Professor J. N. Martin was made Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women, in the Department of Medicine and Surgery by the following vote:

Page  488 488 REGULAR MEETING, 1891. Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On the recommendation of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, it was ordered that the degree of M. D. be conferred upon J. N. Saint, he having completed all the work required for said degree. On motion of Regent Draper, an appropriation of $600 was made for the purchase of apparatus and supplies for the laboratory of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. A call vote being taken, resulted as follows: Ayes —Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. At the request of the Hospital Committee of the Department, of Medicine and Surgery, Regent Draper moved that an appropriation of $50 be made for the purchase of electrodes for use in the Hospital. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays —None. Regent Draper presented and read the following communication from the Common Council of the City of Ann Arbor. To the President and Board of Regents: The undersigned committee, in behalf of the Ann Arbor Council, and the citizens of Ann Arbor, respectfully request: That in consideration of the gift of 825,000 to the Hospital Fund, the city be given the use of one bed free in the University Hospital and one in the Honceopathic Hospital. We do not ask that any certain beds be held open especially for us, but that from time to time, our Poor Commissioner, upon consultation with the Hospital Committee, may send such cases as are unable to defray their own expenses and cannot receive proper medical attention at home. Respectfully submitted, LOUIS P. HALL, WILLIAM HERZ, Commnittee.

Page  489 REGULAR MEETING, 1891. 489 On motion of Regent Draper the consideration of the above communication was deferred until the next meeting of the Board. Regent Draper moved that Dr. Breakey be requested to continue his lectures on Dermatology for the rest of the second semester, and that he be paid $50 for such service. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Professor Hinsdale asked for a leave of absence for next year to go to Europe for study. On motion of Regent Whitman the request was granted, salary to lapse during his absence. Professor de Pont addressed the Board; andpresented the request of the Athletic Association for an appropriation of $5,500 to put the athletic grounds in proper order for use. On motion the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock p. IM. On motion of 7Regent Willett, it was ordered that the degree of Master of Philosophy be conferred upon Miss Marietta Kies, in accordance with the recommnendation of the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. Regent Willett moved that an appropriation of $300 be made for the purpose of purchasing models for illustration in the department of Drawing. The following is the vote on Regent Willett's motion: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett presented and read the following Communication from the University Musical Society:

Page  490 490 REGULAR MEETING, 1891. ANN ARBOR, March 25, 1891. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: In behalf of the University Musical Society, in order that the Commencement Concert may be worthy of the dignity of the University, and in view of the consideration of the fact that the Society cannot assume so great a financial responsibility, I would respectfully request that a guarantee fund of five hundred dollars, ($500), be granted by your Honorable Board. Very Respectfully, ALBERT A. STANLEY, Prof. of Music University of Michigan. On motion of Regent Willett, the guarantee asked by the musical Society was granted, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Draper moved that the following resolution, passed at the last meeting of the Board, (see Regents' proceedings, page 486) be rescinded: Resolved, That Dr. G. C. Huber be appointed as instructor in anatomy, excepting osteology, for the sophomores and seniors for one year, beginning the first day of October last, with a salary of $300 a year. He stated that by a rearrangement of the work of the department, the services of Dr. Huber, under this resolution, was not required. The Board concurring by a full vote, the resolution was rescinded. Regent Willett moved that an appropriation of $91.05 be made for the purchase of a set of fifty-three geological maps and charts belonging to the late Dr. Winchell. The vote on this motion resulted as follows; Ayes —Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays —l'one. Regent Willett moved that Justice Henry B. Brown, be appointed as lecturer on Admiralty Law for the year 1891-2, at a salary of $350, and that George H. Lothrop

Page  491 REGULAR MEETING, 1891. 491 be appointed lecturer on Patent Law for the current year, at a salary of $100. The above appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nayes-N one. The following communication from the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy was presented by Regent Draper: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, ANN ARBOR, IteiI-I, March 25, 1891.) To the Honorable the Board of Regents; Gentlemen: Mr. Joseph Michaei Gries has fulfilled all requirements for graduation with the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist, and he is hereby recommended to you for this degree. By direction of the Faculty, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT. On motion of Regent Draper the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist was conferred upon the person named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy. On motion of Regent Kiefer, an appropriation of t82 was made for the purchase of surgical instruments for the Department of AMedicine and Surgery, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the sum of $500 be appropriated for the purpose of enabling the Department of Zoology to act in concert with the State Fish Commission in making a scientific examination of the fauna of the fresh waters of this state, and making a collection of the various forms for the Museum of the University. The motion of Regent Kiefer was carried by the following vote:

Page  492 492 REGULAR BMEETING, 1891. Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-Regent Willett. On motion of Regent Willett the request of the Athletic Association for an appropriation to fit up the athletic grounds, was referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds to prepare more definite plans and estimates, and report the same to the next meeting of the Board. The President presented the following communication from the Professor of Mechanical Engineering: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, MIC-I., March 25, 1891. President James B. Angell: Dear Sir: Will you kindly ask the Honorable Board of Regents to thank the following firms for donations received for the Department of Mechanical Engineering since their last meeting: The Goulds Manufacturing Co., Seneca Falls, New York; one No. 4 hydraulic ram. The Westinghouse Air Brake Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.; one special triple-valve case for calorimeter. The Battle Creek Machinery Co., Battle Creek, Mich.; one size D Marsh steam-pump. The Fulton Iron and Engine Works; Detroit, Mich.; one "Sure Grip" steel tackle-block. W. W. Cummer, Cadillac, Mich.; part of Westinghouse air brake apparatus. Irvin Van Wie, Baldwinsville Centrifugal Pump Works, 230 -236 West Street, Syracuse, N. Y.; one 14-inch horizontal centrifugal suction pump. Thompson Meter Company, Temple Court Building, Nassau and Beekman street, New York City; one two-inch low capacity water-meter. The Silsby Manufacturing Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y.; one iron rotary power-pump. Lansing Iron and Engine Works, Lansing, Mich.; one set of castings and fly-wheel for new automatic governor for high speed engine in laboratory. It is a pleasure to state that these donations are a valuable addition to our facilities for work in the testing laboratory. Respectfully submitted, M. E. COOLEY, Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

Page  493 REGULAR.M0EETING, 1891. 493 On motion of Regent Whitman, the President was requested to transmit the thanks of the Board to the several firms mentioned in the foregoing communication for their valuable gifts to the Department of Iechanical Engineering. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That the fees of non-resident students be increased by $10, and that the consideration of the question be made the special order at the next meeting of the Board; also that the Executive Committee be requested to confer with the legislature on the subject. The portrait in oil of Dr. Samuel Denton, formerly Professor in the Department of Medicine and Surgery, was received from the Hon. E. D. Kinne, who desired to present the same to the University in the name of his son, Samuel Denton Kinne, grandson of Dr. Denton. The Board accepted the gift, and requested the President to return the thanks of the Board for the same. The President read the following extract from a letter which he had received from Mr. Joshua W. Waterman, of Detroit, who had offered to give to the University the sum of twenty thousand dollars for the erection of a Gymnasium, provided that subscriptions for an equal amount should be procured from others. DETROIT, March 24, 1891. DEAr SIn: The raising of the additional $20,000 for the University Gymnasium Fund may be regarded as an accomplished fact, and I hereby acknowledge myself to be indebted to the University Gymnasium Fund to the amount of twenty thousand dollars. Yours truly, JOSHUA W. WATERMAN. The Regents instructed the President to return their hearty thanks to Mr. Waterman for his generous gift. The Board then adjourned to meet at the call of the President. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  494 SPECIAL MEETING. 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, APRIL 18, 1891. The Board of Regents assembled in the President's room at 10:30 a. m. Present-The President, Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regents Whitman, Butterfield and Hebard. On motion of Regent Willett, Treasurer Soule was chosen Secretary pro tem., in the absence of Secretary Wade. On motion of Regent Draper, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. Sundry papers which had come into the President's hands since the last meeting were presented and referred to appropriate committees. The following resolution was offered by Regent Draper: Resolved, That Section 2 of the By-Laws be amended to read as follows: Regular meetings of this Board shall be held on the third Wednesday of each month in the year, except the months of June, July, August and September. It was carried by the following vote: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett the Board went into Executive Session.

Page  496 496 SPECIAL MEETING, 1891. The following were appointed as Instructors in the Literary Department for one year, from October 1st. inst., at the salary of $900 a year each: William W. Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy. George W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., William J. Hussey, B. S., Joseph L. Markley, Ph. D., Willard R. Clement, A. M., Joseph V. Denney, A. B., John H. T. McPherson, Ph. D., C. Carroll Marden, A. B., Moritz Levi, A. B., George A. Hench, Ph. D., Max Winkler, A. B., Frederick C. Newcombe, B. S., Fred Morley, B. S.,.. " Physics.." 't Mathematics. " i' Latin " " English. s" "' History. " "( French. " " German.." " Botany...".Descriptive Geometry and Drawing..... German and French. < " "Mathematics. " " Greek and Latin. Glen P. Swiggett, A. B., Elmer A. Lyman, A. B., Hiram Allen Sober, A. B., Miss Alice Hunt was appointed Assistant in Drawing at the salary of $350. On motion, the Board adjourned to 1:30 p. m. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 1:45 p. m. Professors Thompson and Knowlton were called before the Board to present their views as to the erection of a new building or remodeling the'old building to suit the wants of the Law Department. Regent Cocker moved that when any important request is to be presented by any Faculty, or any member of a Faculty, for the consideration of any committee, a copy of the request shall, when practicable, be furnished to each member of the Board ten days prior to the meeting of the Board at which such business is to be considered. The motion prevailed by unanimous vote. Regent Draper introduced the following resolution:

Page  497 SPECIAL.MEETING, 1891. 497 Resolved, That Dr. William A. Campbell be appointed Demonstrator of Anatomy at a salary of $1,500 per year, including the salary received by him as Secretary of the Faculty: Provided, that he shall perform the same services and duties as at the present time. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Draper spoke;for Regent Whitman, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds (who is absent), and urged the necessity of extensive additions and repairs to the President's House, and offered the following resolution: Resolved, That the Building Committee at once proceed to repair the President's House according to the plans presented, and at a cost of not to exceed $6,620.00, as per estimate with plans presented. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that the Building Committee be directed to proceed at once with the building of water closets, according to the plans approved, and have the same completed before Commencement. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett presented the following preamble and resolution: WHEREAS, It is apparently the wish of members of the Legislature that the fees of non-resident students of the University shall be raised, and WHEREAS, Since the Calendar announcing the fees for the coming year has been issued, it is impracticable to make an addition to the fees for the next year; therefore, Resolved, That it be announced in the next Calendar that the annual fee of all non-resident students who shall enter the University in or after June, 1892, shall be ten dollars greater than that now required. The vote was as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett and Draper. Nays-Regents Kiefer and Cocker.

Page  498 498 SPECIAL MEETING, 1891. The Building Committee reported as to desired changes in the plaster of the Hospital Buildings, and as to the construction of sun rooms. By vote it was ordered to make such changes, provided the same can be done at an expense which will keep the cost of the buildings within the appropriation. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. The Medical Conmmittee made the following report on a communication from the Department of Medicine and Surgery: Your Committee, to whom was referred the communication of the Medical Faculty enclosing the request of Prof. Gibbes for the appointment of an Instructor, respectfully recommend that the Medical Faculty be advised that the Board decline to make such appointment, and that it is the opinion of the Board that the policy of paying salaries to those who are prosecuting their studies here for a degree should be discouraged, and hereafter avoided. The special advantages resulting to students who are selected to assist Professors in their work are so obvious that there should be no difficulty in procuring all necessary assistance without money compensation, especially in the several laboratories. C. S. DRAPER, HERMANN KLEFER. The report of the Committee was adopted by a full vote. The following memorial was presented: The Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts, at a meeting held March 30, 1891, passed a vote that they request your Honorable Body to consider the question of paying the' necessary expenses of Committees of the Faculty that are sent to inspect the schools of the State, and such other schools in the neighboring States as may be deemed expedient, with a view to establishing or maintaining what is known as the Diploma relation with the University. In connection with this vote the undersigned were appointed a committee to set forth the details of the scheme under consideration, and this Committee beg leave, to suggest the following plan of administration.

Page  499 SPECIAL MEETING, 1891. 499 (1) Before a committtee is sent to visit, a school, satisfactory evidence must be furnished to establish the presumption that the school making the application will, on proper inspection, be approved for at least one of the regular courses leading to a degree. (2) Whenever, owing to the great distance of a school from Ann Arbor, or from any reason, it is deemed expedient that, under the direction of the Faculty, a committee of persons not connected with the University shall perform the work of inspection, the expenses incurred by the Committee in the discharge of its duty shall not be defrayed by the University. (3) When schools located at a great distance from Ann Arbor are visited by a Committee of the Faculty, they will be expected to bear such a proportion of the expense as may be considered equitable. (4) The rule on page 41, of the Calendar of 1890-91, by which approved schools shall be entitled to send their graduates on Diploma for a period of three years (inclusive of the year of visitation), shall remain in force as it stands, except that in case the authorities of any school at any time withlin the period for which the school is accepted desire a committee to visit their school, the expense of such committee shall be borne by the school and not by the University. (5) All bills for the expenses of visitors must be made out in detail and approved by the Auditing Board. 3. A. HINSDALE. M. L. D'OOGE. Regent Cocker introduced the following resolution: Resolved, That under the above scheme the expense of visitation shall be borne by the University. Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Draper, Kiefer and Cocker. Nays-None. On,motion of Reient Draper the Committee on the Law Department was directed to provide for the instruction due from the Kent Professorslip in the Law Department for the remainder of the year. The vote wats as follows: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Draper, Kiefer and Cocker. Nays-N one. On motion the Board adjourned to meet Friday, May 1, at 10 A. Ml. HARRISON SOULE, Secretary pro temn.

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Page  503 AI)JOURNED MEETING. 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, t ANN ARBOR, May 1, 1891.5 The Board of Regents assembled in the room of the President at 1:30 P. M. Present-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper, and Cocker. Absent-Regents Clark and Hebard. Regent Draper moved that the minutes of the last meeting be corrected as follows: (See Regents' Proceedings, page 497, line 3 from top.) After the word " Faculty" add the words "to take effect October 1, 1891." (This relates to the appointment of Dr. W. A. Campbell as Demonstrator of Anatomy.) The motion was adopted and the minutes were then approved. Sundry papers which had reached the President were referred to appropriate committees of the Board. Regent Willett moved that an appropriation of $450 be made for the purchase of illustrative material for work in Latin and Roman Archaeology. The motion of Regent Willett was approved by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Draper presented and read the following communication from the Director of the Chemical Laboratory.

Page  504 504 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1891. ANN ARBOR, MICH., April 17, 1891. To the Honorable the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN-I beg leave to say that the thanks of the University are due for the donation of permanent fixtures in the Chemical Museum as follows: To Mr. Frederick Stearns, of Detroit, for the building of the principal cabinet cases in the Chemical Museum, to the extent of one hundred and forty feet in length, and supplying present needs in a most acceptable manner. To Hon. Theodore H. Hinchman, of Detroit, for the donation of a model Prescription Table, with Pharmaceutical Cases and Work Stand, built to order upon original plans and placed in the Chemical Museum. The Cabinet Cases were built by the University in expenditure of Mr. Stearns' remittance of $500, the cost additional to this sum, if afy, to be paid by Mr. Stearns, at his request. The Prescription Table and other fixtures, nearly complete, were built in Detroit on Mr. Hinchman's order, from plans by Prof. A. B. Stevens, of the Department of Pharmacy and shipped to the University. Very respectfully, A. B. PRESCOTT, Director of the Chemical Laboratory. On motion of Regent Draper the President was requested to transmit to the gentlemen named in the foregoing communication the hearty thanks of the Board for their very acceptable and generous gifts. Regent Draper moved that an appropriation of $156 be made for the purchase of a balance and other apparatus for the Laboratory of General Chemistry, and 8134.80 for a chemical balance for the Chemical Laboratory. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Draper the Board went into Executive Session. After remaining in Executive Session for some time, the business of the open session was resumed.

Page  505 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1891. 505 On motion of Regent Draper the Legislative Appropriation of $7,500 per year for books for libraries was divided as follows, for the year 1891: General Library, $5,000; Law Library, $1,500; Medical Library, $1,000. For the year 1892: General Library, $5,000; Medical Library, $1,500; Law Library, $1,000. Regent Butterfield offered the following resolution which was adopted unanimously: Resolved, That the Board gratefully acknowledge the gift from Mrs. Winchell of eight quarto-volumes containing cuttings collected by the late Dr. Winchell relating to the University and its history, and the State of Michigan, its geology, natural history and resources. The three following motions were made successively and each was carried by the following vote.: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that the sum of $200 be set apart for the purchase of a fine specimen of the elk for the Museum. Regent Whitman moved that the sum of $4,500 be appropriated for the purpose of fitting up the Athletic Grounds. Regent Kiefer moved that the sum of $1,000 be apropriated for the purchase of new cases for the Museum. On motion of Regent Draper the salary of W. F. Edwards, accountant in the Chemical Laboratory was increased from $600 to $900, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. The following resolution was introduced by Regent Whitman and adopted unanimously: Rasolvecl, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be and are hereby authorized to procure and decide on designs and

Page  506 506 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1891. specifications for the following buildings hereinafter named, to wit: For an addition to the Law Building at a cost not exceeding $25,000. For an addition to the Dental Building at a cost not exceeding $15,000. For an addition to the President's house at a cost not exceeding $6,220. To approve contracts; which contracts are then to be signed by the President and Secretary of the Board, after which said Committee are directed and authorized to proceed with the work of construction; to enforce the contracts; to approve the monthly estimates for payment and settlement of all contracts; and to control and do all things that the Board could do, that are neccessary to the completion of the buildings ordered by the Board of Regents at this time. Regent Willett submitted the following resolution which was adopted: Resolved, That Mr. Benjamin L. D'Ooge be appointed to give a course of lectures on the Italic Dialects during the next col legiate year, at an expense not exceeding $45: It was understood that no special provision for this work will be necessary after next year. Regent Willett moved that the following special lecturers be appointed in the Law Department for the years 1891-92. Marshall D. Ewell, Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence at a salary of $350. James L. High, Lecturer on Equity Jurisprudence, at a salary of $400. Thomas M. Cooley, Lecturer on Inter-State Commerce Law, at same salary as last year. The motion of Regent Willett was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion the Board adjourned to 7:30 o'clock.

Page  507 ADJOURNED lMEETING, 1891. 507 EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7:30 o'clock with Regent Draper absent. Regent Kiefer moved that F. G. Novy, Instructor in Hygiene, be made Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry, at a salary of $1,600, to take effect October 1st, 1891. The vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. The Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery having requested the Board to make some provision in the new Hospital for a Training School for Nurses, Regent Willett moved that the Medical Faculty be requested to prepare a plan for such a school, and present the same at the June meeting of the Board. Carried. Regent Willett moved that the salary of J. M. Smoots, Machinist in the Engineering Laboratory be made $1,000, on condition that he give the University ten months service in each year, instead of nine months as heretofore. The motion was carried by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, it was decided that the new Gymnasium building should be located on the Campus. On motion of Regent Cocker the selection of an architect for the Gymnasium building was placed in the hands of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. Regent Butterfield moved that Acting Professor Alexander Ziwet be made Assistant Professor of Mathematics, at a salary of $1,600. The motion was adopted by the following vote:

Page  508 508 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1891. Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., be appointed Instructor in Political Economy for one year from October next, at a salary of $900; and that George H. Rowe be appointed Assistant to the Professor of Physics for one year from October next, at a salary of $600. The above appointments were made as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Cocker moved that Instructor George W. Patterson be made Assistant Professor of Physics at a salary of $1.600 from the first of October next. A call vote being taken, resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman, Carl W. Belser, Instructor in German and Hebrew. was made Assistant Professor of Oriental Languages for one year at a salary of $1,600, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. The Board by unanimous vote directed the Secretary to have the following work done during the coming summer: To purchase and set two new boilers in the east Boiler House. Take steam to and heat the present Dental Building, to be fitted up for the Civil Engineers. Enlarge steam-pipes leading to the Law Building and heat and ventilate the same. Overhaul and fit up the present Hospital Buildings for the use of the Dental Department.

Page  509 ADJOURNED MEETING, 1891. 509 Construct a Laboratory for Zoology, and one for Botany, using the two lower stories in the north wing of the Main Building for that purpose, and provide class rooms in the south wing for those Professors whose present rooms are needed for the Laboratories named above. Connect our water system with the City Water Works, and make the usual annual repairs on the Buildings and Grounds. On motion, the Board adjourned to May 22d, at 10 o'clock a. m. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  511 MAY MEETING, 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, 1 ANN ARBOR, May 22, 1891. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regents Clark, Butterfield and Hebard. On motion of Regent Willett the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board went into Executive Session. Regent Willett, Chairman of the Finance Committee, explained at length the condition of the finances, after which, on his motion, the board took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reconvened at 2 o'clock P. M. and continued the business of the executive session. Regent Clark having arrived, the members were all present except Regents Butterfield and Hebard. Regent Draper moved that the question of providing enlarged accommodations in the new Hospitals be deferred until the nextmeeting of the Board, and that the Faculties of both Medical Departments be requested to furnish the

Page  512 512 MAY MEETING, 1891. Board at that time an estimate of the exact cost of finishing the Hospital Buildings and the cost of equipping them in such a way as will meet the wants of their respective Departments. The motion of Regent Draper was carried. Regent Willett moved that the action taken by the Board at its last meeting on the request of Professor Hinsdale for a leave of absence to go to Europe be rescinded. The motion was carried. Regent Willett moved that Professor Hinsdale be granted leave of absence for one year from October next, to go to Europe for the purpose of study, on the condition that he provide the necessary instruction in his department during his absence. On motion of Regent Willett the Executive Committee were authorized to provide instruction in Geology for the coming year. Regent Willett moved that the salary of Professor De Pont be increased to $2,200, and that Instructor G. A. /Hench be made Assistant Professor in German at a salary of $1,600. The motion of Regent Willett was carled as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett the request of Dr. Freer for the appointment of two assistants in General Chemistry was referred to the Medical Committee. On motion of Regent Draper the President was requested to make inquiry with reference to securing a Director for the Gymnasium and report the results to the next meeting of the Board. Regent Kiefer moved that the sum of $410 be appropriated for the purchase of instruments and apparatus for use in the Physiological Labratory.

Page  513 MAY MEETING, 1891. 513 A call vote on this motion resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Whitman the request of C. G. Taylor, Superintendent of Shops, for an increase of salary was referred to the Committee on the Literary Department. On motion the Board adjourned. JAMES. H. WADE, Secretary.

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Page  515 REGULAR MEETING. JUNE, 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 22, 1891. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Absent-Regents Kiefer, Hebard and Draper. Sundry papers which had reached the President were, on motion of Regent Clark, referred to the appropriate committees of the Board. On motion of Regent Willett, the minutes of the last meeting were approved as printed. On motion of Regent Whitman the Board went into executive session. Regent Clark presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Literature, Science, and the Arts. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to report to your Honorable Body that the following persons have been recommended, at the last meeting of the Faculty, for the degrees indicated below. The three students whose names are marked with an asterisk will necessarily be absent from Commencement for reasons which in the opinion of the Faculty justify conferring the degree in their absence. BACHELOR OF LETTERS. Hilah Lockwood Allen, Louis Vincent DeFoe, Minnie Thornton Buick, Charles Edmund Filkins, Eda May Clark, Helen Louise Hatch, Marguerite Bammel Cook, Ida Z. Hibbard,

Page  516 516 JUNE MEETING, 1891. William Byron Kelly, Harry Edwin King, Edward Robert Lewis, Jacob Lowenhaupt, Grant Mahan, John Aloysius McLaughlin, *Emma Winner Rogers, Annette Stayt, Edward Dodge Warner, Marion Isabel Watrous. William Wilhartz. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (In Biology). *Albert Chauncey Eycleshymer, Charles Hill. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (In Chemistry). Frank Riley Ashley, Abraham Lincoln Knisely, George Oswin Higley, Walter Hammond Nichols, Stillman George Jenks, Julius Otto Schlotterbeck, Ph. Co Lyman Frederick Kebler, Ph. C., Darius Parsons Shuler, Ph. C. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (In Electrical Engineering). James Moseley Crosby, Frederic Stephen Richmond, George Herbert Rowe. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (In Mechanical Engineering). George Russel Brandon, Dwight Bissell Cheever, Clarence Elbert DePuy, Thomas Lee Wilkinson. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. (In Civil Engineering). Alfred Stone Calkins, Bernard Lincoln Green, Harry James Hatch, William James Hinkson, B. S., John T. Noye Hoyt, William Thaddeus Keating, Robert Patterson Lamont, Edward Joseph Murphy, A. B., Robert Lemuel Sackett, Gabriel Cooley Tuthill. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. William Simon Brown, William Clark Campbell, A. B., Theodore Lincoln Chadbourne, Elizabeth Whetten Dean, Orville Richard Hardy, Grace Hastings, James Robertson, Samuel Sherman, Raymond Elmoine Van Syckle.

Page  517 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 517 BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Mary Clark Bancker, Nellie Genevieve Phillips, Wolcott Hackley Butler, LL. B., Bertha Edna Pritchard, Henry Magnus Butzel, Elizabeth Alma Campbell, Lucy Coolidge, John Robert Effinger, Jr., Ethel Fountain, Frederick Sherburne Gaige, M.S., Mertie Leora Goodell, William Edgar Griffin, Matthew Brown Hammond, Lydia Day Holmes, Day Krolik, Clara Marie Meiser, Ida Mighell, Jennie Maud Miller, Bertrand Paul Mossman, George Rebec, Albert Dykeman Rich, Eugene Herbert Robertson, Opal Robeson, Mary Eliza Sanborn,, Gustavus Adolphus Shartau, Edward Hurd Smith, Kate Laura Sprague, Laura Eunice Sprague, Grace Adele Stayt, Katharine Eliza Sumner, Rufus Calvin Thayer, Edgar Miller Thorpe, Lyman Benjamin Trumbull, Charles Beecher Warren. BACHELOR OF ARTS. Emma McAllan Ballentine, Dirk Lawrence 'Betten, A. B., Charles Luther Blodgett, Albert Sidney Brown, Phebe Josepha Bullock, Fred George Cadwell, Lucy Durfee Clark, George Pierre Codd, James Melville Coleman, A. B., Thomas Benton Cooley, George Sears Curtiss, Daniel Layman Dorsey, Earle Wilbur Dow, *Marie Fleming, James Hugh Harris, Walter Edward Healy, Theodore Henry Hinchman, Jr., George Steadman Holden, John Alexander Jameson, Jr., Mary Adelaide Jay, Lillie Wyckoff Johnson, Thomas Kerl, Edna Alexine King, Gustav Kleene, Ruth Winifred Lane, Alfred Courtney Lewerenz, Harriet Anges Lovell, Harrison Beecher McGraw, Amelia Elizabeth McSweeney, Clarence Linton Meader, Samuel Alexander Sterrett Metheny, A. B., Reuben Rice Moore, Loyal Levi Munn, Jr., Flora Oakley, Loran David Osborn, Benjamin Eldridge Page, Walter Truman Palmer, Eleanor Brooks Pearson, William David Plant, Robert Minard Reid, Hudson Sheldon, Herbert Bradish Shoemaker, Herbert Scott Smith,

Page  518 518 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Paul Edwin Stillman, Esther Boise Van Deman, Albert Willis Tressler, Eugene Clarence Warriner, William Hall Turnbull, Ellen Wheeler, John Arthur Van Arsdale, Leslie Henry Wood. CIVIL ENGINEER. Percy Hunt Richardson, B. S., David Wendel Spence, B. S. MASTER OF SCIENCE. David Martin Lichty, B. S., John Adams Shelton, B. S., Charles Orrin Townsend, B. S. MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY. Ella Howison Carnall, A. B.. Harvey Newton Ott, Ph. B., Edgar J. Townsend, Ph. B. MASTER OF ARTS. James Rowland Angell, A. B., Guy Lincoln Kiefer, A. B., Edgar Millard Doughty, A. B., Edwin Lillie Miller, A. B., William Amasa Grace, A. B., Henry Close Montgomery, A. B., Frederick Augustus Henry, A. B., James Rood Robertson, A. B., Ruth Hoppin, A. M., Edward Van Dyke Robinson, A.B. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Fred Converse Clark, A. M., Fayette Hurd, A. M., Samuel Medary Dick, A. B., Marietta Kies, Ph. M. Respectfully submitted, P. R. DE PONT, Registrar. On motion of Regent Clark it was ordered, that the degrees indicated be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendations of the Faculty. Regent Butterfield presented and read the following coinmunication from the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN,) SCHOOL OF PHARMACY, ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 22, 189. ) To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: By direction of the Faculty of the School of Pharmacy I respectfully report that the following named persons have been recommended to your Honorable Body for the respective degrees indicated:

Page  519 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 519 PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST. Arthur Winfield Adams, John Loren Hubbard, Shinichi Ando, Frank Pomfret Huested, William Fuller Ashley, Edward Morse Kennedy, Robert M. Berry, Joseph Catlin' King, Harry Lamont Bird, Harry Cross Loudenbeck, Perry Briggs, Thomas Henry McGee, Homer Burgess, Benjamin Lindley Murray, Arthur Campbell, Frank J. Peck, Alfred Payson Churchill, Dorian Melancthon Russel, John Ward Corbin, Walter Karl Schmidt, Frank Frederick Davis, Frank Irving Shepherd, Edith Emma Greaves, Henry Fred Smith, Frank Albert Green, Henry Persse Snow, Joseph Clement Hearne, Garrie Green Van Schoonhoven, John E. Hitchcock, James Wheeler Whitney. MASTER OF PHARMACY. Harry Kahn, Ph. G. Respectfully submitted, A. B. STEVENS, Sec. On motion of Regent Butterfield it was voted to confer the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist upon the persons named in the foregoing communication. Regent Butterfield presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery; and on his motion the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon the persons named therein. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GtNTLEMEN: I am instructed to inform you that the following named persons have completed the required work and are hereby recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Very respectfully, WILLIAM A. CAMPBELL, Sec. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. Nelson Abbott, James Otis Ballard, Ph. B., Mary Louise Ambrook, LaFayette College. Lizzie Daniel Rose Atkinson, Joseph Grant Bartow, Henri Stranahan Babcock, William Russell Bates,

Page  520 520 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Martin Luther Belser, Fannie Burton Hurd, Francis Rand Blanchard, Edwin August Jarecki, Ray Martel Bradford, Addie Capitola Johnson, Burton Clark Bradshaw, Jay Ellsworth Johnston, A. B., Arthur McKimmon Brown, A.B., Monmouth College. Lincoln University. Thomas ap Roger Jones, A. B., Hugh Brown, Bethany College. Ruth Ophelia Bryant, Charles Edward Kerney, George Henry Cattermole, Guy Lincoln Kiefer, A. B., William Corpron, John Henry Kimble, Ph. B., John Garner Craig, Adrian College. Annie Wood Croacher, Lewis Charles Knapp, Edward Clement Davidson, Dryden Hemingway Lamb, Charles Edwy Decker, Abram Leenhouts, Pedro del Valle, Charles Herman Letterman, William Le Roy Dunn, Ph. C., Robert Ernest Lewis, Frederick B. Dunnigan, Donald Macrae, Jr. Daniel Dwyer, David Powrie Maitland, William Henry Fisher, Emma Louise McCollum, Mary Hopkins Fletcher, Colin Bancroft McKenzie, William Lucas Ford, James Archibald McNiven, Thomas Reese Foster, James Ralph Montgomery, William Joseph Furness, Willet Abraham Mumbrue, Fletcher Gardner, Frederick George Novy, Sc. D., Lucius Orange Gibson, Julia Alice Peterson, Dennis Fred Goo, Samuel Ferdinand Price, Frank Millard Gowdy, Mary Hannah Ratcliffe, Frederic Joseph Graham, William Gifford Rice, Harry Edmund Greene, B. S., John Henry Rishmiller, Wabash College. Mark Rockwell, Ph. C., John Greenshields, A. B., Frank Ladd Saylor, Howard Albertus Grube, John Schurr, Van Henry Gwinn, Yusiro Senshu, Edward Warren Henderson, John Henry Shaper, Ph. C., Joseph Jefferson Henderson, William Shaw, Della Hertzsch, Cassius D. Silver, George Jacob Hirth, Ph. C., Helen Smith, Ralph Oliver Hollister, Mary Coffield Smith, James Hosking, Walter Hamilton Snyder, Loron Whitney Howk, A. B., Willard Ralph Starks, University of Rochester. Charles Spurgeon Stewart, Clinton De Witt Hubbard, Peter Stewart,

Page  521 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 521 Charles Augustus Stimson, Charles Milton Storch, Eugene Silas Strout, May Belle Stuckey, Clark Sutherland, John Clifton Taylor, Frank Melvin Thorns, Frank Burr Tibbals, A. B., Yale University. Jacob Triplett, Edward Henry Troy, Aldred Scott Warthin, A. M., Mary Whitaker Williams, Albert Howe Wishart, Lillis Adora Wood, Percy Ruttan Wood, Simon Menno Yutzy. Regent Butterfield presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of the Homceopathic Medical College, and on his motion it was voted that the degree of Doctor of Medicine be conferred upon the persons named, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The following named persons having complied with all the requirements of the Homceopathic Medical College are hereby recommended for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. In behalf of the Faculty, H. L. OBETZ, Dean. DOCTOR OF MEDICINE. Arza Van Avery, Sara Howard Bostwick, Philip Horton Bourne, Arthur Wordsworth Burdick, William Franklin Dean, B. S., State University of Iowa. Harvey Elmer Flint, Bina Jane Hallock, John Howard Harvey, Charles William Kirtland, Emma Klein, Franklin Frees Lehman, A. B., James W. Losee, Myron Alanson Patterson, Rebecca Williams Rogers, Orlando Leon Sutherland, Frank Scott Tuthill, Mary Emma Van Schoonhoven, Guert Elmer Wilder. Regent Willett, chairman of the Law Committee, presented and read the following communication from the Law Faculty: ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 19, 1891. The following named persons have been voted the degree of Master of Laws in the Law Department.

Page  522 522 JUNE MEETING, 1891. MASTER OF LAWS. Rufus Henry Bennett,LL. B., William Charles Malley, LL. B., George Edmond Clarke, LL. B. Thomas James McKeon, LL. B., Notre Dame University. Notre Dame University. Albert Arthur Dorn, LL. B., Shotaro Ozawa, LL. B. Samuel Henry Goodall, LL. B., Daniel BrighamRichards,LL.B., Elias Finley Johnson, LL. B., John Welton See, LL. B., RodolphusWaite Joslyn, LL. B., Guy Bradley Thompson, LL. B., John Quincy Lyne, LL. B., Will Hendricks Trook, LL. B., Cincinnati University. Frederick C. Wetmore, LL. B. The following named persons have been voted the degree of Bachelor of Laws. BACHELOR OF LAWS. Fred Hull Abbott, A. B., Howard Townsend Abbott, Lysle Ivor Abbott, Willard Aldrich, William Frederick Allen, Daniel Read Anthony, Jr., William Allen Applegate, Charles Alvin Arand, John Bunyan Ayres, Charles Ebenezer Babcock, Nathaniel Holley Bacon, Terry Ligon Baker, Linnaeus Sumner Baldwin, Richard Bannasch, August Bauer, Charles Dave Beardsley, Charles Albert Bejcek, Ford Belford, George Elmer Benson, Frederick William Benz, Jacob Blackford Bergen, Verne Lile Bevington, Harlan Martin Bird, William Addison Blakely, John Charles Boevers, B. S., German English College. John Nelson Boyd, Charles Albert Boynton, George Arthur Brown, George Westfall Brown, George Kime Browning, Lueppo Dedrick Buenting, John Elmer Bunting, A. B., Simpson College. Arnold Henry Burger, Augustus Seymour Butler, Charles Cicero Butler, Ora Elmer Butterfield, William Frederick Samuel Cairns, Llewellyn Link Callaway, William Clark Campbell, A. B., Trinity University. Wroe Leon Carpenter, Charles Michael Cassin, B. S., Santa Clara College. Lavant Z. Caukin, Ulysses Grant Caulk, Thomas James Cavanaugh, Benjamin Franklin Chase, Frank Livingston Christie, A. B., University of New Brunswick. William Henry Churchill, William Duffield Cochran, Solomon Cohen, John Thomas Condon, Samuel Sterritt Cooper,

Page  523 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 523 William Eisaman Cort, Parmius Calvin Gilbert, Patrick James Cosgrave, Norman Edgar Goodrich, Seward Cramer, B. S., Austin Carlos Gormley, Riley Leonard Crane, Aurelian Bruce Gough, Albert Morris Cross, A. B., Lawrence Peck Gould, Illinois College. Harry Samuel Haines, Edward Alexander Cress, Patrick J. M. Hally, A. B., John Cummiskey, Detroit College. Jesse William Curtis, Ph. B. Franklin Thomas Hammerle, University of Southern California.Rolland Burritt Hamilton, Asa Hamilton Danforth, Charles Mason Hamper, Alfred Job Davis, Sherman Theodore Handy, Brayton Eugene Davis. Jacob Leonard Haner, A. B., Elmer E. Davis, Daniel Harrington, Ferman Enes Davis, Solomon Parker Harris, A. B., James Robert Davis, Rust University. Ora DeLos Davis, Williams Cooper HIarris, Walter Reuben Dedrick, George Hefferan, Bert Albert Deyoe, Francis Neff Henley, Wesley Fillmore Dinius, Frederick Augustus Henry, A.B., Jeremiah Donovan, Hiram College. Thomas Joseph Dowling, Joseph Louis Hepburn, Harry Finis Downing, B. S., Herman Solomon Hepner, Knox College. George Henry Hester, Guy Dale Duncan, Ph. B., Henry Alonzo Hickman, Charles Lewis Dundey, Willard Ward Hindman, Samuel Duvall, Christian Gottlob'Hirschi, John Dwan, Jr., Virgil Isaac Hixson, Frederick Eberhardt, Frank Lewis Holleran, B. L., John Murray Edson, Illinois College. Hudson Pomeroy Ellis, Arthur Kingsley Holmes, Elmer Evans, Harry Eugene Hooker, Olen Lee Everts, George Mechlin Hosack, Ulysses Grant Foreman, Lorenzo Dow Hubbard, Henry Allen Forkner, Thomas W. Hughes, Robert Bruce Francis, John Clarence Huntoon, Walter Charles Frazer, John Thomas Inghram, Jr., Abram Lynn Free, Duncan George Inverarity, James Willis Freeman, George Irving, William Hayes Fuller, Harry Irwin, Walter Joseph Gamble, Harry Dimick Jewell,

Page  524 524 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Henderson Franklin Johns, George B. McIntyre, Fred Homer Johnson, Ph. B., Frank Edgar McMaster, Ph. B., Hillsdale College. Cornell College. George Samuel Johnson, Ph. B., James Clifford McNally, Lafayette College. Henry Lincoln Johnson, Oliver Morton Jones, B. S.,.( Purdue University. ( William Kaufman, ] Willie Bullard Kegley, A. B., Milligan College. John Kelleher, John Henry Kelley, Frank Henry Kelly, Arthur Jay Kendall, George Abiathar Kendall, Julius William Knipp, Charles Oscar Knudson, Herbert Thomas Landauer, William Landiss, Henry Lardner, Jr. John Amby Largent, Ulysses Samuel Lesh, Thomas David Lewis, B. S., University of Deseret. Irenaeus Cory Lindley, Will Orville Lindley, W. Ellsworth Lindsey, Thomas Downs Long, Ph. B., Cornell University. Sam Elliott Low, Francis James Lynch, Amos Colin Maple, A. B., DePauw University. Yaichiro Masumoto, Willard Weston Maughan, Arthur Johnson McCabe, B. S., Washburn College. Edward David McCabe, Herbert McCoy, Joseph Samuel McGeagh, A. B., Western University. Jehu Baker Middlecoff, Charles Wilbur Middlekauff, Charles Vernon Miles, Charles Frederic Miller, Hugh John Miller, John Marshall Miller, William Manning Miller, James Lewis Mitchell, Jr., A. B., Indiana University. U. S. Grant Mitchell, John Henry Mohr, Stephen Blackmar Monroe, Ira More, Roland Fowler Moseley, Alexander McGlashan Muir,, Charles Webster Munger, Sanju Muramatsu, William Blain Murrell, John Nicholas Myler, John Rush Newcomer, Benjamin Frederic Ninde,,. William Murray Ninde, George Lowe Nye, Daniel O'Byrne, Odie Odell Oldfather, Walter Bernard O'Neill, A. B., Detroit College. Henry Louis Ottemeier, Eber Ward Owen, James Alexander Park, Charles Borromeo Pavlicek, A. B. B. S., Northern Illinois College. Harry Allen Peirsol, Melvin Emerson Peters, Jesse Connell Petherbridge, Norman Arter Phillips, George Washington Pierson,

Page  525 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Ralph Platt, Presley Faris Stillings, Ora Herbert Porter, Horace Conwell Stilwell, Dwight Alfred Pray, John Elwin Strong, Enoch Jones Price, A. B., Alexander Sinclair Sutherland, Denison University. Martin Ralph Sutherland, Lawrence Francis Puter, Eli Ransom Sutton, Emery Clinton Pyle, Charles Elliott Sweet, Harry Nelson Quigley, A. B., Ira Rolland Tabor, William Butterfield Ramsay, A.B.,Frank James Taylor, Harry Dalton Rankin, Hai old Taylor, Charles Marshall Reader, Hedley Clarence Taylor, A. M., Levi Branson Reeder, Mt. Allison University. Allin Lee Rhodes, David Bellinger Tewkesbury, Michael Roach, William Edward Thompson,A.B., Leslie Baker Robertson, Detroit College. John Romain Rood, Theodore Walter Todd, A. B., Miles Rosenbluth, Monmouth College. Frank Jackson Ross, Willis Leroy Townsend, Leopold G. Rothschild, Emery Brainerd Tyler, John William Roudebush, William Henry Umlor, John Joseph Rudkin, A. B., Edwin Francis Van Vechten, Allegheny College. Duncan MacArthur Vinsonhaler, Simon Morris Sapinsky, Jesse Lester Waller, A. B., John Henry Schrider, Oberlin College. Morgan Clement Shafer, Will Frank Wanless, George Frederic Sherman, Belmont.Waples, A. B., Dudley Morton Shively, Hango Watanabe, Louis Jacob Siemon, Herman Henry Wefel, Jr., William Herbert Slack, William Jesse Whitaker, John Davis Smith, Arthur Percival Will, Sprague Ernest Snively, Stephen Douglas Williams, Edwin Robinson Spotts, Hugh Edward Wilson, John Stansbury, Joseph Richard Wilson, Fred Rollin Stark, Thomas Jefferson Wilson, Harmon Chamberlin St. Clair,George Everhart Wissler, A. B., B. L., Franklin and Marshall College. Edward John Stebick, Charles Bishop Wood, William Du Bose Steele, A. M., Henry Durland Wood, University of the South. J. C. KNOWLTON, Acting Dean.

Page  526 526 5JUNE M1EETING, 1891. Regent Willett moved that the degree of Master of Laws, and that of Bachelor of Laws, be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication, in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Law Department. Carried. Regent Kiefer presented the following communication from the Faculty of the Dental Department: ANN ARBOR, June 23, 1891. To the Honorable Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: The following named persons having complied with the requirements of this Department are recommended by the Faculty of tle Dental College for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. Respectfully submitted, Walter Horace Booth, James Frank Cook, Manuel Vicente del Valle, Rokus Christian Devries, Arthur Aaron Deyoe, Frank Chester Dorrance, Charles Henry Edwards, Frederick William Fleming, Walter Jesse Green, Frank Sydney Henry, William Edward Kearns, Gordon Grant McCoy, Austin McGuire, Clinton Floyd Metcalf, J. TAFT, Dean. Arthur Werner Mueller, Pascal Pratt Nelson, Charles Sigfried Rudolf Osius, Michael More Park, Wilsie David Reed, Clinton Robert Scott, Alfred Louis Sickler, Charles Perce Stone, Jonathan Ray Taft, Lewis Carlisle Thayer, Victor Emmanuel Tuttle, Eldon Waterloo, Lucy Kate Waterloo, ~William Williams, M. D., Western Reserve University. Burt G. Winans. On motion of Regent Kiefer, it was voted that the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery be conferred upon the persons named in the foregoing communication. On motion of Regent Willett, the request of Horace Purfield for an increase of salary was disallowed. On motion of Regent Whitman, the Board adjourned to 2 o'clock P. M.

Page  527 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 527 AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 2 o'clock P. M. On motion of Regent Willett, Professor J. C. Knowlton was made permanent Dean of the Department of Law. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the following named persons were appointed for one year: C. G. Darling, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Surgery; James G. Lynds, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children; William L. Moore, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Nervous Diseases; Elmer E. Hagler, M. D., Assistant to the Professor of Ophthalmology; the salary of each to be $100. Frank A. Waples, B. S., Instructor in Histology, at a salary of $900. S. P. Budgett to be Assistant in Physiology at a salary of $300. Archibald Muirhead, Assistant to the Professor of Materia Medica, at a salary of $300. A call vote being taken on the above appointments, resulted as follows: AYES-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. NAYS-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the title of John J. Abel, Ph. D., M. D., was changed from " Lecturer " to Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Regent Whitman moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint an assistant in Electro-Therapeutics for one year at a salary of $300, and that Professor I. N. Demmon be allowed $250, and Professor W. H. Pettee $100 for services in editing the new general catalogue. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes —Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays —None. The resignation of Dr. C. L. Ford as Dean of the Medical Faculty was received and accepted, and Dr. V. C. Vaughan was appointed to the place.

Page  528 528 JUNE MEETING, 1891. The resignation of Dr. J. N. Martin as lecturer in the Dental Department, was received and accepted. Regent Butterfield moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint an assistant in the general library for one year at a salary of $700, and that the Auditing Board be authorized to expend $50 in the purchase of curtains in the book room, and to provide an additional cloak room in the library. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, it was decided that when the gymnasium is built it shall be located on the northeast corner of the Campus. Regent Clark moved that George O. Higley, B. S., be appointed Instructor in General Chemistry for one year at a salary of $900. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Butterfield, B. B. Rowe, M. D., was appointed House Surgeon in University Hospital for one year, at a salary of $700, by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Butterfield presented and read the following communication from the Faculty of Dental College: ANN ARBOR, MICH., June 1, 1891. To the Honorable Board of Regents of the University of Michigan: GENTLEMEN: The Dental Department has a larger attendance than ever before, and with this increase in numbers its needs enlarge. We have greatly needed more room for the proper conduct of its work, but this need is, as we think, to be quite well supplied by the beginning of the next session. Owing to the adoption of the

Page  529 JUNE MEETING, 1891. three years' course, and the increased attendance some readjustment of the work is necessary. The students are divided into three classes, according to the years of attendance, and certain distinctive work is assigned to each class. In order to secure the best results in this practical instruction, it seems desirable that a teacher should be placed in charge of each of these classes, and made responsible for the work of his department. Dr. Watling has charge of the Clinical Operative Department and Senior Class. Dr. Dorrance, assisted by Dr. Hoff, has charge of the Ciinical Prosthetic work and the Junior Class, and in addition the mechanical construction of Dental appliances with the Freshman Class. The best interests of these departments require that each have a special teacher in charge and such assistants as the nature of the work and the number of students require. In order to meet these needs, we ask that the Mechanical Dentistry, which has hitherto been a part of Dr. Watling's work, be assigned to Dr. N. S. Hoff, and that he be appointed Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Dental Mechanism, at a salary of ($2,000) two thousand dollars, instead of being Assistant Professor of Practical Dentistry. We also recommend that Dr. J. A. Watling's title be changed to Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. That Dr. L. P. Hall be appointed assistant to the Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry, and that his salary be increased to ($600) six hundred dollars per year. That Dr. J. Taft's title be changed to Professor of Principles and Practice of Oral Pathology and Surgery. And that' Dr. C. G. Darling, now Assistant to the Professor of Surgery, be appointed Clinical Lecturer on Oral Pathology and Surgery ($200.) Also that an assistant be appointed who shall give services as required to the Professors of Prosthetic and Mechanical Dentistry. J. TAFT, Dean. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the changes of titles and the increase of salaries recommended by the Faculty were made, except that the salary of Dr. L. P. Hall was fixed at $500, and the salary of Dr. C. G. Darling was made $300, and the Executive Committee were authorized to appoint an assistant to the Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry at a salary of $300.

Page  530 530 JUNE MEETING, 1891. A call vote on the above resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield and Cocker. Nays-None. The following honorary degrees were conferred: MASTER OF PHARMACY on Isaiah Giles Lewis of Chicago. MASTER OF ARTS on Henry Harrison Swan of Detroit, United States District Judge. DOCTOR OF LAWS on Claudius Buchanan Grant, A. B., 1859, Justice of the Supreme Court of Michigan, and on Thomas Francis Bayard, of Wilmington, Del., formerly United States Senator and Secretary of State. On motion, the Board adjourned to 7:30 P. iM. EVENING SESSION. The Board reassembled at 7:'30 P. M. On motion of Regent Butterfield the appointment of Professors to fill the vacancies in the Law Faculty was deferred until the next meeting of the Board. On motion of Regent Butterfield the degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred upon Dr. James M. Hueston as of the class of 1866-7. On motion of Regent Whitman the salary of Mr. C. G. Taylor was increased from $1600 to $1.800 by the following vote. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Clark presented and read the following communication: ANN ARBOR, June 23, 1891. To the Honorable, the Board of Regents: GENTLEMEN: In order to continue the present service of Assistants in the teaching force of the Chemical Laboratory I beg

Page  531 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 531 leave to recommend the following named appointments for the year 1891-92,-each without change of salary or of duty:-Bernard G. Hesse, Ph. C., to be continued as Assistant in Qualitative Analysis, at $192 a year (Minutes of the Board, 1890, page 430). Eugene H. Robertson, Ph. B., to succeed John D. Riker, B. S., M. D., as Assistant in Physiological Chemistry, at $192 per year (Minutes, 1890, page 430, and 1889, page 319). Walter G. Wallace, to succed Christian G. Jenter, Ph. C., as Assistant in Quantitative Analysis, at $200 a year (Minutes, 1890, page 415). And in another communication I have recommended the reappointment of J. O. Schlotterbeck at increased salary. Very respectfully, ALBERT B. PRESCOTT, Director of the Chemical Laboratory. Regent Clark moved that the recommendations of the Director of the Chemical Laboratory, as set forth in the above communication be approved, which was done as follows. Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Kiefer the following rules and regulations for the government of the Hospitals were adopted by the full vote of the Board:

Page  532 RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE COVERNMENT OF THE HOSPITALS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. The entire organization and conduct of the hospitals shall be in accordance with the rules and regulations established by the Board of Regents. In all important questions of administration and discipline the final appeal must be made to the Board of Regents. HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. The Hospital Committee of the University Hospital consists of five members of the Faculty of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, charged with a general oversight of the affairs of the hospital. SUPERINTENDENT. The Superintendent shall be the executive officer of the hospitals, and shall have charge of the same and shall see that the regulations of the Board of Regents and the Hospital Committee are carried into effect. It shall be his duty to admit patients into the hospitals subject to the rules and orders made by the Board of Regents. He may admit temporarily cases of emergency without pay, but shall report such cases in detail within 24 hours to the Auditing Board, who shall decide whether they remain or not. He shall keep, or cause to be kept, a record of the names of patients with their age, residence, employment, nativity, date and terms of admission, diagnosis of disease, date of discharge, elopement or death, result of treatment, disposition of remains, post-mortem examination, if any, and results. He shall keep an inventory of all furniture and other property belonging to the hospitals and make an annual report of the same.

Page  533 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 533 He shall provide such diet as shall be indicated by the dietary card adopted by the Board of Regents. He shall also provide such special diet for patients as may be directed by the physicians and surgeons in charge, the order for which shall be made in writing. And for persons employed he shall furnish such provisions as the Board of Regents shall direct, He shall daily visit and inspect the wards, kitchen, laundry and all other departments of the institution. He shall hire and dismiss all servants employed in and about the hospitals; and it shall be his duty to discharge all those who shall be guilty of profanity, drunkenness, or bringing spirituous liquors clandestinely into the hospital, or other misconduct, and report his action to the next meeting of the Hospital Commitee No employes shall leave the hospital without permission granted by his authority. He shall be particular that no wine, spirits, or malt liquors are used in the hospital except as prescribed for the patients. He shall discharge as soon as practicable all patients recommended for such action, on presentation of their admission ticket signed by the Resident Physician. He may discharge any patient for drunkenness or for being absent from the premises without permission. All such cases must be reported to the Hospital Committee immediately. He shall collect and receive all moneys from patients and make a monthly report of the same to the Auditing Board. Money or valuables belonging to patients which he may receive shall be placed in the safe of the office for safe keeping. He shall keep a press copy of his official correspondence,, including notices to relatives and friends of deceased patients. He shall have the oversight of each department of the hospital and see that the respective duties of each one are properly administered. He shall perform such other duties as the Board of Regents from time to time may direct or the Hospital Committee with the approbation of the Regents may request. In cases where no rule applies, the superintendent shall lay such cases before the Auditing Board of the University, whose action shall govern until the Regents establish a rule governing the same. RESIDENT PHYSICIAN. The Resident Physician shall have the immediate control of the medical management of the hospital, being subordinate to the Hos

Page  534 534 JUNE MEETING, 1891. pital Committee, and responsible to them for the general care of the patients in the hospital. He shall examine patients applying for admission and report the result to the Superintendent who shall admit them after the rules of admission have been complied with. He shall then assign them to their respective departments and shall prescribe for them temporarily on their admission, if necessary, and until seen by the respective physician or assistant under whose charge they will come. In all important cases of emergency he shall as soon as possible notify the professor, or his assistant, of the department to which the case belongs. He shall have general oversight of the dispensary and instrument room, and make requisitions for the necessary supplies for the same, together with the surgical dressings. He shall receive from the professors or their assistants all orders and directions relative to the treatment of their respective patients, and see that the same are faithfully carried out. He shall receive from the respective professors or assistants the recommendations for the discharge of patients and shall sign the admission cards of such patients before they are discharged by the Superintendent. He shall not engage in any other business than that of the hospital, nor shall he engage in the private practice of his profes-:sion. Neither shall he receive fees or gifts from inmates of the hospital. He shall perform such other [duties as the Hospital Committee shall direct, He shall also see that all analyses and examinations of sputum, urine, etc., as required by the clinical professors are made and properly reported to them. ASSISTANT PHYSICIAN. The assistant shall be subordinate to and under the direction of the Resident Physician, and attend to such duties as he may direct. He shall never be absent from the Hospital at the same time with the Resident Physician nor without his permission. It shall be the Assistant Physician's duty to take the history and keep a complete record of every case entering the Hospital, and to properly transcribe or file such record in a neat and proper manner. The Assistant Physician shall be subject to the same rules as the Resident Physician in respect to outside practice and the receiving of gifts.

Page  535 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 535 APOTHECARY. The Apothecary shall be subordinate and responsible to the Resident Physician. He shall have the immediate care and custody of all drugs; medicines and other articles belonging to the department and be responsible for the same. He shall compound and make up all medicines which may be prescribed with exactness and promptitude. He shall deliver no medicines or other articles unless the same be duly entered upon the prescription or order books, or ordered in writing. He shall put up the medicines intended for each ward separately and shall annex to them labels containing the names of the patients for whom they are respectively prescribed, with written or printed directions for their use. He shall deliver them promptly to the nurses of each ward to be by them administered to the patients. He shall be responsible for the correct preparation of all prescriptions. He shall have charge of all the instruments belonging to the Hospital and shall be responsible for them and their good order. He shall keep an account of them and never allow them to leave his possession without taking a proper receipt or ticket from the person so taking them. He shall make an inventory of all instruments belonging to the hospital, when he enters upon his duties; and, on giving up his charge, he shall furnish the Superintendent a like inventory countersigned by the Resident Physician. He shall keep the dispensary and everything pertaining to it clean and in perfect order, and the same shall remain open from 8:30 a. m. to 8 p. m., in his charge. He shall observe economy in everything relating to his department, be particularly careful in the preparation and delivery of medicines, and permit no noise, confusion or disorder in his premises. PATIENTS. Patients will be admitted and discharged between the hours of 8 a. m. and 7 p. m., Sundays excepted. Emergency cases may be admitted at any time. Patients while under treatment will not be allowed to board outside of the Hospitals. Neither will private cases be treated in the Hospital.

Page  536 536 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Patients must pay for board and attendance in advance at the rates established by the Board of Regents. Those needing special rooms and nurses shall pay extra for the same. The services for special nurses will be charged for at the rate of $2.00 per day of 24 hours. The regular attendance of nurses is ample for ward cases, and all patients needing special nurses are required to occupy private rooms. Patients requiring an operation must make satisfactory arrangements by a deposit with the Superintendent sufficient to pay their expenses, before the operation will be performed. All patients who are able will be expected to go the dining-room for their meals, unless otherwise ordered. Breakfast will be served at 7:30 a. m., dinner at 12:30 p. m. and tea at 5:30 p. m. Spitting on the floor or into the air-flues will not be tolerated; and meddling with the grates, gas or steam fixtures is strictly prohibited. Patients will not.leave their wards or rooms without permission from the nurse in charge. They are not allowed to talk to each other about their diseases. All gossipping, loud or profane talking or any indecent behavior is strictly prohibited. The use of tobacco is not allowed in the building except in rooms set apart for that purpose. Patients must be in their wards or rooms when the Resident Physician makes his visits, viz., between the hours of 8 and 10 a, m., and 6 and 8 p. m. The lights will be turned out at 8 p. m., and patients must retire at that hour. Patients must not throw anything whatever on the ground below their window. All alcoholic liquors used by patients must be dispensed as medicine by order of the physician in charge. There is a regular diet for each day, and special diet ordered by patients must be paid for extra, unless prescribed by the Superintendent or attending physician, which will only be done in cases of necessity. Patients must not sit or lie on the bed with their clothes on or wear heavy boots or shoes while in the ward. A minister or priest will be sent for at the request of the patient made known to the nurse in charge. No nurse or servant of this institution is allowed to accept any gift or bequest from or in behalf of any patient except with the approbation of the Hospital Committee.

Page  537 JUNE MEETING, 1891 537 Patients must upon admission invariably have a bath, unless the contrary is ordered by the Resident Physician, and must have a bath at least once a week, unless otherwise ordered. No patient shall be allowed to have any book, pamphlet, newspaper, print or picture of an immoral or indecent character. If any patient shall not conform to the foregoing regulations the Superintendent may immediately discharge him if he deems it necessary and report the case to the Hospital Committee at the next meeting. NURSES. The hour of duty for nurses by day shall be from 7 o'clock a. m. to 7 o'clock p. m., and night nurses from 7 p. m. to 7 a. m. The day and night nurses shall report to each other before they go off duty when any medicines or other attention for patients will be due. Each nurse must be in his or her ward at 7 a. m. Female nurses must be neatly attired in light wash dress, white cap and white apron, with hair properly arranged. Male nurses and orderlies must wear white wash jackets. The nurses' clothing must be kept scrupulously clean, and it shall be their duty to be in the ward during their hours of service and not in their rooms. The assistant nurses and orderlies must regard themselves as subordinate to the head nurses and obey their orders. No command or message shall be received from patients. Nurses must preserve proper decorum and civility toward patients, orderlies, and each other. Nurses and orderlies on the entrance of a stranger into the hall, shall at once arise if seated and give all visitors prompt Aattention. No strangers should be admitted to the wards without passes. The ordinary length of a visit, should be limited to half an hour. This limit should not be exceeded unless so specified on the pass. All passes to wards expire at 5 p. m., unless a later hour is distinctly stated in writing. Meals must be punctually attended by the nurses in turn-one nurse always remaining in the ward or within call. No food, drink, or fruit sent in by friends or other persons out. side, shall be given to the patients except on approval of the Resident Physician. It shall be the duty of the head nurse to report promptly to the Superintendent's office everything in the ward requiring attention and especially the failure of any of the regular supplies, and any misbehavior or insubordination of patients or persons employed.

Page  538 538 JUNE MEETING, 1891. The head nurse must keep a proper supply of medical and surgical dressings and appliances in the supply closet of each ward and keep the closet always locked. Any unfavorable change in a patient's condition must be promptly reported to the Resident Physician, or, in his absence, to his assistant. Every direction of the medical Professors must be carefully noted in a book and immediately reported to the ResidentPhysician, and obeyed, and medicine must be administered faithfully according to directions. The affairs and conditions of all patients are to be considered as strictly private. The nurses in charge will be held responsible for the whereabouts of the patients in their wards. Nurses will never receive patients into their wards without orders from the Superintendent's office. The head nurse will be responsible for the ventilation, temperature, and good condition of the wards, dining-rooms and bath-room attached, and for the serviceable condition of all utensils. When a patient leaves the Hospital the bedding is to be changed and the bed thoroughly aired. All the linen must be changed at a prescribed time, all soiled clothes and other material for the laundry must be collected in clothes bags as soon as soiled. Each clothes bag must be accompanied with a correct list of contents. A duplicate list shall be kept by the nurse. The clothes bags are to be sent to the laundry at 5 p. m. daily. In the diet kitchen, nurses shall make all the beef tea, chicken and oyster broths, gruels, tea, coffee, chocolate, and toast, and in short, do all the special cooking required for individual patients-no order for which shall be sent to the cormmon kitchen. The head nurse shall detail and instruct nurses for service in the diet kitchen. Nurses leaving the Hospital must enter the hour of departure and return in a register kept for the purpose. Nurses are not to visit other wards or talk with other nurses when on duty, except in the performance thereof. MEDICAL STUDENTS. All students admitted to the Hospital or lecture room shall enter by the north door and pass directly up into the amphitheatre. Every student shall produce his matriculation ticket to the doorkeeper when called upon and shall behave with decorum and propriety.

Page  539 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 539 Students shall attend to the cases assigned to them between the hours of 8:00 and 9:30 a. m., and between 6:30 and 7:30 p. m., and shall be excluded at all other times, except when in company with an instructor or with a ticket of permission obtained at the Superintendent's office. They shall do their work promptly and spend their time while in the ward in the study of the cases. All gossiping or visiting with the patients, nurses, or each other, is strictly forbidden. They shall be neat about their work and keep all dressings, mackintoshes, douches, etc., in their places and in a clean and proper condition. If any student shall infringe any of the regulations or rules of the Hospital, or be guilty of any improper conduct, such as smoking, whistling, singing or spitting upon the floors in the amphitheatre, halls or wards, stepping or lying upon the seats, or putting his feet on the backs of seats in the amphitheatre, sitting, standing or putting his feet on beds or tables in the wards, it shall be the duty of the Superintendent to forbid him at once such improper conduct, and if not obeyed, or when caught in similar or like violations of the rules again, to exclude him for the day from the Hospital, and report the same to the Hospital Committee, who may refuse the student further privileges in the Hospital. MISCELLANEOUS. No employes whose duty does not call them into the wards shall enter them without the permission of the Superintendent, nor shall they enter departments where they have no duties, unless on business; and female employes shall not visit the men's rooms nor male employes the women's rooms. No duplicate keys shall be made or retained in the possession of any employe except by the order of the Superintendent. No persons not connected with the Hospital either as patients or employes shall be allowed to lodge or take any meals in the Hospital, or occupy any part of the premises, without express permission of the Superintendent.

Page  540 540 JUNE MEETING, 1891. UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS. HOUSE DIET. BREAKFAST, DINNER. SUPPER. Tea or Coffee Bread and Butl Rice. Eggs and Toast Oatmeal. Graham Muffin Potatoes. EVERY DAY. Tea. Tea. Jer. Potatoes. Stewed or Fresh Fruit. Bread and Butter. Bread and Butter. One vegetable according to season. S. S. SUNDAY. Roast Beef. Apple or Tapioca Pudding. MONDAY. Stewed Beef. Bread Pudding. Cake. Rolled Oats. Toast. Oatmeal. Cornmeal Bread. Potatoes. Oatmeal. Baking Powder Biscu Rolled Oats. Cream Potatoes. Toast. Oatmeal. Cornmeal Muffins. TUESDAY. Soup. Roast Mutton. WEDNESDAY. Corned Beef. Tapioca Cream. THURSDAY. Soup. Stewed Beef. FRIDAY. Fish. Rice Pudding. Ginger Bread. Milk Toast. SATURDAY. Stewed Mutton. Bread Pudding.

Page  541 JUNE MEE 7ING, 1891. 541 On motion of Regent Clark the Executive Committee were authorized to appoint an Instructor in Zo6logy at a salary of $900, and an Assistant Collector at a salary of $200, both appointments for one year. A call vote being taken resulted as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Clark the degree of B. S. was conferred upon Clarence M. Burton as of the class of 1873. Regent Butterfield moved that George Dock, M. D., be *appointed Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and Clinical Medicine in the Department of Medicine and Surgery for one year at a salary of $2,000. The appointment was made as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and,Cocker. Nays-None. Dr. C. G. Huber asked for, and obtained a leave of absence for one year from October 1, 1891, for the purpose of going abroad for study; his salary to lapse during his absence. On motion the following appointments were made for one year: Elmer E. Brown, Ph. D., Acting Assistant Professor of the Science and Art of Teaching (salary to be paid by Professor Hinsdale); C. E. Adams, A. B., M. D., Director of the Gymnasium with the rank of Assistant Professor, salary $1600; Frank C. Wagner, A. M., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, salary $1600; William J. Hussey, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy, salary $900; Arthur J. Hall, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics, salary $900; George H. Mead, A. M., and Alfred H. Lloyd, A. M., Instructors in Philosophy at a salary of $900 each; Will H. Sherzer, B. S., M. S., Instructor in Geology, salary $900; R. L. Weeks, A. M., Instructor in French, salary $900; I. J. Ohman, Assistant in Drawing, salary $250.

Page  542 542 JUNE MEETING, 1891. The above appointments were made by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Whitman, Butterfield, and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion the Board adjourned to Thursday afternoon at 12:30 o'clock. AFTERNOON SESSION. At 12:30 the Board convened and on motion of Regent Willett adopted a vote of thanks to Daniel C. Gilman, LL. D., President of Johns Hopkins University for his scholarly and eloquent Commencement address. On motion the Board adjourned to July 14th. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  543 SPECIAL MEETING. JULY, 1891. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, | ANN ARBOR, JULY 18, 1891. The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Regent Hebard. In the absence of President Angell, Regent Clark was called to the chair. Several communications which had reached the President were referred to appropriate committees of the Board. On motion of Regent Draper, the question of the appointment of an assistant to Dr. Dorrance was laid over until the next meeting of the Board. Regent Willett moved that John W. Langley, B. S. M. D., be reappointed for one year as special Lecturer on the Metallurgy of Steel at a salary of $300. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett presented and read the resignation of Instructor Joseph V. Denney, which, on motion, was accepted. Regent Willett moved that Jonathan A. C. Hildner, A. B., be appointed instructor in German for one year at a salary of $900. The appointment was made as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark,) Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None.

Page  544 544 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Regent Kiefer moved that William F. Breakey, M. D., be reappointed Lecturer on Dermatology in the Department of Medicine and Surgery for one year, at a salary of $300. Carried by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Kiefer moved that $150 be appropriated for the purchase of apparatus for the use of the Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, and the sum of $300 for the purchase of apparatus for the Laboratory of Materia Medica. The motion was carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Willett moved that B. A. Finney, A. B., be appointed as assistant in charge of circulation in the General Library for one year, at a salary of $700. Carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield,. Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the Hospital Committee of the Medical Faculty and Regent Whitman were made a committee to assign rooms in the new Hospital. On motion of Regent Willett, the consideration of Hospital matters was made the special order for 2 o'clock p. m. Regent Kiefer moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint an assistant to the Professor of Pathology for one year, at a salary of $600. Carried as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. The following resolution, introduced by Regent Willett, was adopted unanimously:

Page  545 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 545 Resolved, That the Board of Regents does hereby express its appreciation of the excellent work done by Messrs. Kirchner and Angell in the Law Department and the good will toward the University shown by these gentlemen in undertaking the lectures on such short notice as was given them. Regent Whitman, chairman of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, reported to the Board the following tenders, as being the lowest received for the erection and completion of the following buildings to be erected on the Campus: For an addition to the President's House, Win. Biggs, of Ann Arbor, $7,156.94. For an addition to the Law Building, Lane & Morris, of Detroit, $22,194.50. For the enlargement of the Engineering Building, Lane & Morris, of Detroit, $13,629. Regent Willett moved that the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be authorized to enter into contract in the name of the Board, with the parties named, for the work indicated above and at the price named. The motion was carried by the unanimous vote of the Board. On motion of Regent Draper, the Board adjourned to 1:30 o'clock, standard time. AFTERNOON SESSION. The Board reassembled at 1:30 p. m. Lane & Morris, being present, stated that by some carelessness they had omitted from their bid $4,000 worth of iron work required in the two buildings awarded to them, and declined to enter into contract. Therefore, on motion of Regent Whitman, the action of the Board in accepting the bids of Lane & Morris was rescinded, and the Committee on Buildings was directed to. readvertise for proposals to build the two buildings named.

Page  546 546 JUNE MEETING, 1891. Regent Willett presented the following communication: ANN ARBOR, July 18, 1891. To the Honorable Board of Regents: The Law Faculty recommend that the degree of Bachelor of Laws be conferred on Richard Langdon Hubbard. He has completed the required work. Respectfully, J. C. KNOWLTONr, Dean. On motion of Regent Willett, the degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred upon Richard Langdon Hubbard in accordance with the recommendation of the Faculty of the Law Department. On motion of Regent Willett, the special order of the afternoon was taken from the table. Regent Kiefer moved that the Executive Committee be authorized to appoint an apothecary in University Hospital for one year at a salary of $200. The motion was carried by the following vote: Ayes-Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. Regent Whitman submitted the following resolution, which was adopted; Resolved, That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds be authorized to have plans and specifications prepared for an additional ward to the University Hospital, and to advertise for propos-als to contract for the head and two arms of the same, and in case the lowest proposal shall not exceed $15,000, to let the contract and proceed to construction. Professor M. W. Harrington asked for and obtained leave of absence for the first semester of the next academic year, and instructor W. J. Hussey was placed in charge of the work of astronomy during that time, without change in salary. Regent Willett moved that Nathan Abbott, A. B., of Boston, be appointed Tappan Professor of Law for one year at a salary of $2,000. A call vote being taken resulted as follows:

Page  547 JUNE MEETING, 1891. 547 Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield and Draper. Nays-Regent Cocker. Regent Willett moved that Hon. John W. Champlin of Grand Rapids, and Edwin F. Conely, Esq., of Detroit, be appointed Professors of Law for one year, each to deliver forty lectures to be assigned, and to receive a salary of $1,000 each. These appointments were made as follows: Ayes-Regents Clark, Willett, Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. On motion of Regent Willett, the Board adjourned. JAMES H. WADE, Secretary.

Page  548

Page  549 REGULAR MEETING. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR, October 21, 1891. \ The Board assembled in the room of the President at 10 o'clock A. M. Present-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Absent-Clark and Willett. On motion of Regent Butterfield, the minutes of the last two meetings were approved as printed. Various communications which had reached the President were on motion placed in the hands of the appropriate committees of the Board. The President presented and read the following report of the Executive Committee: The Executive Committee beg leave respectfully to r-port as follows: In August they appointed Lewis Murbach, B. S., Ins ructor in Morphology for the year 1891-2 at the salary of $900. The Board had previously informally authorized the appointment of an Instructor in Morphology. In September they appointed George Rebec, Ph. B., Intructor in English for one year at a salary of $900, in place of J. V. Denney, resigned. Early in October, on the recommendation of the Medical Faculty and the Medical Committee of this Board, Simon M. Yutzey, Instructor in Osteology, As-istant Demonstrator of Anatomy, and Assistant to the Professor of Astronony, for one year at the salary of $900. JAMES B. ANGELL. CHAS. R. WHITMAN. R. W. BUTTERFIELD. W. J. COCKER.

Page  550 550 OCTOBER MEETING, 1891. On motion of Regent Whitman, the report was adopted by the following vote: Ayes-Regents Kiefer, Whitman, Butterfield, Hebard, Draper and Cocker. Nays-None. The President stated that his Annual Report had been prepared and was held subject to the wishes of the Board. On motion of Regent Draper, the President was requested to read the report. Regent Cocker was called to the chair.. The following is the report: THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT. To the Honorable Board of Regents: I beg to present to you my Annual Report for the year ending September 30, 1891. The following changes have been made in the Faculties: At the meeting of the Board of Regents in October 1890 the following appointments in the Law Department were made: Henry Wade Rogers (who had been elected President of the Northwestern University) Lecturer for the first semester of 1890; Mlelville M. Bigelow, Ph. D., Lecturer for the second semester; and Professor Jerome C. Knowlton, A. M., Acting Dean for the year. At the same meeting the following appointments for one year in the Literary Department were made: Frank C. Wagner, A. M., Acting Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Elmer.iA. Lyman, A. B., Instructor in Mathematics. At a meeting of the Board held in December, 1890, George Hempl, Ph. D., was appointed to the permanent position of Assistant Professor of English, and the following non-resident lecturers were elected for one year: John W. Langley, S. B., M. D., Lecturer on the Metallurgy of Steel; John B. Clayberg, LL. B., on Mining Law.

Page  551 OCTOBER MEETING, 1891. 551 Edmund J. James, Ph.D., Hon. Carroll D. Wright, A. M., and Professor E. R. A. Seligman, Ph. D., Lecturers on Political Economy. (Dr. James was unable to serve.) 0. PR. Long, M. D., Lecturer on Mental Diseases to the Homoeopatlic College. At the Msarch meeting of the Board the following appointments were made: James N. Martin, Ph. Mi., -M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women. Hon. Henry B. Brown, LL. D., Lecturer on Admiralty Law for 1891-2. George H. Lothrop, B. S., Lecturer on Patent law. At the April meeting of the Board the following appointments for one year were made: William W. Campbell, B. S., Instructor in Astronomy. George W. Patterson, A.B., S.B., Instructor in Physics. William J. Hussey, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics. Joseph D. Markley, Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics. Willard R. Clement, A. M., Instructor in Latin. Joseph V. Denney, A. B., Instructor in English. John H. T. McPherson, Ph. D., Instructor in History. C. Carroll Marden, A. B., Instructor in French. Moritz Levi, A. B., Instructor in French. George A. Henec, Ph. D. Instructor in German. Max Winkler, A. B., Instructor in German. Frederick C. Newcombe, B. S., Instructor in Botany. Fred Morley, B. S., Instructor in Descriptive Geometry and Drawing. Glen P. Swiggett, A. B., Instructor in German and French. Elmer A. Lyman, A, B., Instructor in Mathematics. Hiram Allen Sober, A.B.,Instructor in Greek and Latin. Miss Alice Hunt, Assistant in Drawing. William A. Campbell, M. D., was appointed Demonstrator of Anatomy on and after October, 1891. At the meeting of the Board in May the following appointments were made for 1891-2:

Page  552 552 OCTOBER MEE1ING, 1891. Benjamin L. D'Ooge, A. M., Lecturer on the Italic Dialects. Marshall D. Ewell, LL. D., Lecturer on MWedical Jurisprudence. James L. High, LL. D., Lecturer on Equity Jurisprudence. Thomas M. Cooley, LL. D., Lecturer on Inter-State Commerce. F. G. Novy, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physiological Chemistry for three years. Alezander Ziwet, C. E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics for three years. George W. Patterson, A. B., S. B., Assistant Professor of Physics for three years. Carl W. Belser, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Oriental Languages for one year. Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Instructor in Political Economy for the year 1891-2. At the Board meeting on May 22, 1891, G. A. Hench, Ph. D., was made Assistant Professor of German, for three years; Professor Hinsdale was granted leave of absence for a year. At the June meeting the following appointments and changes of title were made: Professor J. C. Knowlton, Acting Dean of thle Law Department was chosen Dean. Professor Vaughan was made Dean of the Department of Medicine and Surgery, in place of Professor Ford, who resigned that office. George Dock, II. D., was elected Professor of the Theory and Practice of Mledicine and Clinical Medicine in the same Department. J.. Abel, Ph. D., M. D., Lecturer in that Department was elected Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics.

Page  553 OCTOBER MEETING, 1891. 553 F. A. Waples, B. S., was elected Instructor in Histology for one year, at the salary of $900. B. B. Rowe, M. D., was appointed House Surgeon in the University Hospital for the coming year. C. G. Darling, M3. D., was chosen Lecturer for one year on Oral Pathology and Surgery, in the Dental Department, in the place of J. N. Martin, M. D., resigned. The title of Dr. J. Taft was made Professor of the Principles and Practice of Oral Pathology and Surgery; that of Dr. J. A. Watling, Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry; and that of Dr. N. S. Hoff, Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Dental Mechanism. In the Literary Department the following appointments were made for one year: Elmer E. Brown, Ph. D., Acting Assistant Professor of the Science and the Art of Teaching. Frank C. Wagner, A. M., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. C. E. Adams, A. B., M. D., Director of the Gymnasium, with the rank of Assistant Professor. Win. J. Hussey, B. S., transferred from Instructorship in Mathematics to Instructorship in Astronomy. Will H. Sherzer, M. S., Instructor in Geology. Arthur G. Hall, B. S., Instructor in Mathematics. G. O. Higley, B. S. Instructor in General Chemistry. Geo. H. Mead, A. M., Instructor in Philosophy. Alfred W. Lloyd, Ph. D., Instructor in Philosophy. Robert L. Weeks, A. M., Instructor in French. At the July meeting the following appointments were made for the coming year: Hon. John W. Champlin, LL. D., Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Michigan, and Edwin P. Conely, Esq., of Detroit, Professors of Law; and Nathan Abbott, A. M., LL. B., of Boston, Mass., Tappan Professor of Law for one year.

Page  554 554 OCTOBER MEETING, 1891. Dr. Win. F. Breakey, Lecturer on Dermatology. J. A. C. Hildner, A. B., Instructor in German. We have been heavily afflicted this year by the decease of two of our oldest and most distinguished Professors. Dr. Winchell died in December, 1890, after a brief illness. He joined our Faculty earlier than any man now in our service. He was appointed to a chair in 1853, and though absent from us for four years during his incumbency of the Presidency of Syracuse University and of a Professorship in Vanderbilt University, he gave thirtythree years of his life to this institution. He was a man of large and varied ]earning, not only in the sciences which he taught, but also in mathematics, physics, astronomy, ethnology, language and philosophy. His name and his work were widely known both in this country and in Europe. Professor William P. Wells, Kent Professor of Law, died instantly, while pleading in the court room in Detroit. He was first appointed to his chair in 1872. Vith one period of interruption from impaired health, he held his position till his death. He possessed rare gifts for the exposition of law and unusual power of public discourse' Degrees have been conferred as follows: DEGREES ON EXAMINATION. Bachelor of Letters..................................................... 19 Bachelor of Science (in Biology)........................................... 2 Bachelor of Science (in Chemistry).......................................... 7 Bachelor of Science (in Electrical Engineering)...................... 3 Bachelor of Science (in Mechanical Engineering).................... 4 Bachelor of Science (in Civil Engineering)............................ 10 B achelor of Science............................................. 11 Bachelor of Philosophy......................................................... 34 Bachelor of Arts........................................................... 51 Civil Engineer................................. 2 Master of Science................................................... 3 Master of Philosophy........................................ 2 M aster of A rts................................................................... 11

Page  555 OCTOBER iEETING, 1891. 555 Doctor of Philosophy.......................................................... 4 Doctor of Medicine (Department of Medicine and Surgery)... 102 Bachelor of Laws............................................... 265 Master of Laws............................................................. 15 Pharm aceutical Chem ist........................................................ 30 Master of Pharmacy.......................................... I Doctor of Medicine (Homoeopathic Medical College)............. 18 Doctor of Dental Surgery............................................... 29 623 HONORARY DEGREES. Master of Pharmacy............................................. 1 M aster of A rts........................................................ 1 Doctor of Laws....................................I.......................... 2 Total number of degrees conferred................................. 627 The number of graduates on examination exceeded that of the previous year by 71. It was not only larger than that of any previous year, but much larger than that of any American University at any time. This result has been accomplished not by lowering the conditions of graduation, but in the face of a somewhat rapid advancement in the requirements for graduation in all Departments. The roll of attendance was as follows: DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS. Holder of the Elisha Jones Classical Fell