/ Sidgwick on Moral Motivation
Sidgwick seems to claim that belief and rationality are sufficient for moral motivation. For example, "[w]hen I speak of the cognition or judgment that 'X ought to be done' ... as a 'dictate' or 'precept' of reason to the persons to whom it relates, I imply that in rational beings as such this cognition gives an impulse or motive to action" (ME 34). These cognitions "in so far as they relate to conduct on which any one is deliberating ... are accompanied by a certain impulse to do the acts recognised as right" (ME 77). If Sidgwick did not hold that belief and rationality are sufficient for motivation, there would be no need for an argument against Hume.
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