Rabbi Judah Leyb Levin Papers (1862-1926)
Summary Information
Title: Rabbi Judah Leyb Levin Papers
Creator: Levin, Yehudah Leyb, b. 1863
Inclusive dates: 1862-1926
Extent: 1.0 Linear feet (1 record center box)
Abstract:
The Rabbi Levin collection contains his two books (in three volumes), Sefer Ha-Aderet Veha-Emunah . Many of Levin’s ideas concerning various Talmudic tractates are collected in these volumes. The chapters are arranged by the order of the Mishnah, and in the last volume he discusses some biblical matters. The published volumes have been removed from the collection of manuscript material and cataloged separately. The collection also contains family documents, manuscript notebooks, and miscellaneous notes.
Call number: levin
Language: The material is in Hebrew.
Repository: University of Michigan Library (Special Collections Research Center)

Access and Use
Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

Copyright:

Copyright has not been transferred to the Regents of the University of Michigan. Permission to publish must be obtained from the copyright holder(s).

Preferred Citation:

Rabbi Judah Leyb Levin Papers, University of Michigan Library (Special Collections Research Center)

Collection History
Acquisition Information:

Gift of Judith Levin Cantor, Dr. Joseph H. Levin, and Miriam Levin Friedman, Sept., 2000.

Processing Information:

Yael Dolev, Elliot Gertel, Marlene Gitelman, Kathleen Dow, 2002.


Biography

Rabbi Judah Leyb Levin was born Judah Leyb Yoke on April 6, 1862, in Traby, a village near Vilna, (formerly Russia and presently Lithuania). His father, Rabbi Nahum Phineas, had a rabbinical degree, but did not accept a pulpit; instead, he conducted business as a landowner in Traby. Levin’s parents died when he was a young boy. He was adopted by his uncle, Rabbi Levin, and assumed the Levin name. When Levin was 18 years old, he studied for his rabbinical diploma at the Volozhin Yeshivah, Belarus. He continued his studies, taking post-graduate courses under the renowned Rabbi Isaac Elconin Spektor, after which he became a rabbi in Liskovo, in the Suvalk Province (formerly Russia and presently Sowatki, Poland.)

In 1882, he married Esther Rhoda Levin, daughter of Rabbi Isaac Levin of Traby. Levin first immigrated to the eastern United States in 1887, alone, while his family stayed in Russia. In 1888 Levin became the rabbi of Rochester, New York. Two years later he returned to Russia to serve as a rabbi there. He left Russia for good in 1892 and found a position in New Haven, Connecticut. The rest of his family joined him a year later. In 1897, Levin accepted an appointment to the as Chief Rabbi of the United (Orthodox) Jewish Congregations of Detroit, a position he held for the rest of his life.

Levin had four sons: the first two, Dr. Nathan P. Levin and Samuel M. Levin, were born in Liskovo, Poland; and the two younger sons, Isadore Levin and Abraham J. Levin, were born in New Haven, Connecticut in 1894 and 1897, respectively.

Rabbi Levin was a significant figure in the Orthodox Jewish community in Detroit and was active in building Jewish groups and organizations that served the Jewish community. Among his projects were the establishment of a Hebrew education system and founding a school which later became Yeshivah Beth Yehudah of Detroit. Levin was actively involved in helping to solve problems that arose in the fast-growing Jewish community in Detroit during the early part of the twentieth century. He was involved in setting up kashruth authorities, providing meals for the poor, and in developing Jewish cemeteries. Levin took part in establishing Jewish American organizations such as the Union of Orthodox Rabbis of America, of which he was a member of the executive committee, and Hamizrahi (Orthodox Zionism Movement) in North America. Rabbi Levin died in Detroit in 1926.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Rabbi Levin collection contains his two books (in three volumes), Sefer Ha-Aderet Veha-Emunah . Many of Levin’s ideas concerning various Talmudic tractates are collected in these volumes. The chapters are arranged by the order of the Mishnah, and in the last volume he discusses some biblical matters. The published volumes have been removed from the collection of manuscript material and cataloged separately. The collection also contains family documents, manuscript notebooks, and miscellaneous notes.

The manuscript materials have been organized to facilitate research. Four files contain a variety of materials relating to Rabbi Levin and his family. The first file contains biographical details about Rabbi Levin. The second file has information about his son, while the third file contains all the information about Levin’s patent for a calculating machine. In addition to being rabbi, Levin was also an inventor. He invented one of the earliest machines that was able to perform simple calculations involving adding and subtracting. The original machine is currently housed in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The fourth file contains correspondence between Levin and Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, Chief Rabbi of Palestine. The letters from Rabbi Kook are on his personal stationery.

The core of the collection consists of Rabbi Levin’s twenty two notebooks. Each notebook was assigned a distinct identification number. The numbers are arbitrary and do not represent any chronological or thematic order. The notebooks are all in Levin’s hand, written in a mixture of Yiddish and Hebrew, but also in English written in Hebrew letters. The majority of the notes written in the notebooks are drafts of text, or fragments of drafts, in preparation for sermons he gave in various synagogues, or for lectures he presented on special occasions. There are also notes and ideas that apparently never were developed into complete essays or speeches. The sermons and lectures were for all kinds of occasions, which are summarized under the following titles: Ceremonies, Biblical Sermons, Holidays and Festivals, Additional Talmudic Sermons, and General.

Ceremonies cover all stages of a person’s life, from birth to death. In some cases, Levin prepared general orations for funeral or wedding services to be used as needed; while others are specific, and the name of a person and details about that person are included. An example is the memorial for Dr. Theodor Herzl (Notebook #14). In many cases, Levin explained the custom of the ceremony and would often include an analysis or argument. For example, in one of the orations for brit milah (circumcision ritual), Levin argued that the meaning of the ceremony was not just religious, but also had a more general, nationalistic side. In the same ceremony description, he emphasized that in Judaism’s view, parents had no right to harm their children, as children were not their parents’ property (Notebook #1). For a bar-mitzvah ceremony, Levin based his blessing on “a wise son makes a glad father, but a foolish son is his mother’s grief” (Proverbs 10:1, Notebook #1.) and explained the broader concept behind the quote. Based on these notebooks, it appears that many of the ceremonies that he conducted were funerals. Often he began his oration with “Lord, what is man that You should care about him … man is like a breath … ”Psalms 144:3-4). Sometimes, however, he also used other citations. For example, in Notebook #1, he compared the contemporary saying, “Life is Short,” to the saying “The day is short and the task is great” (Aboth 2:15). The following summary contains is a list of the ceremonies that appear in each notebook.

Biblical Sermons likely delivered in the synagogue each Shabbat, are concerned with Shabbat observances, most of them following a consistent format: first Levin quoted from the weekly Torah readings, next he discussed some Talmudic questions or arguments connected with the quote; this is followed by a concentration on a general topic. In many cases, the general topic dealt with historic events that were happening at the time of writing. Levin emphasized the hard times Jewish communities experienced in various places in Europe, in particular, in his Russian homeland. For example, in November 1915, Levin cited “and Esau said,” Let us start on our journey … ” (Genesis 33:12, Va-Yishlah weekly reading), and spoke about the Jewish people who were loyal to Mother Russia and fought in the Russian Army. But in return, their country engaged in pogroms and stole the belongings of many Jewish families (Notebook #15).

Having lived through World War I, Levin often mentions the war and its horrible results in his notebooks. On December 3, 1914, he also explained how the Americans fought the Turks (Notebook #7). In many of his orations, his main message is that the contemporary, materialistic world encourages wars. For example, on August 20, 1921 (Notebook #4), Rabbi Levin explains the Shelah-Lekha weekly reading, and told his audience that God is against all the golden crowns that human beings like czars and sultans put on because they bring about war. Levin argued that disputes should be settled through discussion and not by the sword.

Levin considered education an important tool in safeguarding the spirit of Judaism and in preventing conflict. On January 15, 1916, while discussing the Beshallah weekly reading, Levin declared that contemporary schools, similar to the schools in Europe, encouraged heroic exploits and wealth, instead of spirituality; therefore, they encouraged warlike behavior. He argued that fighting does not solve any problems, and never defeats evil (Notebook #15). Levin had some faith in efforts to resolve problems in the world through negotiations and to bring peace to the world. Thus, on November 12, 1921, commenting on the Lekh-Lekha weekly reading (Notebook #5), he addressed a “World Peace Conference in Washington,” connecting it to the prophecy of the last days: “The wolf shall dwell with the lamb” (Isaiah 11:6).

In some of his biblical sermons, Levin would bring up current disputes in the Jewish world: On October 23, 1915, while talking about the Va-Yera reading, he discussed Orthodox and Reform views of the way Judaism should be practiced, and the question of practicing “half Judaism” (Notebook #15). In another instance, while discussing the Va-Yera reading, Levin mentioned the dispute in Baltimore (1917) which concerned the question of “Who is a Jew?” (Notebook #4). In the summary, one can find which weekly readings were discussed in each notebook.

Although they are part of biblical sermons, Holidays and Festivals are mentioned separately. For many of the holidays, Levin discusses the customs and the sources of these days. He comments upon the “Hellenization” phenomenon (Notebook #2), in the Hanukkah story and the four cups of wine of the Passover seder (Notebook #12). He also relates the history upon which the holidays were based. An example can be found in an entry for Hanukkah, on December 25, 1921, where he expounds on the admiration that the Israelites had for the Hasmoneans, and compares it to the attitude the Americans had toward Lincoln (Notebook #4). On September 18, 1920, which was Shabbat Shuvah, Levin translated the meaning of “Hear Oh, Israel” and the sanctification of the Holy Name. He connects it to what was happening at the time to Jews who lived under the Bolsheviks in Russia and in Poland (Notebook #4). For the Festivals (Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur,) Levin discusses the spirit and message of biblical passages. On March 11, 1922, Shabbat Zakhor, Levin read “Remember what Amalek did to you … ” (Deuteronomy 25:17) and coped with the idea of revenge, which is in opposition to the spirit of the Bible. He explained that if the Jewish people would remember how they were rescued, it could intensify their spirit to fight and be strong in difficult times (Notebook #12). Even in his writings about holidays, Levin always considered contemporary world events, and he encouraged his audience to keep their spirits up. On April 12 1921, he talks about Nissan - the month of redemption. Levin writes that he found signs of deliverance in the recognition of the nations of the Zionist Congress and its president (Notebook #2). On Shavuot, on June 1, 1922, Levin talked about the hope that the Balfour Declaration gave to the Jewish people. Although he felt that there were many problems with the British mandate and its pro-Arab stance, Levin was reassured that, with faith, the people of Israel were close to achieving salvation. In the summary, one can find a list of holidays that were discussed in each notebook.

Additional Talmudic Sermons, refers to those chapters where Levin taught about Talmudic issues and Mishnah tractates. In some of the notebooks, he drafted sermons that appear in his book Sefer Ha-Aderet Veha-Emunah . Some sermons were published exactly as they appeared in the notebooks; only portions of the original writings were used for other sermons that appeared in the book. As a result, at times, the notebooks reveal more of Rabbi Levin’s ideas and thoughts about a given subject than does his book. In the summary, there are lists of all the tractates that are discussed in each notebook. Also, some of the notebooks serve as a type of index or concordance for studying Talmudic tractates.

General incorporates a wide-range of non-religious subjects, even some that were discussed as part of the weekly biblical readings. Levin always brought some Talmudic and biblical aspects to general topics, and in many cases added some humor to a serious subject. For the opening of a conference on July 23, 1921, Levin related the history of the survival of Judaism, comparing it to the endurance of the parochet (the curtain which hangs in front of the synagogue cabinet which holds the Torah scrolls and commemorates the curtain in front of the holy ark of the Temple in Jerusalem) and to the endurance of the national flag (Notebook #3). On January 9, 1915, in a conference of Hamizrahi in Chicago, Levin presented the idea represented by the passage “But the more they were oppressed, the more they increased and spread out,” (Exodus 1:12 - Notebook #7).

Many of Rabbi Levin’s writings are related to the hope for the creation of a Jewish state. In an oration for a conference, he emphasizes the necessity of a Jewish state for the survival of the Jewish Diaspora (Notebook #8). Levin celebrated any declaration or promise made by Great Britain, or any other nation, in reference to the establishment of a Jewish state. In one of his essays, he quoted Dr. Haim Weizman (Notebook #3). For a banquet that was held at the Carmel Restaurant in Detroit on August 14 1920, Levin discussed, among other issues, the importance of the Balfour Declaration (Notebook #3). In preparing for a conference that took place on November 13, 1920 (Notebook #2), Levin discusses the redemption of the people of Israel as a result of the decisions that took place in London. He tries to remind people how the Hellenization of Jews is artificial and untrue to the faith, and he calls upon the Jewish people to return to the way of the Torah. At a Hamizrahi conference, in 1921 (Notebook #2), Levin compares the people of Israel to a worshipper who finds it difficult to arise from bed for the morning prayers. He beseeches Jews to wake up and return to the way of Torah, and he complains that the people who built the Jewish state created divisiveness within Judaism.

Levin was active in Hamizrahi, (Orthodox Zionist organization, known also as Mizrahi: literally means “Eastern”, but actually derived from the Hebrew acronym for “Spiritual Center” - merkaz ruhani ). His speeches included some of the debates that took place in Hamizrahi concerning what the nature of the Jewish state should be. In Levin’s opinion, the Zionist movement should follow the way of the Torah. He compared the Zionist movement and Hamizrahi to the two cherubs in the temple of God: each had his individual way to perform God’s will, but both were necessary for the temple (Notebook #8). Levin referred to the passage “No bread -- no learning, no learning -- no bread.” Levin relates that between 1267-1854, the Jewish people were concentrating on the study of the Bible, and only later did they begin farming and other livelihoods, and that is where Zionism and Hamizrahi stood at this time.

Levin was very concerned that the Jewish people were quarreling amongst themselves. At a Hamizrahi banquet during a conference in Detroit on November 22, 1913, Levin told the people not to be deceived by the solemn atmosphere that prevailed in the hall while the real world of Judaism was segmented and even hostile (Notebook #4). On January 9, 1915, at a conference of Hamizrahi in Chicago, Levin stressed that the point of having the gathering was not the bellyful of food that was served during the conference which gave the participants a sweet taste, rather their purpose was to overcome the bitter taste of assimilation and persecution by creating a place for the Jews in their own country (Notebook #7). In another preparation for a Hamizrahi conference (Notebook #2), Levin explained that, so far, not many practical deeds, like buying land, had been done to help building the country of Israel. The organization was mainly busy with internal arguments about which way the country of Israel should choose. Levin was concerned that the Zionist movement was not following the way of the Torah. In an additional Hamizrahi conference on October 6th, 1920, he talked about those who condemned and those who blessed the Zionist movement. He explained the two viewpoints, and their connections to historic events like the Peace Conference in Paris (Notebook #3). However, he highlighted that the goal was more important than the dispute. Therefore, the Jewish people should show unity, or their cause would suffer. On January 17, 1914, he emphasized that in spite of the difference of opinions between the Orthodox factions, they all should be united and help to build the country of Israel, otherwise, they would not be part of the country (Notebook #4).

Rabbi Levin was very active in fund-raising for good causes, and was always concerned that the money would serve its cause and not the people who collected the money. For example, on January 12 1918, while acting for “Distribution Funds for the Land of Israel” Levin admonished the audience not to use the money for food for the banquets held to raise the money (Notebook #4). On Shavuot 1921, he talked for the Jewish Foundation Fund “Keren ha-Yesod.” He encouraged the idea of giving a tithe, and begged the people not to wait until God would build the country of Israel. He also praised and endorsed Dr. Weizmann, who had collected money all over the world, but did not take a penny for himself (Notebook #5).

Levin took part in building synagogues and participated in opening ceremonies for several new synagogues in Detroit. He stressed the importance of keeping the synagogues active all year around, and not just to build nice houses for keeping God in a beautiful place (Notebook # 9, #18). Levin was also involved in building religious schools in the Detroit area. In some of his orations he discusses these events; for example, the laying of the corner-stone for the Talmud-Torah School in Detroit, on July 15 1922 (Notebook #12) where he discussed the efforts to preserve Judaism in the modern world. In other notes he considers the question of whether Jewish studies needed to include the full spectrum of the sciences, or just concentrate on biblical subjects (Notebook #9).

Levin did much work on behalf of charitable projects, such as orphanages (Notebook #18), and hospitals. On August 2, 1913, he was involved in opening the “Bikur Holim” hospital and sanatorium for needy patients in Mount Clemens, Michigan (Notebook #13). On November 22, 1915, he participated in a fund-raiser for the “Hevra Kaddisha” burial society. Rabbi Levin thought that it was essential to have a Jewish burial society which offered all Jewish people the opportunity to be buried according to the laws of the Torah (Notebook #15). The summary includes a list of the topics that are discussed in each notebook.

Subject Terms
    Subjects:
    • Kook, Abraham Isaac, 1865-1935
    • Aggada -- Commentaries.
    • Hadran.
    • Jewish sermons, American.
    • Jewish sermons, Hebrew -- Michigan -- Detroit.
    • Jews, Russian.
    • Midrash -- Commentaries.
    • Orthodox Judaism -- United States.
    • Rabbis -- United States.
    • Talmud -- Commentaries.
    • Zionism and Judaism.
    Contents List
       Container / Location    Title
     
    Books [series]:

    This section contains Rabbi Levin's two books (in three volumes), Sefer Ha-Aderet Veha-Emunah . Many of Levin’s ideas concerning various Talmudic tractates are collected in these volumes. The chapters are arranged by the order of the Mishnah, and in the last volume he discusses some biblical matters. The published volumes have been removed from the collection of manuscript material and cataloged separately.

    Box   1  
    Sefer Ha-Aderet Veha-Emunah: Kolel ma’amarim yekarim u-mehudashim be-agadot hazal, ba-Torah, Nevi’im u-Ketuvim, be-‘inyanim shonim/ mi-meni Judah Leyb Levin. 3 volumes in 2 books. Moyneshter Printing, St. Louis, Mo. 1919-1922.
     
    Files [series]:

    These files contain a variety of materials relating to Rabbi Levin and his family. The first file contains biographical details about Rabbi Levin. The second file has information about his son, while the third file contains all the information about Levin’s patent for a calculating machine. In addition to being rabbi, Levin was also an inventor. He invented one of the earliest machines that was able to perform simple calculations involving adding and subtracting. The fourth file contains correspondence between Levin and Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, Chief Rabbi of Palestine. The letters from Rabbi Kook are on his personal stationery.

     
    File #1 - About Rabbi Levin
    Box   1  
    Biographical description of Rabbi Levin and his sons – a copy of the article from the Universal Jewish Encyclopedia
    Box   1  
    Biography by Glenn Cantor (hand script)
    Box   1  
    Family notes about Levin
    Box   1  
    Newspaper obituaries
    Box   1  
    Daily Newspaper article
    Box   1  
    Detroit Jewish Chronicle, Feb 21, 1941
    Box   1  
    Beth-Yehudah school book 1957
    Box   1  
    An interview (translated from Hebrew) with O. Blumenthal who discusses Levin
     
    File #2 - Samuel Levin (son)
    Box   1  
    A list of Samuel Levin’s archive at Wayne State University
    Box   1  
    A program with photograph of the First Annual Smoker of the Menorah Society, University of Michigan, May 7, 1911
     
    File #3 - Levin’s calculating machine – patent #706000
    Box   1  
    Correspondence regarding calculating machine
    Box   1  
    Patent process
    Box   1  
    Technical figures
    Box   1  
    Description of the machine and its operation as an adding and subtracting machine
    Box   1  
    A photograph of the machine
     
    File #3 - Correspondence between Levin and Chief Rabbi Abraham Isaac
    Box   1  
    Hakohen Kook, Chief Rabbi of Palestine
     
    Envelopes [series]:
     
    Envelope #1
    Box   1  
    Various papers with a variety of notes. Some might be missing papers from notebooks.
     
    Envelope #2
    Box   1  
    A letter to Merkaz Harav’ dealing with a criticism of one of Levin’s articles
     
    Notebooks [series]:

    The core of the collection consists of Rabbi Levin’s twenty two notebooks. Each notebook was assigned a distinct identification number. The numbers are arbitrary and do not represent any chronological or thematic order. The notebooks are all in Levin’s hand, written in a mixture of Yiddish and Hebrew, but also in English written in Hebrew letters. The majority of the notes written in the notebooks are drafts of text, or fragments of drafts, in preparation for sermons he gave in various synagogues, or for lectures he presented on special occasions. There are also notes and ideas that apparently never were developed into complete essays or speeches. The sermons and lectures were for all kinds of occasions, which are summarized under the following titles: Ceremonies, Biblical Sermons, Holidays and Festivals, Additional Talmudic Sermons, and General.

     
    Notebook #1 – 1903-1904
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding
    Box   1  
    Brit Milah - Circumcision
    Box   1  
    Bar-Mitzvah
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Toledot
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Rosh Hashana
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Yom Kippur
    Box   1  
    Purim
    Box   1  
    Passover
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Non-kosher food
    Box   1  
    Tractate Megillah
    Box   1  
    Alphabetical index
     
    Notebook #2 – 1920-1921
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Va-Era
    Box   1  
    Terumah
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Purim
    Box   1  
    Passover
    Box   1  
    The New Moon of Nissan
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Megillah
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Conference on November 13, 1920 (Vol. 3, p.170)
    Box   1  
    For Hamizrahi conference (No date discernable)
    Box   1  
    For Hamizrahi conference, 1921
     
    Notebook #3 – 1920
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    No’ah
    Box   1  
    Va-Yera
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shavuot (Pentecost)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Opening of a conference, July 23, 1921
    Box   1  
    The Zionist Congress and Hamizrahi
    Box   1  
    For Banquet in Carmel Restaurant, 1920
    Box   1  
    For Hamizrahi conference, October 16, 1920
     
    Notebook #4 – 1913-1914, 1918-1919, 1921-1922
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Funeral
    Box   1  
    A Funeral Oration (Vol. 3, p.214)
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Hayyei Sarah
    Box   1  
    Toledot
    Box   1  
    Va-Yishlah
    Box   1  
    Va-Yeshev
    Box   1  
    Va-Yiggash (Vol.3 p.208)
    Box   1  
    Shemot
    Box   1  
    Va-Era
    Box   1  
    BeShallah
    Box   1  
    Terumah
    Box   1  
    Tezavveh and Zakhor
    Box   1  
    Shelah Lekha
    Box   1  
    Balak
    Box   1  
    Pinhas
    Box   1  
    Ki Tavo
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Shemini Atzereth - Eight days of Succoth (Vol.2 p.100)
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Nahamu
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Mevarhim
    Box   1  
    Elul
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the Bible (Vol. 2, p.103)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of tractate Yoma 15 Ab (Vol. 2, p.47)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the six orders of the Mishnah and Tractate Sukkah (Vol. 2, p.125)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Megillah (Vol. 2, p.122)
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of Order Nashim (Vol. 2, p.51)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Yebamoth (Vol. 2, p.57)
    Box   1  
    Nedarim
    Box   1  
    Sanhedrin
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of Order Nezikim and Tractate Horayot (Vol. 2, p.72)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Parah
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Hamizrahi banquet in Detroit - November 22, 1913
    Box   1  
    Laying a cornerstone for Ohel-Moshe Synagogue in Detroit, August 15, 1914
    Box   1  
    A draft for a letter to Rabbi Pinhas Halevi on December 29, 1917
    Box   1  
    An appeal for the Land of Israel on January 17, 1914
    Box   1  
    An appeal for funds for the Land of Israel on January 12, 1918
    Box   1  
    Housewarming and the blessing of hospitality, Detroit, February 2, 1918
    Box   1  
    Opening of Yeshiva, Talmud Torah Michigan, 1918
    Box   1  
    Laying a cornerstone for Talmud Torah – Beth Sofer, October 12, 1918
    Box   1  
    Speech for Hamizrahi, on the New Moon of Marheshvan, October 7, 1918
     
    Notebook #5 - 1921
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Lekh Lekha
    Box   1  
    Ki Tavo
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    “Kol Shofar” Sounding the ram’s horn
    Box   1  
    Sukkoth (Feast of Tabernacles)
    Box   1  
    Shavuot (Pentecost)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Nahamu
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Oration for Keren Ha-Yesod (Jewish Foundation Fund) on the first day of Shavuot, June 12, 1921
    Box   1  
    For Ahavat Zion Synagogue, September 24, 1921
    Box   1  
    About a “world conference” in Washington DC, November 1921
    Box   1  
    Laying foundation – “Hevrah Kaddishah” (The Jewish burial society), 15 Kislev, 16 December - 1921
     
    Notebook #6 - 1907-1909
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding (Vol. 1, p.133)
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Toledot (Vol. 1, p.133)
    Box   1  
    Va-Yehi
    Box   1  
    Yitro
    Box   1  
    Pekudei (Vol. 1, p.139)
    Box   1  
    Pinhas
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Rosh Hashana
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah – Beth Yaakov Synagogue (Vol. 1, p.141)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat (Vol. 1, p.140,141)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Rosh Hashanah (Vol. 1, p.170)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of Order Nezikim and Tractate Horayot (Vol. 2, p.107)
     
    Notebook #7 - 1914-1915
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Hayyei Sarah
    Box   1  
    Shemot
    Box   1  
    Va-Era
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    First Shabbat Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Passover
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of Order Zera’im (Vol. 2, p.4)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    G’milut Hasadim- an act of loving-kindness during WWI, 15 Kislev, December 3, 1914
    Box   1  
    The Conference, about midwives
    Box   1  
    Hamizrahi Banquet, Chicago, January 9, 1915
     
    Notebook #8 - 1914
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Yom Kippur (Vol. 1, p.175)
    Box   1  
    The New Moon of Elul
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Gittin (Vol. 1, p.179)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of Tractate Makkot
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Hamizrahi Conference, Scranton, Pennsylvania
    Box   1  
    About the Zionist Assembly, “No bread no learning”
    Box   1  
    Arguments about versions of the prayer book (Vol. 1, p.177)
     
    Notebook #9 - 1884, 1897-1906
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Brit Milah (Vol. 1, p.43)
    Box   1  
    Funeral
    Box   1  
    Funeral (Vol. 1, p.98)
    Box   1  
    Funeral (Vol. 1, p.157)
    Box   1  
    Funeral for Dr. Theodor Herzl (Vol. 1, p.101)
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Hayyei Sarah
    Box   1  
    Va-Yeshev
    Box   1  
    Mi-Kets (Vol. 1, p.95)
    Box   1  
    Va-Yehi (Vol. 1, p.103)
    Box   1  
    Shemot (Vol. 1, p.132)
    Box   1  
    Be-Shallah (Vol. 1, p.131)
    Box   1  
    Terumah , Beth David Synagogue, Detroit, February 15, 1902, (Vol. 1, p.10,66)
    Box   1  
    Terumah 1903 (Vol. 1, p.70)
    Box   1  
    Be-Midbar
    Box   1  
    Hukkat (Vol. 1, p.44)
    Box   1  
    ‘Ekev (Vol. 1, p.103)
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva in Beth Israel Synagogue, September 21, 1901
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva in Shaarey Zedek Synagogue, Detroit, September 17, 1904 (Vol. 1, p.86)
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of the Torah (the Five Books of Moses) (Vol .1, p.94)
    Box   1  
    Simhat Torah (the rejoicing of the law)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim (Vol. 1, p.105)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Zakhor
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol (Vol. 2, p.44)
    Box   1  
    Passover (Vol. 1, p.76)
    Box   1  
    Shavuot, Beth Yaakov Synagogue, Detroit, June 11,1902 (Vol. 1, p.91)
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Eruvin (Vol. 1, p.48)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Pesahim (Vol. 2, p.44)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Yoma (Vol. 1, p.48,93)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Sukkah
    Box   1  
    Tractate Bava Batra (Vol. 1, p.95)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Horayot (Vol. 1, p.66) Innovation for Hoshen Mishpat (by Rabbi Yaacov Ben-Ha-rosh)
    Box   1  
    Innovation for Hoshen Mishpat (by Rabbi Yaacov Ben-Ha-rosh)
    Box   1  
    A story about the fly and the eagle, analogy for the evil inclination (Vol. 1, p.97)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    For Talmud Torah, Detroit, 1901? 1902? (Vol. 1, p.62)
    Box   1  
    Hamizrahi Conference, Cincinnati, June 20, 1903 (Vol. 1, p.78)
    Box   1  
    “Impress them upon your children,” on education (Vol. 1, p.72)
    Box   1  
    “As when fire kindles brushwood…” Isaiah 64:1
     
    Notebook #10 - 1907
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding (Vol. 1, p.128)
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    “Non of you shall go outside the door…” Exodus 12:22 (Vol. 1, p.120)
    Box   1  
    Hukkat and Red Cow (Vol. 1, p.119)
    Box   1  
    Isaiah 50:1 and Psalms 49:6 (Vol. 1, p.130)
    Box   1  
    “Can a woman forget her baby…” Isaiah 49:14-15
    Box   1  
    “A song for ascents…” Psalms 121:1 (Vol. 1, p.146)
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim (Vol. 1, p.111)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Zakhor (Vol. 1, p.114)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol (Vol. 1, p.120)
    Box   1  
    Shavuot (Vol. 1, p.120)
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Berakot (Vol. 2, p.15)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat (Vol. 1, p.123,126), (Vol. 2, p.36)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Megillah (Vol. 2, p.114)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Bava Batra (Vol. 1, p.126)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Sunset and sunrise for Jacob (Vol. 1, p.116)
     
    Notebook #11 - 1891-1892, 1895-1896, 1898
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding
    Box   1  
    Funeral (Vol. 1, p.160)
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Etz Hayim (Tree of life) (Vol. 1, p.11)
    Box   1  
    “God said, “Let there be light”…” Genesis 1:3
    Box   1  
    Va-Era
    Box   1  
    Be-Shallah, Beth-Yaakov Synagogue, New-Haven
    Box   1  
    Mishpatim
    Box   1  
    The sin of the golden calf (Vol. 1, p.106)
    Box   1  
    “Because of this, our hearts are sick…” Lamentations 5:17-18
     
    Holidays and Sermons
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
    Box   1  
    Counting of the Omer (49 days between Passover and Shavuot)
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Berakot
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat (Vol. 2, p.36)
    Box   1  
    Order Mo’ed and Tractate Hagigah (Vol. 2, p.27)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the Mishnah and Order Mo’ed (Vol. 2, p.34)
    Box   1  
    Gittin
    Box   1  
    Tractate Avodah Zarah
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the Mishnah and Order Tohorot (Vol.2, p.133)
    Box   1  
    Questions and answers - a woman in confinement (Vol. 2, p.139)
    Box   1  
    Organs out of a living animal (Vol. 2, p.150)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Israel among the nations - “Lazy one, go to the ant…” Proverbs 6.6-7 (Vol. 1, p.24)
     
    Notebook #12 - 1921-1923
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Weddings
    Box   1  
    Golden Wedding
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    No’ah
    Box   1  
    Va-Yera
    Box   1  
    Va-Yeze
    Box   1  
    Va-Yehi (Vol.3 p.212)
    Box   1  
    Bo
    Box   1  
    Beshallah
    Box   1  
    Yitro
    Box   1  
    Pekudei
    Box   1  
    Shemini
    Box   1  
    ‘Emor
    Box   1  
    Hukkat and Balak
    Box   1  
    Devarim
    Box   1  
    Re’eh
     
    Holidays and Sermons
    Box   1  
    Rosh Hashana
    Box   1  
    Yom Kippur and Kol Nidrei
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of the Torah (the Five Books of Moses)
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Zakhor
    Box   1  
    Purim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
    Box   1  
    Passover
    Box   1  
    Shavuot
    Box   1  
    Ninth of Av
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Bava Batra (Vol. 2, p.152)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Sanhedrin
    Box   1  
    Tractate Avot
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the Six Orders of the Mishnah and Tractate Uktsin, Magen Abraham Synagogue (Vol. 2, p.133)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Laying a cornerstone, Talmud Torah (religious school), Detroit, 15 July, 1922
    Box   1  
    House warming, United Talmud Torah, February 13, 1923
     
    Notebook #13 - 1913-1914
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Wedding
    Box   1  
    Bar-Mitzvah
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Beshallah
    Box   1  
    Tezavveh
    Box   1  
    Be-Midbar
    Box   1  
    Masei
    Box   1  
    Shofetim
    Box   1  
    Receiving the laws
    Box   1  
    “See, this day I set before you a blessing and a curse” (Deuteronomy 11:26)
    Box   1  
    “See, I set before you this day life…death” (Deuteronomy 30:15)
     
    Holidays and Sermons
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Kol Nidrei
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Zakhor in Bnei Israel Synagogue
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Nahamu and Va-‘ethannan
     
    General
    Box   1  
    “All that the Lord has spoken we will faithfully do!” a speech about education
    Box   1  
    On The way to establish Bikur Holim Hospital for indigent rheumatism patents. Mount Clemens, Michigan, August 2, 1913.
    Box   1  
    The Flags – and The Necessity for a Unified World Jewry
    Box   1  
    A speech for a Hospital that we are trying to build
    Box   1  
    A speech in Beth Yaakov, during a visit of Agudath Israel (religious party) delegation, January 1914
     
    Notebook #14 - 1914-1915
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Redemption of the First Born
    Box   1  
    Bar-Mitzvah
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Hayyei Sarah
    Box   1  
    Toledot - Magen Abraham Synagogue
    Box   1  
    Va-Yishlah
    Box   1  
    Beshallah
    Box   1  
    Ki Tetse
    Box   1  
    David’s Harp
    Box   1  
    King II Chap. 2
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Berakhot
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat
    Box   1  
    Tractate Megillah
    Box   1  
    Tractate Hagigah
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Zionist Assembly on Tu’B’Shevat, (15 Shevat, Arbor-Day,) 30 January 1915
    Box   1  
    King David and his attitude toward crises and wars
    Box   1  
    Theodor Herzl Memorial Day
     
    Notebook #15 - 1915-1916
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Va-Yera (Vol. 1, p.185)
    Box   1  
    Va-Yishlah
    Box   1  
    “For on this day, atonement shall be made for you” Leviticus 16:30
    Box   1  
    Va-Yeshev (Vol. 3, p.202)
    Box   1  
    Beshallah
    Box   1  
    Yitro
    Box   1  
    Ki Teze
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Sounding the Shofar (the ram’s horn)
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of the Torah (the Five Books of Moses)
    Box   1  
    The Eighth day of Succoth (Shemini Atseret)
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Nahamu
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat
    Box   1  
    Tractate Eruvin
    Box   1  
    Tractate Yoma
    Box   1  
    Tractate Rosh Hashanah and the immigrants to the United States as an analogy (Vol. 1, p.170)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Hagigah
    Box   1  
    Maintaining holy precepts
     
    General
    Box   1  
    The approach of Hamizrahi
    Box   1  
    A controversy between Orthodox and Reform Jews in understanding the essence of Jewishness
    Box   1  
    Banquet for Gemilut Hasadim (charity) for Hevra Kaddishah, 15 Kislev – 22 November 1915.
     
    Notebook #16 - 1912-1913
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Va-Yishlah
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    The eighth day of Succoth (Shemini Atseret)
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Shabbat
    Box   1  
    Hoshen Mishpat – on Kiddushin (marriage)
    Box   1  
    Family life and Order Nezikin.
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Housewarming for the synagogue clerk
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah 1912, while there is a war between a Balkan Kingdom and Turkey
     
    Notebook #17 - 1913
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Rosh Hashanah
    Box   1  
    Yom Kippur and Kol Nidrei, Tashlikh, and the book of remembrance
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Lamentation for the year that had just passed (October, 1913)
     
    Notebook #18 - 1918-1920
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Brit Milah
    Box   1  
    Bar-Mitzvah
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Deliverance of the Divine Presence
    Box   1  
    Toledot (Vol. 3, p.187)
    Box   1  
    Va-Yiggash
    Box   1  
    Va-Yehi
    Box   1  
    Va-Era and Bo
    Box   1  
    Mishpatim
    Box   1  
    Aharei Mot and Kedoshim
    Box   1  
    Be-Har
    Box   1  
    Korah
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Rosh Hodesh
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva in Shaarey Zedek Synagogue, Detroit.
    Box   1  
    Yom Kippur and Kol Nidrei
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shekalim
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Zakhor
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Parah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
    Box   1  
    Shavuot
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Nahamu
     
    Additional Talmudic Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Tractate Berakhot
    Box   1  
    For the conclusion of Tractate Yoma
    Box   1  
    Tractate Nazir (Vol. 2, p.59)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Gittin (Vol. 2, p.64)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Bava Kamma (Vol. 2, p.95)
    Box   1  
    Non-Kosher food
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Restoration funds for the Zionists who build their country, January 4, 1919
    Box   1  
    Kashruth (kosher food) in the land of Israel
    Box   1  
    “Take us back, O Lord, Yourself, And let us come back, Renew our days as of old” (Lamentations 5:21) The question of reconstruction
    Box   1  
    Remembering war casualties
    Box   1  
    Introducing Rabbi Meir Berlin Bar-Ilan, the president of Hamizrahi on Shabbat, May 31, 1919
    Box   1  
    Housewarming for Porath Josef, Detroit, September 6, 1919
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah dinner in Carmel Restaurant Detroit, December 16, 1919.
    Box   1  
    Housewarming for an orphanage
    Box   1  
    Shabbat, May 1, 1920, after the Jewish National Home Declaration by the San Remo Conference.
    Box   1  
    Shabbat ceremony, in Beth Yaakov Synagogue, with the children from the new orphanage, May 15, 1920
    Box   1  
    Banquet in Carmel Restaurant, 1920.
     
    Notebook #19 - undated
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    19 pages of ideas about various tractates of the Mishnah
     
    Notebook #20 - 1910-1911
     
    Ceremonies
    Box   1  
    Funeral
     
    Biblical Sermons
    Box   1  
    Va-Yiggash
     
    Holidays and Festivals
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Mevarhim
    Box   1  
    Rosh Hashana(Vol. 1, p.184)
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Shuva
    Box   1  
    Kol Nidrei
    Box   1  
    Hanukkah
    Box   1  
    Shabbat Ha-Gadol
    Box   1  
    Acrostic of the ten plagues
    Box   1  
    Shavuot
     
    Additional Talmudic Sermons
    Box   1  
    Tractate Berakhot
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of Orders Mo’ed (Vol. 2, p.27)
    Box   1  
    Tractate Nedarim
    Box   1  
    Orders Zera’im (Vol. 2, p.69)
    Box   1  
    Orders Nezikin (Vol. 2, p.70)
    Box   1  
    Six Orders of the Mishnah and Ein-Yaakov (Vol. 2, p.130)
    Box   1  
    The conclusion of the Six Orders of the Mishnah and Toledot weekly readings (Vol. 2, p.143)
     
    General
    Box   1  
    Banquet for Gemilut Hasadim on December 6, 1911 (15 Kislev)
    Box   1  
    Zionist assembly, December 30, 1911 (9 Tevet)
     
    Notebook #21
    Box   1  
    The entire notebook is a concordance index for Tractate Betzah
     
    Notebook #22 - 1922
    Box   1  
    The entire notebook is a concordance for statements of various Rabbis (Amoraic Rabbis) from the following tractates: Ta’anit, Megillah, Mo’ed Katan, Hagigah, and Betzah.