Revised United States Army regulations of 1861, with an appendix containing the changed and laws affecting Army regulations and Articles of war to June 25, 1863:
United States. War Dept.

Page  1 REVISES UNITED STATES ARMY REGULIATIONSI OF 1861. 4AN APPENIX1 CONTAINING THE CHANGES AND LAWS AFFECTING ARMY REGULATIONS AND ARTICLES OF WAR TO JUNE 25, 1863. WASHINGTON: GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 1863. ,qim in+ _ o.U _ I -1 * WITH

Page  2

Page  3 WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, AUGUST 10, 1861. WHEREAS, it has been found expedient to revise the Regulations for the Army, and the same having been approved by the President of the United States, he commands that they be published for the information and government of the military service, and that, from and after the date hereof, they shall be strictly observed as the sole and standing authority upon the matter therein contained. Nothing contrary to the tenor of these Regulations will be enjoined in any part of the forces of tile United States by any commander whatsoever. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War. 8 ati ,^, " I A i

Page  4 il

Page  5 CON T ENTS. A TFRULL INDEX WILL BE FOUND AT IRE END OF THIS WORK. ARTICLE I. MILITARY DISCIPLINE..................................................................... ARTICLE II. RANK AND COMMAND.................................................................... ARTICLE III. SUCCESSION IN COMMAND OR DUTY................................................... ARTICLE IV. APPOINTMENT AND PROMOTION OF.COMMISSIONED OFFICERS.................... ARTICLE V. RESIGNATIONS OF OFFICERS............................................................. ARTICLE VI. EXCHANGE OR TRANSFER OF OFFICERS................................................ ARTICLE VII. APPOINTMENTS ON THE STAFF................................................... 1 ARTICLE VIII. DISTRIBUTION OF THE TROOPS......................................................... ARTICLE IX. CARE OF FORTIFICATIONS............................................................... ARTICLE X. CARE OF ARMAMENT OF FORTIFICATIONS........................................... A2 6 RAGX * 9 9 11 11 12 12 13 13 . 13 . 15

Page  6 6(3~ ~CONTENTS. ARTICLE XI. ARTILLERY PRACTICE.................................................................... ARTICLE XII. REGIMENTS................................................................................. ARTICLE XIII. COMPANIES................................................................................ ARTICLE XIV. ORDNANCE SERGEANTS.................................................................... ARTICLE XV. TRANSFER OF SOLDIERS........................................................... ARTICLE XVI. DECEASED OFFICERS....................................................................... ARTICLE XVII. DECEASED SOLDIERS...................................................................... ARTICLE XVIII. DESERTERS................................................................................... ARTICLE XIX. DISCHARGES............................................................................... ARTICLE XX. TRAVELING ON DUTY.................................................................... ARTICLE XXI. LEAYES OF ABSENCE TO OFFICERS................................................ ARTICLE XXII. FURLOUGHS TO ENLISTED MEN....................................................... ARTICLE XXIII. COUNCILS OF ADMINISTRATION........................................................ ARTICLE XXIV. CHAPLAINS................................................................................. ARTICLE XXV. SUTLERS.................................................................................... PAGE 16 18 21 24 27 28 28 . 29 . 30 . 31 . 31 . 34 . 34 .'36 ..37

Page  7 CONTENTS. 7 -.... ~ ARTICLE XXVI. PAG5 MILITARY DISCUSSIONS AND PUBLICATIONS..................................... 38 ARTICLE XXVII. ARRESTS AND CONFINEMENTS........................................................... 38 ARTICLE XXVIII. HOURS OF SERVICE AND ROLL-CALLS....................................... 39 ARTICLE XXIX. HONORS TO BE PAID BY THE TROOPS................................ 40 ARTICLE XXX. INSPECTIONS OF THE TROOPS............................................................ 46 ARTICLE XXXI. MUSTERS...................................................................................... 49 ARTICLE XXXII. FORMS OF PARADE................................................................. 50 ARTICLE XXXIII. GUARDS............................................................................ 61 ARTICLE XXXIV. ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE.......................................................... 66 ARTICLE XXXV. RETURNS AND REPORTS............................................................... 69 ARTICLE XXXVI. TROOPS IN CAMPAIGN..................................................................... 71 ARTICLE XXXVII. TROOPS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS.................................................... 120 ARTICLE XXXVIII. COURTS-MARTIA L........................................................................................... 124 ARTICLE XXXIX. WORKING-PARTIES................................. 127 ARTICLE XL. RECRUITING SERVICE,................................128

Page  8 8 CONTENTS. ARTICLE XLI. PAGI PUBLIC PROPERTY, MONEY, AND ACCOUNTS.............................. 147 ARTICLE XLII. QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT..................................................... 159 ARTICLE XLIII. SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT.............................................................. 241 ARTICLE XLIV. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT................................................................... 281 ARTICLE XLV. PAY DEPARTMENT..................................................................... 34J ARTICLE XLVI. CORPS OF ENGINEERS........................................................... Omitted. The Regutations for Engineers are fiurnished to offcers requiring them, by the Chief Engineer ARTICLE XLVII. ORDNANCE 1)EPARTMENT................................................................. 387 ARTICLE XLVIII. PROCEEDINGS IN CIVIL COURTS....................................................... 474 ARTICLE XLIX. ARMS OF THE UNITED STATES......................................................... 474 ARTICLE L. FLAGS, COLORS, STANDARDS, GUIDONS................................ 475 ARTICLE LI. UNIFORM, DRESS, AND HORSE EQUIPMENTS...................................... 476 ARTICLE LII. VOLUNTEERS AND MILITIA IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES...... 495 APPENDIX. A. ARTICLES OF WAR..................................485 EXTRACTS FROM ACTS OF CONGRESS FROM 16TH MARCH, 1802, TO 25TH JULY, 1861...................................... 503 B. CHANGES AND ADDITIONS TO ARMY REGULATIONS UP TO JUNE 25, 1863.................................................................................. 510 ABSTRACTS FROM ACTS OF CONGRESS FROM 29TIH JULY, 1861, TO 3D MARCH, 1863.................................... 525 AR.MY' PAY Tf;ET............................................. 544

Page  9 REVISED REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. ARTICLE I. MILITARY DISCIPLINE. 1. ALL inferiors are required to obey strictly, and to execute with alacrity and good faith, the lawful orders of the superiors appointed over them. 2. Military authority is to be exercised with firmness, but with kindness and justice to inferiors. Punishments shall be strictly conformable to military law. 3. Superiors of every grade are forbidden to injure those under them by tyrannical or capricious conduct, or by abusive language. ARTICLE II. RANK AND COMMAND. 4. Rank of officers and non-commissioned officers: 1st. Lieutenant-General. 2d. Major-General. 3d. Brig,adier-General. 4th. Colonel. 5th. Lieutenant-(Colonel. 6th. Major. 7th. Captain. 8th. First Lieutenant. 9th. Second Lieutenant. Cadet. Sergeant-Major. Quartermaster-Sergeant of a Regiment. Ordnance Sergeant and Hos pital Steward. First Sergeant. Sergeant. Corporal. And in each grade by date of commission or appointment. 5. When commissions are of the same date, the rank is to be decided, between officers of the same regiment or corps by the order of appointment; between officers of different regiments or corps: lst. by rank in .Ct.Ue,i service when appointed; 2d. by former rank and service in the 14th. I 15th. 16th.

Page  10 REVISED REGULATIONS Rank.- Command. army or marine corps; 3d. by lottery among such as have not been in the military service of the United States. In case of equality of rank by virtue of a brevet commission, reference is had' to commissions not brevet. 6. Officers having brevets, or commissions of a prior date to those of the regiment in which they serve, may take place in courts-martial and on detachments, when composed of diff( rent corps, according to the ranks given them in their brevets or dates of their former commissions; but in the regiment, troop, or company to which such officers belong, they shall do duty and take rank both in courts-martial and on detachments which shall be composed only of their own corps, according to the commissions by which they are mustered in the said corps.-(61st Art. of War.) 7. If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of the army shall happen to join, or do duty together, the'officer highest in rank of the line of the army, marine corps, or militia, by commission, there on duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders for what is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by the President of the United States, according to the nature of the case.- (62d Art. of War.) 8. An officer not having orders from competent authority cannot put himself on duty by virtue of his commission alone. 9. Officers serving by commission from any state of the Union take rank next after officers of the like grade by commission from the United States. 10. Brevet rank takes effect only in the following cases: 1st. by special assignment of the President in commands composed of different corps; 2d. on courts-martial or detachments composed of different corps. Troops are on detachment, only when sent out temporarily to perform a special service. 11. In regularly constituted commands, as garrisons, posts, departments; companies, battalions, regiments; corps, brigades divisions, army corps, or the army itself, brevet rank cannot be exercised except by special assignment. 12. The officers of Engineers are not to assume nor to be ordered oa any duty beyond the line of their immediate profession, except by the special order of the President. 13. An officer of the Pay or Medical Department cannot exercise commnand except in his own department; but, by virtue of their commissions, officers of these departments may command all enlisted men, like othei commissioned officers. 14. Officers of the corps of Engineers or Ordnance, or of the Adju. taint-General's, Inspector-General's, Quartermaster-General's, or Subsistenco Department, though eligible to command according te the rank they 10

Page  11 FOR THE ARMY. ii Succession in Duties.-Appointments. hold in the army of the United States, shall not assume the command of troops unless put on duty under orders which specially so direct by authority of the President. ARTICLE III. SUCCESSION IN COMMAND OR DUTY. 15. The functions assigned to any officer in these regulations by title of office, devolve on the officer acting in his place, except as specially excepted. 16. During the absence of the Adjutant-General, or of the chief of any military bureau of the War Department, his duties in the bureau, prescribed by law or regulations, devolve on the officer of his department empowered by the President to perform them in his absence. 17. An officer who succeeds to any command or duty, stands in regard to his duties in the same situation as his predecessor. The officer relieved shall turn over to his successor all orders in force at the time, and all the public property and funds pertaining to his command or duty, and shall receive therefor duplicate receipts, showing the condition of each article. 18. An officer in a temporary command shall not, except in urgent cases, alter or annul the standing orders of the regular or permanent commander without authority from the next higher commander. ARTICLE IV. APPOINTMENT AND PROMOTION OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 19. All vacancies in established regiments and corps, to the rank of Colonel, shall be filled by promotion according to seniority, except in case of disability or other incompetency. 20. Promotions to the rank of Captain shall be made regimentally; to Major and Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel, according to the arm, as infantry, artillery, &c., and in the Staff Departments and in the Engineers, Topographical Engineers,. and Ordnance, according to corps. 21. Appointments to the rank of Brigadier-General and Major-General will be made by selection from the army. 22. The graduates of the Military Academy are appointed to vacancies of the lowest grade, or attached by brevet to regiments or corps, not to exceed one brevet to each company; and meritorious non-commissioned officers, examined by an Army Board, and found qualified for the duties ii 'FOR THE ARMY.

Page  12 REVISED REGULATIONS Resignations.-Exchanges. cf commissioned officers, will, in like manner, be attached to regiments its Brevet Second Lieutenants. 23. Whenever the public service may require the appointment of any citizen to the army, a Board of Officers will be instituted, before which the applicant will appear for an examination into his physical ability, moral character, attainments, and general fitness for the service. If the Board report in favor of the applicant, he will be deemed eligible for a commission in the army. ARTICLE V. RESIGNATIONS OF OFFICERS. 24. No officer will be considered out of service on the tender of his resignation, until it shall have been'duly accepted by the proper authority. Any officer who, having tendered his resignation, shall, prior to due notice of the acceptance of the same by the proper authority, and, without leave, quit his post or proper duties with the intent to remain permanently absent therefrom, shall be registered as a deserter, and punished as such. 25. Resignations will be forwarded by the commanding officer to the Adjutant-General of the army for decision of the War Department; and with them, where leave is given, the officer's address. 26. Resignations tendered under charges, when forwarded by any commander, will always be accompanied by a copy of the charges; or, in the absence of written charges, by a report of the case, for the information of the Secretary of War. 27. Before presenting the resignation of any officer, the AdjutantGeneral will ascertain and report to the War Department the state of such officer's accounts of money, as well as of public property, for which he may have been responsible. 28. In time of war, or with an army in the field, resignations shall take effect within thirty days from the date of the order of acceptance. 29. Leaves of absence will not be granted by commanding officers to officers on tendering their resignation, unless the resignation be unconditional and immediate. ARTICLE VI. EXCHANGE OR TRANSFER OF OFFICERS. 30. The transfer of officers from one regiment or corps to another will be maple only by the War Department, on the mutual application of the parties desiring the exchange. 12 - , 1,

Page  13 —,F T R Staff Appointments.-Care of Fortifications. 31. An officer shall not be transferred from one regiment or corps to another with prejudice to the rank of any officer of the regiment or corps to which he is transferred. 32. Transfers will be seldom granted-never except for cogent reasons. ARTICLE VII. APPOINTMENTS ON THE STAFF. 33. As far as practicable, all appointments and details on the staff will be equalized among the several regiments.: 34. General Officers appoint their own Aides-de-camp. 35. Brevet Brigadier and Major Generals on duty as such, may, with the special sanction of the War Department, be allowed the aides-de-camp of their brevet grades. 36. An officer shall not fill any staff appointment, or other situation, the duties of which will detach him from his company, regiment, or corps, until he has served at least three years with his regiment or corps; nor shall any officer (aides-de-camp excepted) so remain detached longer than four years. 37. An officer of a mounted corps shall not be separated from his regiment, except for duty connected with his particular arm. 38. The senior Lieutenant present, holding the appointment of Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, is entitled to perform the duties. ARTICLE VIII. DISTRIBUTION OF THE TROOPS. 39. The military geographical departments will be established by the War Department. In time of peace, brigades or divisions will not be formed, nor the stations of the troops changed, without authority from the War Department. ARTICLE IX. CARE OF FORTIFICATIONS. 40. No person shall be permitted to walk upon any of the slopes of a fortification, excepting the ramps and glacis. If, in any case, it be necessary to provide for crossing them, it should be done by placing wooden steps or stairs against the slopes. The occasional walking of persons on a parapet will do no harm, provided it be not allowed to cut the surface into paths. B FOR THE ARMY. i3.

Page  14 REVISED REGULATIONS Care of Fortifications. 41. No cattle, horses, sheep, goat, or other animal, shall ever be permitted to go upon the slopes, the ramparts, or the parapets, nor upon the glacis, except within fenced limits, which should not approach the crest nearerthan 30 feet. 42. All grassed surfaces, excepting the glacis, will be carefully and frequently mowed (except in dry weather), and the oftener the better, while growing rapidly-theigrass never being allowed to be more than a few inches high. In order to cut the grass even and close, upon small slopes a light one-handed scythe should be used; and in mowing the steep slopes, the mower should stand on a light ladder resting against the slope, and not upon the grass. Crops of hay may be cut on the glacis; or, if fenced, it may be used as pasture; otherwise it should be treated as of her slopes of the fortification. On all the slopes, spots of dead grass will be cut out and replaced by fresh sods. All weeds will be eradicated. A very little labor, applied steadily and judiciously, will maintain the grassed surfaces, even of the largest of our forts, in good condition. 43. The burning of grass upon any portion of a fortification is strictly forbidden. 44. Particular attention is required to prevent the formation of gullies in the parade, terreplein, and ramps, and especially in slopes where grass is not well established. If neglected, they soon involve heavy expense. 45. Earth, sand, or ashes must not be placed against wood-work; a free ventilation must be preserved around it; and all wooden floors, platforms, bridges, &c., will be kept clean swept. 46. The machinery of draw-bridges, gates, and posterns must be kept in good working order by proper cleaning and oiling of the parts; the bridges will be raised, and the gates and posterns opened as often as once a week. 47. The terrepleins of forts, the floors of casemates, caponniers, storerooms, barracks, galleries, posterns, magazines, &c., and the sidewalks in front of quarters and barracks, as well as other walks, are sometimes paved with bricks or stones, or formed of concrete. These surfaces must be preserved from injury with great care. In transporting guns and carriages, and in mounting them, strong way-planks will be used, and neither the wheels nor any other part of the carriages, nor any machinery, such as shears, gins, &c., nor any handspike or other implements, will be allowed to touch those surfaces. Unless protected in a similar manner, no wheelbarrow or other vehicle, no barrels, hogsheads, &c., will be rolled upon these surfaces. No violent work will be suffered to be done upon them, such as cutting wood, breaking coal, &c., and no heavy weight be thrown or permitted to fall thereon. In using machines, as gins, &c., in casemates, care must be taken not to injure the arch or ce!.1ing, as well as the 4

Page  15 F()R Tli ARMY. 15 Care of Armament of Fortifications. floor. Neglect of these precautions may cause injuries slight in appearance but serious in effect from the leaking of water into masonry and casemates, and expensive to repair. 48. The doors and windows of all store-rooms and unoccupied case mates, quarters, barracks, &c., will be opened several times a week for thorough ventilation. 49. The masonry shot-furnaces will be heated only on the approach of an enemy. For ordinary practice with hot shot, iron furnaces are provided. 50. The foregoing matters involve but little expense; the labor is within the means of every garrison, and no technical knowledge is called for beyond what will be found among soldiers. Other repairs requiring small disbursements, such as repainting exposed wood or iron work, can be also executed by the garrison; but reports, estimates, and requisitions may be necessary to obtain the materials. 51. No alteration will be made in any fortification, -or: in its casemates, quarters, barracks, magazines, store-houses, or any other building belonging to it; nor will any building of any kind, or work of earth, masonry, or timber be erected within the fortification, or on its exterior within half a mile, except under the superintendence of the Engineer Department, and by the authority of the Secretary of War. ARTICLE X. CARE OF ARMAMENT OF FORTIFICATIONS. 52. At each permanent post with a fired battery, and garrisoned by not more than one company, there will be kept mounted, for purposes of instruction and target practice, three heavy guns, and at posts garrisoned by more than one company, at the rate of two for each of the companies composing its garrison. The other guns dismounted will be properly placed (see page 21, Ordnance Manual for 1850) within their own traverse circles, and the carriages preserved from the weather. 53. All guns should be sponged clean and their vents examined to see hat they are clear. The chassis should be traversed and left in a different position, the. top carriage moved backward and forward and left alternately over the front and rear transoms of the chassis; the elevating screws or machines wiped clean, worked and oiled if required, and the nuts of all bolts screwed up tight. This should all be done regularly once in every week. 54. When tarpaulins, or pent houses, are placed over the guns, they should be removed once a week when the weather is fair, the carriages and guns brushed off, and, if damp, allowed to dry. 55. An old sponge-staff and head should be used for drill. The new . 15 F <),It T 11 JE A R.Nl Y.

Page  16 REVISED REGULATIONS Artillery Practice. sponges should never be used unless the gun is fired. The implements should be kept in store, under cover, and be examined, wiped clean or brushed at least once a month. In the case of leather equipments, the directions for the preservation of harness in the Ordnance Manual should be followed. 56. The magazine should be frequently examined to see that the powder is well preserved. It should be' opened every other day when the air is dry and clear. Barrels of powder should be turned and rolled occasionally. Under ordinary circumstances, only a few cartridges should be kept filled. If the paper body of the cartridge becomes soft or loses its sizing, it is certain that the magazine is very damp, and some means should be found to improve the ventilation. Cartridge bags may be kept in the magazine ready for filling; also port-fires, fuzes, tubes, and primers. Stands of gral)e, canisters, and wads for barbette guns, should be kept in store with the implements. For casemate guns, wads may be hung in bundles, and grape and canisters placed near the guns. Shot, well lacquered and clean, may be placed in piles near the guns. ARTICLE XI. ARTILLERY PRACTICE. 57. At all posts with fixed batteries, the position of every gun, mounted or to be mounted, will have its number, and this number be placed on the gun when in position. 58. For every such work a post-book of record will be kept, under the direction of the commander of the post, in which will be duly enteredthe number of each mounted gun, its calibre, weight, names of founder and its inspector, and other marks; the description of its carriage and date of reception at the post; where from; and the greatest field of fire of-the gun in its position. 59. Every commander of a fort or other fixed battery will, before enterijg on artillery practice, carefully reconnoitre and cause to be sketched for his record-book, the water-channels with their soundings, and other approaches to the work. B13uoys,or marks will be placed at the extreme and intermediate ranges of the guns, and these marks be numerically noted on the sketch. A buoy at every five hundred yards may suffice. 60. At the time of practice, a distinct and careful note will be made "or the record-book of every shot or shell that may be thrown, designating the guns fired by their numbers, the charges of powder used, the times of flight of shots and shells, the ranges and ricochets, and the positions of guns in respect to the horizontal and vertical lines. 61. The time of flight of a shell may be noted with sufficient accuracy t-,"6

Page  17 FOR THE ARMY.,' Artillery Practice. by a stop-watch, or by counting the beats (previously ascertaining their value) of other watches, and the range may sometimes be computed by the time of flight. Other modes of ascertaining the range will readily occur to officers of science. 62. When charged shells with fuzes are thrown, the time of bursting will be noted. If they are intended to fall on land, only a blowing charge will be given to the shells, so that they may be picked up for further use. 63. On filling from the barrel, the proof range of powder will be marked on the cartridges. 64. The general objects of this practice are-to give to officers and men the ready and effective use of batteries; to preserve on record the more important results for the benefit of the same, or future commanders, and to ascertain the efficiency of guns and carriages. 65. Commanders of field artillery will also keep registers of their practice, so that not a shot or shell shall be thrown in the Army, for instruction, without distinct objects, such as range, accuracy of aims number of ricochets, time of bursting, in the case of shells, &c. 66. Every company with a field battery will be allowed for annuai practice as many blank cartridges for the instruction and drill as may be necessary for the purpose, on requisitions duly approved at the proper Departments. Companies with fixed batteries will be allowed 100 cartridges each, with seventy-five shots or shells. This ammunition will be expended in equal parts in the three months designated below, and if the company be mounted, eight blank cartridges will be allowed for each of the other months in the year. This allowance is intended only for companies permanently serving with batteries. The firing with field-guns by other Artillery companies must be confined to blank cartridges. 67. For all Artillery there will be annually three periods of practice in firing-April, June, and October for the latitude of Washington and south; and fIay, July, and,September north of that latitude. 68. At the termination of each period of practice, the commanding officers.of posts will transmit to the Adjutant-General full reports of the esults, in order that proper tabular statements may be prepared for the War Department. 69. To determine accuracy of aim in firing shot and shell, butts or targets will be used. Where no natural butt presents itself, targets will be erected. A form for floating targets will be sent to the commanders' of the several forts. 70. As practice in gunnery is a heavy expense to government, commanders of companies and their immediate superiors are charged with 17 B 2 2

Page  18 REVISED REGULATIONS Regiments.-Non-Commissioned Officers. the strict execution of the foregoing details; and all officers authorized to make tours of inspection will report, through the prescribed channels, on such execution. ARTICLE XII: REGIMENTS. 71. On the organization of a regiment, the companies receive a permanent designation by letters beginning with A, and the officers are assigned to companies; afterward, company officers succeed to companies, as promoted to fill vacancies. Companies take place in the battalion according to the rank of their captains. 72. Captains should be with their companies. Therefore, although subject to the temporary details of service, as for courts-martial, military boards, &c., they shall not, except for urgent reasons, be detailed upon any duty which may separate them for any considerable time from their companies. 73.- The commander of a regiment will appoint the adjutant from the subalterns of the regiment. He will nominate the regimental quartermaster to the Secretary of War for appointment if approved. Ite will appoint the non-commissioned staff of the regiment; and, upon the recommendation of the company commanders, the sergeants and corporals of companies. 74. In cases of vacancy, and till a decision can be had from regimental head-quarters, the company commanders may make temporary appointments of non-commissioned officers. 75. Commanders of regiments are enjoined to avail themselves of every opportunity of instructing both officers and men in the exercise and management of field artillery; and all commanders ought to encourage useful occupations, and manly exercises and diversions among their men, and to repress dissipation and immorality. 76. Regiments serving on foot, being usually employed as light troops, will be habitually exercised in the system of U. S. Tactics for light infantry and riflemen adopted by the War Department, May 1, 1861. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 77. A board, to consist of the Professors of Mathematics and Ethics and the Commandant of Cadets, will convene at the Military Academy, on the first Monday of September in every year, for the examination of such non-commissioned officers, for promotion, as have already passed the regimental examination prescribed in General Orders No. 17, of October 4 1854. is

Page  19 FOR THE ARMY. 19 FOR THE ARMY. Non-Commissioned oficers. 78. It is enjoined upon all officers to be cautious'u reproving noncommissioned officers in the presence or hearing of privates, lest their authority be weakened; and non-commissioned officers are not to be sent to the guard-room and mixed with privates during confinement, but to be considered as placed in arrest, except in aggravated cases, where escape may be apprehended. 79. Non-commissioned officers may be reduced to the ranks by the sentence of a court-martial, or by order of the commander of the regiment on the application of the company commander. If reduced to the rank by garrison courts, at posts not the head-quarters of the regiment, the company commander will immediately forward a transcript of the order to the regimental commander. 80. Every non-commissioned officer shall be furnished with a certificate or warrant of his rank, signed by the colonel and countersigned by the adjutant. Blank warrants, on parchment, are furnished from the Adjutant-General's office. The first, or orderly sergeant, will be selected by the captain from the sergeants. 81. When it is desired to have bands of music for regiments, there will be allowed for each, sixteen privates to act as musicians, in addition to the chief musicians authorized by law, provided the total number of privates in the regiment, including the band, does not exceed the legal standard. Regimental commanders will without delay designate the proportion to be subtracted from each company for a band, and the "number of recruits required" will be reported accordingly. The companies from which the non-commissioned officers of bands for artillery regiments shall be deducted, will in like manner be designated, and vacancies left accordingly. At the artillery school, Fort Monroe, the non-commnissioned officers and privates of the band, will be apportioned among the companies serving at the post. 82. The musicians of the band will, for the time being, be dropped from company muster-rolls, but they will be' instructed as soldiers, and liable to serve in the ranks on any occasion. They will be mustered in a separate squad under the chief musician, with the non-commissioned staff, and be included in the aggregate in all regimental returns. 83. When a regiment occupies several stations, the band will be kept at the head-quarters, provided troops (one or more companies) be serving there. The field music belonging to companies not stationed at regimental head-quarters will not be separated from their respective companies. 84. No man, unless he be a carpenter, joiner, carriage-maker, ]lacksmith, saddler, or harness-maker, will be mustered as an "artificer." 85. Every article, excepting- arms and accoutrements, belonging to the regiment, is to be marked with the number and name of the regiment. 19

Page  20 R E VIS E D REGULAT I ON Non-Commissioned Officers.-Post Books. 86. Such articles as belong to companies are to be marked with the letter of the company, and, number and name of the regiment; and such as belong to men, with their individual numbers, and the letter of the company. 87. All orders and circulars from general, department, division, or brigade head-quarters, will be tied together in book form, and properly indexed as they are received; and afterwards bound in volumes of convenient size. 88. The books for each regiment shall be as follows: 1. Regimental Order Book, of three quires of paper, 16 inches by 10~ inches, to contain regimental orders, with an index. 2. Letter Book, of three quires of paper, 16 inches by 10~ inches, to contain the correspondence of the commanding officer on regi mental subjects, with an index. 3. An index of letters required to be kept on file, ill the following form: No. Name of writer. Date. Subject. Captain A. B..... July 15, 1860 Appoiatm't of non-com. officers. Adjt. Gen. R. J.. Sept. 4, 1860 Recruiting service. Captain F. G..... Oct. 11, 1860 Error in company return. Lieutenant C. )D. Nov. 2, 1860 Application for leave. The date of receipt should be indorsed on all letters. They should be numbered to correspond with the index, and filed in regular order, for easy reference. 4. Descrtitive Book, of five quires of paper, 16 inches by 10~ inches, to contain a list of the officers of the regiment, with their rank, and dates of appointment, and promotions; transfers, leaves of absence, and places and dates of birth. To contain, also, the names of all enlisted soldiers, entered according to priority of enlistments, giving their description, the dates and periods of their enlistment; and, under the head of remarks, the cause of discharge, character, death, desertion, transfer, actions in which en gaged, &c.; in short, every thing relating to their military history. This book to be indexed, and when filled, and no longer needed with the company, to be forwarded to the Adjutant-General's office. One copy of the monthly returns will be filed. POST BOOKS. 89. The following books will be kept at each post: a Morning Report 13ook, a Guard Report Book, an Order Book, a Lette~ Book, each two quires f(olicap; also copies of the monthly post returns 20 1 2 3 4

Page  21 FOR THE ARMY. Companies. ARTICLE XIII. COMPANIES. 90. The captain will cause the men of the company to be numbered, in a regular series, including the non-commissioned officers, and divided into four squads, each to be put under the charge of a non-commissioned officer. 91. Each subaltern officer will be charged with a squad for the supervision of its order and cleanliness; and captains will require their lieutenants to assist them in the performance of all company duties. 92. As far as practicable, the men of each squad will be quartered together. 93. The utmost attention will be paid by commanders of companies to the cleanliness of their men, as to their persons, clothing, arms, accoutrements, and equipments, and also as to their quarters or tents. 94. The name of each soldier will be labeled on his bunk, and his com pany number will be placed against his arms and accoutrements. 95. The arms will be placed in the arm-racks, the stoppers in the muzzles the cocks let down, and the bayonets in their scabbards; the accoutrements suspended over the arms and the swords hung up by the belts on pegs. 96. The knapsack of each man will be placed on the lower shelf of his bunk, at its foot, packed with his effects, and rqady to be slung; the great-coat on the same shelf, rolled and strapped; the coat, folded inside out, and placed under the knapsack; the cap on the second or upper shelf; and the boots well cleaned. 97. Dirty clothes will be kept in an appropriate part of the knapsack; no article of any kind to be put under the bedding. 98. Cooking utensils and table equipage will be cleaned and arranged in closets or recesses; blacking and brushes out of view; the fuel in boxes. 99. Ordinarily the cleaning will be on Saturdays. The chiefs of squads will cause bunks and bedding to be overhauled; floors dry rubbed; tables and benches scoured; arms cleaned; accoutrements whitened and polished, and every thing put in order. 100. Where conveniences for bathing are to be had, the men should bathe once or twice a week. The feet to be washed at least twice a week. The hair kept short, and beard neatly trimmed. 101. Non-commissioned officers, in command of squads, will be held more immediately responsible that their men observe what is prescribed above; that they wash their hands and faces daily; that they brush or 21:

Page  22 R EVISED REGULATIONS Companies. comb their heads; that those who are to go on duty put-their arms, accoutrements, dress, &c., in the best order, and that such as have permission to pass the chain of sentinels are in the dress that may be ordered. 102. Commanders of companies and squads will see that the arms and' accoutrements in possession of the men are always kept in good order, and that proper care be taken in cleaning them. 103. When belts are given to a soldier, the captain will see that they are properly fitted to the body; and it is forbidden to cut any belt without his sanction. 104. Cartridge-boxes and bayonet-scabbards will be polished with blacking; varnish is injurious to the leather, and will not be used. 105. All arms in the hands of the troops, whether browned or bright, will be kept in the state in which they are issued by the Ordnance Department. Arms will not be taken to pieces without permission of a commissioned officer. Bright barrels will be kept clean and free from rust without polishing them; care should be taken in rubbing not to bruise or bend the barrel. After firing, wash out the bore; wipe it dry, and then pass a bit of cloth, slightly greased, to the bottom. In these operations, a rod of wood with a loop in one end is to be used instead of the rammer. The barrel, when not in use, will be closed with a stopper. For exercise, each soldier should keep himself provided with a piece of sole leather to fit the cup or countersink of the hammer. (For care of arms in service, see Ordnance Manual, page 185, &c.) 106. Arms shall not be left loaded in quarters or tents, or when the men are off duty, except by special orders. 107. Ammunition issued will be inspected frequently. Each man will be made to pay for the rounds expended without orders, or not in the way of duty, or which may be damaged or lost by his neglect. 108. Ammunition will be frequently exposed to the dry air, or sunned. 109. Special care shall be taken to ascertain that no ball-cartridges are mixed with the blank cartridges issued to the men. 110. All knapsacks are to be painted black. Those for the artillery will be marked in the centre of the cover with the number of the regiment only, in figures of' one inch and a half in length, of the character called full face, with yellow paint. Those for the infantry will be marked in the same way, in white paint. Those for the ordnance will be marked with two cannon, crossing; the cannon to be seven and a half inches in length, in yellow paint, to resemble those on the cap. The knapsack straps will be black. 111. The knapsacks will also be marked upon the inner side with the letter of the company and the number of the soldier, on such part as may be readily observed at inspections 22

Page  23 FOR THE ARlMY. Soldiers' Mess. 112. Haversacks will be marked upon the flap with the number and name of the regiment, the letter of the company, and number of the soldier, in black letters and figures. And each soldier must, at all times, *be provided with a haversack and canteen, and will exhibit them at all inspections. It will be worn on the left side on marches, guard, and when paraded for detached service-the canteen outside the haversack. 113. The front of the drums will be painted with the arms of the United States, on a blue field for the infantry, and on a red field for the artillery. The letter of the company and number of the regiment, under the arms, in a scroll. 114. Officers at their stations, in camp or in garrison, will always wear their proper uniform. 115. Soldiers will wear the prescribed uniform in camp or garrison, and will not be permitted to keep in their possession any other clothing. When on fatigue parties, they will wear the proper fatigue dress. 116. In camp or barracks, the company officers must visit the kitchen daily and inspect the kettles, and at all times carefully attend to the messing and economy of their respective companies. The commanding officer of the post or regiment will make frequent inspections of the kitchens and messes. These duties are of the utmost importance-not to be neglected. 117. The bread must be thoroughly baked, and not eaten until it is cold. The soup must be boiled at least five hours, and the vegetables always cooked sufficiently to be perfectly soft and digestible. 118. Ilesses will be prepared by privates of squads, including private musicians, each taking his tour. The greatest care will be observed in washing and scouring the cooking utensils; those made of brass and copper should be lined with tin. 119. The messes of prisoners will be sent to them by the cooks. 120. No persons will be allowed to visit or remain in the kitchens, except such as may come on duty, or be occupied as cooks. The kitchen should always be under the particular charge of a non-commissioned officer. 121. Those detailed for duty in the kitchens will also be required to keep the furniture of the mess-room in order. 122. On marches and in the field, the only mess furniture of the soldier will be one tin plate, one tin cup, one knife, fork, and spoon, to each man, to be carried by hilmself on the march. 123. Tradesmen may be relieved from ordinary military duty to make, to alter, or to mend soldiers' clothing, &c. Company commanders wiL fix the rates at which work shall be done, and cause the men, for whose benefit it is done, to pay for it at the next pay day. 23,

Page  24 REVISED REGULATIONS Employment of Soldiers as Clerks, &c. 124. Each company officer, serving with his company,,nay take from it one soldier as waiter, with his consent and the consent of his captain. No other officer shall take a soldier as a waiter. Every soldier so employed shall be so reported and mustered. 125. Soldiers taken as officers' waiters shall be acquainted with their military duty, and at all times be completely armed and clothed, and in every respect equipped according to the rules of the service, and have all their necessaries complete and in good order. They are to fall in with their respective companies at all reviews and inspections, and are liable to such drills as the commanding officer shall judge necessary to fit them for service in the ranks. 126. Non-commissioned officers will, in no case, be permitted to act as waiters; nor are they, or private soldiers, not waiters, to be employed in any menial office, or made to perform any service not military, for the private benefit of any officer or mess of officers. COMPANY BOOKS. 127. The following books are allowed to each company: one descriptive book, one clothing book, one order book, one morning report book, each one quire, sixteen inches by ten. One page of the descriptive book will be appropriated to the list of officers; two to the non-commissioned officers; two to the register of men transferred; four to register of men discharged; two to register of deaths; four to register of deserters-the rest to the company description list. LAUNDRESS. 128. Four women will be allowed to each company as washerwomen, and will receive one ration per day each. 129. The price of washing soldiers' clothing, by the month, or bythe piece, will be determined by the Council of Administration. 130. Debts due the laundress by soldiers, for washing, will be paid, or collected at the pay-table, under the direction of the captain. ARTICLE XIV. ORDNANCE SERGEANTS. 131. The Secretary of War selects from the sergeants of the line of the army, who may have faithfully served eight years (four years in the grade of non-commissioned officer), as many Ordnance Sergeants as the service may ~equire, not exceeding one to each military post. 132. Captains will report to their colonels such sergeants as, by their eondilet and service, merit such appointment, setting forth the descrip 24

Page  25 FOR THE ARMY. Ordnance Sergeants. tion, length of'serv ice of the sergeant, the portion of his service he was a non-commissioned officer, his general character as to fidelity and sobriety, his qualifications as a clerk, and his fitness for the duties to be performed by an ordnance sergeant. These reports will be forwarded to the Adjutant-General, to be laid before the Secretary of War, with an application in the following form: Head- Quarters, &c. To the Adjutant- General: SIR:-I forward, for consideration of the proper authority, an applcaion for the appointment of Ordnance Sergeant. Length of Service. . O same and Regiment. v As nen-commissioned Officer. In the Army. Remarks. o Years. Monthso. Years. Months. _. ~~~~~~~~~I Inclosed herewith you will receive the report of, the officer commanding the company in which the sergeant has been serving, to which I add the following remarks: . ~ Commanding - Regiment. 133. When a company is detached from the head-quarters of the regiment, the reports of the commanding officer in this matter will pass to the regimental head-quarters through the commanding officer of the post or detachment, and be accompanied by his opinion as to the fitness of the candidate. 134. Ordnance Sergeants will be assigned to posts when appointed, and are not to be transferred to other stations except by orders from the Adjutant-General's office. 135. At the expiration of their term of service, Ordnance Sergeants may be re-enlisted, provided they shall have conducted themselves in a becoming manner, and performed their duties to the satisfaction of the commanding officer. If the commanding officer, however, shall not think proper to re-enlist the Ordnance Sergeant of his post, he will communi C 2,',)

Page  26 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Sergeants. cate to the Adjutant-General his reasons for declining to re-enlist him, in time to receive the decision of the War Department before the Sergeant may lawfully claim to re-enlist.. 136. The officers interested must be aware, from the nature of the duties assigned to Ordnance Sergeants, that the judicious selection of them is of no small importance to the interests of the service; and that while the law contemplates, in the appointment of these non-commissioned officers, the better preservation of the ordnance and ordnance stores in deposit in the several forts, there is the further motive of offering a reward to those faithful and well-tried sergeants who have long served their country, and of thus giving encouragement to tle soldier in the ranks to emulate them in conduct, and thereby secure substantial promotion. Colonels and Captains cannot, therefore, be too particular in investigating the characters of the candidates, and in giving their testimony as to their merits. 137. The appointment and removal of Ordnance Sergeants, stationed at military posts, in pursuance of the above provisions of law, shall be reported by the Adjutant-General to the chief of the Ordnance Department. 138. When a non-commissioned officer receives the appointment of Ordnance Sergeant, he shall be dropped from the rolls of the regiment or company in which he may be serving at the time. 139. The duty of Ordnance Sergeants relates to the care of the ordnance, arms, ammunition, and other military stores at the post to which they may be attached, under the direction of the commanding officer, and according to the regulations of the Ordnance Department. 140. If a post be evacuated, the Ordnance Sergeant shall remain on duty at the station, under the direction of the chief of the Ordnance Department, in charge of the ordnance and ordnance stores, and of such other public property as is not in charge of some officer or agent of other departments; for which ordnance stores and other property he will account to the chiefs of the proper departments until otherwise directed. 141. An Ordnance Sergeant in charge of ordnance stores at a post where there is no commissioned officer shall be held responsible for the safe-keeping of the property, and he shall be governed by the regulations of the Ordnance Department in making issues of the same, and in preparing and furnishing the requisite returns. If the means at his disposal are not sufficient for the preservation of the property, he shall report the circumstances to the chief of the Ordnance Department. 142. Ordnance Sergeants are to be considered as belonging to the non commissioned staff of the post, under the orders of the commanding 26

Page  27 FOR THE ARMY. 27 O(dnance Sergeants.-Transfers. officer. They are to wear the uniform of the Ordnance Department, with the distinctive badges prescribed for the non-commissioned staff of' regiments of artillery; and they are to appear under arms with the troops at all reviews and inspections, monthly and weekly. 143. When serving at any post which may be the head-quarters of a regiment, Ordnance Sergeants shall be reported by name on the post returns, and mustered with the non-commissioned staff' of the regiment; and at all other posts they shall be mustered and reported in some company stationed at the post at which they serve; be paid on the muster. roll, and be charged with the clothing and all other supplies previously received from any officer, or subsequently issued to them by the commanding officer of the company for the time being. Whenever the company may be ordered from the post, the Ordnance Sergeant will be transferred to the rolls of any remaining company, by the order of the commanding officer of the post. 144. In the event of the troops being all withdrawn from a post at which there is an Ordnance Sergeant, he shall be furnished with his descriptive roll and account of clothing and pay, signed by the proper officer last in command, accompanied by the remarks necessary for his military history; and on his exhibiting such papers to any Paymaster, with a letter from the Ordnance Office acknowledging the receipt of his returns, and that they are satisfactory, he will be paid on a separate account the amount which may be due him at the date of the receipt of the returns mentioned in such letter, together with commutation of rations, according to the regulations of the Subsistence Department. A certified statement of his pay account will be furnished the Ordnance Sergeant by the Paymaster by whom he may be last paid. When there are no troops at the post, the Ordnance Sergeant will report to the A djutant-General's office, by letter, on the last day of every month. ARTICLE XV. TRANSFER OF SOLDIERS. 145. No non-commissioned officer or soldier will be transferred from one regiment to another without the authority of the commanding general. 146. The colonel may, upon] the application of the captains, transfer a non-commissioned officer or soldier from one company to another of his regiment-with consent of the department commander in case of change of post. 147. When soldiers are authorized tc be transferred, the transfer will take place on the first of a month, with, a view to the more convenient settlement of their accounts. 27 FOR THE A-RMY. t

Page  28 REV1SED REGULATION8 'Deceased Officers and Soldiers. 148. In all cases of transfer, a complete descriptive roll will accompany the soldier transferred, which roll will embrace an account of his pay, clothing, and other allowances; also, all stoppages to be made on account of the government, and debts due the laundress, as well as such other acts as may be necessary to show his character and military history. ARTICLE XVI. DECEASED OFFICERS. 149. Whenever an officer dies, or is killed at any military post or station, or in the vicinity of the same, it will be the duty of the commanding officer to report the fact direct to the Adjutant-General, with the date, and any other information proper to be communicated. If an officer die at a distance from a military post, any officer having intelligence of the same will in like manner communicate it, specifying the day of his decease; a duplicate of the report will be sent to Department Head-Quarters. 150. Inventories of the effects of deceased officers, required by the 94th Article of War, will be transmitted to the Adjutant-General. 151. If a legal administrator or family connection be present, and take charge of the effects, it will be so stated to the Adjutant-General. ARTICLE XVII. DECEASED SOLDIERS. 152. Inventories of the effets of deceased non-commissioned officers and soldiers, required by the 95th Article of War, will be forwarded to the Adjutant-General, by the commander of the company to which the deceased belonged, and a duplicate of the same to the colonel of the regiment. Final statements of pay, clothing, &c., will be sent with the inventories. When a soldier dies at a post or station absent from his company, it will be the duty of his immediate commander to furnish the required inventory, and, at the same time, to forward to the commanding officer of the company to which the soldier belonged, a report of his death, specifying the date, place, and cause; to what time he was last paid, and the money or other effects in his possession at the time of his decease; which report will be noted on the next muster-roll of the company to which the man belonged. Each inventory will be indorsed, "Inventory of the effects of, late of company (-) -- regiment of -—, who died at, the day of a, 186-." If a legal representative receive the effects, it will be stated in the report. If the 4oldier leave no effects, the fact will be reported. 153 Should the effects of a deceased non-commissioned officer or 2-8 t

Page  29 FOR THE ARMY. Deserters. soldier not be administered upon within a-short period after his decease, they shall be disposed of by a Council of Administration, under the authority of the commanding officer of the post, and the proceeds depo. sited with the Paymaster, to the credit of the United States, until they shall be claimed by the legal representatives of the deceased. 154. In all such cases of sales by the Council of Administration, a statement in detail, or account of the proceeds, duly certifiedby the Council and oommanding officer, accompanied by the Paymaster's receipt for the proceeds, will be forwarded by the commanding officer to the Adjutant-General. The statement will be endorsed, "Report of the proceeds of the effects of, late of company (-) - regiment of, who died at, the day of,2 186-." ARTICLE XVIII. DESERTERS. 155. If a soldier desert from, or a deserter be received at, any post other than the station of the company or detachment to which he belonged, he shall be promptly reported by the commanding officer of such post to the commander of his company or detachment. The time of deoertion, apprehension, and delivery will be stated. If the man be a recruit, unattached, the required report will be made to the AdjutantGeneral.'When a report is received o~ the apprehension or surrender of a deserter at any post other than the station of the company or detachmeRt to which he belonged, the commander of such company or detachmenit shall immediately forward his description and account of clothing to the officer making the report. 156. A reward of five dollars will be paid for the apprehension and delivery of a deserter to an officer of the army at the most convenient post or recruiting station. Rewards thus paid will be promptly reported by the disbursing officer to the officer commanding the company in which the deserter is mustered, and to the authority competent to order his trial. The reward of five dollars will include the remuneration for all expenses incurred for apprehending, securing, and delivering a deserter. 157. When non-commissioned officers or soldiers are sent min pursuit of a deserter, the expenses necessarily incurred will be paid whether he be apprehended or not, and reported as in case of rewards paid. 158. Deserters shall make good the time lost by desertion, unless dis charged by competent authority. 159. No deserter shall be restored to duty without trial, except by authority competent to order the trial. 02 29 i

Page  30 REVISED REGULATIONS Discharges. 160. Rewards and expenses paid for apprehending a deserter will be set against his pay, when adjudged by a court-martial, or when he is restored to duty without trial on such condition. 161. In reckoning the time of service, and the pay and allowances of deserter, he is to be considered as again in service when delivered up as a deserter to the proper authority. 162. An apprehended deserter, or one who surrenders himself, shall receive no pay while waiting trial, and only such clothing as may be actually necessary for him. ARTICLE XIX. DISCHARGES. 163. No enlisted man shall be discharged before the expiration of his term of enlistment without authority of the War Department, except by sentence of a general court-martial, or by the commander of the Department or of an army in the field, on certificate of disability, or on application of the soldier after twenty years' service. 164. When an enlisted man is to be discharged, his company commander shall furnish him certificates of his account, usually called final statements, according to Form. 4, Pay Department. And to ensure his being at the post to get these, no leave of absence, terminating with his service, will be given to him. HIe may, however, be discharged in advance of the latter, under the circumstances and conditions described in General Orders No. 24, from the War Department, of November 30, 1859. 165. Blank discharges on parchment will We furnished from the Adjutant-General's office. No discharge shall be made in duplicate, nor any certificate given in lieu of a discharge. 166. The cause of discharge will be stated in the body of the discharge, and the space at foot for character cut off, unless a recommendation is given. 167. Whenever a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall be unfit for the military service in consequence of wounds, disease, or infirmity, his captain shall forward to the commander of the Department or of the army in the field, through the commander of the regiment or post, a statement of his case, with a certificate of his disability signed by the senior surgeon of the hospital, regiment, or post, according to the form prescribed in the Medical Regulations. 168. If the recommendation for the discharge of the invalid be approved, the authority therefor will I e indorsed on the "certificate of disability," which will be sent back to be completed and signed by the so

Page  31 FOR THE ARMY. 3] Traveling on Duty.-Leaves of Absence to Officers. commanding officer, who will then send the same to the Adjutant-General's office. 169. Insane soldiers will not be discharged, but sent, under proper protection, by the Department commander to Washington for the order of the War Department for their admission into the Government Asylum. The history of the cases, with the men's descriptive list, and accounts of pay and clothing, will be sent with them. 1 170. The date, place, and cause of discharge of t soldier absent from his company will be reported by the commander of the post to his company commander. 171. Company commanders are required to keep the blank discharges and all certificates relating to discharge carefully in their own custody. 172. No volunteer will be discharged upon Surgeon's certificate of disability until the certificate shall have been submitted to the Medical Director, and shall have been approved and countersigned by him ARTICLE XX. TRAVELING ON DUTY. 173. Whenever an officer traveling under orders arrives at his post, he will submit to the commanding officer a report, in writing, of the time occupied in the travel, with a copy of the orders under which the journey was performed, andy an explanation of any delay in the execution of the orders; which report the commanding officer shall transmit, with his opinion on it, to Department Head-Quarters. If the officer be superior in rank to the commander, the required report will be made by the senior himself. 174. Orders detaching an officer for a special duty, imnply, unless otherwise stated, that he is thereafter to join his proper station. ARTICLE XXI. LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO OFFICERS. 175. In no case will leaves of absence be granted, so that a company be left without one of its commissioned officers, or that a garrisoned post be left without two commissioned officers and competent medical attendance; nor shall leave of absence be granted to an (;fficer during the season of active operations, except on urgent necessity. 176. When not otherwise specified, leaves of absence will be considered as commenting on the day that the officer is relieved from d-ty at his post. Hie will report, monthly, his address for the next thirty days, to the commander of his post and of his regiment or corps. and to FOR THE ARMY. 31

Page  32 REVISED REGULATIONS leaves of Absence to Officers. the Adjutant-General, together with every change of address; and in his first report state the day when his leave of absence commenced. Tho expiration of his leave must find him at his station. 177. In time of peace, commanding officers may grant leaves of absence as follows: the commander of a post not to exceed seven days at one time, or in the same month; the commander of a geographical department not to exceed sixty days. Applications for leaves of absence for more than four months, or to officers of engineers, ordnance, or of the general staff, or serving on it (aides-de-camp excepted), for more than thirty days, must be referred to the Adjutant-General for the decision of the Secretary of War. In giving a permission to apply for the extension of a leave of absence, the term of the extension should be stated. The term of the extension approved by the Departnent commander will be regulated by the season and the usual opportunities for reaching the officer's station, so that he may not be absent during the time for active operations. 178. The War Department will not grant leaves to officers on applications made out of the proper military channel; or longer extensions of leave than are recommended by the competent authority. 179. The immediate commander of the officer applying for leave of absence, and all intermediate commanders, will indorse their opinion on the application before forwarding it. 180. The commander of a post may take leave of absence not to exceed seven days at one time, or in the same month, reporting the fact to his next superior. 181. Three months' leave of absence will be allowed to graduates, from the time of quitting (as cadet) the Military Academy. 182. No leave of absence exceeding seven days, except on extraordi nary occasions, when the circumstances must be particularly stated (and except as provided in the preceding paragraph), shall be granted to any officer until he has joined his regiment or corps, and served therewith at least two years. 183. Officers will not leave the United States, to go beyond sea, without permission from the War Department. 184. All leaves of absence to Chaplains and Schoolmasters employed at military posts will be granted Dy the commanding officer, on the recommendation of the post Counci of Administration, not to exceed four months. 185. An application for leave of absence on account of sickness must be accompanied by a certificate of the senior medical officer present, in the following form: 32

Page  33 38 Leaves of Absence to Officers. of the regiment of, having. applied for a certifcate on which to ground an application for leave of absence, I do hereby certify that I have carefully examined this officer, and find that[Here the nature of the disease, wound, or disability is to be fully stated, and the period during which the officer has suffered under its effects.] And that, in consequence thereof, he is, in my opinion, unfit for duty. 1 further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties in a less period than -- [Here state candidly and explicitly the opinion as to the period which will probably elapse before the officer will be able to resume his duties. When there is no reason to expect a recovery, or when the prospect of recovery is distant and uncertain, or when a change of climate is recommended, it must be so stated.] Dated at this day of Signature of the Medical Officer. 186. Leaves of absence on account of sickness will not be granted to officers to go beyond the limits of the Military Department within which they are stationed, unless the certificate of the medical officer shall explicitly state that a greater change is necessary to save life, or prevent permanent disability. Nor will sick leaves to go beyond the Department limits be given in any case, except of immediate urgency, without the previous sanction of the War Department; 187. On the expiration of a leave of absence given on account of sickness, if the officer be able to travel, he will forthwith proceed to his post, although his disability may not have been removed. Exceptions to this general rule must be made in each case by the War Department on full and explicit medical certificates setting forth the reasons for delay and the length of time delay is considered necessary. 188. When an officer is prevented by sickness from joining his station, he will transmit certificates in the above form monthly, to the commanding officer of his post and regiment or corps, and to the Adjutant-General; and when he cannot procure the certificates of a medical officer of the army, he will substitute his own certificate on honor to his condition, and a full statement of his case. If the officer's certificate is not satisfactory, and whenever an officer has been absent on account of sickness for one year, he shall be examined by a medical board, and the case specially reported to the President. 189. In all reports of absence, or applications for leave of absenice on account of sickness, the officer shall state how long he has been absent already on that account, and by whose permission. FOR THE ARMY.

Page  34 REVISED REGULATIONS Furloughs to Enlisted Men. Councils of Administration. ARTICLE XXII. FURLOUGHS TO ENLISTED MEN. 190. Furloughs will be granted only by the commanding officer of the post, or the commanding officer of the regiment actually quartered with it. Furloughs may be prohibited at the discretion of the officer in command, and are not to be granted to soldiers about to be discharged. 191. Soldiers on furlough shall not take with them their arms or accoutrements. 192. Form of furlough: TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN. The bearer hereof, a Sergeant (corporal, or private, as the case may be) of Captain- company, regiment of, aged -years, - feet - inches high, - complexion, eyes, - hair, and by profession a; born in the of - and enlisted at - in the of on the day of , eighteen hundred and -, to serve for the period of, is hereby permitted to go to, in the county of -, State of he having received a Furloughfrom the- day of, to the - day of , at which period he will rejoin his company or regiment at - or wherever it then may bet or be considered a deserter. Subsistence has been furnished to said to the -day of -.-, and pay to the - day of -, both inclusive. Given under my hand, at this - day of -, 18-. Signatu'e of the officer. giving the furlough. ) ARTICLE XXIII. COUNCILS OF ADMINISTRATION. 193. The commanding officer of every post shall, at least once in every two months, convene a Post Council of Administration, to consist of the three regimental or company officers next in rank to himself; or, if there be but two, then the two next; if but one, the one next; and if there be none other than himself, then he himself shall act. 194. The junior member will record the proceedings of the Council in a book, and submit the same to the commanding officer. If he disapprove the proceedings, and the Council, after a reconsideration, adhere to its decision, a copy of the whole shall be sent by the officer commanding to the next higher commander, whose decision shall be final, and entered 84

Page  35 m,,~ ~FRTH RM.3 Council of Administration.- Post Fund. in the Council book, and the whole be published in orders for the information and government of all concerned. 195. The proceedings of Councils of Administration shall be signed by the president and recorder, and the recorder of each meeting, after entering the whole proceedings, together with the final order thereon, shaL deposit the book with the commanding officer. In like manner, the approval or objections of the officer ordering the Council will be signed with his own hand. 196. The Post Council shall prescribe the quantity and kind of clothing, small equipments, and soldiers' necessaries, groceries, and all articles which the sutlers may be required to keep on hand; examine the sutler's books and papers, and fix the tariff of prices of the said goods or commodities; inspect the sutler's weights and measures; fix the laundress' charges, and make regulations for the post school. 197. Pursuant to the 30th Article of War, commanding officers reviewIng the proceedings of the Council of Administration-will scrutinize the tariff of prices proposed by them, and take care that the stores actually furnished by the sutler correspond to the quality prescribed. POST FUND. 198. A Post Fund shall be raised at each post by a tax on the sutler, not to exceed 10 cents a month for every officer and soldier of the command, according to the average in each month to be ascertained by the Council, and from the saving on the flour ration, ordinarily 33 per cent., by baking the soldiers' bread at a post bakery. Provided, that when want of vegetables or other reasons make it necessary, the commanding officer may order the flour saved, or any part of it, issued to the men, after paying expenses of baking. 199. The commanding officer shall designate an officer to be post treasurer, who shall keep the account of the fund, subject to the inspection of the Council and commanding officer, and disburse the fund on the warrants of the commanding officer, drawn in pursuance of- specific resolves of the Council. 200. The following are the objects of expenditure of the post fund:1st. Expenses of the bake-house; 2d. support of a band; 3d. the post school for soldiers' children; 4th. for formation of a library. * 201. On the last day of April, August, and December, and when relieved from the duty, the treasurer shall make out his account with the fund since his last account, and submit it, with his vouchers, to the Council of Administration, to be examined by them, and recorded in the Council book, and then forwarded by the commanding officer to Depart ment Head-Quarters. 35 FOR THE ARMY.

Page  36 REVISED REGULA IIONS Company Fund.-Chaplains. 202. At each settlement of the treasurer's account, the Council shall Distribute the unexpended balance of the post fund to the several companies and other troops in the ratio of their average force during the period. 203. When a company leaves the post, it shall then receive its distributive share of the accrued fund. 204. The regulations in regard to a post fund will, as far as practicable, be applied in the field to a regimental fund, to be raised, admi. nistered, expended, and distributed in like manner, by the regimental commander and a regimental council. COMPANY FUND. 205. The distributions from the post or regimental fund, and the savings from the company rations, constitute the Company Fund, to be disbursed by the captain for the benefit of the enlisted men of the company, pursuant to resolves of the Company Council, consisting of all the company officers present. In case of a tie vote in the Council, the commander of the post shall decide. The Council shall be convened once in two months by the captain, and whenever else he may think proper. 206. Their proceedings shall be recorded in a book, signed by all the Council, and open at all times to the inspection of the commander of the post. Every four months, and whenever another officer takes command of the company, and when the company leaves the post, the account of the company fund shall be made up, audited by the Council, recorded in the Council book, and submitted, with a duplicate, to the post commander, who shall examine it and forward the duplicate to Department Head-Quarters. 207. The supervision of the company fund by the post commander herein directed shall, in the field, devolve on the commander of the regiment. ARTICLE XXIV. CHAPLAINS. 208. One chaplain shall be allowed to each regiment of the army, to be appointed by the colonel, on the nomination of the company commanders. None but regularly ordained ministers of some Christian denomination, however, shall be eligible to appointment; and the wishes and wants of the sOldiers of the regiment shall be allowed their full and due weight in making the selection. The proceedings in each case will be immediately forwarded to the Adjutant-General's office, the name and denomination of the chaplain being in every case reported. Chaplains will only be allowed to regiments which are embodied and serving together as one whole-not to regiments of which the,ompanies are serving at different stations. 209. Chaplains, net to exceed thirty in number, are also allowed to 36

Page  37 FOR THE ARMY. 37 Sutlers. posts. The posts at which chaplains may be employed will be announced by the War Department, but the appointment will be made by the Council of Administration. 210. The Council of the post will, however, report to the AdjutantGeneral, for the approval of the Secretary of War, the rate of pay allowel to the person selected to officiate as Chaplain and perform the duties of Schoolmaster; the decision of the Secretary on this point will be notified to the commanding officer of the post by the Adjutant-General. ARTICLE XXV. SUTLERS. 211. Every military post may have one Sutler, to be appointed by the Secretary of War. 212. A Sutler shall hold his office for a term of three years, unless sooner removed; but the commanding officer may, for cause, suspend a Sutler's privilege until a decision of the War Department is received in the case. 213. In case of vacancy, a temporary appointment may be made by the commanding officer upon,he nomination of the Council of Administration. 214. Troops in campaign, on detachment, or on distant service, will be allowed Sutlers, at the rate of one for every regiment, corps, or separate detachment; to be appointed by the commanding officer of such regiment, corps, or detachment, upon the recommendation of the Council of Administration, subject to the approval of the general or other officer in command. 215. No tax or burden in any shape, other than the authorized assessment for the post fund, will be imposed on the Sutler. If there be a spare building, the use of it may be allowed him, he being responsible that it is kept in repair. If there be no such building, he may be allowed to erect one; but this article gives the Sutler no claim to quarters, transportation for himself or goods, or to any military allowance whatever. 216. The tariff of prices fixed by the Council of Administration shall be exposed in a conspicuous place in the Sutler's store. No difference of prices will be allowed on cash or credit sales. 217. No Sutler shall sell to an enlisted man on credit to a sum exceeding one-third of his monthly pay, within the same month, without the written sanction of the company commander, or the commanding officer of the post or station, if the man does not belong to a company; and not exceeding one-half of the monthly pay with such permission. 218. Three days before the last of every month the Sutler shall render, D FOR THE ARMY. 37 -

Page  38 REVISED REGUL&TIONS Military Discussions and Publications. Arrests and Confinements. for verification, to the company commander, or to the commanding officer, as the case may be, according to the meaning of the preceding paragraph, a written and separate account in each case of any charges he may have against enlisted men for collection, and the officer shall submit the account to the soldier for'acknowledgment and signature, and witness the same. In the case of death, desertion, or removal from the post (of the soldier), the account will be rendered immediately. If the soldier dispute the account and the Sutler insist, and in the case of death and desertion, the Sutler will be required to establish the account by affidavit indorsed on it before any officer authorized to administer an oath. Debts thus verified as due the Sutler are to be noted on the Muster Rolls, and will be paid by the Paymaster out of the arrearages due to the soldier at the time of death, desertion, discharge, or sentence of court-martial: the sums due the Government and laundress being first paid. Every facility will be afforded to the Sutler in the collection of the just debts contracted with him. Hie will, to this end, be allowed to take his place at the paytable with his books and accounts. 219. Sutlers shall not farm out or underlet the business and privileges granted by their appointment. ARTICLE XXVI. MILITARY DISCUSSIONS AND PUBLICATIONS. 220. Deliberations or discussions among any class of military'men, having the object of conveying praise, or censure, or any mark of approbation toward their superiors or others in the military service; and all publications relative to transactions between officers of a private or personal nature, whether newspaper, pamphlet, or hand-bill, are strictly prohibited. ARTICLE XXVII. ARRESTS AND CONFINEMENTS. 221. None but commanding officers have power to place officers under arrest except for offenses expressly designated in the 27th Article of War. 222. Officers are not to be put in arrest for light offenses. For these the censure of the commanding officer will, in most cases, answer the purposes of discipline. 223. An officer in arrest may, at the discretion of his commanding officer, have larger limits assigned him than his tent or quarters, on written application to that effect. Close confinement is not to be resorted 'o unless under circumstances of an aggravated character. 224. In ord-nary cases, and where inconvenience to the service would 38

Page  39 FOR THE ARMY. Hours of Service and Roll-Calls.-Signals. result from it, a medical officer will not be put in arrest until the court martial for his trial convenes. 225. The arrest of an officer, or confinement of a soldier, will, as soon as practicable, be notified to his immediate commander. 226. All prisoners under guard, without written charges, will be released by the officer of the day at guard-mounting, unless orders to the contrary be given by the commanding officer. 227. On a march, company officers and non-commissioned officers in arrest will follow in the rear of their respective companies, unless otherwise particularly ordered. 228. Field officers, commissioned and non-commissioned staff officers, under the same circumstances, will follow in the rear of their respective regiments. 229. An officer under arrest will not wear a sword, or visit officially his commanding or other superior officer, unless sent for; and in case of business, he will make known his object in writing. ARTICLE XXVIII. HOURS OF SERVICE AND ROLL-CALLS. 230. In garrison, reveille will be sounded immediately after day-break; and retreat at sunset; the troop, suryeon's call, signals for breakfast and dinner at the hours prescribed by the commanding officer, according to climate and season. In the cavalry, stable-calls immediately after reveille, and an hour and a half before retreat; water-calls at the hours directed b)y the commanding officer. 231. In camp, the commanding officer prescribes the hours of reveille, reports, roll-calls, guard-mounting, meals, stable-calls, issues, fatigues, &ea 1. To go for fuel-poing stroke and ten-stroke roll. 2. To go for water-two strokes and a fiam. 3. For fatigue party-ioneer's march. 4. Adjutant's call-firstpart of the troop. 5. First sergeant's call-one roll and four taps. 6. Sergeant's call —one roll and three taps. 7. Corporal's call-one roll and two taps. 8, For the drummers-the drummer's call. 233. The drummer's call shall be beat by the drums of the police guard five minutes before the time of beating the stated calls, when the drummers will assemble before the colors of their respective regiments, 39, 232. SIGNALS.

Page  40 REVISED REGULATIONS Roll-Calls. Honors to be paid by the Troops. and as soon as the beat begins on the right, it will be immediately taken up along the line. ROLL-CALLS. 234. There shall be daily at least three roll-calls, viz., at reveille, retreat, and tattoo. They will be irade on the company parades by the first sergeants, superintended by a commissioned officer of the company. The captains will report the absentees without leave to the colonel or commanding officer. 235. Immediately after reveille roll-call (after stable-duty in the cavalry), the tents or quarters, and the space around them, will be put in order by the men of the companies, superintended by the chiefs of squads, and the guard-house or guard-tent by the guard or prisoners. 236. The morning reports of companies, signed by the captains and First Sergeants, will be handed to the Adjutant before eight o'clock in the morning, and will be consolidated by the Adjutant within the next hour, for the information of the Colonel; and if the consolidation is to be sent to higher authority, it will be signed by the Colonel and th6 Adjutant. ARTICLE XXIX. HONORS TO BE PAID BY THE TROOPS. 237. The President or Vice-President is to be saluted with the highest honors-all standards and colors dropping, officers and troops saluting. drums beating and trumpets sounding. 238. A General commanding-in-chief is to be received-by cavalry, with sabres presented, trumpets sounding the march, and all the officers saluting, standards dropping; by infantry, with drums beating the march, colors dropping, officers saluting, and arms presented. 239. A Major- General is to be received-by cavalry, with sabres presented, trumpets sounding twice the trumpet-flourish, and officers salut-. ing; by infantry, with three ruffles, colors dropping, officers saluting, and arms presented. 240. A Brigadier-General is to be received-by cavalry, with sabres presented, trumpets sounding once the trumpet-flourish, and officers saluting; by infantry, with two ruffles, colors dropping, officers saluting, and arms presented. 241. An Adjutant- General or Inspector. General, if under the rank of a General officer, is to be received at a review or inspection of the troops under arms-by cavalry, with sabres presented, officers saluting; by in antry, officers saluting and arms presented. The same honors to be paid 40

Page  41 ~~~~FO TH RM.4 Honors to be paid by the Troops. to any field-officer authorized to review and inspect the troops. When the inspecting officer is junior to the officer commanding the parade, no compliments will be paid: he will be received only with swords drawn and arms shouldered. 242. All guards are to turn out and present arms to General officers as often as they pass them, except the personal guards of General officers, which turn out only to the Generals whose guards they are, and to officers of superior rank. 243. To commanders of regiments, garrison, r camp, their own guard turn out, and present arms once a day; after which, they turn out with shouldered arms. 244. To the members of the Cabinet; to the Chief Justice, the President of the Senate, and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States; and to Governors, within their respective States and Territories -the same honors will be paid as to a General commanding-in-chief. 245. Officers of a foreign service may be complimented with the honors due to their rank. 246. Amwerican and Foreign Envoys or Ministers will be received with the compliments due to a Major-General. 247. The colors of a regiment passing a guard are to be saluted, the trumpets sounding, and the drums beating a march. 248. When General officers, or persons entitled to salute, pass in the rear of a guard, the officer is only to make his men stand shouldered, and not to face his guard about, or beat his drum. 249. When General officers, or persons entitled to a salute, pass guards while in the act of relieving, both guards are to salute, receiving the word of command from the senior officer of the whole. 250. All guards are to be under arms when armed parties approach their posts; and to parties commanded by commissioned officers, they are to present their arms, drums beating a march, and officers saluting. 251. No compliments by guards or sentinels will be paid between retreat and reveille, except as prescribed for grand rounds. 252. All guards and sentinels are to pay the same compliments to the officers of the navy, marines, and militia, in the service of the United States, as are directed to be paid to the officers of the army, according to their relative ranks. 253. It is equally the duty of non-commissioned officers and soldiers, at all times and in all situations, to pay the proper compliments to officers of the navy and marines, and to officers of other rcgiments, when in uniform, as to officers of their own particular regiments and corps. 254. Courtesy among military men is indispensable to discipline. Respect to superiors will not be confined to obedience on duty, but will be D2 41 FOR THE ARMY.

Page  42 REVISED REGULATIONS Salutes. extended to all occasions. It is always the duty of the inferior to accost or to offer first the customary salutation, and of the superior to return such complimentary notice. 255. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will salute by bringing them to a present —with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, so as to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the ranks, and privates not sentries, will carry their muskets at a shoulder as sergeants, and salute in like manner. 256. When a soldier without arms, or with side-arms only, meets an officer, he is to raise his hand to the right side of the visor of his cap, palm to the front, elbow raised as high as the shoulder, looking at the same time in a respectful and soldier-like manner at the officer, who will return the compliment thus offered. 257. A non-commissioned officer or soldier being seated, and without particular occupation, will rise on the approach of an officer, and make the customary salutation. If standing, he will turn toward the officer for the same purpose. If the parties remain in the same place or on the same ground, such compliments need not be repeated. SALUTES. 258. The national salute is determined by the number of States composing the Union, at the rate of one gun for each State. 259. The President of the United States alone is to receive a salute of twenty-one guns. 260. The Vice-President is to receive a salute of seventeen guns. 261. The Heads of the great Executive I)epartments of the National Government; the General commanding the army; the Governors of States and Territories, within their respective jurisdictions, fifteen guns. 262. A Major-General, thirteen guns. 263. A Brigadier-General, eleven guns. 264. Foreign ships of war will be saluted in return for a similar compliment, gun for gun, on notice being officially received of such intention. If there be several posts in sight of, or within six miles of each ot} er, the principal only shall-reciprocate compliments with ships passing. 265. Officers of the Navy will be saluted according to relative ran. 266. Foreign Officers invited to visit a fort or post may be salt ted according to their relative rank. 267. Envoys and Ministers of the United States and foreign po rers are to be saluted with thirteen guns. 268. A General officer will be saluted but once in a year at each! sjt and only when notice of his intention to visit the post has been give ~ 269. Salutes to individuals are to be fired on their arrival only. 1% 42

Page  43 -~~~~O TH AIM.4 Escorts of Honor.-Funeral Honors. 270. A national salute will be fired at meridian on the anniversary of the Independence of the United States, at each military post and camp provided with artillery and ammunition. ESCORTS OF HONOR. 271. Escorts of honor may be composed of cavalry or infantry, or both, according to circumstances. They are guards of honor for the purpose of receiving and escorting personages of high rank, civil or military. The troops for this purpose will be selected for their soldierly appearance and superior discipline. 272. The escort will be drawn up in line, the centre opposite to the place where the personage presents himself, with an interval between the wings to receive him and his retinue. On his appearance, he will be re ceived with the honors due to his rank. When he has taken his place in the line, the whole will be wheeled into platoons or companies, as the case may be, and take up the march. The same ceremony will be observed, and the same honors paid, on his leaving the escort. 273. When the position of the escort is at a considerable distance from the point where he is expected to be received, as, for instance, where a court-yard or wharf intervenes, a double line of sentinels will be posted from that point to the escort, facing inward, and the sentinels will successively salute as he passes. 274. An officer will be appointed to attend hinim, to bear such communications as he may have to make to the commander of the escort. FUNERAL HONORS. 275. On the receipt of official intelligence of the death of the President of the United States, at any post or camp, the commanding officer shall, on the following day, cause a gun to be fired at every half hour, beginning at sunrise, and ending at sunset. When posts are contiguous, the firing will take place at the post only commanded by the superior officer. 276. On the day of the interment of a General commanding-in-chief, a gun will be fired at every half hour, until the procession moves, beginning at sunrise. 277. The funeral escort of a General commanding-in-chief shall consist of a regiment of infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and six pieces of artillery. 278. That of a 3Jajor-General, a regiment of infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and four pieces of artillery. 279. That of a Brigadier-General, a regiment of infantry, one comn pany of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. FOR THE ARMY. 43

Page  44 REVISED REGULATIONS Funeral Honors. 280 That of a Colonel, a regiment. 281. That of a Lieutenant-Colonel, six companies. 282 That of a Major, four companies. 283. That of a Captain, one company. 284. That of a Subaltern, half a company. 285. The funeral escort shall always be commanded by an officer of the same rank with the deceased; or, if none such be present, by one of the next inferior grade. 286. The funeral escort of a non-commissioned staff officer shall consist of sixteen rank and file, commanded by a Sergeant. 287. That of a Sergeant, of fourteen rank and file, commanded by a Sergeant. 288. That of a Corporal, of twelve rank and file, commanded by a Corporal; and, 289. That of a private, of eight rank and file, commanded by a Corporal. 290. The escort will be formed in two ranks, opposite to the quarters or tent of the deceased, with shouldered arms and bayonets unfixed; the artillery and cavalry on the right of the infantry. 291. On the appearance of the corpse, the officer commanding the escort will command, P)resent-ARMS! when the honors due to the deceased will be paid by the drums and trumpets. The music will then play an appropriate air, and the coffin will then be taken to the right, where it will be halted. The commander will next order, 1. Shoulder-ARMs! 2. BY company (or platoon), left wheel. 3. MARCH! 4. Reverse-ARMs! 5. Column, forward. 6. Guide right. 7. MARcH! The arms will be reversed at the order by bringing the firelock under the left arm, butt to the front, barrel downward, left hand sustaining the lock, the right steadying the firelock behind the back; swords are .reversed in a similar manner under the right arm. 292. The column will be marched in slow time to solemn music, and, on reaching the grave, will take a direction so as that the guides shall be next to the grave. When the centre of the column is opposite the grave, the commander will order, 1. Column. 2. HIIALT! 3. Right into line, wheel. 4. MARcH! The coffin is then brought along the front, to the opposite side of the grave, and the commnander then orders, 44

Page  45 FOR THE ARMY. Funeral Honors. 1. Shoulder-ARMS! 2. Present-ARMS! And when the coffin reaches the grave, he adds, 1. Shoulder-ARMS! 2. Rest on-ARMS! I The rest on arms is done by placing the muzzle on the left foot, both hands on the butt, the head on the hands or bowed, right knee bent. 293. After the funeral service is performed, and the coffin is lowered into the grave, the commander will order, 1. Attention! 2. Shoulder-ARMS! 3. Load at will. 4. LOAD I When three rounds of small arms will be fired by the escort, taking care to elevate the pieces. 294. This being done, the commander will order, 1. By company (or platoon), right wheel. 2. MARCH! 3. Column, forward. 4. Guide left. 5. Quick-MARcH! The music will not begin to play until the escort is clear of the inclosure. 29' When the distance to the place of interment is considerable, the escort may march in common time and in column of route, after leaving the camp or garrison, and till it approaches the burial-ground. 296. The pall-bearers, six in number, will be selected from the grade of the deceased, or from the grade or grades next above or below it. 297. At the funeral of an officer, as many in commission of the army, division, brigade, or regiment, according to the rank of the deceased, as can conveniently be spared from other duties, will join in the procession in uniform, and with side-arms. The funeral of a non-commissioned officer or private will be attended, in like manner, by the non-commissioned officers or privates of the regiment or company, according to the rank of the deceased, with'side-arms only. 298. Persons joining in the procession follow the coffin in the inverse order of their rank. 299. The usual badge of military mourning is a piece of black crape around the left arm, above the elbow, and also upon the sword-hilt; and will be worn when in full or in undress. 300. As family mourning, crape will be worn by officers (when in uniform) only around the left arm. 301. The drums of a funeral escort will be covered with black crape, or thin black serge. 46

Page  46 REVISED REGULATION S Inspections of the Troops.-Form of Inspection. 302. Funeral honors will be paid to deceased officers without military rank, according to their assimilated grades. ARTICLE XXX. INSPECTIONS OF THE TROOPS. 303. The inspection of troops, as a division, regiment, or other body composing a garrison or ommand, not less than a company, will generally be preceded by a review. 304. There will be cei.ain periodical inspections, to wit: 1. The commanders of regiments and posts will make an inspection of their commands on the last day of every month. 2. Captains will inspect their companies every Sunday morning. No soldier will be excused from Sunday inspection except the guard, the sick, and the necessary attendants in the hospital. 3. Medical officers having charge of hospitals will also make a thorough inspection of them every Sunday morning. 4. Inspection when troops are mustered for payment. 305. Besides these inspections, frequent visits will be made by the commanding officer, company and medical officers, during the month, to the men's quarters, the hospital, guard-house, &c. FORM OF INSPECTION. 306. The present example embraces a battalion of infantry. The inspecting officer and the field and staff officers will be on foot. 307. The battalion being in the order of battle, the Colonel will cause it to break into open column of companies, right in front. HIe will next order the ranks to be opened, when the color-rank and color-guard, under the direction of the Adjutant, will take post ten paces in front, and the band tpn paces in rear of the column. 308. The Colonel, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, 1. Officers and Seryeants to the front of your companies. 2. MARCH I The officers will form themselves in one rank, eight paces, and the noncommissioned officers in one rank, six paces, in advance, along the whole fronts of their respective companies, from right to left, in the order of' seniority; the pioneers and music of each company, in one rank, two paces behind the non-commissioned officers. 309. The Colonel will next command, Field and staf, to the front —MARCH! 46

Page  47 FOR THE ARMY. 47 Form of Inspection. The commissioned officers thus designated will form themselves in one rank, on a line equal to the front of the column, six paces in front of the colors, from right to left, in the order of seniority; and the non-commissioned staff, in a similar manner, two paces in rear of the preceding rank. The Colonel, seeing the movement executed, will take post on the right of the Lieutenant-Colonel, and wait the approach of the inspecting officer But such of the field officers as may be superior in rank to the Inspector will not take post in front of the battalion. 310. The Inspector will commence in front. After inspecting the dress and general appearance of the field and commissioned staff under arms, the Inspector, accompanied by these officers, will pass down the open column, looking at every rank in front and rear. 311. The Colonel will now command, 1. Order Arms. 2. REST! when the Inspector will proceed to make a minute inspection of the several ranks or divisions, in succession, commencing in front. 312. As the Inspector approaches the non-commissioned staff, colorsank, the color-guard, and the band, the Adjutant will give the necessary orders for the inspection of arms, boxes, and knapsacks. The colors will be planted firm in the ground, to enable the color-bearers to display the contents of their knapsacks. The non-commissioned staff may be dismissed as soon as inspected; but the color-rank and color-guard will remain until the colors are to be escorted to the place from which they were taken. 313. As the Inspector successively approaches the companies, the Captains will command, 1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Inspection-ARMs! The inspecting officer will then go through the whole company, and minutely inspect the arms, accoutrements, and dress of each soldier. After this is done, the Captain will command, Open-BOXES! when the ammunition and the boxes will be examined. 314. The Captain will then command, 1. Shoulder-ARMms! 2. Close order. FOR THE ARMY. 47 3. MARCH.! 4. Ord-Apms.1

Page  48 48 REIE REUAIN Form of Inspection. 8. Frontrank-rABoUT-FAcE r 9. Unsling-Knapsacks. 10. Open —Knapsacks. 5. Stack —-ARMS! 6. To the rear, open order. 7. MARCH! 315. The Sergeants will face inward at the 2d command, and close upon the centre at the 3d, and stack their arms at the 5th command; at the 6th command they face outward, and resume their positions at the 7th. When the ranks are closed, preparatory to take arms, the Sergeants will also close upon the centre, and at the word, take their arms and resume their places. 316. The knapsacks will be placed at the feet of the men, the flaps from them, with the great-coats on the flaps,-and the knapsacks leaning on the great-coats. In this position the Inspector will examine- their contents, or so many of them as he may think necessary, commencing with the non-commissioned officers, the men standing at attention. 317. When the Inspector has passed through the company, the Captain will command, Repack-Knapsacks; when each soldier will repack and buckle up his knapsack, leaving it on the ground, the number upward, turned from him, and then stand at rest. 318. The Captain will then command, 1. Attention. 2. Company. 3. Sling-Knapsacks. At the word sling, each soldier will take his knapsack, holding it by the inner straps, and stand erect; at the last word he will replace it on his back. The Captain will continue, 4. Frontrank-ABOUT-FAcE! 5. Close order. 6. MARCH! 7. Take-ARMS! 8. Shoulder- ARM s! 9. Oficers and Sergeants, to your posts. 10. MARCH! and will cause the company to file off to their tents or quarters, except the company that is to re-escort the colors, which will await the further orders of the Colonel. 319. In an extensive column, some of the rearmost companies may, after the inspection of dress and general appearance, be permitted to stack arms until just before the Inspector approaches them, when they will be directed to take arms and resume their position. 320. The inspection of the troops being ended, the field and staff will REVISED REGULATIONS 48

Page  49 OR THE ARMY. 4', Form of Inspection.-Musters. next accompany the Inspector to the hospital, magazine, arsenal, quarters, sutler's shop, guard-house, and such other places as he may think proper to inspect. The Captains and subalterns repair to their companies and sections to await the Inspector. 321. The hospital being at all times an object of particular interest, it will be critically and minutely inspected. 322. The men will be formed in the company quarters in front of their respective bunks, and on the entrance of the Inspector the word Attenf,ion! will be given by the senior non-commissioned officer present, when bthe whole will salute with the hand, without uncovering. 323. The Inspector, attended by the company officers, will examine the general arrangement of the interior of the quarters, the bunks, bedding, cooking and table utensils, and such other objects as may present themselves; and afterward the exterior. 3294 The Adjutant will exhibit to the Inspector the regimental books and papers, including those relating to the transactions of the Council of Administration. The company books and papers will also be exhibited, the whole together, generally at the Adjutant's office, and in the presence of the officers not otherwise particularly engaged. 325. The Inspector will examine critically the books and accounts of the administrative and disbursing officers of the command, and the money and property in their keeping. 326. The inspection of cavalry and artillery will conform to the principles laid down in the foregoing paragraphs, regard being had to the system of instruction for those arms of service respectively. ARTICLE XXXI. MUSTERS. 327. tiroops will be mustered for pay on the last day of February, April, June, August, October, and December. The musters will be made by an Inspector-General, if present, otherwise by an officer specially designated by the Commahder of the Army, Division, or Department; and in absence of either an Inspector-General or officer specially designated, the muster will be made by the commander of the post. 328. When one inspecting officer cannot muster all the troops himself on the day specified, the commanding officer will designate such other competent officers as may be necessary, to assist him. 329. All stated musters of the troops shall be preceded by a minute and careful inspection in tle prescribed mode; and if the command be of more than a company, by a review, before inspection. 330. The mustering officer having inspected the companies in succession, B ~~~~~~ 4 FOR THE ARMY. 4fo

Page  50 5(0 REVISED REGULATIONS Forms of Parade. beginning on the right, returns to the first company to muster it. The company beii:g at or'dered arms, with open ranks, as when inspected, the Captain will, as the mustering offcer approaches, command, 1. Attention. 2. Company! 3. Sh7ouclder- kRMs! 4. Support-ARMS I The mustering officer will then call over the names on the roll, and each man, as his name is called, will distinctly answer, Jiere! and bring his piece to a carrey and to an order. 331. After each company is mustered, the Captain will order it to be mnarched to the company parade, and there dismissed to quarters to await the Inspector's visit. 332. After mustering the companies, the mustering officer, attended by the company commaaders, will visit the guard and hospital, to verify the presence of the men reported there. 333. The muster and pay rolls will be made on the printed forms furnished from the Adjutant-General's office, and according to the directions given on them. On the nmuster-rolls companies are designated by the name of the Captain, whether present or absent. The pay-roll is left blank, to be filled by the Paymaster. 334. One copy of each muster-roll will be transmitted by the mustering officer to the Adjutant-General's office in the War. Department within three days after the muster. ARTICLE XXXII. FORMS OF PARADE. 335. On all parades of ceremony, such as Reviews, Guard-mounting, at Troop or Retreat parades, instead of the word "Rest," which allows the men to move or change the position of their bodies, the coninmand will be "PARADE-REST!" At the last word of this command, the soldier will carry the right foot six inches in rear of the left heel, the left knee slightly bent, the body upright upon the right leg; the musket resting against the hollowv of the right shoulder, the hands crossed in front, the backs of them outward, and the left hand uppermost. At the word "ATTENTION!" the soldier will resume the correct position at ordered arms. In the positions here indicated, the soldier will remain silent and motionless; and it is particularly enjoined upon all officers to cause the commands above given, on the part of tale soldier, to be executed with great briskness and spirit.' 336. Officers on all duties under arms are to have their swords drawn, without waiting for any wors9 of command for that purpose

Page  51 FOR TIlE ARMY. 51 Dress Parade. I. DRESS PARADE. 3,7. There shall be daily one dress parade, at troop or retreat, as the coimmanding officer may direct. 338. A signal will be beat or sounded half an hour before troop or retreat, for the music to assemble on the regimental parade, and each company to turn out under arms on its own parade, for roll-call and inspection by its own officers. 339. Ten minutes after that signal, the Adjuttant's call will be given, when the Captains will march their companies (the band playing) to the regimental parade, where they take their positions in the order of battle. When the line is formed, the Captain of the first company, on notice from the Adjutant, steps one pace to the front, and gives to his company the command, "Order-ARms! PIARAD-E-REST!" which is repeated by each Captain in succession to the left. The Adjutant takes post two paces on the right of the line; the Sergeant-major two paces on the left. The music will be formed in two ranks on the right of the Adjutant. The senior officer present will take the command of the parade, and will take post at a suitable distance in front, opposite the centre, facing the line. 340. When the companies have ordered arms, the Adjutant will order the music to beat o, when it will commence on the right, beat in front of the line to the left, and back to its place on the right. 341. When the music has ceased, the Adjutant will step two paces te the front, face to the left, and command, 1. Attention! 2. Battalion. 3. Shoulder-ARMS! 4. Prepare to open ranks! 5. To the rear, open order! 6..MARCH! At the sixth command, the ranks will be opened according to the system laid down in the Infantry Tactics, the commissioned officers marching to the front, the company officers four paces, field officers six paces, opposite to their positions in the order of battle, where they will halt and dress. The Adjutant, seeing the ranks aligned, will command, FRONT' and march along the front to the centre, face to the right, and pass the line of company officers eight or ten paces, where he will come to the right-about, and command, Present-ARMS! when arms will be presented, officeers saluting.

Page  52 TEVISED REGULATIONS Dress Parade. 342'. Seeing this executel, he will face about to the commanding officer, salute, and rerort, "Sir, the parade is formed." The Adjutant will then, on intimation to that effect, take his station three paces on the left of the commanding officer, one pace retired, passing round hIis rear. 343. The commanding officer, having acknowledged the salute of th' line by touching his hat, will, after the Adjutant has taken his post draw his sword, and command, 1. Battalion. 2. Shoulder-ARMs! and add such exercises as he may think proper, concluding with Order-ARMS! then return his sword, and direct the Adjutant to receive the reports. 344. The Adjutant will now pass round the right of the commanding officer, advance upon the line, halt midway between him and the line of company officers, and command, 1. First Sergeants, to the front and centre. 2. MARCH! At the first command, they will shoulder arms as Sergeants, march two paces to the front, and face inward. At the second command, they will march to the centre, and halt. The Adjutant will then order, 1. Front-FACE. 2. Report. At the last word, each in succession, beginning on the right, will salute by bringing the left hand smartly across the breast to the right shoulder, and report the result of the roll-call previously made on the company parade. 345. The Adjutant again commands, 1. First Sergeants, outwar-FAcE! 2. To your posts-MARCH! when they will resume their places, and order arms. The Adjutant will now face to the commanding officer, salute, report absent officers, and give the result of the First Sergeants' reports. The commanding officer will next direct the orders to be read, when the Adjutant will face about and announce, Attention to Orders. He will then read the orders. 52

Page  53 FOR THE ARMY. Dress Parade.-Review. 346. The orders having been read, the Adjutant will face to the commanding officer, salute, and report; when, on an intimation from the commander, he will face again to the line, and announce, Parade is dismissed. All the officers will now return their swords, face inward, and close on the Adjutant, he having taken position in their line, the field officers on thie flanks. The Adjutant commands, 1. Front-FACE! 2. Forward-MARCH! when they will march forward, dressing on the centre, the music playing, and when within six paces of the commander, the Adjutant will give the word, Halt! The officers will then salute the commanding officer by raising the hand to the cap, and there remain until he shall have communicated to them such instructions as he may have to give, or intimates that the ceremony is finished. As the officers disperse, the First Sergeants will close the ranks of their respective companies, and march them to the company parades, where they will be dismissed, the band continuing to play until the companies clear the regimental parade. 347. All field and company officers and men will be present at dress parades, unless especially excused, or on some duty incompatible with such attendance. 348. A dress parade once a day will not be dispensed with, except on extraordinary and urgent occasions. II. REVIEW OF A BATTALION OF INFANTRY. 349. Preparatory to a review, the Adjutant will cause a camp-color to be placed 80 or 100 paces, or more, according to the length of the line, in front of, and opposite to, where the centre of the battalion will rest, where the reviewing officer is supposed to take his station; and, although he may choose to quit that position, still the color is to be considered as the point to which all the movements and formations are relative. 350. The Adjutant will also cause points to be marked, at suitable distances, for the wheelings of the divisions; so that their right flanks, in marching past, shall only be about four paces from the camp-color, where it is supposed the reviewing officer places himself to receive the alate. 53 E2

Page  54 REVISED REGULATIONS Review. 35]. The battalion being formed in the order of battle, at shouldered arms, the Colonel will command, 1. Battalion, prepare for review! 2. To the rear, open order. 3. MARCH! At the word MARCH, the field and staff officers dismount; the company officers and the color-rank advance four paces in front of the front rank, and place themselves opposite to their respective places, in the order of battle. The color-guard replace the color-rank. The staff officers place themselves, according to rank, three paces on the right of the rank of company officers, and one pace from each other; the music takes post as at parade. The non-commissioned staff take post one pace from each other, and three paces on the right of the front rank of the battalion. 352. When the ranks are aligned, the Colonel will command, FRONT! and place himself eight paces, and the Lieutenant-Colonel and Major will place themselves two paces, in front of the rank of company officers, and opposite to their respective places in the order of battle, all facing to the front. 353. When the reviewing officer presents himself before the centre, and is fifty or sixty paces distant, the Colonel will face about, and command, Present-ARMS! and resume his front. The men present arms, and the officers salute, so as to drop their swords with the last motion of the firelock. The noncommissioned staff salute by bringing the sword to a poise, the hilt resting on the breast, the blade in front of the face, inclining a little outward. The music will play, and all the drums beat, according to the rank of the reviewing officer. The colors only salute such persons as, from their rank and by regulation (see Article XXIX.), are entitled to that honor. If the reviewing officer be junior in rank to the commandant of the parade, no compliment will be paid to him, but he will be received with arms carried, and the officers will not salute as the column passes in review. 354. The reviewing officer having halted, and acknowledged the salute of the line by touching or raising his cap or hat, the Colonel will face about and command, Shoulder-ARMs! when the men shoulder their pieces; the officers and non-commissioned staff recover their swords with the last motion, and the Colonel faces to the front. 54

Page  55 FOR TIHE ARMY. 55 _.........Review. Review. 355. The reviewing officer will then go toward the right, the whole remaining perfectly steady, without paying any further compliment, while he passes along the front of the battalion, and proceeds round the left 'flank, and along the rear of the file-closers, to the right. While the reviewing officer is going round the battalion, the band will play, and will cease when he has returned to the right flank of the troops. 356. When the reviewing officer turns off, to place himself by the camp-color in front, the Colonel will face to the line and commandI 1. Close Order. 2. MARCH! At the first command, the field and company officers will face to the right-about, and at the second command, all persons, except the Colonel, will resume their places in the order of battle; the field and staff officers mount. 357. The reviewing officer having taken his position near the campcolor, the Colonel will command, 1. By company, right wheel. 2. Quick-MARICH! 3. Pass in revtew 4. Column, forward. 5. Guide right. 6. MARCH! The battalion, in column of companies, right in front, will then, in common time, and at shouldered drms, be put in motion; the Colonel four paces in front of the Captain of the leading company; the LieutenantColonel on a line with the leading company; the Major on a line with the rear company; the Adjutant on a line with the second company; the Sergeant-Major on a line with the company next preceding the rear-each six paces from the flank (left) opposite to the reviewing officer; the staff officers in one rank, according to the order of precedency, from the right, four paces in rear of the column; the music, preceded by the principal musician, six paces before the Colonel; the pioneers, preceded by a Corporal, four paces before the principal musician; and the QuartermasterSergeant two paces from the side opposite to the guides, and in line with the pioneers. 358. All other officers and non-commissioned officers will march past in the places prescribed for them in the march of an open column. The guides and soldiers will keep their heads steady to the front in passing i. review. 359. The color-bearer will remair in the ranks while passing and saluting. 360. The music will begin to play ~t the command to march, and after passing the reviewing officer, wheel to the left out of the column, and

Page  56 REVISED REGULATIONS Review. take a position opposite and facing him, and will continue to play until the rear of the column shall have passed him, when it will cease, and follow in the rear of the battalion, unless the battalion is to pass in quick time also, in which case it will keep its position. 361. The officers will salute the reviewing officer when they arrive within six paces of him, and recover their swords when six paces past him. All officers, in saluting, will cast their eyes toward the reviewing officer. 362. The Colonel, when he has saluted at the head of the battalion. will place himself near the reviewing officer, and will remain there until the rear has passed, when he will rejoin the battalion. 363. The colors will salute the reviewing officer, if entitled to it, when within six paces of him, and be raised when they have passed by him an equal distance. The drums will beat a march, or ruffle, according to the rank of the reviewing officer, at the same time that the colors salute. 364. When the column has passed the reviewing officer, the Colonel will direct it to the ground it marched from, and command, Guide left, in time for the guides to cover. The column having arrived on its ground, the Colonel will command, 1. Column. 2. HIIALT! form it in order of battle, and cause the ranks to be opened as in paragraph 351. The review will terminate by the whole saluting as at the beginning. 365. If, however, instructions have been previously given to march the troops past in quick time also, tile Colonel will, instead of changing the guides, halting the column, and wheeling it into line, as above directed, give the command, 1. Quick,ime. 2. MARnCH! In passing the reviewing officer again, no salute will be offered by either officers or men. The music will have kept its position opposite the reviewing officer, and at the last command will commence playing, and as the column approaches, will place itself in front of, and march off with the column, and continue to play until the battali6n is halted on its original ground of formation. The Revi tw will terminate in the same manner as presribed above. 66

Page  57 -~~~~~O Til ARY. Review. 366. The Colonel will afterward cause the troops to perform such exercises and mancouvres as the reviewing officer may direct. 367. When two or more battalions are to be reviewed, they will be formed in parade order, with the proper intervals, and will also perform the same movements that are laid down for a single battalion, observing the additional directions that are given for such movements when applied to the line. The Brigadier-General and his staff, on foot, will place themselves opposite the centre of the brigade; the Brigadier-General two paces in front of the rank of Colonels; his aid two paces on his right, and one retired; and the other brigade staff officers, those having the rank of field officers, in the rank of Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors; and those below that rank, in the rank of company officers. 368. In passing in review, a Major-General will be four paces in front of the Colonel of the leading battalion of his division; and the BrigadierGeneral will be on the right of the Colonels of the leading battalions of their brigades; staff officers on the left of their Generals. 369. When the line exceeds two battalions, the reviewing officer may cause them to march past in quick time only. In such cases the mounted officers only will salute. 370. A number of companies less than a battalion will be reviewed as a battalion, and a single company as if it were with the battalion. In the latter case, the company may pass in column of platoons. 371. If several brigades are to be reviewed together, or in one line, this further difference will be observed: the reviewing personage, joined by the General of the division, on the right of his division, will proceed down the line, parallel to its front, and when near the Brigadier-Generals respectively, will be saluted by their brigades in succession. The music of each, after the prescribed salute, will play while the reviewing person age is in front, or in rear of it, and only then. 372. In marching in review, with several battalions in common time, the music of each succeeding battalion will commence to play when the music of the preceding one has ceased, in order to follow its battalion. When marching in quick time, the music will begin to play when the rear company of the preceding battalion has passed the reviewing officer. 373. The reviewing officer or personage will acknowledge the salute by raising, or taking off, his cap or hat, when the commander of the troops salutes him; and also when the colors pass. The remainder of the time occupied by the passage of the troops he will be covered. 374. The review of Cavalry and Artillery will be conducted on similar principles, and according to the systems of instruction for those arms of Servie. FOR THE ARMY. 57

Page  58 REVISED REGULATIONS Guard-Mounting. III. GUARD-MOUNTING. 375. Camp and garrison guards will be relieved every twenty-four hours. The guards at outposts will ordinarily be relieved in the same manner, but this must depend on their distances from camp, or other circumstances, which may sometimes require their continuing on duty several days. In such cases, they must be previously warned to provide themselves accordingly. 376. At the first call for guard-mounting, the men warned for duty turn out on their company parades for inspection by the First Sergeants; and at the second call, repair to the regimental or garrison parade, conducted by the First Sergeants. Each detachment, as it arrives, will, under the direction of the Adjutant, take post on the left of the one that preceded it, in open order, arms shouldered, and bayonets fixed; the supernumeraries five paces in the rear of the men of their respective companies; the First Sergeants in rear of them. The Sergeant-Major will dress the ranks, count the files, verify the details, and when the guard is formed, report to the Adjutant, and take post two paces on the left of the front rank. 377. The Adjutant then commands Front, when the officer of the guard takes post twelve paces in front of the centre, the Sergeants in one rank, four paces in the rear of the officers; and the Corporals in one rank, four paces in the rear of the Sergeants-all facing to the front. The Adju. .tant then assigns their places in the guard. 378. The Adjutant will then command, 1. Officer and non-commissioned officers. 2. ABOUT —F ACE. 3. Inspect your guards-MARCII! The non-commissioned officers then take their posts. The commander of the guard then commands, 1. Order-ARMS. 2. Inspection-AiRMs. and inspects his guard. When there is no commissioned officer on the guard, the Adjutant will inspect it. Dnring inspection the band will play 379. The inspection ended, the officer of the guard takes post as though the guard were a company of a battalion, in open order, under review; at the same time, also, the officers of the day will take post in front of the centre of the guard; the old officer of the day three paces on the right of the new officer of the day, one pace retired. 380. The Adjutant will now command, bs

Page  59 FOR THE ARMY. 59 Gur-Xutig __ _ 1. Parade-REST! 2. Troop -Beat off! when the music, beginning on the right, will beat down the line in front of the officer of the guard to the left, and back to its place on the right, where it will cease to play. 381. The Adjutant then commands, 1. Attention! 2. Shoulder-ARMs! 3. Close order-MARCH At the word "close order," the officer will face about; at "march," resume his post in line. The Adjutant then commands, Present-ARMs! At which he will face to the new officer of the day, salute, and report, "Sir, the guard is formted." The new officer of the day, after acknlowledging the salute, will direct the Adjutant to march the guard in review, or by flank to its post. But if the Adjutant be senior to the officer of the day, he will report without saluting with the sword then or when marching the guard in review. 382. In review, the guard march past the officer of the day, according to the order of review, conducted by the Adjutant, marching on the left of the first division; the S3rg,eant-Major on the left of the last division. 383. When the column has passed the officer of the day, the officer of the guard marches it to its post, the Adjutant and Sergeant-Major retiring. The music, which has wheeled out of the column, and taken post opposite the officer of the day, will cease, and the old officer of the day salute, and give the old or standing orders to the new officer of the day. The supernumeraries, at the same time, will be marched by the First Sergeants to their respective company parades, and dismissed. 384. In hadl weather, or at night, or after fatiguing marches, the ceremony of turning off may be dispensed with, but not the inspection. 385. Grand guards, and other brigade guards, are organized and mounted on the brigade parade by the staff officer of the parade, under the direction of the field officer of the day of the brigade, according to the principles here prescribed for the police guard of a regiment. The detail of each regiment is assembled on the regimental parade, verified by the Adjutant, and marched to the brigade parade by the senior officer of the detail. After inspection and review, the officer of the day directs the several guards to their respective posts. 386. The officer of the old guard, having his guard paraded, on the pproach of the new guard commands, P.esent-ARm5s! 59 FOR THE ARMY. Guard-Mounting.

Page  60 REVISED REGULATION8 Guard-Mounting. 387. The new guard will marcA, in quick time, past the old guard, at shouldered arms, officers saluting, and take post four paces on its right, where, being aligned with it, its commander will order, Present-ARMS! The two officers will then approach each other, and salute. They will then return to their respective guards, and command, 1. Shoulder-ARMs! 2. Order-ARMs! 388. The officer of the new guard will now direct the detail for the advanced guard to be formed and marched to its post, the list of the guard made and divided into three reliefs, experienced soldiers placed over the arms of the guard and at the remote and responsible posts, and the young soldiers in posts near the guard for instruction in their duties, and will himself proceed to take possession of the guard-house or guardtent, and the articles and prisoners in charge of the guard. 389. During the time of relieving the sentinels and of calling in the small posts, the old commander will give to the new all the information and instructions relating to his post. 390. The first relief having been designated and ordered two paces to the front, the Corporal of the new guard will take charge of it, and go to relieve the sentinels, accompanied by the Corporal of the old guard, who will take command of the old sentinels, when the whole are relieved. 391. If the sentinels are numerous, the Sergeants are to be employed, as well as the Corporals, in relieving them. 392. The relief, with arms at a support, in two ranks, will march by a flank, conducted by the Corporal on the side of the leading front-rank man; and the men will be numbered alternately in the front and rear rank, the man on the right of the front rank being No. 1. Should an officer approach, the Corporal will command carry arms, and resume the support arms when the officer is passed. 393. The sentinels at the guard-house or guard-tent will be the first relieved and left behind: the others are relieved in succession. 394. When a sentinel sees the relief approaching, he will halt and face to it, with his arms at a shoulder. At six paces, the Corporal will command, 1. Relief. 2. IIALT! when the relief will halt and carry arms. The Corporal will then add, ('No. 1w" or "No 2," or "No. 3," according to the number of the post, 60

Page  61 FOR THE ARMY. Guar:-ounting. Guards. Arms-rPORT! The two sentinels will, with arms at port, then approach each other, when the old sentinel, under the correction of the Corporal, will whisper tlLe instructions to the new sentinel. This done, the two sentinels will shoulder arms, and the old sentinel will pass, in quick time, to his place in rear of the relief. The Corporal will then command, 1. Support-ARMs! 2. forward. 3. MARCH! and the relief proceeds in the same manner until the whole are relieved. 395. The detachments andsentinels from the old guard having come in, it will be marched, at shouldered arms, along the front of the new guard, in quick time, the new guard standing at presented arms; officers saluting, and the music of both guards beating, except at the outposts. 396. On arriving at the regimental or garrison parade, the commander of the old guard will send the detachments composing it, under charge of the non-commissioned officers, to their respective regiments. Before the men are dismissed, their pieces will be drawn or discharged at a target. On rejoining their companions, the chiefs of squads will examine the arms, &c.> of their men, and cause the whole to be put away in good order. 397. When the old guard has marched off fifty paces, the officer of the Jew guard will order his men to stack their arms, or place them in the arm-racks. 398. The commander of the guard will then make himself acquainted with all the instructions for his post, visit the sentinels, and question them and the non-commissioned officers relative to the instructions they may have received from other persons of the old guard. ARTICLE XXXIII. GUARDS. 399. Sentinels will be relieved every two hours, unless the state of the weather, or other causes, should make it necessary or proper that it be done at shorter or longer intervals. 400. Each relief, before mounting, is inspected by the commander of the guard or of its post. The Corporal reports to him, and presents the old relief on its return. 401. The countersign, or watchword, is given to such persons as are entitled to pass during the night, and to tfficers, non-commissioned F I 61

Page  62 REVISED REGULATIONS Sentinels. officers, and sentinels of the guard. Interior guards receive the countersign only when ordered by the commander of the troops. 402 The parole is imparted to such officers only as have a right to visit the guards, and to make the grand rounds; and to officers conmmanding guards. 403. As soon as the new guard has been marched off, the officer of the day will repair to the office of the commanding officer and report for orders. 404. The officer of the day must see that the officer of the guard is furnished with the parole and countersign before retreat. 405. The officer of the day visits the guards during the day at such times as he may deem necessary, and makes his rounds at night at least once after 12 o'clock. 406. Upon being relieved, the officer of the day will make such remarks in the report of the officer of the guard as circumstances require, and present the same at head-quarters. 407. Commanders of guards leaving their posts to visit their sentinels, or on other duty, are to mention their intention, and the probable time of their absence, to the next in command. 408. The officers are to remain constantly at their guards, except while visiting their sentinels, or necessarily engaged elsewhere on their proper duty. 409. Neither officers nor soldiers are to take off their clothing or accoutrements while they are on guard. 410. The officer of the guard must see that the countersign is duly communicated to the sentinels a little before twilight. 411. When a fire breaks out, or any alarm is raised in a garrison, all guards are to be immediately under arms. 412. Inexperienced officers are put on guard as supernumeraries, for the purpose of instruction 413. Sentinels will not take orders or allow themselves to be relieved, except by an officer or non-commissioned officer of their guard or party, the officer of the day, or the commanding officer; in which case the orders will be immediately notified to the commander of the guard by the officer giving them. 414. Sentinels will report every breach of orders or regulations they are instructed to enforce. 415. Sentinels must keep themselves on the alert, observing every thing that takes place within sight and hearing of their post. They will carry their arms habitually at support, or on either shoulder, but will never quit them. In wet weath r, if there be no sentry-box, they will secure arms. , 0 -62 I.

Page  63 FOR THE ARMY. Form of Guard Report. FORM OF GUARD REPORT. Report of a Guard mounted at -, on the -, and relieved on the -. Articles in S, ~ Charge. -, Cut ig Gu ard-House H 9.Mgzn S ~ cz o L O E GUARD. L Relief. Where posted. Remarks LS OFPISONERS. No. Names. ~ Confined. Charges. Sentences. Remarls A. B. C., a- to - _- to -- Lieut. -Co. Regt. Commanding 8th Guar.d-House. .H 9th Magazine. I 10th Quarm'r Store. Serg't Guard. Corp'l " ISONERS. Charges. Sentences. Remarks am, A. B. C., Lieut. — Regt. Commanding the Guard[. lst Relief. 2d Relief. 3d From - to - From - to - From and -to- and -to- and No. Name. Co. Rt. Name. Co. Rt. Name 1 C. D. A 1st I. J. D 3d O. P. 2 E. F. B 4th K. L. E 2d Q. R. 8 G. H. C 6thI M. N. F 5th S. T. 1 Sergeant W. V., Co. A, 1st Artillery. 2 Corporal W. X., Co. B, 1st Infantry. 8 Corporal Y. Z., Co. C, 8d Infantry. 6As 0

Page  64 64 REVISED REGULATIONS~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Duties of Sentinels. 416. No sentinel shall quit his post or hold conversation not necessary to the proper discharge of his duty. 417. All persons, of whatever rank in the service, are required to observe respect toward sentinels. 418. In case of disorder, a sentinel must call out the guard; and if a fire take place, he must cry —" Fire!" adding the number of his post. If in either case the danger be great, he must discharge his firelock before calling out. 419. It is the duty of a sentinel to repeat all calls made from posts more distant from the main body of the guard than his own, and no sentinel will be posted so distant as not to be heard by the guard, either directly or through other sentinels. 120. Sentinels will present arms to general and field officers, to the officer of the day, and to the commanding officer of the post. To all other officers they will carry arms. 421. When a sentinel in his sentry-box sees an officer approaching, he will stand at attention, and as the officer passes will salute him, by bringing the left hand briskly to the musket, as high as the right shoulder. 422. The sentinel at any post of the guard, when he sees any body o! troops, or an officer entitled to compliment, approach, must call-" Tura out the guard!" and announce who approaches. 423. Guards do not turn out as a matter of compliment after sunset,; but sentinels will, when officers in uniform approach, pay them proper attention, by facing to the proper front, and standing steady at shouldered arms. This will be observed until the evening is so far advanced that the sentinels begin challenging. 424. After retreat (or the hour appointed by the commanding officer), until broad daylight, a sentinel challenges every person who approaches him, taking, at the same time, the position of arms port. He will suffer no person to come nearer than within reach of his bayonet, until the person has given the countersign. 425. A sentinel, in challenging, will call out —" Who comes there?" If answered-" Friend, with the countersign," and he be instructed to pass persons with the countersign, he will reply-"Advance, friend, with the countersign!" If answered-"Friends!" he will reply-" Halt, friends! Advance one with the countersign!" If answered-" Relief," " Patrol," or " Grand rounds," he will reply-" Halt! Advance, Sergeant (or Corporal), with the countersign!" and satisfy himself that the warty is what it represents itself to be. If he have no authority to pass ersons with the countersign, if the wrong countersign be given, or if 84 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  65 FOR THE ARMY. Duties of Sentinels. the persons have not the countersign, he will cause them to stand, and call-" Corporal of the guard!" 426. In the daytime, when the sentinel before the guard sees the officer of the day approach, he will call-" Turn out the guard! officer of the day." The guard will be paraded, and salute with presented arms 427. When any person approaches a post of the guard at night, the sentinel before the post, after challenging, causes him to halt until examined by a non-commissioned officer of the guard. If it be the officer of the day, or any other officer entitled to inspect the guard and to make the rounds, the non-commissioned officer will call-" Turn out the gua.rd!" when the guard will be paraded at shouldered arms, and the officer of the guard, if he thinks necessary, may demand the countersign and parole. 428. The officer of the day, wishing to make the eounds, will take an escort of a non-commlissioned officer and two men. When the rounds are challenged by a sentinel, the Sergeant will answer-" Grand rounds!" and the sentinel will reply-" -Halt, grand rounds! Advance, Sergeant, with the countersign!" Upon which the Sergeant advances and gives the countersign. The sentinel will then cry-" Advance, rounds!" and stand at a shoulder till they have passed. 429. When the sentinel before the guard challenges, and 18 answered -" Grand rounds," he will reply-" Halt, grand rounds! Turn out the guard; grand rounds!" Upon which the guard will be drawn up at shouldered arms. The officer commanding the guard will then order a Sergeant and two men to advance; when within ten paces, the Sergeant challenges. The Sergeant of the grand rounds answers-" Grand rounds!" The Sergeant of the guard replies-" Advance, Sergeant, with the countersiygn!" The Sergeant of the rounds advances alone, gives the countersign, and returns to his round. The Sergeant of the guard calls to his officer-" The countersign is right!" on which the officer of the guard calls-"Advance, rounds!" The officer of the rounds then advances alone, the guard standing at shouldered arms. The officer of the rounds passes along the front of the guard to the officer, who keeps his post on the right, and gives him the parole. He then examines the guard, orders back his escort, and, taking a new one, proceeds in the same manner to other guards. 430. All material instructions given to a sentinel on post by persons entitled to make grand rounds, ought to be promptly notified to the commander of the guard. 431. Any General officer, or the commander of a post or garrison, may visit the guards of his command, and go the grand rounds, and be received in the same manner as prescribed Cor the officer of the day. 65 F2 5

Page  66 REVISED REGULATIONS Orders and Correspondence. ARTICLE XXXIV. ORDERS AND CORRESPONDENCE. 432. The orders of commanders of armies, divisions, brigades, regi. ments, are denominated orders of such army, division, &c., and are either general or special. Orders are numbered, general and special, in separate series, each beginning with the year. 433. General orders announce the time and place of issues and payments; hours for roll-calls and duties; the number and kind of orderlies, and the time when they shall be relieved; police regulations, and the prohibitions required by circumstances and localities; returns to "e made, and their forms; laws and regulations for the army; promotions and appointments; eulogies or censures to corps or individuals, and generally, whatever it may be important to make known to the whole command. 434. Special orders are such as do not concern the troops generally, and need not be published to the whole command; such as relate to the march of some particular corps, the establishment of some post, the detaching of individuals, the granting requests, &c., &c. 435. A general order, and an important special order, must be read and approved by the officer whose order it is, before it is issued by the staff officer. 436. An order will state at the head the source, place, and date, and at the foot, the name cf the commander who gives it; as for example: Head- Quarters of the First Briyade, Second Division. tramp at ) 1st June; 1860. GENERAL ORDERS, } NO. - By command of Brigadier-General A. B. C. D., Assistant AdjutantGeneraI. 437. Orders may be put in the form of letters, but generally in the strict military form, through the office of the Adjutant or AdjutantGeneral of the command. 438. Orders are transmitted through all the intermediate commanders in the order of rank. When an intermediate commander is omitted, the officer who gives the order shall inform him, and he who receives it shall report it to his immediate superior. 439. Orders for any body of troops will be addressed to the commander. aJld will be opened and executed by the commander present, and published 06

Page  67 FOR TIE ARMY. Orders and Correspondence. or distributed by him when necessary; printed orders, however, are gene rally distributed direct to posts from the head-quarters where issued. 440. Orders assigning the stations of officers of engineers, ordnance, and of the staff departments, except as provided in the regulations for troops in the campaign, will be given by the Secretary of War, through the Adjutant-General's office, or by commanders of geographical depart ments, under the special authority of the War Department. The commander of a department, who, in consequence of the movement of troops or other necessity of the service, removes an officer from the station assigned to him by the Secretary of War, shall promptly report the case to the Adjutant-General. 441. A file of the printed orders will be kept with the head-quarters of each regiment, with each company, and at each military post, and will be regularly turned over by the commander, when relieved, to his successor. 442. If general orders are not received in regular -succession, commanding officers will report the missing numbers to the proper headquarters. 443. The orderly hours being fixed at each head-quarters, the staff officers and chiefs of the special services either attend in person, or send their assistants to obtain the orders of the day; and the first sergeants of companies repair for that purpose to the regimental or garrison headquarters. 444. During marches and active operations, and when the regular orderly hours cannot be observed, all orders will be either sent direct to the troops, or the respective commanders of regiments or corps will be informed when to send to head-quarters for them. Under the same circumstances, orders will be read to the troops during a halt, without waiting for the regular parades. 445. Orders to any officer to make a tour of travel on duty, as for the inspection or payment of troops, &c., shall designate the troops and posts he shall visit, and the order in which he shall visit them, and the route of travel. 446. Every commander who gives an order involving an expenditure of public money, shall send a copy, without delay, to the bureau of the War Department to which the expenditure appertains, and if such commander be serving in a military department, he shall send a copy of the order to the head-quarters of the Department. 447. If a military commander shall give to a disbursing officer any order in conflict with orders received by him from the officer in charge of his department, at any superior head-quarters, such commander shall forthwith transmit the order to suc head-quarters, with explanation of the necessity which justifies it. 67

Page  68 REVISED REGULATIONS Orders and Correspondence. 448. Copies of all orders of the commanders of armies, departments, divisions, and detached brigades, and of the Superintendent of the recruiting service, will be forwarded at their dates, or as soon thereafter as practicable, in separate series, on full sheets of letter paper, or as printed, to the Adjutant-General's office. 449. Written communications from a commander to those under his command may be made by his staff officer. In all other cases by the officer'himself. 150. In signing an official con:munication, the writer shall annex to his name his rank and corps. When he writes by order, he shall state by whose order. 451. All official correspondence between the heads of the different departments of the staff of any command, and its commander, must pass through the Adjutant-General, Assistant Adjutant-General, or Adjutlnt of the command, as the case may be. Communications to or from a commander, and those under his command, must pass through the Adjutant-General, Assistant Adjutant-General, or Adjutant on duty with it; excepting only such communications between a disbursing officer and the chief of his particular branch of the staff, as relate exclusively to the urdinary routine of business in their own department. All comemunica. tions, whether from an inferior to a superior, or vice versa, are, as a general rule, to be passed through the intermediate commanders. The same rule governs in verbal applications: for example, a Lieutenant seeking an indulgence must apply through his Captain, the Captain through the Adjutant, and so on. 452. Copies of all important communications from the bureaus of the War Department to disbursing fficers, relating to the service in a military department, shall be sent from the bureau to the department commander. 453.' Rolls and returns will be accompanied by a letter of transmittal, enumerating them, and referring to no other subject. 454. Generally, officers who forward communications indorse on them their remarks or opinion, without other letters of transmittal. 455. Official letters should generally refer to one matter only. In regard to an enlisted man, the company and regiment must be stated. 456. Letters on letter paper will be folded in three folds, parallel with the writing. 45G. All communications on public service are to be marked on the cover, " Official Busin s s." 68

Page  69 -~~~~FRTiEAM.: Returns and Reports. Annual Returns. ARTICLE XXXV. RETURNS AND REPORTS. MONTHLY RETURNS. 458. Commanders of regiments, corps, and posts, will make to the Adjutant-General's office of the War Department monthly returns f their respective regiments, corps, and posts, on the forms furnished from that office, and according to the directions expressed on them. In like manner, Captains make monthly company returns to regimental headquarters. All monthly returns will be forwarded on the 1st day of the next month, except regimental returns, which are forwarded as soon as all the company returns are received. 459. In campaign, monthly returns of divisions and detached brigades, and, generally, of all detached commands (see General Order No. 1, of February 10, 1855), will be made to the Adjutant-General's office. They will exhibit separately the several regiments, and detachments, and staff corps, and the strength of each garrison within the command. These returns, and those of regiments, corps, and posts, in campaign, will, unless otherwise ordered, be transmitted through the intermediate commanders. 460. The established printed forms and blanks of all returns required from the commanders of divisions, brigades, regiments, corps, companies, and posts, will be furnished from the Adjutant-General's office, on their requisitions annually made, or oftener, if necessary. The receipt of these forms and blanks will be immediately acknowledged, and afterward accounted for on the next monthly returns. 461. Manuscript returns, rolls, certificates, and other documents, are prohibited, unless the proper printed forms have not been received in time. Regimental returns must be made out in the name of the Colonel, whether he be present or absent. ANNUAL RETURNS-CASUALTIES. 462. This return will exhibit the various changes and alterations which may have taken place in the regiment during the preceding twelve months: that is to say-a statement of the number of resignations, transfers, deaths, &c., of commissioned officers; the number of men joined by enlistment, transferred, and discharged; the number tried by Courts-Martial or by the civil law, and the nature of their offenses; the number of discharges, deaths, dismissals, and desertions; number joined from desertion, pardoned, &c., &c. FOR THE ARMY. .9

Page  70 0o REVISED REGULATIONS Return of Deceased Soldiers. Reports. RETURN OF DECEASED SOLDIERS. 4(;3. To be forwarded to the Adjutant-General, by the Colonels of regiments, quarterly. Also a duplicate to the Second Auditor of the Treasury. FIELD RETURNS. 464. Besides the stated returns of the htoops, such other field retuxns and reports will be made as may be necessary to keep the government 'nformed of the condition and strength of the forces. 465. After any action or affair, a return of the killed, wounded, and missing will be made, in which the name, rank, and regiment of each officer and soldier will be specified, with such remarks and explanations as may be requisite for the records of the Department of War, or be necessary to establish the just claims of any individual who may have been wounded, or of the heirs and representatives of any killed in action (taking care to specify the nature of the wound, the time and place of its occurrence, the company, regiment, or corps, and the name of the Captain, Colonel, or other commanding officer). REPORTS. 466. The date of appointment, of detail, and of removal of all staff officers, or of officers selected for duty in staff departments, which may entitle them to receive additional pay, will be immediately reported by the officer making such appointment, detail, or removal, to the AdjutantGeneral, and to the Paymaster of the department or command to which such officers belong. 467. Whenever any change takes place in the position or location of troops, the fact will be immediately reported by the commanding officer to general, division, and department head-quarters, specifying the date of departure of the whole or any part of the troops, or of the arrival of any detachment; as well as all other circumstances connected with such changes in the command. These special reports will always be accompanied by an exact return of the troops according to the established printed forms. A similar report will be noted on the next monthly return of the post or station. If a new post or position be established, its situation, and the nearest post-office and proper route to it, should be reported. 468. Officers on detached duty will report: monthly, to the commanders of their posts, of their regiments or corps, and to the Adjutant. General, their stations, the nature of their duties, and the authority placing' them thereon-likewise Mach change of address.

Page  71 4 FOR THE ARMY. Prisoners. Troops in Campaign. PRISONERS OF WAR-CAPTURED PROPERTY. 469. A return of prisoners, and a report of the number and descripti,)n of the killed and wounded of the enemy, will be forwarded to the Adjutant-General's office, Washington. 470. A return of all property captured will be made by the commanding officer of the troops by whom such capture was made, to the Adjutant. General, at Washington, in order that it may be disposed of according to the orders of the War Department. INSPECTION REPORTS. 471. Inspection reports will show the discipline of the troops; their instruction in all military exercises and duties: the state of their arms, clothing, equipments, and accoutrements of all kinds; of their kitchens and messes; of the barracks and quarters at the post; of the guardhouse, prisons, hospital, bake-house, magazines, store-houses, and stores of every description; of the stables and horses; the condition of the post school; the management and application of the post and company funds; the state of the post, and regimental, and company books, papers, and files; the zeal and ability of the officers in command of troops; the capacity of the officers conducting the administrative and staff services, the fidelity and economy of their disbursements; the condition of all public property, and the amount of money in the hands of each disbursing officer; the regularity of issues and payments; the mode of enforcing discipline by courts-martial, and by the authority of the officers; the propriety and legality of all punishments inflicted; and any information whatsoever concerning the service, in any matter or particular that may merit notice, or aid to correct defects or introduce improvements. 472. Inspectors are required particularly to report if any officer is of intemperate habits, or unfit for active service by infirmity or any other cause. ARTICLE XXXVI. TROOPS IN CAMPAIGN. OR(ANIZATION OF AN ARMY IN TIIE FIELD. 473. The formation by divisions is the basis of the organization and administration of armies in the field. 474. A division consists usually of two or three brigades, either of infantry or cavalry, and troops of other corps in the necessary proportion. 475. A brigade is formed of two or more regiments. The first numbel takes the right. 4. 71

Page  72 REVISED REGULATIONS Organization of an Army in the Field. 476. Mixed brigades are sometimes formed of infantry and light cavalry, especially for the advanced guards. 477. As the troops arrive at the rendezvous, the general commandingin-chief will organize them into brigades and divisions. 478. The light cavalry is employed as flankers and partisans, and generally for all service out of the line. 479. Heavy cavalry belongs to the reserve, and is covered, when necessary, in marches, camps, or bivouacs, by light troops, or infantry of the line. 480. The arrangement of the troops on parade and in order of battle is-Ilst, the light infantry; 2d, infantry of the line; 3d, light cavalry; 4th, cavalry of the line; 5th, heavy cavalry. The troops of the artillery and engineers are in the centre of the brigades, divisions, or corps to which they are attached; marines take the left of other infantry; volunteers and militia take the left of regular troops of thie same arm, and among themselves, regiments of volunteers or militia of the same arm take place by lot. This arrangement is varied by the general commanding-in-chief, as the circumstances of war render expedient. 48 [. Brigades in divisions, and divisions in the army, are numbered from right to left; but in reports of military operations, brigades and divisions are designated by the name of the general commanding them. 482. The order of regiments in brigades and of brigades in divisions May be changed by the commander of the division for important reasons, such as the weakne. of some corps, or to relieve one from marching too long at the rear ef the columnn. Such changes must be reported to the general commanding-in-chief. 483. The general commanding-in-chief assigns the generals of divisions and of brigades to their respective commands, when the assignment is not made by the Department of War. 484. The general of brigade inspects his troops in detail, by companies, when he takes the command and at the opening of the campaign, and as often as may be necessary to ascertain exactly their condition. The general of division makes similar inspections when he thinks proper. At these inspections the generals examine the arms, clothing, equipments, harness, horses, &c., direct the necessary repairs, and designate the men and horses to remain in dep6t, or march with the train. 485. Reports of inspections are made by the general of brigade to the general of division, and by the general of division to the general commanding-in-chief. 486. During marches and all active operations, generals of brigade keep themselves exactly informed, by reports of corps and by their in-pections, of the actual strength of the regiments, so as always, and 1-2

Page  73 F'OR THE ARMY. Contributions.-Orderlios. especially after an engagement, to make accurate returns to the general of division. 487. Staff officers, and officers of engineers, ordnance, and artillery, according to the nature of the service, are assigned to the head-quarters of armies and divisions, and detached brigades, by order of the general coinmanding-in-chief, when the distribution of these officers has not been regulated by the War Department. The necessary staff will be assigned to commanders of brigades. 488. When an Engineer or other officer is charged with directing an expedition or making a reconnoissance, without having command of the escort, the commander of the escort shall consult him on all the arrangements necessary to secure the success of the operation. 489. Staff officers, and commanders of engineers, ordnance, and artillery, report to their immediate commanders the state of the supplies and whatever concerns the service under their direction, and receive their — orders, and communicate to them those they receive from their superiors in their own corps. 490. The senior officer of engineers, of ordnance, and the departments of the general staff serving at the chief head-quarters in the field, will transmit to the bureau of his department at Wshington, at the close of the campaign, and such other times as the commander in the field may approve, a full report of the operations of his department, and whatever information to improve its service he may be able to furnish. The report of the officer of engineers will embrace plans of military works executed during the campaign, and, in case of siege, a journal of the attack or defense. CONTRIBUTIONS. 491. When the wants of the army absolutely require it, and in other cases, under special instructions from the War Department, the general commanding the army may levy contributions in money or kind on the enemy's country occupied by the troops. No other commander can levy such contributions without written authority from the general command ing-in-chief. ORDERLIES. 492. At the opening of a campaign, the commander of an army deermines and announces in orders the number of orderlies, mounted or foot, for the-Generals, and the corps or regiments by which they are to be supplied, and the periods at which they shall be relieved. 493. In marches, the mounted orderlies follow the Generals, and perform the duty of escorts, or march w,ith orderlies on foot at the head of the division or brigade. 73 (-I

Page  74 REVISED RE G PLATIONS Depots and Camps. 494. The staff officer who distributes the orderlies to their posts sends with them a note of the time and place of departure; those relieved receive a like note from the staff officer at the head-quarters. 495. Mounted soldip are to be employed to carry dispatches only in special and urgent cases. (See par. 557.) 496. The precise time when the dispatch is sent off, and the rate at which it is to be conveyed, are to be written clearly on the covers of all letters transmitted by a mounted orderly, and the necessary instructions to him, and the rate of travel going and returning, are to be distinctly explainxed to him. DEPOTS. 497. The grand depots of an army are established where the military operations would not expose them to be brokefn up. Smaller dep6ts are organized for the divisions and the several arms. They are commanded by officers temporarily disabled for field service, or by other officers when necessary, and comprise, as much as possible, the hospitals and depots for convalescents. When conveniently placed, they serve as points for the halting and assembling of detachments. They receive the disabled from the corps on the march; and the officers in command of the depots send with the detachments to the army those at the depots who have become fit for service. CAMIPS. 498. A camp is the place where troops are established in tents, in hjuts, or in bivouac. Cantonments are the\ inhabited places which troops occupy for shelter when not put in barracks. The camping-party is a detachment detailed to prepare a camp. 499. RIeconnoissances should precede the establishment of the camp. l'or a camp of troops on the march, it is only necessary to look to the health and comfort of the troops, the facility of the communications, the convenience of wood and water, and the resources in provisions and forage. The ground for an intrenched camp, or a camp to cover a country, or one designed to deceive the enemy as to the strength of the army, must be selected, and the camp arranged for the object in view. 500. The camping-party of a regiment consists of the regimental Quartcrmaster and Quartermaster-Sergeant, ana a Corporal and two men per company. The General decides whether the regiments camp separately or together, and whether the police guard shall accompany the campingparty, or a larger escort shall be sent. 501. Neither baggage nor led horses are permitted to move with the ampitng-party. )). W1ein the General ciLn send in advance to prpsa e tihe camp, ne 74 I

Page  75 FOR THE ARMY. Camps. gives his instructions to the,hief of the Quartermaster's Department, whc calls on the regiments for their camping-parties, and is accompanied, if necessary, by an Engineer to propose the defenses and communications. 503. The wateritig-places are examined, andignals placed at those that are dangerous. Any work required to make them of easier access is done by the police guard or Quartermaster's men. Sentinels, to be relieved by the guards of the regiment when they come up, are placed by the camping-party over the water if it is scarce, and over the houses and stores of provisions and forage in the vicinity. 504. If the camping-party does not precede the regiment, the Quartermaster attends to these things as soon as the regiment reaches the camp. 505. On reaching the ground, the infantry form on the color front, the cavalry in rear of its camp. 506. The Generals establish the troops in camp as rapidly as possible, particularly after long, fatiguing marches. 507. The number of men to be furnished for guards, pickets, and orderlies; the fatigue parties to be sent for supplies; the work to be done, and the strength of the working parties; the time and place for issues; the hour of marching, &c., are then announced by the BrigadierGenerals to the Colonels and by them to the field officers-the Adjutant and Captains formed in front of the regiment, the First Sergeants taking post behind their Captains. The Adjutant then makes the details, and the First Sergeants warn the men. The regimental officer of the day forms the picket, and sends the guards to their posts. The colors are then planted at the centre of the color line, and the arms are stacked on the line; the fatigue parties to procure supplies, and the working parties, form in rear of the arms; the men not on detail pitch the tents. 508. If the camp is near the enemy, the picket remains under arms until the return of the fatigue parties, and, if necessary, is re-enforced by details from each company. 509. In the cavalry, each troop moves a little in rear of the point at which its horses are to be secured, and forms in one rank; the men then dismount; a detail is made to hold the horses; the rest stack their arms and fix the picket repe; after the horses re attended to, the tents are pitched, and each horseman places his carbine at the side from the weather, and hangs his sabre and bridle on it. 510. The standard is then carried to the tent of the Colonel. 511. The terms front, flank, right, left, file, and rank, have the same meaning when applied to camps as to the order of battle. 512. The front of the oamp is usually equal'o the front of the troops. 75

Page  76 REVISED REGULATIONS Camp of Infantry. The tents are arranged in ranks and files. The number of ranks varies with the strength of the companies and the size of the tents. 513. No officer will be allowed to oo-upy a house, although vacant and on the ground of his c$p, except by permission of the commander of the brigade, who shall report it to the commander of the division. 514. The staff officer charged with establishing the camp will designate the place for the shambles. The offal will be buried. CAMP OF INFANTRY. 515. Each company has its tents in two files, facing on a street per pendicular to the color line. The width of the street depends on the front of the camp, but should not be less than 5 paces. The interval between the ranks of tents is 2, paces; between the files of tents of adjacent companies, 2 paces; between regiments, 22 paces. 516. The color line is 10 paces in front of the front rank of tents. The kitchens are 20 paces behind the rear rank of company tents; the non-commissioned staff and sutler, 20 paces in rear of the kitchens; the company officers, 20 paces farther in rear; and the field and staff, 20 paces in rear of the company officers. 517. The company officers are in rear of their respective companies; the Captains on the right. 518. The Colonel and Lieutenant-Colonel are near the centre of the line of field and staff; the Adjutant, a Major and Surgeon, on the right; the Quartermaster, a Major and Assistant Surgeon, on the left. 519. The police guard is at the centre of the line of the non-commissioned staff, the tents facing to the front, the stacks of arms on the left. 520. The advanced post of the police guard is about 200 paces in front of the color line, and opposite the centre of the regiment, or on the best ground; the prisoners' tent about 4 paces in rear. In a regiment of the second line, the advanced post of the police guard is 200 paces in rear of the line of its field and staff. 521. The horses of the staff officers and of the baggage train are 25 paces in rear of the tents of the field and staff; the wagons are parked on the same line, and the men of the train camped near them. 522. The sinks of the men are 150 paces in front of the color line those of the officers 100 paces in rear of the train. Both are concealed by bushes. When convenient, the sinks of the men may be placed in rear or on a flank. A portion of the earth dug out for sinks to be thrown back occasionally. 523. The front of the camp of a regiment of 1000 men in two ranks will be 400 paces, or one ifth less paces than the number of files, if the -115 8

Page  77 PrisovanCe uars. giPrisoners. Men's Sinks. n i I I I i ttI v-q I o 11 .. 2 2P [[ a]B [] [[3 13'1 13 [] L[]I CS~ 0 BI31 :3 o3 B3a [ a Du Du [ [ up i3 aa Ua LU L U 3 U a U U oo a U LI LI El LI La uU a a o r DU UU UU UU UU UUa UCJ aa u Kitchens. m a] m mam nvs ~~~~~Police Gtuard. Sutler. s OxxL Ia WL U Cbmpany Officers. 12i LI 0 13 L 12[:] 212 El2I;L LI 1 [3 [[E:] [ El[ [2[ Ast. Surg. M. Q. M-. Lt. Cl. Cl. Adjt. M. Surg. "z o3 Bagage Train. Baggage Train. o Ofcers' Sinks. 400paces. G2 .. 1. - I I - I I I I.~~~~~~~~~~~~~ - I i I i I '1 I b~ l~ Stacks of.Arms. Colorline. a co a '_ cIcO IV

Page  78 . P. m.8. m~~~~~~~~a -~=: Camp of a Regimenlt of Five Squadrons of C'avalry. Cz.-Co~~~neZ.0 00 00 0c ~Lt 6.-Lieut. Colonel. O o G 0 O M.-Major. L L0 0L 9I LI LI LI LI 9 Surg. Surgeon.LI LI L LI'L'L LI L LI L Asvt Surg.-A,?8t Surgeon. L0 0 1 0 1 Adjt.-Adjutant.0 L I'.I LI L ~ L I L Q. f.-QuartermasterLI LI L L C.-Captain. 01 10 0. 0 o L-Lieutenant. 1I L I L L I'I L I L A..-Advanced Guard.'L LI L 10 0IL LI L L P..-Police Guard. dI~I dI~I ~ l~I ~ I~I ~ I~L m s.-Men's Sinks. L a ns k.-itcen sins. f.-~Forage.I~JM P. —Prisoner8. I of jo 10.0:0 10 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~a LI LI LI ILI LI a 0 lo'0'0 0 1~~~~~ ~~~ ~~~~~~~0a1 0 o a. 10 0 0 ~~~~~~I LI Of 10 10 a~l LI a L i I I I I I cI i i I i i i i I I i i i I I i I i i II II i II I i I 1 i i II i i i i I I i i i I i i i i i i i I i I i i I I i I ,j 4 r.i — i I I i i I i I i I I i i I I i i II i i i II i I III i II I II II II i I i i i II Pd ;r (D m. CD k 00 c a Of a 0 . a 00 a 0a a 0 ,a 0 1 a 0 a 0 a I u a I 00 a 0 a a 0 a 0 a a 0 a a u Lt. CZ. a a 0 a a 0 a a 0 0a a a a Ull. a 0 Li a 0 a P.G. a I u. C.. a 0 a u Q.x 0 /I. I-,' I i 11. I

Page  79 OR HE ARMY. 79 ____ Capo Cvly camp is to have the same front as the troops in order of battle. But the front may be reduced to 190 paces by narrowing the company streets to 5 paces; and if it be desirable to reduce the front still more, the tents of companies may be pitched in single file-those of a division facing on the same street. CAMP OF CAVALRY. 524. In the cavalry, each company has one file of tents-the tents opening on the street facing the left of the camp. 525. The horses of each company are placed in a single file, facing the opening of the tents, and are fastened to pickets planted firmly in the ground, from 3 to 6 paces from the tents of the troops. 526. The interval between the file of tents should be such that, the regiment being broken into column of companies [as indicated in plate], each company should be on the extension of the line on which the horses are to be picketed. 527. The streets separating the squadrons are wider than those between the companies by the interval separating squadrons in line; these intervals are kept free from any obstruction throughout the camp. 528. The horses of the rear rank are placed on the left of those of their file-leaders. 529. The horses of the Lieutenants are placed on the right of their platoons; those of the Captains on the right of the company. 530. Each horse occupies a space of about 2 paces. The number of norses in the company fixes the depth of the camp, and the distance between the files of tents; the forage is placed between the tents. 531. The kitchens are 20 paces in front of each file of tents. 532. The non-commissioned officers are in the tents of the front rank. Camp-followers, teamsters, &c., are in the rear rank. The police guard in the rear rank, near the centre of the regiment. 533. The tents of the Lieutenants are 30 paces in rear of the file of their company; the tents of the Captains 30 paces in rear of the Lieutenants. 534. The Colonel's tent 30 paces in rear of the Captains', near the centre of the regiment; the Lieutenant-Colonel on his right; the Adjutant on his left; the M1ajors on the same line, opposite the 2d company on the right and left; the Surgeon on the left of the Adjutant. 535. The field and staff have their horses on the left of their tents, on the same line with the company horses; sick horses are placed in one line on the right or left of the camp. The men who attend them have a separate file of tents; the forges and wagons in rear of this file. The horses of the train and of camp-follow'ers are in one or more files extending FOR THE ARMY. . Camp of Cavalry. 79

Page  80 REVISED REGULAtIONS _________ Camp of Artillery-Bivouacs. to the rear, behind the right or left squadron. The advanced post of the police guard is 200 paces in front, opposite the centre of the regiment; the horses in one or two files. 536. The sinks for the men are 150 paces in fronthose for officers 100 paces in rear of the camp. CAMP OF ARTILLERY. 537. The artillery is encamped near the troops to which it is attached, so as to be protected from attack, and to contribute to the defense of the camp. Sentinels for the park are furnished by the artillery, and, when necessary, by the other troops. 538. For a battery of 6 pieces the tents are in three files-one for each section; distance between the ranks of tents 15 paces; tents opening to the front. The horses of each section are picketed in one file, 10 paces to the left of the file of tents. In the horse artillery, or if the number of horses makes it necessary, the horses are in two files on the right and left of the file of tents. The kitchens are 25 paces in front of the front rank of tents. The tents of the officers are in the outside files of company tents, 25 paces in rear of the rear rank-the Captain on the right, the Lieutenants on the left. 539. The park is opposite the centre of the camp, 40 paces in rear of the officers' tents. The carriages in files 4 paces apart; distance between ranks of carriages sufficient for the horses when harnessed to them; the park guard is 25 paces in rear of the park. The sinks for the men 150 paces in front; for the officers 100 paces in rear. The harness is in the tents of the men. BIVOUACS. 540. A regiment of cavalry being in order of battle, in rear of the ground to be occupied, the Colonel breaks it by platoons to the right. The horses of each platoon are placed in a single row, and fastened as prescribed for camps; near the enemy, they remain saddled all night, with slackened girths. The arms are at first stacked in rear of each row of horses; the sabres, with the bridles hung on them, are placed against the stacks. 541. The forage is placed on the right of each row of horses. Two stable-guards for each platoon watch the horses. 542. A fire for each platoon is made near the color line, 20 paces to the left of the row of horses. A shelter is made for the men around the fire, if possible, and each man then stands his arms and bridle against the shelter. 80 Camp,-of Artillery.-Bivouacs.

Page  81 FOR THE ARMY. 81 Cantonments. 543.; The fires and shelter for the officers are placed in rear of the line of those for the men. 544. The interval between the squadrons must be without obstruction throughout the whole depth of ~ke bivouac. 545. The interval between the shelters should be such that the platoons can take up a line of battle freely to the front or rear. 546. The distance from the enemy decides the manner in which the horses are to be fed and led to water. When it is permitted to unsaddle, the saddles are placed in the rear of the horses. 547. In infantry, the fires are made in rear of the color line, on the ground that would be occupied by the tents in camp. The companies are placed around them, and, if possible, construct shelters. When liable to surprise, the infantry should stand to arms at daybreak, and the cavalry mount until the return of the reconnoitring parties. If the arms are to be taken apart to clean, it must be done by detachments, successively. CANTONMENTS. 548. The cavalry should be placed under shelter whenever the distance from the enemy, and from the ground where the troops are to form for battle, permit it. Taverns and farm-houses, with large stables and free access, are selected for quartering them. 549. The Colonel indicates the place of assembling in case of alarm. It should generally be outside the cantonment; the egress from it should be free; the retreat upon the other positions secure, and roads leading to it on the side of the enemy obstructed. 550. The necessary orders being given, as in establishing a camp, the picket and grand guards are posted. A sentinel may be placed on a steeple or high house, and then the troops are marched to the quarters. The men sleep in the stables, if it is thought necessary. 551. The above applies in the main to infantry. Near the enemy, companies or platoons should be collected, as much as possible, in the same houses. If companies must be separated, they should be divided by platoons or squads. All take arms at daybreak. 552. When cavalry and infantry canton together, the latter furnish the guards by night, and the former by day. 553. Troops cantoned in presence of the enemy should be covered by advanced guards and by natural or artificial obstacles. Cantonments taken during a cessation of hostilities should be established in rear of a line of defense, and in front of the point on which the troops would concentrate to receive an attack. The General commanding-in-chief assigns the limits of their cantonments to the divisions, the commanders of divisions to 6 FOR THE ARMY. 81

Page  82 REVISED REGULATIONS Milry Exercises.-Watchwords. brigades, and the commanders of brigades post their regiments. The position for each corps in case of attack is carefully pointed out by the Generals. HEAD-QUARTERS. 554. Generals take post at the centre of their commands, on the main channels of communication. If troops bivouac in presence of the enemy, the Generals bivouac with them. MILITARY EXERCISES. 555. When troops remain in camp or cantonment many days, the Colonels require them to be exercised in the school- of the battalion and squadron. Regiments and brigades encamped by division are not united for drills without the permission of the General of division. The troops must not be exercised at the firings without the authority of the General commanding-in-chief. The practice of the drums must never begin with the " general," or the "march of the regiment;" nor the trumpets with the sound "to horse." The hour for practice is always announced. ORDERS. 556. In the field, verbal orders and important sealed orders are carried by officers, and, if possible, by staff officers. When orders are carried by orderlies, the place and time of departure will be marked on them, and place and time of delivery on the receipt. DISPATCHES. 557. Dispatches, particularly for distant corps, should be intrusted only to officers to whom their contents can be confided. In a country occupied by the enemy, the bearer of dispatches should be accompanied by at least two of the best mounted men; should avoid towns and villages, and the main roads; rest as little as possible, and only at out-ofthe-way places. Where there is danger, he should send one of the men in advance, and be always ready to destroy his dispatches. He should be adroit in answering questions about the army, and not to be intimidated by threats. WATCHWORDS. 558. The parole and countersign are issued daily from the principal head-quarters of the command. The countersign is given to the sentinels and non-commissioned officers of guards; the parole to the commissioned officers of guards. The parole is usually the name of a general, the 'ountersign that of a battle. 87 9

Page  83 FOR THB ARMY. Issues. Roster. 559. When the parole and countersign cannot be communicated daily to a post or detachment which ought to use the same as the main body, a series of words may be sent for some days in advance. 560. If the countersign is lost, or one of the guard deserts with it, the commander on the spot will substitute another, and report the case at once to the proper superior, that immediate notice may be given to head-quarters. ISSUES. 561. At what time and for what period imsues are made, must depend on circumstances, and be regulated in orders. When an army is not moving, rations are generally issued for four days at a time. Issues to the companies of a regiment, and the fatigues to receive them, are superintended by an officer detailed from the regiment. Issues are made from one end of the line to the other, beginning on the right and left, alter. nately. An issue commenced to one regiment will not be interrupted for another entitled to precedence if it had been in place. THE ROSTER, OR DETAILS FOR SERVICE. 562. The duties performed by detail are of three classes. The first class comprises, 1st. grand guards and outposts; 2d. interior guards, as of magazine, hospital, &c.; 3d. orderlies; 4th. police guards. The second class comprises, 1st. detachments to protect laborers on milita~ forks, as field works, communications, &c.; 2d. working parties on such works; 3d. detachments to protect fatigues. The third class are all fatigues, without arms, in or out of camp. In the cavalry, stable-guards form a separate roster, and count before fatigue. 563. The rosters are distinct for each class. Officers are named on them in the order of rank. The details are taken in succession in the order of the roster, beginning at the head. 564. Lieutenants form one roster, and first and second Lieutenants are entered on it alternately. The senior first Lieutenant is the first on the roster; the senior second Lieutenant is the second, &c. The Captains form one roster, and are exempt from fatigues, except to superintend issues. A Captain commnanding a battalion temporarily is exempt from detail, and duty falling to him passes. Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors are on one roster. They may be detailed for duties of the first and second classes, when the importance of the guards and detachments requires it Their roster is kept at division and brigade head-quarters. In the company, sergeants, corporals, and privates form distinct rosters. 565. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers take duties of the first class in the order stated viz., the first, for the detail, trkes the grand 89

Page  84 REVISED REGULATIONS Roster. -Police Guard. guards; the next, the interior guards; the last, the police guard; and the same rule in regard to the details and duties of the second class. In the details for the'third class, the senior officer takes the largest party The party first for detail takes the service out of camp. 566. When the officer whose tour it is, is not able to take it, or is not present at the hour of marching, the next after him takes it. WiEen a guard has passed the chain of sentinels, or an interior guard has reached its post, the officer whose tour it was cannot then take it. He takes the tour of the officer who has taken his. When an officer is prevented by sickness from taking his tour, it passes. These rules apply equally to non-commissioned officers and soldiers. 567. Duties of the first and second classes are credited on the roster when the guards or detachments have passed the chain of sentinels, or an interior guard has reached its post; fatigue duties when the parties have passed the chain or begun the duties in camp. 568. Every officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, on duty of tbhe first class, or who is of the next detail for such duty, takes, when relieved, the duty of the second or third class that has fallen to him during that time, unless he has marched for detachment of more than twenty-four hours. 569. Soldiers march with knapsacks on all duties of the first class; and with arms and equipments complete on all working parties out of the camp, unless otherwise ordered. In the cavalry, horses are packed for all mounted service. 570. In the cavalry, dismounted men, and those whose horses are not in order, are preferred for the detail for dismounted service. Those who are mounted are never employed on those services, if the number of the other class are sufficient. 571. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier in the cavalry detailed for dismounted service must, before he marches, take to the First Sergeant of the troop, or Sergeant of his squad, his horse equipments and his valise ready packed. In case of alarm, the First Sergeant sees that the horses of these men are equipped and led to the rendezvous. 572. These rules in regard to the roster apply also to service in garrison. POLICE GUARD. 573. In each regiment a police guard is detailed every day, consisting of two sergeants, three corporals, two drummers, and men enough to furnish the required sentinels and patrols. The men are taken-from all the companies, from each in proportion to its strength. The guard is comnmanded by a Lieutenant, under the supervision of a Captain, as reginmental officer of the day. It frrnishes ten sentinels at the camp: 84

Page  85 FOR THE ARMY. Police Guard. one over the armns of the guard; one at the Colonel's tent; three on the color front, one of them over the colors; three, fifty paces in rear of the field officers' tents; and one on each flank, between it and the next regiment. If it is a flank regiment, one more sentinel is posted on the outer flank. 574. An advanced post is detached from the police guard, composed of a sergeant, a corporal, a drummer, and nine men to furnish sentinels and the guard over the prisoners. The men are the first of the guard roster from each company. The men of the advanced post must not leave it under any pretext. Their meals are sent to the post. The advanced post furnishes three sentinels; two a few paces in front of the post, opposite the right and left wing of the regiment, posted so as to see as far as possible to the front, and one over the arms. 575. Inthe cavalry, dismounted men are employed in preference on the police guard. The mounted men on guard are sent in succession, a part at a time, to groom their horses. The advanced post is always formed of mounted men. 576. In each company, a corporal has charge of thie stable-guard. His tour begins at retreat, and ends at morning stable-call. The stable-guard is large enough to relieve the men on post every two hours. They sleep in their tents, and are called by the corporal when wanted. At retreat be closes the streets of the camp with cords, or uses other precautions to prevent the escape of loose horses. 577. The officer of the day is charged with the order and cleanliness of the camp: a fatigue is furnished to him when the number of prisoners is insufficient to clean the camp. He has the calls beaten by the drummer of the guard. 578. The police guard and the advanced post pay the same honors as other guards. They take arms when an armed body approaches. 579. The sentinel over the colors has orders not to permit them to be moved except in presence of an escort; to let no one touch them but the color-bearer, or the sergeant of the police guard when he is accompanied by two armed men. 580. The sentinels on the color front permit no soldier to take arms from the stacks, except by order of some officer, or a non-commissioned officer of the guard. The sentinel at the Colonel's tent has orders to warn him, day or night, of any unusual movement in or about the camp. 581. The sentinels on the front, flanks, and rear, see that no soldier leaves camp with horse or arms unless conducted by a non-commissioned officer. They prevent non-commissioned officers and soldiers from passing out at night, except to go to the sinks, and mark if they return. They arrest, at any time, suspicious E arsons prowling about the camp, and at It S& I

Page  86 REVISED REGULATIONS Police Guard. niglht, every one who attempts to enter, even the sold'ers of other corps. Arrested perosons are sent to the officer of the guard, who sends them, if necessary, to the officer of the day. 582. The sentinels on the front of the advanced post have orders to permit neither non-commissioned officers nor soldiers to pass the line, without reporting at the advanced post; to warn the advanced post of the approach of any armed body, and to arrest all suspicious persons. The sergeant sends persons so arrested to the officer of the guard, and warns him of the approach of any armed body. 583. The sentinel over the arms at the advanced post guards the prisoners and keeps sight of them, and suffers no one to converse with them without permission. They are only permitted to go to the sinks one at a time, and under a sentinel. 584. If any one is to be passed out of camp at night, the officer of the guard sends him under escort to the advanced post, and the sergeant of the post has him passed over the chain. 585. At retreat, the officer of the guard has the roll of his guard called, and inspects arms, to see that they are loaded and in order; and visits the advanced post for the same purpose. The sergeant of the police guard, accompanied by two armed soldiers, folds the colors and lays them on the trestle in rear of the arms. Hle sees that the sutler's stores are then closed, and the men leave them, and that the kitchen fires are put out at the appointed hour. 586. The officer of the day satisfies himself frequently during the night, of the vigilance of the police guard and advanced post. He prescribes patrols and rounds to be made by the officer and non-commissioned officers of the guard. The officer of the guard orders them when he thinks necessary. He visits the sentinels frequently. 587. At reveille, the police guard takes arms; the officer of the guard inspects it and the advanced post. The Sergeant replants the colors in place. At retreat and reveille the advanced post. takes arms; the Sergeant makes his report to the officer of the guard when he visits the post. 588. When necessary, the camp is covered at night with small outposts, forming a double chain of sentinels. These posts are under the orders of the commander of the police guard, and are visited by his patrols and rounds. 589. The officer of the guard makes his report of his tour of service, including the advanced post, and sends it, after the guard is ma.rched off, to the officer of the day. 590. When the regiment mal'hes, the men of the police guard return o their companies, except those )f the advanced post. In the cavalry, at }i' sotnd'"boot anld saddle,," tte officer of the guard sends one-half the 815

Page  87 FOR TIIE ARMY. The Picket. men to saddle and pack; when the regiment assembles, all the men join it. 591. When the camping-party precedes the regiment, and the new police guard marches with the camping-party, the guard, on reaching the camp, forms in line thirty paces in front of the centre of the ground marked for the regiment. The officer of the guard furnishes the sentinels required by the commander of the camping-party. The advanced post takes its station. 592. The advanced post of the old police guard takes charge of the prisoners on the march, and marches, bayonets fixed, at the centre of the regiment. On reaching camp, it turns over the prisoners to the new advanced post. THE PICKET. 593. The detail for the picket is made daily, after the details for duty of the first class, and from the next for detail on the roster of that class. It is designed to furnish detachments and guards unexpectedly called for in the twenty-four hours; it counts as a tour of the first class to those who have marched on detachment or guard, or who have passed the night in bivouac. 594. The officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers of the picket are at all times dressed and equipped; the horses are saddled, and knapsacks and valises ready to be put on. 595. Detachments and guards firom the picket are taken from the head of the picket-roll in each company, and, if possible, equally from each company. The picket of a regiment is composed of a Lieutenant, two Sergeants, four Corporals, a drummer, and about forty p/ivates. For a smaller force, the picket is in proportion to the strength of the detachmeut. 596. Officers and men of the picket who march on detachment or guard before retreat will be replaced. 597. The picket is assembled by the Adjutant at guard-mounting; it is posted twelve paces in rear of the guard, and is inspected by its own commander. When the guard has marched in review, the commandant of the picket marches it to the left of the police guard, where it stacks its arms, and is dismissed; the arms are under charge of the sentinel of the police guard. 598. The picket is only assembled by the orders of the Colonel or officer of the day. It forms on the left of the police guard. 599. The officer of the day requires the roll of the picket to be called frequently during the day; the call is sounded from the police guard. At roll-calls and inspections, infantry pickets assemble with knapsacks of, cavalry on foot. The picket is assembled at retreat; the officer has the g,ri

Page  88 REVISED REGULATIONS Grand Guards and other Outposts. roll called, and inspects the arms. The picket sleep in their tents, but without undressing. 600. The picket does not assemble at night except in cases of alarm, or when the whole or a part is to march; then the officer of the day calls the officers, the latter the non-commissioned officers, and these the men, for which purpose each ascertains the tents of those he is to call; they are assembled without beat of drum or other noise. At night, cavalry pickets assemble mounted. 601. Pidkets rejoin their companies whenever the regiment is under arms for review, drill, march, or battle. GRAND GUARDS AND OTHER OUTPOSTS. 602. Grand guards are the advanced posts of a camp or cantonment, and should cover the approaches to it. Their number, strength, and position are regulated by the commanders of brigades; in detached corps, by the commanding officer. When it can be, the grand guards of cavalry and infantry are combined, the cavalry furnishing the advanced sentinels. When the cavalry is weak, the grand guards are infantry, but furnished with a few cavalry soldiers, to get and carry intelligence of the enemy. 603. The strength of the grand guard of a brigade will depend on its object and the strength of the regiments, the nature of the country, the position of the enemy, and the disposition of the inhabitants. It is usually commanded by a Captain. 604. Under the supervision of the Generals of Division and Brigade, the grand guards are specially under the direction of a field officer of the day in each brigade. In case of necessity, Captains may be added to the roster of Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors fot this detail. 605. Staff officers, sent from division head-quarters to inspect the posts of grand guards, give them orders only in urgent cases, and in the absence of the field officer of the day of the brigade. 606. Grand guards usually mount at the same time as the other guards, but may mount before daybreak if the General of Brigade thinks it necessary to double the outposts at that time. In this case they assemble and march without noise, and during their march throw out scouts; this precaution should always be taken in the first posting of a grand guard. The doubling of guards weakens the corps and fatigues the men, and should seldom be resorted to, and never when preparing to march or fight. 607. A grand guard is conducted to its post, in the first instance, by the field officer of the day, guided by a staff officer who accompanied the General in his reconnoissance. After the post has been established, the commander sends to the field officer of the day, when necessary, a soldier of the guard to guide the relieving guard to the post. He also sends to 88

Page  89 FC}R THE ARMY. Fraud Guards and other Outposts. him in the evening a corporal or trusty man of the guard for the note containing the parole and countersign, and sends them before dark to the detached posts. He will not suffer his guard to be relieved except by a guard of the brigade, or by special orders. 608. If there is no pass to be observed or defended, the grand guards are placed near the centre of the ground they are to observwe, on sheltered, and, if possible, high ground, the better to conceal their strength and observe the enemy; they ought not to b. placed near the edge of a wood. When, during the day, they are placed very near or in sight of the enemy, they fall back at night on posts selected farther to the rear. 609. In broken or mountainous countries, and particularly if the in habitants are ill disposed, intermediate posts must be established when it is necessary to post the grand guard distant from the camp. 610. Grand guards are chiefly to watch the enemy in front; their Ranks are protected by each other, and the camp must furnish posts t6o protect their rear and secure their retreat. 611. Grand guards are seldom intrenched, and never without the orders of the General, except by a barricade or ditch when exposed in a plain to attacks of cavalry. 612. The General of Division, if he thinks proper, changes the stations and orders of these guards, and establishes posts to connect the brigades or protect the exterior flanks. 613. After a grand guard is posted, the first care of the commander and of the field officer of the day is to get news of the enemy; then to reconnoitre his position, and the roads, bridges, fords, and defiles. This reconnoissance determines the force and position of the small posts and their sentinels day and night. These posts, according to their importance, are commanded by officers or non-commissioned officers; the cavalry posts may be relieved every four or eight hours. 614. The commander of a grand guard receives detailed instructions from the General and field officer of the day of the brigade, and instructs the commanders of the small posts as to their duties and the arrangements for defense or retreat. The commanders of grand guards may, in urgent cases, change the positions of the small posts. If the small posts are to change their positions at night, they wait until the grand guard have got into position and darkness hides their movements from the enemy; then march silently and rapidly under the charge of an officer. 615. In detached corps, small posts of picked men are at night sent forward on the roads by which the enemy may attack or turn the position. They watch the forks of the roads, keep silence, conceal themselves, light no fires, and often change place. They announce the approach of the H2 so

Page  90 REVISED REGULATIONS Grand Guards and other Outposts. enemy by signals agreed upon, and retreat, by routes examined during the day, to places selected, and rejoin the guard at daybreak. 616. Grand guards have special orders in each case, and the following in all eases: to inform the nearest posts and the field officer of the day, or the General of Brigade, of the march and movements of the enemy, and of the attacks they receive or fear; to examine every person passing tear the post, particularly those comiig from without; to arrest suspicious persons, and all soldiers and camp-followers who try to pass out without permission, and to send to the General, unless otherwise directed, all country people who come in. 617. All out-guards stand to arms at night on the approach of patrols, rounds, or other parties; the sentinel over the arms has orders to call them out. 618. Advanced posts will not take arms for inspection or ceremony when it would expose them to the view of the enemy. 619. Grand guards are often charged with the care and working of telegraphic signals. 620. The sentinels and vedettes are placed on points from which they can see farthest, taking care not to break their connection with each other or with their posts. They are concealed from the enemy as much as possible by walls, or trees, or elevated ground. It is generally even of more advantage not to be seen than to see far. They should not be placed near covers, where the enemy may capture them. 621. A sentinel should always be ready to fire; vedettes carry their pistols or carbines in their hands. A sentinel must be sure of the presence of an enemy before he fires; once satisfied of that, he must fire, though all defense on his part be useless, as the safety of the post may depend on it. Sentinels fire on all persons deserting to the enemy. 622. If the post must be where a sentinel on it cannot communicate with the guard, a Corporal and three men are detached for it, or the sentinels are doubled, that one may communicate with the guard. During the day the communication may be made by signals, such as raising a eap or handkerchief. At night sentinels are placed on low ground, the better to see objects against the sky. 623. To lessen the duty of rounds, and keep more men on the alert at night, sentinels are relieved every hour. To prevent sentinels from being surprised, it is sometimes well to precede the countersign by signals, such as striking the musket with the hand, striking the!ands together, &C. 624. On the approach of any one at night, the sentinel orders" Halt!" If the order is not obeyed after one repeated, he fires. If obeyed, he calls -'WTlO joes t7zreP." If answered-"Rott" or 90

Page  91 FO THE ARM!. 91 Grand Guards and other Outposts. "Patrol," he says-" Stand: Advance one with the countersign." If more than one advance at the same time, or the person who advances fails to give the countersign or signal agreed on, the sentinel fires, and falls back on his guard. The sentinel over the arms, as soon as his hail is answered, turns out the guard, and the Corporal goes to reconnoitre. When it is desirable to hide the position of the sentinel from the enemy, the hail is replaced by signals; the sentinel gives the signal, and those approaching the counter signal. 625. With raw troops, or when the light troops of the enemy are numerous or active, and when the country is broken or wooded, the night stormy or dark, sentinels should be doubled. In this case, while one watches, the other, called a flying sentinel, moves about, examining the paths and hollows. 626. The commandants of grand guards visit the sentinels often change their positions when necessary; make them repeat their orders teach them under what circumstances and at what signals to retire, ano particularly not to fall back directly on their guard if pursued, but tt lead the enemy in a circuit. 627. At night, half the men of the grand guard off post watch undel arms, while the rest lie down, arms by their side. The horses are always bridled; the horsemen hold the reins, and must not sleep. 628. When a grand guard of cavalry is so placed as not to be liable to a sudden attack from the enemy, the General may permit the horses to be fed during the night, unbridling for this purpose a few at a timethe horsemen being vigilant to prevent them from escaping. 629. An hour before break of day, infantry grand guards stand to arms, and cavalry mount. At the advanced posts, some of the infantry are all night under arms, some of the cavalry on horseback. 630. The commander of a grand guard regulates the numbers, the hours, and the march of patrols and rounds, according to the strength of his troop and the necessity for precaution; and, accompanied by those who are to command the patrols and rounds during the night, he will reconnoitre all the routes they are to follow. 631. Patrols and rounds march slowly, in silence, and with great pre. caution; halt frequently to listen and examine the ground. The rounds consist of an officer or non-commissioned officer, and two or three men. 632. Toward break of day the patrols ought to be more frequent, and sent to greater distances. They examine the hollow-ways and ground likely to conceal an enemy, but with great caution, to avoid being cut off, or engaged in an unequal combat; if they meet the enemy, they fire and attempt to stop his march. Whi.le the patrols are out, the posts are under arms. FOR THE ARMY. 91

Page  92 92 REVISED PEGULATIONS Grand Guards and other Outposts. 633. Cavalry patrols should examine the country to a greater distance than infantry, and report to the infantry guard every thing they observe. T'he morning patrols and scouts do not return until broad daylight; and when they return, the night sentinels are withdrawn, and the posts for the day resumed. 634. When patrols are sent beyond the advanced posts, the posts and sentinels should be warned. 635. On their return, commanders of patrols report in regard to the ground and every thing they have observed of the movements of the enemy, or of his posts, and the commandant of the grand guard reports to the field officer of the day. 636. The fires of grand guards should be hidden by a wall, or ditch, or other screen. To deceive the enemy, fires are sometimes made on ground not occupied. Fires are not permitted at small posts liable to surprise. 637. The horses of cavalry guards are watered or fed by detachments; during which the rest are ready to mount. 638. If a body of troops attempt to enter the camp at night, unless their arrival has been announced, or the commander is known to, or is the bearer of a written order to the commander of the grand guard, he stops them, and sends the commander under escort to the field officer of the day, and warns the posts near him. 639. Bearers of flags are not permitted to pass the outer chain of sentinels; their faces are turned from the post or army; if necessary, their eyes are bandaged; a non-commissioned officer stays with them to prevent indiscretion of the sentinels. 640. The commandant of the grand guard receipts for dispatches, and sends them to the field officer of the day or General of Brigade, and dismisses the bearer; but if he has discovered what ought to be concealed from the enemy, he is detained as long as necessary. 641. Deserters are disarmed at the advanced posts, and sent to the commander of the grand guard, who gets from them all the information he can concerning his post. If many come at night, they are received cautiously, afew at a trime. They are sent in the morning to the field officer of the day, or to the nearest post or camp, to be conducted to the General of the brigade. All suspected persons are searched by the commanders of the posts. 642. When an enemy advances to attack, unless he is in too great force, or the grand guard is to defend an intrenched post or a defile, it will take the positions and execute the movements to check the enemy, actin g as skirmishers, or fighting in close I open order, as may be best 92 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  93 FOR THE ARMY. Intrenched Posts.-Detachments. The guard joins its corps when in line, or when a sufficient number of troops have reached the ground it defends. INTRENCHED POSTS. 643. Unless the army be acting on the defensive, no post should be ientrenched, except to cover the weak parts of the line, or at points which the enemy cannot avoid, or in mountain warfare, or to close a defile, or cover winter quarters. 644. Posts connected with the operations of an army are intrenched only by order of the General commanding-in-chief or a General of Division. 645. Any intrenchment that requires artillery is considered as a post, and a guard or garrison and commander are assigned to it. 646. The General who establishes an intrenched post gives to its eommander detailed instructions in regard to its defense, and the circumstances under which the defense should cease. 647. The commander reconnoitres his post; distributes the troops; posts the officers and non-commissioned officers; forms a reserve; gives orders for all contingencies he can foresee; supposes an attack, and arranges his troops for defense, so as to prepare them for attack, day or night. 648. In dark weather he redoubles his vigilance, and changes the hours and direction of the rounds and patrols. He permits no flags of truce, deserters, or strangers to enter. If a flag ought to pass his post, he bandages his eyes. He refuses admittance to a relief or any other party until he has carefully examined them. In case of an attack, he does not wait for orders or hold a council. Having defended his post to the last extremity, or till the purpose of the defense, according to his instructions, is answered, he may then spike his guns and rejoin the army under cover of night, or by cutting his way through the enemy. DETACHMENTS. 649. When a detachment is to be formed from the different regiments of a brigade, the Assistant Adjutant-General of the brigade assembles it, and turns it over to the commander. 650. When a detachment is to be formed from different brigades, the Assistant Adjutant-General in each forms the contingent of the brigade, and sends it to the place of assembling. 651. Detachments are generally formed by taking battalions, squadrons, companies, platoons in turn, according to the roster for such detail. 652. When the detachment is to consist of men from every company or troop, the first on the roster for guard are taken. 9a

Page  94 REVISED REGULATIONS Reconnoissances. 653. Officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers, whose tour it is to go on detachment, if employed otherwise at the time, are relieved frown the duty they are on, if they can reach camp in time to march with the detachment. 654. When detachments meet, the command is regulated while they serve together as if they formed one detachment. But the senior officer cannot prevent the commander of any detachment from moving, when he thinks proper, to execute the orders he has received. 655. On the return of a detachment, the commander reports to the head-quarters from which he received his orders. RECONNOISSANCES. 656. Near an enemy, daily reconnoissances are made to observe the ground in front, and to discover whether the advanced guards of the enemy have been increased or put in motion, or any other sign of his preparation for march or action. 657. They are made by small parties of cavalry and infantry, from the brigade, under direction of the General of Division or the General of a separate brigade, and to less distance by the patrols of the grand guard, and are not repeated at the same hour or by the same route. On tke plain, reconnoissances are made by cavalry; among mountains, by infantry, with a few horsemen to carry intelligence. 658. Reconnoitring parties observe the following precautions: to leave small posts, or sentinels at intervals, to transmit intelligence to the advanced posts of the army, unless the return is to be by a different route; to march with caution, to avoid fighting; and see, if possible, without being seen; to keep an advanced guard; to send well-mounted men ahead of the advanced guard, and on the flank of the party; to instruct the scouts that no two should enter a defile or mount a hill together, but to go one at a time, while one watches to carry the news if the other is taken. 659. Before daybreak the advanced guard and scouts are drawn closer; the party then march slowly and silently, stop frequently to listen, and keep the horses that neigh in the rear. The party should enter no wood, defile, village, or inclosure, until it has been fully examined by the scouts. 660. Special reconnoissances are made under the instruction of the General in command, by such officers and with such force as he may direct. 661. Offensive or forced reconnoissances are to ascertain with certainty points in the enemy's position, or his strength. They are sometimes preludes to real actions, and sometimes only demonstrations. They drive in bis outposts, and sometimes engage special corps of his line. They are 94

Page  95 FOR TIlE ARMY. 95 Partisans and Flankers. Partisans and lFlanakers. only made by the order of the General commanding-in-chief, or the commander of an isolated corps. 662. In all reports of reconnoissances, the officer making them shall distinguish expressly what he has seen from the accounts he has not been able to verify personally. 663. In special and offensive reconnoissances, the report must be accompanied by a field-sketch of the localities, the dispositions and de fensos of the enemy. PARTISANS AND FLANKERS. 664. The operations of partisan corps depend on the nature and theatre of the war; they enter into the general plan of operations, and are conducted under the orders of the Genera commanding-in-chief. 665. The composition and strength of partisan corps and detachments of flankers depend on the object, the difficulties, the distance, and the probable time of the expedition. 666. The purpose of these isolated corps is to reconnoitre at a distance on the flanks of the army, to protect its operations, to deceive the enemy? to interrupt his communications, to intercept his couriers and his correspondence, to threaten or destroy his magazines, to carry off his posts and his convoys, or, at all events, to retard his march by making him detach largely for their protection. 667. While these corps fatigue the enemy and embarrass his operations, they endeavor to inspire confidence and secure the good will of the inhabitants in a friendly country, and to hold them in check in an enemy's country. 668. They move actively, appear unexpectedly on different points in such a manner as to make it impossible to estimate their force, or to tell whether they are irregular forces or an advanced guard. 669. These operations require vigilance, secrecy, energy, and promptness. The partisan commander must frequently supply by stratagem and audacity what he wants in numbers. 670. These detachments are sometimes composed of different arms, but the service belongs more particularly to the light cavalry, which can move to a distance by rapid marches, surprise the enemin, Attack unexpecetedly, and retire as promptly. 671. Stormy weather, fogs, extreme heat, and the night above all, are fivorable to the success of ambuscades; when the enemy are careless, the break of day is the best time. A partisan commander should communicate to his second in command his secret orders, the direction and object of the expedition, and the diierent points of junction with the army. 672. Guides of the country and spies are often necessary to the parti.

Page  96 REVISED REGULATIONS Partisans and Flankers-X Marches. san. They are examined separately, and confronted if their accounts differ. When there is but one guide, he marches with the advanced guard, guarded by two men, and bound if necessary. Peddlers and smugglers are specially suitable for spies. 673. A fit time to attack a convoy is at a halt, or when they begin to park, or when they are watering, or passing a wood or a defile; at a bend of the road, a bridge, or steep ascent. 674. The attacking party may be principally cavalry, with some infantry. The first object is to disperse the escort. A part of the detachment attacks the main body of the escort, another the wagons, and a third is in reserve; skirmishers line the road, and try to cut the traces, and to seize the front and rear wagons, and turn them across the road, to prevent the train from advancing or retreating. 675. If the convoy is parked, the cavalry surrounds it, assails the escort, and tries to draw it away from the train. The infantry then engage the troops remaining at the park, slip under the wagons, and get into the park. When the cavalry is alone and the enemy are shaken, they dismount a portion of the men to supply the want of infantry. 676. If it is a large convoy, the principal attack is made on the centre; the most valuable wagons are also selected, and additional horses are put to them if the attack is successful. Those that cannot be carried off are burned. MARCHES. 677. The object of the movement and the nature of the ground determine the order of march, the kind of troops in each column, and the number of columns. 678. The force is divided into as many columns as circumstances permit, without weakening any one too much. They ought to preserve their communications, and be within supporting distance of each other. The commander of each column ought to know the strength and direction of the others. 679. The advance and rear guards are usually light troops; their strength and composition depend on the nature of the ground and the position of the enemy. They serve to cover the movements of the army, and to hold the enemy in check until the General has time to make his arrangements. 680. The advance guard is not always.at the head of the column; in a march to a flank, it takes such positions as cover the movement. Sappers are attached to the advanced guard if required. 681. The "general," sounded one hour before the time of marching, is the signal to s;lrike tents, to load the wagons, and pack horses, and send themn to the place of assembling. The fires are then put out, and care taken 96

Page  97 FOR TflE ARMY. 97 Marches. to avoid burning straw, &c., or giving to the enemy any other indication of the movement. 682. The "march" will be beat in the infantry, and the "advance" sounded in the cavalry, in succession, as each is to take its place in the column. 683. When the army should form suddenly to meet the enemy, the "long roll" is beat, and "to horse" sounded. The troops form rapidly in front of their camp. 684. Batteries of artillery and their caissons move with the corps to which they are attached; the field train and ambulances march at the rear of the column; and the baggage with the rear guard. 685. Cavalry and infantry do not march together, unless the proximity of the enemy makes it necessary. 686. In cavalry marches, when distant from the enemy, each regiment, and, if possible, each squadron, forms a separate column, in order to keep up the same gait from front to rear, and to trot, when desirable, on good ground. In such cases, the cavalry may leave camp later, and can give more rest to the horses, and more attention to the shoeing and harness. Horses are not bridled until the time to start. 687. When necessary, the orders specify the rations the men ali to carry in their haversacks. The field officers and Captains make inspections frequently during the march; at halts they examine the knapsacks, valises, and haversacks, and throw aw,y all articles not authorized. The officers and non-commissioned officers of cavalry companies attend perSonally to the packs and girths. 688. When it can be avoided, troops should not be assembled on highroads or other places where they interrupt the communication. 689. Generals of Division and commanders of detached corps send a staff officer to the rendezvous, in advance, to receive the troops, who, on arriving, take their place in the order of battle, and form in close column, unless otherwise ordered. Artillery, or trains halted on the roads, form in file on one side. 690. The execution of marching orders must not be delayed. If the commander is not at the head of his troops when they are to march, the next in rank puts the column in motion. 691. If possible, each column is preceded by a detachment of sappers. to remove obstacles to the march, aided, when necessary, by infantry, or the people of the country. The detachment is divided into two sections. one stops to remove the first obstacle, the other moves on to the next. 692. In night marches, and at bad places, and at cross-roads, whet necessary, intelligent non-commissioned officers are posted to show the way, and are relieved by the regiments as they come us. 7 FOR THE ARMY. 97

Page  98 REVISED REGULATIONS Marches. 693. On the march no one shall fire a gun, or cry "halt" or "march" without orders. 694. Soldiers are not to stop for water; the canteens should be filled before starting. 695. It is better to avoid villages; but, if the route lies through them, officers and non-commissioned officers are to be vigilant to prevent straggling. Halts should not take place at villages. 696. Besides the rear guard, the General sometimes takes a detachment from the last regiment, and adds to it non-commissioned officers from each regiment, to examine villages and all hiding-places on the route, to bring up stragglers and seize marauders. 697. In night marches, the Sergeant-Major of each regiment remains at the rear with a drummer, to give notice when darkness or difficulty stops the march. In cavalry, a trumpet is placed in rear of each squadron, and the signal repeated to the head of the regiment. 698. The General and field officers frequently stop, or send officers to the rear, to see that the troops march in the prescribed order, and keep their distances. To quicken the march, the General warns the Colonels, and may order a signal to be beat. It is repeated in all the regiments. 699. In approaching a defile, the Colonels are warned; they close their legiments as they come up; each regiment passes separately, at an accelerated pace, and in as close order as possible. The leading regiment having passed, and left room enough for the whole column in close order, then halts, and moves again as soon as the last regiment is through. In the cavalry, each squadron, before quickening the pace to rejoin the column" takes its original order of march. 700. When the distance from the enemy permits, each regiment, after closing up in front and rear of the defile, stacks arms. 701. Halts to rest and re-form the troops are frequent during the day, depending on the object and length of the march. They are made in preference after the passage of defiles. 702. No honors are paid by troops on the march or at halts. 703. The sick march with the wagons. 704. Led horses of officers, and the horses of dismounted men, foll(:w their regiment. The baggage wagons never march in the column. When the General orders the field train and ambulances to take place in the column, he designates the position they shall take. 705. If two corps meet on the same road, they pass to the right, and both continue their march, if the road is wide enough; if it is not, the first in the order of battle takes the road, the other halts. 706. A corps in march must not be cut by another. If two corps meet at cross-roads, that which urri-ves last halts if the other is in motion. 98

Page  99 FOR ~ TH RM.9 Directions for Keeping the Journal. A corps in march passes a corps at a halt, if it has precedence in the order of battle, or if the halted corps is not ready to move at once. 7907. A column that halts to let another column pass resumes the march in advance of the train of this column. If a column has to pass a train, the train must halt, if necessary, till the column passes. The column which has precedence must yield it if the commander, on seeing the orders of the other, finds it for the interest of the service. JOURNAL. 708. Commanding officers of troops marching through a country little known, will keep journals of their marches according to the form and directions hereto annexed. At the end of the march a copy of the journal will be retained at the station where the troops arrive, and the orig(inal will be forwarded to the head-quarters of the Department, or corps d'armde. Thence, after a copy has been taken, it will be transmitted, through the head-quarters of the army, to the Adjutant-General, for the information of the War Department. 709. The object of the journal is to furnish data for maps, and information which may serve for future operations. Every point of practical importance should therefore be noted, even though not indicated in these directions. DIRECTIONS FOR KEEPING THE JOURNAL. 710. The journal should be kept in a pocket note book; or, if one cannot be obtained, in a book made of sheets of paper folded to half the letter size. 711. The record is to run from the bottom to the top of each page. 712. The horizontal divisions in the column headed "Route" represent portions of a day's march. The distance, in miles, between each of the horizontal divisions, will be noted in the column headed "'Distance," which will be summed up at the top of each column, and the sum carried to the bottom of the next column. 713. The notes within each horizontal division are to show the general direction of the march, and every object of interest observed in its course. All remarkable features of the country, therefore, such as hills, streams, fords, springs, houses, villages, forests, marshes, &c., and the places of encampment, will be sketched in their relative positions, as well as noted by name. 714. The "Remarks" corresponding to each division will be upon the soil, productions, quantity and quality of timber, grass, water, fords, nature of the roads, &c., and important incidents. They should show where provisions, forage, fuel, and water can be obtained; whether the FOR THE ARMY. 99

Page  100 REVISED REGULATIONS Journal. FORM OF JOURNAL of the march of [here insert the names of the regimnents from [here insert the point of departure] to [the stopping-plac], Date. Hour. Weather Distance. Route.' 180oa,_ 19 Total, 19 3' July 8. High timbered Peak. a Camnp No. 1. % 0 Sqins :z II 0 0 o 0) v l !5 o. 10 --- uo 10. 3 A L 1 Mt.P. Kent. 6. July 7. 100 1860. 14 5. a.m. 8 1 p.m. 6.80. 4 4.30.

Page  101 FOR TH ARMY. 101 Journal. JOURNAL. or companies composing the c)lumn], commanded by parsuant to [here give the No. and date of order for the march]. Remarks. Road rocky; but little grass; good water. Plenty of timber on summit of hills, extending three miles; road to right of hills. Good shelter for camp at foot of peak; fuel plenty. Springs of sweet water, with good grass near. Road to this point rather more sandy. Road runs through a caflon i mile long, to right of a small stream, marsh on left of stream; water sweet; grass excellent. Halted to graze two huurs. No Indian signs. Companies F, G, and I, 3d, detached at Mount P, under command of - (see par. 3, General Orders No. ), to take road to. A small creek, easily forded. Road turns short to right at top of hill after crossing river; crossing good, but a little boggy on the right bank. This bottom shows signs of recent overflow, when it must have been impassable; banks low; water sweet; no wood near crossing; road hard and good up to river. I2 FOR THj& ARMY. 101

Page  102 ax oO0 p I Very pleasant; cloudy in the p. m. a, VI S. S. E i S. S./E. I I& 8 W. 0~ I s~

Page  103 FOR THE ARMY. Journal. Continued. Remarks. At the point where the road forks, turn to the right. road leads to a deep ravine, which cannot be crossed. After the road strikes the ravine, it runs one mile along its bank before coming to the crossing-place. The camping-ground is at springs, half a mile beyond the ravine. Old Indian signs at the springs. Road less rocky; last three miles rather sandy; no water. Passed at the point marked t an Indian grave. Road still rocky; good springs, where casks should be filled. No more water for twenty miles after leaving sprungs. Occasional hills to left of road; no wood or grass 103 The left-hand

Page  104 10 RVSE REULTI Posts. Battles. streams to be crossed are fordable, miry, have quicksands or steep banks, and whether they overflow their banks in wet seasons; also the quality of the water; and, in brief, every thing of practical importance. 715. When a detachment leaves the main column, the point on the "Route" will be noted, and the reason given in the Remarks. The commander of the detachment will be furnished with a copy of the journal up to that point, and will continue it over his new line of march. POSTS. 716. Whenever a new post is established, or a camp, meant to be occupied for some time, the commanding officer will forward to the Adjutant-General's office, as well as to the head-quarters of the Department, or corps d'arnmee if in the field, an accurate description of its locality, of its distance and bearings from the nearest known point, and the manner of reaching it by mail, together with a sketch of the country in its immediate vicinity. 717. Military posts will be named by the Secretary of War. BATTLES. 718. Dispositions for battle depend on the number, kind, and quality of the troops opposed, on the ground, and on the objects of the war; but the following rules are to be observed generally: 719. In attacking, the advanced guard endeavors to capture the enemy's outposts, or cut them off from the main body. Having done so, or 4riven them in, it occupies, in advancing, all the points that can cover )r facilitate the march of the army, or secure its retreat, such as bridges, 4efiles, woods, and heights; it then makes attacks, to occupy the enemy, without risking too much, and to deceive them as to the march and projects of the army. 720. When the enemy is hidden by a curtain of advanced troops, the commandant of the advanced guard sends scouts. under intelligent officers, to the right and left, to ascertain his position and movements. If he does not succeed in this way, he tries to unmask the enemy by demonstrations; threatens to cut the advance from the main body; makes false attacks; partial and impetuous charges in echelon; and if all fail, he makes a real attack to accomplish the object. 721. Detachments left by the advanced guard to hold points in the rear rejoin it when other troops come up. If the army takes a position, and the advanced guard is separated from it by defiles or heights, the communication is secured by troops drawn from the main body. 722. At proper distance from the enemy, the troops are formed for the attack in several lines; if oily twc ean be formed, some battalions in 104 REVISED REGULATICNS

Page  105 POR THE ARMY. Battles. column are placed behind the wings of the second line. The lines may be formed of troops in column or in order of battle, according to the ground and plan of attack. 723. The advanced guard may be put in the line or on the wings, or other position, to aid the pursuit or o,ver the retreat. 724. The reserve is formed of the best troops of foot and horse, to complete a victory or make good a retreat. It is placed in the rear of the centre, or chief point of attack -or defense. 725. The cavalry should be distributed in echelon on the wings and at the centre, on favorable ground. 726. It should be instructed not to take the gallop until within charging distance; never to receive a charge at a halt, but to meet it, or, if not strong enough, to retire manoeuvring; and in order to be ready for the pursuit, and prepared against a reverse, or the attacks of the reserve, not to engage all its squadrons at once, but to reserve one-third, in column or in echelon, abreast of or in the rear of one of the wings; this arrangement is better than a second line with intervals. 727. In the attack, the artillery is employed to silence the batteries that protect the position. In the defense, it is better to direct its fire on t]le advancing troops. In either case, as many pieces are united as possible, the fire of artillery being formidable in proportion to its concentration. 728. In battles and military operations it is better to assume the offensive, and put the enemy on the defensive; but to be safe in doing so requires a larger force than the enemy, or better troops, and favorable ground. When obliged to act on the defensive, the advantage of position and of making the attack may sometimes be secured by forming in rear of the ground on which we are to fight, and advancing at the moment of action. In mountain warfare, the assailant has always the disadvantage; and even in offensive warfare in the open field, it may frequently be very important, when the artillery is well posted, and any advantage of ground may be secured, to await the enemy and compel him to attack. 729. The attack should be made with a superior force on the decisive point of the enemy's position, by masking this by false attacks and demonstrations on other po)ints, and by concealing the troops intended for it by the ground, or by other troops in their front. 730. Besides the arrangements which depend on the supposed plan of the enemy, the wings must be protected by the ground, or supported by troops in echelon; if the attack of the enemy is repulsed, the offensive must at once be taken, to inspire the troops, to disconcert the enemy, and oftento decide the action In thus taking the offensive, a close column should lot)

Page  106 O6 REVISED REGULATIONS Battles. be pushed rapidly on the wing or flank of the enemy. The divisions of .his column form in line of battle successively, and each division moves to the fiont as soon as formed, in order, by a rapid attack in echelon, to prevent the enemy from changing front or bringing up his reserves. In all arrangements, especially in those for attack, it is most important to conceal the design until the moment of execution, and then to execute it with the greatest rapidity. The night, therefore, is preferred for the movement of troops on the flank or rear of the enemy, otherwise it is necessary to mask their march by a grand movement in front, or by taking a wide circuit. 731. In making an attack, the communications to the rear and for retreat must be secured, and the General must give beforehand all necessary orders to provide for that event. 732. When a success is gained, the light troops should pursue the enemy promptly and rapidly. The other troops will restore order in their columns, then advance from position to position, always prepared for an attack or to support the troops engaged. 733. Before the action, the Generals indicate the places where they will be; if they change position, they give notice of it, or leave a staff officer to show where they have gone. 734. During the fight the officers and non-commissioned officers keep the men in the ranks, and enforce obedience if necessary. Soldiers must not be permitted to leave the ranks to strip or rob the dead,-nor even to assist the wounded unless by express permission, which is only to be given after the action is decided. The highest interest and most proissing duty is to win the victory, by winning which only can a proper care of the wounded be ensured. 735. Before the action, the Quartermaster of the division makes all the necessary arrangements for the transportation of the wounded. He establishes the ambulance dep6ts in the rear, and gives his assistants the necessary instructions for the service of the ambulance wagons and other means of removing the wounded. 736. The ambulance dep6t, to which the wounded are carried or directed for immediate treatment, is generally established at the most convenient building nearest the field of battle. A red flag marks its place, or the way to it, to the conductors of the ambulances and to the wounded who can walk. 737. The active ambulances follow the troops engaged to succor the wounded and remove them to the dep6ts; for this purpose the conductors should always have the necessary assistants, that the soldiers may have no excuse to leave the ranks for that object. 738. The medical director of the division, after consultation with the REVISED REGULATIONS 106

Page  107 FOR THE ARMY. 107 Battles.-Prisoners of War. Quartermaster-General, distributes the medical officers and hospital attendants at his disposal, to the depots and active ambulances. He will send officers and attendants, when practicabie, to the active ambulances, to relieve the wounded who require treatment before being removed from the ground. He will see that the depots and ambulances are provided with the necessary apparatus, medicines, and stores. He will take post and render his professional services at the principal dep6t. 739. If the enemy endanger the depot, the Quartermaster takes the orders of the General to remove it or to strengthen its guard. 740. The wounded in the depots and the sick are removed, as soon as possible, to the hospitals that have been established by the QuartermasterGeneral of the army on the flanks or rear of the army. 741. After an action, the officers of ordnance collect the munitions of war left on the field, and make a return of them to the General. The Quartermaster's Department collects the rest of the public property captured, and makes the returns to head-quarters. 742. Written reports for the General commanding-in-chief are made by commandants of regiments, batteries, and separate squadrons, and by all commanders of a higher grade, each in what concerns his own command, and to his immediate commander. 743. When an officer or soldier deserves mention for conduct in action, a special report shall be made in his case, and the General commanding-in-chief decides whether to mention him in his report to the government and in his orders. But he shall not be mentioned in the report until he has been mentioned in the orders to the army. These special reports are examined with care by the intermediate commanders, to verify the facts, and secure commendation and rewards to the meritorious only. 744. The report of battles, which must frequently be made before these special reports of persons are scrutinized, is confined to general praise or blame, and an account of the operations. PRISONERS OF WAR. 745. Prisoners of war will be disarmed and sent to the rear, and reported as soon as practicable to the head-quarters. The return of prisoners from the Head-Quarters of the Army to the War Department will specify the number, rank, and corps. 746. The private property of prisoners will be duly respected, and each shall be treated with the regard due to his rank. They are to obey the necessary orders given them. They receive for subsistence one ration each. without regard to rank; and the wounded are to be treated with FOR THP, AP-MY. 107

Page  108 108 REV~~~~~~~~~~~SEI) REGULATIONS~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Convoys and their Escorts. the same care as the wounded of the army. Other allowances to themt will depend on conventions with the enemy. Prisoners' horses will be fken for the army. 747. Exchanges of prisoners and release of officers on parole depend on the orders of the General commanding-in-chief, under the instructions of government. CONVOYS AND THEIR ESCORTS. 748. The strength and composition of the escort of a convoy depend on the country, the nature and value of the convoy, and the dangers it may incur. A larger escort is required for a convoy of powder, that the defense may not be near the train. 749. Cavalry is employed in escorts chiefly to reconnoitre; the proportion is larger as the country is more open. 750. Pioneers or working-parties are attached to convoys to mend roads, remove obstacles, and erect defenses. The convoys should always be provided with spare wheels, poles, axles, &c. 751. The commandant of the escort should receive detailed instructions in writing. 752. As far as the defense permits, the commander of the escort shall refer to the officer in charge of the convoy for the hours of departure, the halts, the parking and order of the train, and the precautions against accidents. 753. Officers who accompany the convoy, but do not belong to the escort, shall exercise no authority in it except by consent of the commander. If these officers are junior to the commander, he may assign them to duty if the defense requires it. 754. Large convoys are formed into divisions, each with a conductor. The distance between the wagons is four paces. A small party of infantry is attached to each division. 755. Generally, munitions of war are at the head of the convoy, subsistence next, and then other military stores; the butler last. But always that part of the convoy which is most important to the army shall be where it is most secure from danger. 756. The commandant should send out reconnoitring parties, and never put the convoy in motion until their reports have been received. Hie always forms an advance and rear guard, and keeps the main body under his immediate order at the most important point, with small guards or posts at other points. 757. In an open country tho main body marches by the side of the road, opposite the centre of the convoy; in other cases at the head or rear of the column, as the one or the other is more exposed. 108 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  109 F0 R THIE ARMY. 109 Convoys and their Escorts. 758. The advance guard precedes the convoy far enough to remove all obstacles to its advance. It examines the woods, defiles, and villages. and by mounted men gives information to the commander, and receives his orders. It reconnoitres places for halts and parks. 759. If the head of the column is threatened, the advanced guard seizes the defiles and places which the enemy might occupy, and holds them until the main body advances to the front and relieves it; the main body holds the positions until the head of the convoy arrives, and then leaves detachments which are relieved by the parties marching with the divisions; the posts are not abandoned until the whole convoy has passed and the position is no longer important. 760. When the rear is threatened, like measures are taken; the rear guard defends the ground and retards the enemy by breaking the bridges and blocking the road. 761. If the flanks are threatened, and the ground is broken, and many defiles are to be passed, the defense of the convoy becomes more difficult; the advance and rear guards must be reduced, the flanks strengthened, and positions which will cover the march of the convoy must be occupied by the main body of the troops before the head of the convoy reaches them, and until it has passed. 762. If the convoy is large, and has to pass places that the force and position of the enemy make dangerous, the loss of the whole convoy must not be risked; it must pass by divisions, which reunite after the passage. In this case the greater part of the troops guard the first division; they seize the important points, and cover them with light troops, or, if necessary, with small posts, and hold them until all the divisions have passed. 763. If there is artillery in the convoy, the commander of the escort uses it for the defense. 764. To move faster and make the defense easivr, the wagons move in double file whenever the road allows it. If a wagon breaks, it is at once removed from the road; when repaired, it takes the rear; when it cannot be repaired, its load and horses are distributed to some of the other wagons kept in the rear for that purpose. 765. Convoys by water are escorted on the same principles. Each boat has a small infantry guard; one portion of the escort precedes or follows the convoy in boats. The cavalry march opposite the convoy; the advance and rear guard move by land, and a]' are connected by flankers with the convoy. Where a river runs through a narrow valley, the body of the infantry moves by land to prevent the enemy from occupying the heights and disturbing the cornvoy. 766. Convoys halt every hour to let the horses take bre.::t and the wagons o)e up. Long hakt are may but seldom, anA only in places II

Page  110 REVISED REGULATIONS Convoys and their Escorts.-Baggage Trains. that have been reconnoitred and found favorable for defense. At night the park is arranged for defense, and in preference at a distance from inhabited places, if in an enemy's country. 767. The wagons are usually parked in ranks, axle against axle, the poles in the same direction, and with sufficient space between the ranks for the horses. If an attack is feared, they are parked in square, the hind-wheels outside, and the horses inside. 768. On the appearance of the enemy during the march, the commander closes up the wagons and continues his march in order; he avoids fighting; but if the enemy seizes a position that commands his road, he attacks vigorously with the mass of his force, but is not to continue the pursuit far from the convoy. The convoy halts, and resumes the march when the position is carried. 769. When the enemy is too strong to be attacked, the convoy is parked in square if there is room; if not, closed up in double file; at the front and rear the road is blocked by wagons across it. The drivers are dismounted at the heads of the horses. They are not permitted to make their escape. The light troops keep the enemy at a distance as long as possible, and are supported when necessary, but prudently, as the troops must be kept in hand to resist the main attack. 770. If a wagon takes fire in the park, remove it if possible; if not, remove first the ammunition wagons, then those to leeward of the fire. 771. When a whole convoy cannot be saved, the most valuable part may sometimes be by abandoning the rest. If all efforts fail, and there is no hope of succor, the convoy must be set on fire and the horses killed that cannot be saved; the escort may then cut its way through. 772. If the convoy is of prisoners of war, every effort should be made to reach a village or strong building where they may be confined; if forced to fight in the field, the prisoners must be secured and made to lie down until the action is over. BAGGAGE TRAINS. 773. The baggage train of general head-quarters and the trains of the several divisions are each under the charge of an officer of the Quartermaster's Department. These officers command and conduct the trains under the orders they receive from their respective head-quarters. When the trains of different divisions march together, or the train of a division marches with the train of general head-quarters, the senior Quartermaster directs the whole. 774. The Regimental Quartermaster has charge of the wagons, horses equipments, and all means of transport employed in the service of the regiment. UTnder the orders of the Colonel, he assembles them for the 110

Page  111 FOR T~~~~~~~~~~~~lE ARMY. 111~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ___ Bagg Tris march, and maintains the order and police of the train in park and on the march. On marches, the regimental trains are under the orders of the Quartermaster of the division. When the march is by brigade, the senior Regimental Quartermaster in the brigade, or the Quartermaster of the brigade, has the direction of the whole. The necessary wagon-masters, or non-commissioned officers to act as such, are employed with the several trains. 775. None but the authorized wagons are allowed to march with the train. The wagons of the several head-quarters, the regimental wagons, and the wagons of sutlers authorized by orders from head-quarters to march with the train, are all to be conspicuously marked. 776. When the train of headquarters is to have a guard, the strength of the guard is regulated by the General. Generals of Brigade guard their trains by the men attached to the train of the first regiment of their brigades. The regimental trains are loaded, unloaded, and guarded, as far as practicable, by convalescents and men not effective in the ranks; in the cavalry, by dismounted men. When the guard of a train is the escort for its defense, the regulations in regard to convoys and escorts take effect. 777. Habitually each division is followed by its train, the regimenta trains uniting at the brigade rendezvous. When otherwise, the order for the movement of the divisions, brigades, and regiments contains the necessary directions in regard to the assembling and marching of the respective trains. The several trains march in an order analogous to the rank of the generals, and the order of battle of the troops to which they belong. Trains are not allowed in any case to be in the midst of the troops, or to impede the march of the troops. 778. The wagon-masters, under the orders of the officers of the Quartermaster's Department, exercise the necessary restraints over the teamsters and servants who leave their teams, or do not properly conduct them; oF who ill treat their horses, or who attempt to pillage, or run away in case of attack. 779. The General commanding the army and the Generals of Division will not permit any general or staff officer, or regiment under their orders, or any person whatsoever, attached to their command, to have more than the authorized amount or means of transportation. For this purpose they will themselves make, and cause to be made, frequent reviews and inspec tic is of the trains. They will see that no trooper is employed to lead rivate horse, no soldier to drive a private vehicle, and that no trooper put on foot to lend his horse to an officer. They will not permit the wagons of the artillery or of the train to be loaded with any thing foreign to theiri proper service, nor any public horse, for any occasion, to be harnessed to a private carriage. FOR TIIE ARMY. III Baggage Trains.

Page  112 REVISED REGULATIONS General Police. Safeguards. 780. The officers of the Quartermaster's Department, the wagon. masters, and all conductors of trains, are charged with watching that the regulations respecting transportation allowances are strictly observed. GENERAL POLICE. 781. When necessary, the General-in-chief or General of Division may appoint a provost marshal to take charge of prisoners, with a suitable guard, or other police force. 782. Private servants, not soldiers, will not be allowed to wear the uniform of any corps of the army, but each will be required to carry with him a certificate from the officer who employs him, verified, for regimental officers, by the signature of the Colonel; for other officers under the rank of Colonel, by the chief of their corps or department. 783. Laundresses permitted to follow the army will be furnished with certificates, signed as in t'!o preceding paragraph, and no woman of bad character will be allowed to follow the army. Other persons with the army, not officers or soldiers, sueh as guides of the country, interpreters, &c., will carry about them similar certificates from the headquarters that employs them. 784. Deserters firom the enemy, after being examined, will be secured for some days, as they may be spies in disguise; as opportunities offer, they will be sent to the rear; after which, if they are found lurking about the army, or attempting to return to the enemy, they will be treated with severity. 785. The arms and accoutrements of deserters will be turned over to the Ordnance Department, and their horses to the corps in want of them, after being branded with the letters "U.S." The compensation to be accorded to deserters, for such objects, will be according to appraisement, made under the direction of the Quartermaster's Department. The enlistment of deserters, without express permission from general headquarters, is prohibited. 786. It is forbidden to purchase horses without ascertaining the right of the party to sell. Stolen horses shall be restored. Estrays, in the enemy's country, when the owner is not discovered, are taken for the army. 787. Plundering and marauding, at all times disgraceful to soldiers, when committed on the persons or property of those whom it is the duty of the army to protect, become crimes of such enormity as to admit of no remission of the awful punishment which the military law awards against offenses of this nature. SAFEGUARDS. 788. Safeguards are protections granted t, persons or property in 112

Page  113 -~~~~FRTH RY 1 ___ Saeurs-igs foreign parts by the commanding general, or by other commanders within the limits of their command. 789. Safeguards are usually given to protect hospitals, public establishments, establishments of religion, charity, or instruction, museums, depositories of the arts, mills, post-offices, and other institutions of publie benefit; also to individuals whom it may be the interest of the army to respect. 790. A safeguard may consist of one or more men of fidelity and firmness, generally non-effective non-commissioned officers, furnished with a paper setting out clearly the protection and exemptions it is intended to secure, signed by the commander giving it, and his staff officer; or it may consist of such paper, delivered to the party whose person, family, house, and property it is designed to protect. These safeguards must be numbered and registered. 791. The men left as safeguards by one corps may be replaced by another. They are withdrawn when the country is evacuated; but if not, they have orders to await the arrival of the enemy's troops, and apply to the commander for a safe-conduct to the outposts. 792. Form of a safeguard: By authority of -, A safeguard is hereby granted to [A. B, or the house and family of A. B, or to the college, mills, or property; stating precisely the place, nature, and description of the person, property, or buildings]. All officers and soldiers belonging to the army of the United States are therefore commanded to respect this safeguard, and to afford, if necessary, protection to [the person, family, or property of, as the case may be]. Given at Tlead-Quarters, the- day of A. B, Major-General commanding-in-chief. By command of the General. C. D -, Adjutant-General. 55th Article of the Rules and Articles of War. "Whosoev,r belonging to the armies of the United States, employed in foreign parts, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death." SIEGES. 793. In the following regulations the besieging force is supposed to be two divisions of infantry and a brigade of cavalry. The same principles govern in other cases. 794. The Brigadier-Generals of infantry serve, in turn, as Generals of the trenches; one or more of them are detailed daily, according to the K2 8 FOR THE ARMY. 118 Safeguards.-Sieges.

Page  114 11 REIE REUAIN _____ Sigs front an(l number of attacks; they superintend the operations, and dispose the guards of the trenches to repulse sorties and protect the works. Officers of the general staff are assigned to them to transmit their orders and attend to the details of service. 795. The Colonels and Lieutenant-Colonels of infantry alternate for duty in the trenches; one or more are detailed daily; they superintend the service of the guards and workmen in the part of the work to which the General of the trenches assigns them, being posted with troops of their own regiments in preference. The commandant of the siege may place the Colonels on the roster wvith the Brigadier-Generals. 796. The commandants of engineers and artillery accompany the first troops before the place to examine the works and the approaches. When the engineers have completed the reconnoissance of the works, and of each front as far as practicable, the commandant of engineers makes a plan of the works as exact and detailed as possible, and, under the instructions of the General commanding the siege, draws up the general plan of the siege, and discusses it with the commandant of artillery in regard to the best employment of that arm. These officers then submit their joint or separate opinions to the General, who decides on the plan of the siege, and gives the orders for the execution. The commandant of engineers directs the construction of all the works of siege, under the authority of the General, and lays before him every day a report of his operations, and a plan showing the progress of the attack. The commandant of artillery also makes daily reports to the General of all that relates to his branch of the service. 797. The Quartermaster-General establishes the hospitals, and organizes the means for transporting the wounded to them. 798. The commanding General appoints a field officer of the trenches, who is aided by one or two Captains or Lieutenants. 799. The field officer of the trenches is charged with all the details relative to the assembling of the guards and the workmen. He distributes the guards on the different points of the attack agreeably to the orders of the General of the trenches, and forms the detachments of workmen for the engineers and artillery; that he may be prepared for this distribution, he receives every day from the Adjutant-General a statement of the details for the next day. 800 On the arrival of the General of the trenches, the field officer of the trenches gives him all the information necessary to enable him to station the troops, attends him in his visit to the trenches, and takes his orders on the changes to be made in the position of the troops. The execution is intrusted to the commandants of the troops. 801. Tlihe field offter of the trenches sees that men and litters are REVISED REGULATIONS 114 Sieges.

Page  115 FOR THE ARMY. Sieges. always ready to bring off the wounded. One or more companies of the guards of the trenches are put under his immediate orders for the preservation of order and police in the trenches. 802. The divisions, brigades, regiments, and battalions are encamped during the siege in the order of battle. The service of camp is conducted as heretofore prescribed. 803. The infantry has two kinds of siege service, -the guard of the trenches and the work of the trenches. 804. The guards of the trenches mount every day by battalions, in such order of detail that all the troops may take an equal share, and no part of the line be left too weak. If only one battalion is required, each division furnishes it alternately; if two are required, each division gives one; if three, one division furnishes two, the other one, alternately. The two battalions of the same division are not taken from the same brigade. 805. The detail for work of the trenches is by company, from all the regiments at one time, or in turn, and continues generally twelve hours. The detail from any regiment should never be less than a company. If only half a company would be needed from all the regiments at a time, every other regiment furnishes a full company alternately. 806. The battalions for guard are detailed at least twelve hours in advance; they furnish no other details during this tour. If the whole regiment is called out, it leaves a sufficient police guard in camp. 807. Twenty-four hours, or twelve at least, before mounting guard in the trenches, the battalions detailed for guard do not furnish workmen; and the companies of those battalions whose tour it would have been to work in the trenches, do not go there for twenty-four hours after guard, if possible, or at the least twelve. 808. The workmen who are required for other work than that of the trenches are taken from the roster for fatigue from the battalions and companies not employed in the trenches. 809. The battalions first for detail for guard of the trenches, and the companies first for detail for work in the trenches, furnish no other details, and are held on picket, ready to march at the call of the field officer of the trenches. 810. Materials for the siege, such as fascines, gabions, hurdles, pickets, &c., are furnished by the different corps, in the proportion ordered by the General. 811. Guards and workmen going to the trenches march without beat of drum or music. 812. At all times, and especially on the day the trenches are opened, 115

Page  116 -16 REVISED BEGULATIO Sieges. every thing is avoided likely to attract the attention of the enemy. With this view, the General may vary the hour of relieving guards. 813. The chiefs of engineers and artillery make requisitions for workmen in advance, that the details may be made in time to prevent any delay in the work. They should exceed the number strictly required, that there may be a reserve for unforeseen wants. If this reserve is found insufficient, the General directs the field officer of the trenches to call on the picket. 814. Before the guards and workmen march, the field officer of thetrenches arranges them so that each detachment can reach its ground without confusion. The troops are posted in the trenches according to the position of their regiments in the order of battle, and, as far as possible, the companies of workmen in like order. The reserves of workmen are placed at the depot of the trenches, or the nearest suitable place to the works. 815. The workmen leave their knapsacks and swords in camp, and march with their firearms and cartridge-boxes, which they place near them while at work. They always carry their overcoats, to cover them in resting or when wounded. 816. The guards always enter the trenches with arms trailed, and the workmen also, unless they carry materials or tools, when the arms are in the sling. 817. The guards and detachments of workmen send a Corporal to the openings of the trenches to guide the relief. They march out of the trenches by the flank, with trailed arms. 818. Sand-bags, forming loop-holes, are placed at intervals on the parapet to cover the sentinels; they are more numerous than the sentinels, so that the enemy may not know where the sentinels are placed. 819. When detachments are placed at night in advance of the trenches, to covert the workmen, the men sit or lie down, with their firearms in their hands, to hide themselves better from the enemy; the sentinels put their ears to the ground frequently, that they may hear troops coming out of the place. To prevent mistakes, the workmen are told what troops cover them. 820. No honors are paid in the trenches. When the General commanding the siege visits them, the guards place themselves in rear of the banquette, and rest on their arms. The colors are never carried to the trenches unless the whole regiment marches to repulse a sortie or make an assault. Even in this case they are not displayed until the General commanding the siege gives a formal order. 821. The materials of the siege of all kinds, together with the tools, arc-e collected in part at the depots of the trenches, and in pars at the 116 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  117 FOR THB ARMY. Sieges. openings of the trenches, or in such other place as has been appointed for the convenience of the service by the field officer of the trenches, on the advice of the chiefs of artillery and engineers. They are in charge of officers of engineers and of artillery, with guards or non-commissioned officers of both corps. But if these corps cannot furnish them, the chiefs apply for assistance from the infantry. 822. The workmen, in going to the trenches, carry such tools and materials as are required by the artillery and engineers. In this case, the field officer of the trenches has notice and superintends it. 823. The soldiers sent to the trenches go with their cartridge-boxes filled. Cartridges, when needed, are sent to the trenches on the requisition of commanders of battalions, approved by the General of the trenches. 824. In the case of a sortie, the guards move rapidly to the places that have been designated by the General of the trenches, and which afford the best defense for the head of the works, the batteries, the communications, or the flanks, or best enable them to take the sortie itself in flank or reverse. HIaving lined the banquette to fire on the enemy, the troops form on the reverse of the trench to receive him. The workmen take arms, retain their positions, or retire with their tools, as ordered. The officers commanding the detachments of workmen see that their movements are made promptly and in good order, so as to avoid all confusion in the communications. 825. The troops that advance beyond the trenches to repulse the sortie must not follow in pursuit. The General takes care that they return to the trenches before the retreat of the sortie allows the artillery of tile place to open on them. When the workmen return, the officers and noncommissioned officers of the detachments call the roll without interruptiDg the work, which is immediately resumed. 826. When it is necessary to dismount cavalry and send them to the trenches, they should be employed as near their camp as possible, and posted between the detachments of infantry. 827. Men belonging to the cavalry may, in assaults, be employed in carrying fascines and other materials to fill ditches and make passages. 828. The general officers of cavalry are more particularly employed in the service of posts and detachments placed in observation to protect the siege. They and the field officers of this arm are employed in the command of escorts to convoys, of whatever arms the escorts may be cormposed. When these duties are not sufficient to employ them, they take their share of the duty of the trenches. p29. The officers of engineers and artillery of the trenches make to the General of the trenches a return of all losses in their troops, and such 117

Page  118 11 REIE REUAIN Sieges.- Defense of Fortified Places. other reports on the work as he requires, in addition to the reports direct to their respective chiefs on the details of the service. 830. At the end of each tour, the field officer of the trenches draws up a report for the twenty-four hours to the General of the trenches. The General of the trenches reports to the General commanding the siege. 831. The commanders of the several corps in the trenches report, when relieved, to their respective head-quarters the losses during the tour, and the conduct of the officers and men. 832. However practicable the breach may appear, or however ruined the works in rear of it, the heads of columns must always be supplied with ladders to get over unexpected obstacles. 833. The General commanding the siege designates picked companies to protect property and persons, and prevent pillage and violence, from the moment the place is carried. The officers exert themselves to restrain the men. 834. The General designates the places requiring particular protection, such as churches, asylums, hospitals, colleges, schools, and magazines. The order for their protection should remind the soldiers, at the time, of the penalty of disobeying it. 835. Whether the place be taken by assault or by capitulation, the provisions and military stores, and the public funds, are reserved for the use of the army. 836. The commander of engineers will keep a journal of the siege, showing the operations of each day in detail, the force employed on the work, the kind and quantity of materials used in them, &c. He will also mark on a plan of the ground the daily progress of the works, and make the necessary drawings explanatory of their construction. 837. The commander of the artillery will keep a daily journal of the operations under his direction, showing-the number and kind of pieces in battery, the force employed in serving them, the kind and quantity of ammunition expended, the number of rounds fired from each piece of ordnance, the effect of the fire, and all other particulars relative to his branch of the service. 838. These journals and drawings will be sent, after the siege, with the report of the General, to the War Department. DEFENSE OF FORTIFIED PLACES. 839. In war, every commander of a fortified place shall always hold himself prepared with his plan of defense, as if at any time liable to attack. He arranges this plan according to the probable mode of attack; determines the posts of the troops i the several parts of the works, the REVISED REGULATIONS 118

Page  119 FOR THE ARMY. Defense of Fortified Places. reliefs, the reserves, and the details of service in all the corps. He draws up instructions for a case of attack, and exercises the garrison according to his plan of defense. In sea-coast works, he provides the instructions for the different batteries on the approach of ships. 840. In framing his plan, he studies the works and the exterior within the radius of attack and investment, the strength of the garrison, the artillery, the munitions of war, subsistence and supplies of all kinds, and takes immediate measures to procure whatever is deficient of troops or supplies, either by requisition on the government or from the means put at his disposal. 841. On the approach of an enemy, he removes all houses and other objects, within or without the place, that cover the approaches, or interrupt the fire of the guns or the movements of the troops. He assures himself personally that all posterns, outlets, embrasures, &c., are in proper state of security. 842. He shall be furnished by the Department of War with a plan of the works, showing all the details of the fortifications and of the exterior within the radius of attack; with a map of the environs within the radius of investment; with a map of the vicinity, including the neighboring works, roads, water-channels, coasts, &c.; with a memoir explaining the situation and defense of the place, and the relations and bearings of the several works on each other, and on the approaches by land and waterall which he carefully preserves, and communicates only to the council of defense. 843. He -consults his next in rank, and the senior officer of the engineers and of the artillery, either separately or as a council of defense. In the latter case he designates an officer to act as secretary to the council, and to record their proceedings and their joint or separate opinions, which are to be kept secret during the siege. The members may record their opinions under their own signature. In all cases, the commander decides on his own responsibility. 844. The commander of the place, and the chiefs of engineers and of artillery, shall keep journals of the defense, in which shall be entered, in order of date, without blank or interlineation, the orders given or received, the manner in which they are executed, their results, and every event and circumstance of importance in the progress of the defense. These journals and the proceedings of the council of defense shall be sent after the siege to the Department of War. 845. There shall be kept in the office of the commandant of the place, to be sent after the siege to the Department of War, a map of the en, virons, a plan of the fortifications, and a special plan of the front of atack, on which the chief engineer will trace, in succession, the positions lig

Page  120 REVISED REGULATIONS Defense of Fortified Places. Troops on board of Transports. occupied, and the works executed by the enemy from the investment; and also the works of counter approach or defense, and the successive positions of the artillery and other troops of the garrison during the progress of the siege. 846. The commander shall defend in succession the advanced works, the covered way and outworks, the body of the work, and the interior intrenchments. HIe will not be content with clearing away the foot of the breaches, and defending them by abattis, mines, and all the means used in sieges; but he shall begin in good time, behind the bastions or front of attack, the necessary intrenchments to resist assaults on the main work. 847. He shall use his means of defense in such manner as always to have a reserve of fresh troops, chosen from his best soldiers, to resist assaults, retake the outworks, and especially to resist the assaults on the body of the place; and a reserve of provisions for the last period of the siege, and of ammunition for the last attacks. 848. He must, in every case, compel the besieging force to approach by the slow and successive works of siege, and must sustain at least one assault on a practicable breach in the body of the place. 849. When the commander thinks that the end of the defense has come, he shall still consult the council of defense on the means that may remain to prolong the siege. But in all cases he alone will decide on the time, manner, and terms of the surrender. In the capitulation, he shall not seek or accept better terms for himself than for the garrison, but shall share their fate, and exert his best endeavors for the care of the troops, and especially of the sick and wounded. 850. No commander in the field shall withdraw troops or supplies from any fortified place, or exercise any authority over its commandant, unless it has been put subject to his orders by competent authority. ARTICLE XXXVII. TROOPS ON BOARD OF TRANSPORTS. 851. Military commanders charged with the embarkation of troops, and officers of the Quartermaster's Department intrusted with the selection of the transports, will take care that the vessels are entirely seaworthy and proper for such service, and that suitable arrangements are made in them for the health and comfort of the troops. 852. If, in the opinion of the officer commanding the troops to be embarked, the vessel is not proper or suitably arranged, the officer charged with the embarkation shall cause her to be inspected by competent and experienced persons. 26

Page  121 s~~~~~O TH ARY 121 Troops on board of Transports. 853. Immediately after embarking, the men will be assigned to quarters, equal parties on each side of the ship, and no man will be allowed to loiter or sleep on the opposite side. As far as practicable, the men of each company will be assigned to the same part of the vessel, and the squads, in the same manner, to contiguous berths. 854. Arms will be so placed, if there be no racks, as to be secure from Injury, and enable the meli to handle them promptly-bayonets unfixed and in scabbard. 855. Ammunition in cartridge-boxes to be so placed as to be entirely secure from fire; reserve ammunition to be reported to the master of the txansport, with request that he designate a safe place of deposit. Fre quent inspections will be made of the service ammnunition, to insure its safety and good condition. 856. No officer is to sleep out of his ship, or to quit his ship, without tLe sanction of the officer commanding on board. 857. The guard will be proportioned to the number of sentinels required. At sea the guard will mount with side-arms only. The officer of the guard will be officer of the day. 858. Sentinels will be kept over the fires, with buckets of water at hand, promptly to extinguish fires. Smoking is prohibited between decks or in the cabins, at all times; nor shall any lights be allowed between decks, except such ship lanterns as the master of the transport may direct, or those carried by the officer of the day in the execution of his duty. 859. Regulations will be adopted to enable companies or messes to cook in turn; no others than those whose turn it is, will be allowed to loiter around or approach the galleys or other cooking places. 860. The commanding officer will make arrangements, in concert with the master of the vessel, for calling the troops to quarters, so that in case of alarm, by storm, or fire, or the approach of the enemy, every man may repair promptly to his station. But he will take care not to crowd the deck. The troops not wanted at the guns or to assist the sailors, and those who cannot be advantageously employed with small arms, will be formed as a reserve between decks. 861. All the troops will turn out at, A.M., without arms (t uniform, and (in warm weather) without shoes or stockings; when every individual will be clean, his hands, face, and feet washed, and his hair combed. The same personal inspection will be repeated thirty minutes before sunset. The cooks alone may be exempted from one of these inspections per day, if necessary. 862. Reeruits or awkward men will be exercised in the morning and evening in the use of arms, an hour each time, when the weather will permit. L FOR THE ARMY. 121

Page  122 IEVISED REGULATIONS - - Troops on board of Transports. 4!; 863. Officers will enforce cleanliness as indispensable to health. When the weather will permit, bedding will be brought on deck every morning for airing. Tubs may be fixed on the forecastle for bathing, or the men may be placed in the chains and have buckets of water thrown over them. 864. Between decks will not be washed oftener than once a week, and only when the weather is fine. The boards of the lower berths will be removed once or twice a week to change the S,traw. Under the direction of the Surgeon and the officer of the day, frequent fumigations will be performed between decks. The materials required are common salt, four ounces; powdered oxide of manganese, one ounce; sulphuric acid, one ounce, diluted with two ounces of water. The diluted acid is poured over the other ingredients in a basin placed in a hot sand-bath. Solutions of chloride of lime and chloride of zinc are excellent disinfecting agents. 865. During voyages in hot weather, the master of the vessel will be desired to provide wind-sails, which will be kept constantly hung up, and frequently examined, to see that they draw well and are not obstructed. 866. During cooking hours, the officers of companies visit the camboose, and see that the messes are well prepared. The coppers and other cooking utensils are to be regularly and well washed, both before and after use. 867. The bedding will be replaced in the berths at sunset, or at an earlier hour when there is a prospect of bad weather; and at tattoo every man not on duty will be in his berth. To insure the execution of this regulation, the officer of the day, with a lantern, will make a tour between decks. 868. Lights will be extinguished at tattoo, except such as are placed under sentinels. The officer of the day will see to it, and report to the commanding officer. The officers' lights will be extinguished at 10 o'clock, unless special permission be given to continue them for a longer time, as in case of sickness or other emergency. 869. For the sake of exercise, the troops will be occasionally called to quarters by the beat to arms. Those appointed to the guns will be frequently exercised in the use of them. The arms and accoutrements will be frequently inspected. The metallic pa:;ts of the former will be often wiped and greased again. 870. The men will not be allowed to sleep on deck in hot weather or in the sun; they will be encouraged and required to take exercise on deck, in squads by succession, when necessary. 871. At morning and evening parades, the Surgeon will examire the men, to observe whether thlere be any appearance of disease. 122 Troops on board of Transports. T

Page  123 FOR THE ARMY. Troops on board of Transports. 872. The sick will, as far as practicable, be separated from the healthy men. On the first appearance of mal' gnant contagion, a signal will be made for the hospital vessel (if there be one in company), and the dis eased men removed to her. 873. A good supply of hospital stores and medicines will be taken on each vessel, and used only for the sick and convalescent. 874. The Surgeon will guard the men against costiveness on approach ing a hot climate. In passing through the West Indies, to the southern coast for instance, and for some weeks after landing in those latitudes, great care is required in the use of fruit, as strangers would not be com petent to judge of it, and most kinds, after long voyages, are prejudi cial. 875. In harbor, where there is no danger from sharks, the men may bathe; but not more than ten at a time, and attended by a boat. 876. In fitting up a vessel for the transportation of horses, care is to be taken that the requisite arrangements are made for conveniently feed ing and cleaning them, and to secure them from injury in rough weather by ropes attached to breast-straps and breeching, or by other suitable means; and especially that proper ventilation is provided by openings in the upper deck, wind-sails, &c. The ventilation of steamers may be assisted by using the engine for that purpose. 877. Horses should not be put on board after severe exercise or when heated. In hoisting them on board, the slings should be made fast to a hook at the end of the fall, or the knot'tied by an expert seaman, so that it may be well secured and easily loosened. The horse should be run up quickly, to prevent him from plunging, and should be steadied by guide ropes. A halter is placed on him before he is lifted from the ground. 878. On board, care is to be taken that the horses are not over-fed; bran should form part of their ration. The face, eyes, and nostrils of each horse are to be washed at the usual stable hours, and, occasionally, the mangers should be washed and the nostrils of the horses sponged with vinegar and water. 879. In loading vessels with stores for a military expedition, the cargo of each should be composed of an assortment of such stores as may be available for service in case of the non-arrival of others, and they should be placed on board in such a manner that they may be easily reached, in the order in which they are required for service. Each store-ship should be marked, at the bow and stern, on both sides, in large characters, with a distinctive letter and number. A list is to be made of the stores on board of each vessel, and of the place where they are to be found in it; a copy of this list to be sent to the chief officer of the proper departs ment in the expedition, or at the place of destination. 123

Page  124 REVISED REGULATIONS Courts-Xartial. ARTICLE XXXVIII. COURTS-MARTIAL. 880. In appointing a general court-martial, as many members will be detailed, from five to thirteen inclusively, as can be assembled without manifest injury to the service. 881. The decision of the officer appointing the court, as to the number that can be assembled without manifest injury to the service, is conclusive. 882. A President of the court will not be appointed. The officer highest in rank present will be President. 883. Form of Qrder appointing a general court-martial; the last paragraph omitted when the court can be kept up with thirteen members. Head-Quarters, &c. A General Court-martial is hereby appointed to meet at, on the - day of, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of and such other prisoners as may be brought before it. Detail for the Court: 1. 2. 3. 4. 12. 7., Judge Advocate. No other officers than those named can be assembled without manifest injury to the service. By order of - -, commanding -, Assistant Adjutant-General. 884. In the detail the members will be named, and they will take place in the court, in the order of their rank. A decision of the proper authority in regard to the rank of the members cannot be reversed by the court. 885. The place of holding a court is appointed by the authority convening it. 886. Application for delay or postponement of trial must, when practicable, be made to the authority convening the court. When made to the court, it must be before plea, and will then, if in the opinion of the court well founded, be referred to the authority convening the court, to 124 8. 9. 10. ii. 5. 6. 13.

Page  125 F T A Y. 12-5 Courts-Martial. -decide whether the court should be adjourned or dissolved, and the charges reserved for another court. 887. Upon application by the accused for postponement on the ground of the absence of a witness, it ought distinctly to appear on his oath, 1st. that the witness is material, and how; 2d. that the accused has used due diligence to procure his attendance; and, 3d. that he has reasonable ground to believe, and does believe, that he will be able to procure such r,ttendance within a reasonable time stated. 888. The President of a court-martial, besides his duties and privileges as member, is the organ of the court, to keep order and conduct its business. He speaks and acts for the court in each case where the rule has been prescribed by law, regulation, or its own resolution. In all their Deliberations the law secures the equality of the members. 889. The 76th Article of War does not confer on a court-martial the power to punish its own members. For disorderly conduct, a member is liable as in other offenses against military discipline; improper words are to be taken down, and any disorderly conduct of a member reported to she authority convening the court. 890. The Judge Advocate shall summon the necessary witnesses for the trial; but he shall not summon any witness at the expense of th' United States, nor any officer of the army, without the order of the court, unless satisfied that his testimony is material and necessary to the ends of justice. 891. Every court-martial shall keep a complete and accurate record of its proceedings, to be authenticated by the signatures of the President and Judge Advocate; who shall also certify, in like manner, the sentence pronounced by the court in each case. The record must show that the court was organized as the law requires; that the court and Judge Advocate were duly sworn in the presence of the prisoner; that he was previously asked whether he had any objection to any member, and his answer thereto. A copy of the order appointing the court will be entered on the record in each case. 892. Whenever the same court-martial tries more prisoners than one, tnd they are arraigned on separate and distinct charges, the court is to De sworn at the commencement of each trial, and the proceedings in each case will be made up separately. 893. The record shall be clearly and legibly written; as far as prac. ticable, without erasures or interlineations. The pages to be numbered, with a margin of one inch on the left side of each page, and at the top of the odd and bottom of the even pages; through this last margin the sheets to be stitched together; the documents accompanying the pro L2 FOR THE ARAI

Page  126 REVISED REGULATIONS Courts-Marti al. ceedings to be noted and marked in such manner as to afford an easy reference. 894. No recommendation will be embraced in the body of the sentence. Those members only who concur in the recommendation will ign it. 895. The legal punishments for soldiers by sentence of a court-martial according to the offense, and the jurisdiction of the court, are-death; confinement; confinement on bread and water diet; solitary confinement; hard labor; ball and chain; forfeiture of pay and allowances; discharges from service; and reprimands, and, when non-commissioned officers, reduction to the ranks. Ordnance Sergeants and Hospital Stewards, however, though liable to discharge, may not be reduced. Nor are they to be tried by regimental or garrison courts-martial, unless by special permission of the department commnander. Solitary confinement, or confinemnent on bread and water, shall not exceed fourteen days at a time, with intervals between the periods of such confinement not less than such periods; and not exceeding eighty-four days in any one year. 896. The Judge Advocate shall transmit the proceedings, without delay, to the officer having authority to confirm the sentence, who shall state, at the end of the proceedings in each case, his decision and orders thereon. 897. The original proceedings of all general courts-martial, after the decision on them of the reviewing authority, and all proceedings that require the decision of the President under the 65th and 89th Articles of War, and copies of all orders confirming or disapproving, or remnitting, the sentences of courts-martial, and all official communications for the Judge Advocate of the army, will be addressed to' "The A(Ijutant-General of the Army, }Far Dei)artmefnt," marked on the cover, "JZudge Advocate." 898. The proceedings of garrison and regimental courts-martial will be transmitted without delay by the garrison or regimental commander to the department head-quarters for the supervision of the department commander. 899. The power to pardon or mitigate the punishment ordered by a ceurt-martial is vested in the authority confirming the proceedings, and in the President of the United States. A superior military commander to the officer confirming the proceedings may suspend the execution of the sentence when, in his judgment, it is void upon the face of the pr(, ceedings, or when he sees a fit case for executive clemency. In such cases, the record, with his order prohibiting tl.e execution, shall be transmnitted for the final ordert of the President. ~Ad When a oourt-martial - or court of inquiry adjourns without day? 126

Page  127 FOR THE' ARMY. Working-Parties. the members will return to their respective posts and duties unless otherwise ordered. 901. When a court adjourns for three days, the Judge Advocate shall report the fact to the commander of the post or troops, and the members belonging to the command will be liable to duty during the time. ARTICLE XXXIX. 902. When it is necessary to employ the army at work on fortifica tions, in surveys, in cutting roads, and other constant labor of not less than ten days, the non-commissioned officers and soldiers so emnployed are enrolled as extra-duty men, and are allowed twenty-five cents a day when employed as laborers and teamsters, and forty cents a day when employed as mechanics? clerks, storekeepers, &c., at all stations east of the Rocky MIountains, and thirty-five and fifty cents per day, respectively, at all stations west of those mountains. But no man shall be rated and paid as a clerk or mechanic, who is not szilled in his particular employment; nor any man as a storekeeper, &c., whose trust is not of sufficient import ance. Mere strikers, inferior workmen, &c. shall be rated as laborers Commanding officers will particularly see to this; nor shall any soldier be rated at the higher pay, except by their order. 903. Enlisted men of the Ordnance and Engineer Departments, and artificers of artillery, are not entitled to this allowance when employed in their appropriate work. 904. Soldiers will not be employed as extra-duty men for any labor in camp or garrison which can properly be performed by fatigue parties. 905. No extra-duty men, except those required for the ordinary service of the Quartermaster, Commissary, and Medical Departments, and saddlers in mounted companies, will be employed without previous authority from department head-quarters, except in case of necessity, which shall be promptly reported to the department commander. 906. Extra-duty men should attend the weekly and monthly inspections of their companies, and, if possible, one drill in every week. 907. Extra-duty pay of the saddler in a mounted company will be charged on the company muster-roll, to be paid by the Paymaster and refunded by the Ordnance Department. Extra-duty pay of cooks and nurses in the hospital service will be paid by the quartermnaster, in the absence of a medical disbursing officer, and refunded by the Me(lical Department. 908. The officer commanding a working-party will conlform to thQ 127 WORKING-PARTIES.

Page  128 REVISED REGULATIONS Recruiting Service.-Duties of Superintendents. directions and plans of the engineer or other officer directing the work, without regard to rank. 909.- A day's work shall not exceed ten hours in summer, nor eight in winter. Soldiers are paid in proportion for any greater number of hours they are employed each day. Summer is considered to commence on the ] st of April, and winter on the 1st of October. 910.:Although the necessities of the service may require soldiers to be ordered on working-parties as a duty, commanding officers are to bear in mind that fitness for military service by instruction and discipline is the object for which the army is kept on foot, and that they are not to employ the troops when not in the field, and especially the mounted troops, in labors that interfere with their military duties and exercises, except in case of immediate necessity, which shall be forthwith reported for the orders of the War Department. ARTICLE XL. RECRUITING SERVICE. 911. The recruiting service will be conducted by the Adjutant-General. under the direction of the Secretary of War. 912. Field officers will be detailed to superintend the recruiting districts, and lieutenants to take charge of the recruiting parties. The Adjutant-General will select the field officers, and announce in orders the number of Captains and Lieutenants to be selected for this duty from each regiment by the Colonel. 913. A recruiting party will consist generally of one lieutenant, one non-commnissioned officer, two privates, and a drummer and fifer. The parties will be sent from the principal dep6ts, and none but suitable men selected. 914 Officers on the general recruiting service are not to be ordered on any other duty, except from the Adjutant-General's office. DUTIES OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 915. As soon as a recruiting station is designated, the superintendent sends estimates for funds to the Adjutant-General, and requisitions on the proper departments (through the Adjutant-General) for clothing, camp equipage, arms, and accoutrements. 916. Subsequent supplies for the station in his district are procured by the superintendent on consolidated estimates; these are made quartcrly for funds, and every six or twelve months for clothing, equipage, arms, and accoutrements Estimates for funds will be in the following form: 128

Page  129 FOR THE ARMY. ltecruiting Service.-Superintendeuts. Estimate of Recruiting Ftnds requi2ed for the during t -A iu:rter endf,g _~~~~~~ tk,q, l, Amount ex N0 peiidd last Amount on Names.. A qua te. lt hand. o quarter. __________a $ Cts. $ Cts. Total amount requil ed......................................... , Superintendent. 917. Funds and supplies of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, arms and accoutrements, when ordered, will be sent direct to each station. 918. For subsistence to recruiting stations, see regulations of the Sub sistence Department. When army rations are issued for recruits, savings on the rations shall be applied for their benefit, as in companies. 919. The superintendents will transmit to the Adjutant-General conso lidated monthly returns of the recruiting parties under their superintendence, according to directions on the printed blanks, accompanied by one copy of the enlistment of each recruit enlisted within the month. 920. When recruits should be sent to regiments, a superintendent will report to the Adjutant-General for instructions in reference thereto. 921. When recruits are sent from a dep6t or rendezvous to a regiment or post, a nmtuster and descriptive roll, and an account of clothing of the detachment, will be given to the officer assigned to the command of it. And a duplicate of the muster and descriptive roll will be forwarded to the Adjutant-General by the superintendent, who will note on it the names of all the officers on duty with the detachment, and the day of its departure from the dep6t or rendezvous. 922. The superintendent will report all commissioned or non-commissioned officers who may be incapable or negligent in the discharge of their functions. Where a recruiting party fails to get recruits from any cause'other than the fault of the officer, the superintendent will recoInmend another station for the party. 923. When a rendezvous is closed, the superintendent will give the necessary instructions for the safe-keeping or disposal of the public property, so as not to involve any expense for storage. 924. Tours of inspection by superintendents will be made only on instructions from the Adjutant-General's Of e. Officers on the recruit. I 129 ) 18. Amount required. $ Cts. Remarks.

Page  130 REVISED REGULATIONS Duties of Recruiting Officers. ing service will not be sent from place to place without orders from the same source. DUTIES OF RECRUITING OFFICERS. 925. Success in obtaining recruits depends much on the activity and personal attention of recruiting officers, and they will not entrust to enlisted men the duties for which themselves only are responsible. They will in no case absent the nselves from their stations without authority from the superintendent. 926. They will not allow any man to be deceived or inveigled into the service by false representations, but will in person explain the nature of the service, the length of the term, the pay, clothing, rations, and other allowances to which a soldier is entitled by law, to every man before he signs the enlistment. 927. If minors present themselves, they are to be treated with great candor; the names and residences of their parents or guardians, if they have any, must be ascertained, and these will be informed of the minor's wish to enlist, that they may make their objections or give their consent. 928. With the sanction of superintendents, recruiting officers may insert, in not exceeding two newspapers, brief notices directing attention to the rendezvous for further information. - 929. Any free white male person above the age of eighteen and under thirty-five years, being at least five feet three inches high, effective, ablebodied, sober, free from disease, of good character and habits, and with a competent knowledge of the English language, may be enlisted. This regulation, so far as respects the height and age of the recruit, shall not extend to musicians or to soldiers who may "re-enlist," or have served honestly and faithfully a previous enlistment in the army. 930. No man having a wife or child shall be enlisted in time of peace without special authority obtained from the Adjutant-General's Office, through the superintendent. This rule is not to apply to soldiers who "re-enlist." 931. No person under the age of twenty-one years is to be enlisted or re-enlisted without the written consent of his parent, guardian, or master. The recruiting officers must be very particular in ascertaining the true age of the recruit. 932. After the nature of the service and terms of enlistment have been fairly explained to the recruit, the officer, before the enlistments are filled up, will read to him, and offer for his signature, the annexed declaration, to be appended to each copy of his enlistment: I,, desiring to enlist in the Army of the United States for the period of five years, do declare that I am years and - months of age; that I have neither wife nor child; that I have never 130 0

Page  131 FOR THE ARMY. 181 Duties of Recruiting Officers. been discharged from the United States service on account of disability, or by sentence of a court-martial, or by order before the expiration of a term of enlistment; and I know of no impediment to my serving honestly and faithfully as a soldier for five years. - Witness: 933. If the recruit be a minor, his parent, guardian, or master must sign a consent to his enlisting, which will be added to the preceding de claration, in the following form: I,, do certify that I am the (father, only survivinyparent, legal master, or guardian, as the case may be) of; that the said is - years of age; and I do hereby freely give my consent to his en listing as a soldier in the Army of the United States for the period of five years. Witness: 934. The forms of declaration, and of consent in case of a minor, having been signed and witnessed, the recruit will then be duly examined by the recruiting officer, and surgeon if one be present, and, if accepted, the 20th and 87th Articles of War will be read to him; after which he will be allowed time to consider the subject until his mind appears to be fully made up before the oath is administered to him. 935. As soon as practicable, and at least within six days after his enlistment, the following oath will be administered to the recruit: "I, A- B-, do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) that 1 will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever, and observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United States." (See 10th Art. of War.) 936. Under the 11th section of the act of 3d August, 1861, chap. 42, the oath of enlistment and re-enlistment may be administered by any commissioned officer of the army. 937. It is the duty of the recruiting officer to be present at the examination of the recruit by the medical officer. (See par. 1261.) 938. Recruiting officers will not employ private physicians without authority from the Adjutant-General's Office, for the special purpose of examining the recruits prior to their enlisting. 939. If it be necessary, as in case of sickness, to employ a physician, the recruiting officer may engage his services by contract on reasonable terms, "by the, visit," or by the month. If by the month, the examina FOR TI-IE AR-MY. 131

Page  132 REVISED REGULATIONS Duties of Recruiting Officers. tion of the recruits must be stated in the contract as part of his duty. In vouchers for medical attendance and medicines, the name of each patient, date of, and charge for, each visit, and for medicine filrnished, must be given, and the certificate of the physician added, that the rates charged are the usual rates of the place. The physician/will be paid from the recruiting funds. 940. Enlistments must, in all cases, be taken. in triplicate. The recruiting officer will send one copy to the Adjutant-General with his quarterly accounts, a second to the superintendent with his monthly return, and a third to the dep6t at the time the recruits are sent there. In cases of soldiers re-enlisted in a regiment, or of regimental recruits, the third copy of the enlistment will be sent at its date to regimental head-quarters for file. 941. When ordnance sergeants re-enlist, the recruiting officer will immediately send the second copy of the enlistment direct to the Adjutant-General, and the third copy to the station of the ordnance sergeant for file. 942. Enlistments must, in no case, be ante-dated so as to entitle a soldier who applies after the period for "re-enlistfig" has expired, to any additional pay therefor. 943. The recruiting officer will see that the men under his command are neat in their personal appearance, and will require the permanent party to wear their military dress in a becoming manner, especially when permitted to go abroad. 944. Only such articles of clothing as are indispensable for immediate use will be issued to recruits at the rendezvous. Their equipment will not be made complete till after they have passed the inspection subsequent to their arrival at the dep6t. 945. The instruction of the recruits will commence at the rendezvous from the moment of enlistment. The general superintendent will see that all recruiting officers give particular attention to this subject. 946. Recruits will be sent from rendezvous to dep6ts every ten days, or oftener if practicable, provided the number disposable exceeds three The detachments of recruits will be sent from rendezvous to depots under charge of a non-commissioned officer. 947. Before recruits are sent from recruiting depots to regiments or companies, the amounts due by them to the laundress and sutler, having been verified and audited, will be entered on a roll made for the purpose, and will be paid by the paymaster on his next visit at the post, the receipts of the laundress and sutler to the amounts paid being the voucher: Provided the recruits have a clear amount of pay due them, over and above their dues to the government, equal to the claims of the laundress 132

Page  133 FOR THE ARMY. Rendezvous.-Blanks. and sutler. The same amounts will be entered on the muster and de scriptive roll of the recruits as "amount paid laundress, or sutler," (naming them,) to be deducted from the pay of the soldiers at their first subsequent payment. 948. Every officer commanding a recruiting party will procure the necessary transportation, forage, fuel, straw, and stationery, taking the requisite vouchers. 949. The transportation of recruits to depots, and from one recruiting station to another, will be paid from the recruiting funds; transportation of officers and enlisted men on the recruiting service will be paid in the same manner, except when first proceeding to join that service, or returning to their regiments after having been relieved. 950. No expenses of transportation of officers will be admitted that do not arise from orders emanating from the Adjutant-General's office, except they be required to visit branch or auxiliary rendezvous under their charge, when they will be allowed the stage, steamboat, or railroad fare, porterage included. 951. Whenever an officer is relieved or withdrawn from the recruiting service, he will pay over the balance of any unexpended recruiting funds in his possession to the officer appointed to succeed him, or to the paymaster, if no officer be so designated; and if there be no paymaster or other proper officer convenient to receive such balance, the amount will be deposited to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States, with the most convenient Assistant Treasurer, or other depositary of public moneys. In either case the officer will forward to the Adjutant-General the evidence of the disposition he may make of the funds, and report the fact to the superintendent, or to his Colonel, if on regimental recruiting service. RENDEZVOUS, QUARTERING AND SUBSISTING RECRUITS. 952. Written contracts will be made by recruiting officers for the rent of a rendezvous upon the most reasonable terms possible. The rent will be paid from the recruiting funds. The terms of the contract will be immediately reported to the Adjutant-General. 953. For the manner of subsisting recruits, see regulations of the Subsistence Department. BLANKS. 954. Officers on recruiting service will make timely requisitions for printed blanks, direct, as follows: To the Adjutant-General.-For enlistments; re-enlistments; forms for medical inspection of recruits; muster-rolls; muster and descriptive rolls; M 138

Page  134 REyISED REGULATIONS Furniture and Stationery.- Accounts, Returns, &M. monthly returns; tri-monthly reports; recruiting accounts current accounts of clothing issued; posters or handbills. To the Quartermaster-General.-For estimates of clothing, camp and garrison equipage; clothing receipt rolls; quarterly returns of clothing, camp and garrison equipage. 955. Of the blanks above named, none but the printed forms furnished will be used. Other blanks, when required, must be ruled. 956. Blanks for the regimental recruiting service are furnished to the company commanders. FURNITURE AND STATIONERY. 957. The articles of furniture and police utensils which may be absolutely necessary at a recruiting station may be procured by the officer in charge of the rendezvous, on the special authority of the superintendent. 958. Necessary stationery will be purchased monthly or quarterly, not to exceed, per quarter at each station, six quires of paper, twenty-four quills, or twenty-four steel pens and two holders, half an ounce of wafers, one paper of ink-powder, one bottle of red ink, four ounces of sealingwax, one quire of cartridge paper, or one hundred envelopes, one-fourth quire of blotting-paper, and one piece of tape. If necessary, an additional supply of one-fourth of these rates will be allowed to the recruiting officer having charge of one or more auxiliary rendezvous distant from his permanent station. At the principal dep6ts the allowance must be fixed by the wants of the public service. 959. To each office table is allowed one inkstand, one wafer stamp, one Wafer box, one paper-folder, one ruler, and as many lead-pencils as may be required, not exceeding four per annum. 960. Such blank books as may be necessary are allowed to the general superintendent and at permanent recruiting depots; also, one descriptive book for the register of recruits at each permanent station. Blank books will be purchased by recruiting officers, under instructions from the superintendent. 961. When a recruiting officer is relieved, the blanks, books, and unexpended stationery, with all the other public property at the station, will be transferred to his successor, who will receipt for the same. ACCOUNTS, RETURNS) ETC. 962. The following are the accounts, returns, &c. to be rendered by officers on recruiting service: To the Adjutant-General. I Recruiting accounts current, quarterly, with abstract, (Form C,) vouchers, (Form D,) and one set of enlistments. An account will 1.34

Page  135 FOR THEB ARMY. Accounts, Returns, &c be rendered by every officer who may receive funds, whether he makes expenditures or not during the quarter. 2. A quarterly return of stationery, books, fuel, straw, and such other property as may have been purchased with the recruiting funds. 3. A monthly summary statement of money received, expended, and remaining on hand, (Form E,) to be transmitted on the last day of each month. 4. A muster-roll of all enlisted men at the rendezvous, including the names of all who may have joined, died, deserted, been transferred or discharged, during the period embraced in the muster-roll. b. Tri-monthly reports of the state of the recruiting service, accord ing to the prescribed form. To the Superintendent. 6. A monthly return of recruits and of the recruiting party, accom panied with one copy of the enlistment of every recruit enlisted within the month. 7. Duplicate muster-rolls for pay of the permanent recruiting party, which may be sent direct to the nearest paymaster, when authorized by the superintendent. A triplicate of this roll will be retained at the station. 8. Muster and descriptive rolls and an account of clothing of every detachment of recruits ordered to the principal depot. If the re cruits be ordered to proceed from the rendezvoau direct, to join any regiment or post, these rolls and accounts of clothing will be delivered to the officer in command of the detachment, a duplicate of each muster and descriptive roll only being then made and sent to the superintendent. 9. Copy of the quarterly abstract of contingent expenses; to be forwarded within three days after the expiration of each quarter. 10. Quarterly estimates for funds. 11. Estimates for clothing, and camp and garrison equipage, and for arms and accoutrements, for six or twelve months, or for such times as may be directed by the superintendent. 12. Copy of the return No. 13. To the Quartermaster-General. 13 A quarterly return of clothing and camp and garrison equipage, and of all quartermaster's property in his possession, not including such as is purchased with the recruiting funds. 13C'

Page  136 REVISED REGULATIONS Accounts, Returns, &c. To the Ordnance Department. 14. A quarterly return of arms, accoutrements, ammunition, and of all ordnance stores. RULES FOR MAKING ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS. 963. The following rules must be observed in making out and forwarding accounts and papers: 1. Letters addressed to the Adjutant-Geneal "on recruiting service," will be so endorsed on the envelopes, under the words "official business." 2. Each voucher must be separately entered on the abstract of contingent expenses, (Form C,) and only the gross amount of the abstract must be entered on the account current. 3. No expenditure must be charged without a proper voucher to support it. (See Form D.) 4. The receipt to the voucher must be signed, when practicable, by a principal. When this is not practicable, the recruiting officer will add to his own certificate a statement that the agent is duly authorized to sign the receipt. 5. When an individual makes "his mark" instead of signing his name to the receipt, it must be witnessed by a third person. 6. Expenditures must be confined to items stated in the Regulations. In an unforeseen emergency, requiring a deviation from this rule, a full explanation must be appended to the voucher for the ex penditure; and, if this be not satisfactory, the account will be charged in the Treasury against the recruiting officer. 7. In all vouchers, the different items, with dates, and cost of each, must be given. To vouchers for transportation of officers, a copy of the order under which the journey was performed, must be appended. 8 In vouchers for medical attendance and medicines, the name of each patient, date of, and charge for, each visit, and for medicine furnished, must be given, and the certificate of the physician added, that the rates charged are the usual rates of the place. 9. To each voucher for notices inserted in newspapers a copy of the notice will be appended. 10. Quarterly accounts current must exhibit the numbers of Treasury drafts and dates of their receipt; and when funds are transferred, the names of officers from whom they are received, or to whom they are turned over, with the dates of transfer. 11. Fractions of cents are not to be taken up on accounts current. 12. Enlistments must be filled up in a fair and legible hand. The 136

Page  137 FOR THE ARMY. 137 Depots for Collecting Recruits. real name of the recruit must be ascertained, correctly spelled, and written in the same way wherever it occurs; the Christian name must not be abbreviated. Numbers must be written, and not expressed by figures. Each enlistment must be endorsed as follows: No.-. A B — enlisted at January-, 186-, ByLt.C D - Regiment of —. The number in each month to correspond with the names alpha betically arranged. 13. Whenever a soldier re-enters the service, the officer who enlisted him will endorse on the enlistment, next below his own name and regiment, "second (or third) enlistment," as the case may be, to gether with the name of the regiment and the letter of the com pany in which the soldier last served, and date of discharge from former enlistment. This information the recruiting officer must obtain, if possible, from the soldier's discharge, which he should in all cases be required to exhibit. (See 22d Art. of War.) 14. Re-enlistments must be forwarded with recruiting accounts, al though the bounty due on them may not be paid. When the bounty is subsequently paid, the soldier's receipt is to be taken on a voucher showing date and place of re-enlistment, company and regiment, and by whom re-enlisted. 15. The filling up of, and endorsement on, the enlistment, will be in the handwriting of the recruiting officer, or done under his imme diate inspection. t6. To facilitate the final settlement of accounts of discharged soldiers, the name of the State, as well as the town, where each recruit is en listed, will be recorded on all muster, pay, and descriptive rolls. DEPOTS FOR COLLECTING AND INSTRUCTING RECRUITS. 954. The depots for recruits are established by orders from the Adjubut-General's Office. 965. To each (ldepo6t there will be assigned a suitable number of officers to command and instruct the recruits; and, when necessary, such number of enlisted men as may be designated at the Adjutant-General's Office, will be selected for the permanent party, to do garrison duty and for drill-masters. 966. The number of recruits at depots to be assigned to each arm and regiment is directed from the Adjutant-General's Office. M2 FOR THE ARMY. 137

Page  138 18 -Id-}~ REUAIN Depots for Collecting Recruits. 967. The recruits are to be dressed in uniform according to their respective arms, and will be regularly mustered and inspected. They are to be well drilled in the Infantry Tactics, through the school of the soldier to that of the battalion, and in the exercise of field and garrison pieces. Duty is to be done according to the strict rules of service. 968. The general superintendent will cause such of the recruits as are found to possess a natural talent for music, to be instructed (besides the drill of the soldier) on the fife, bugle, and drum, and other military instruments; and boys of twelve years of age, and upward, may, under his direction, be enlisted for this purpose. But as recruits under eighteen years of age and under size must be discharged, if they are not capable of learning music, care should be taken to enlist those only who have a natural talent for music, and, if practicable, they should be taken on trial for some time before being enlisted. 969. Regiments will be furnished with field music on the requisitions of their commanders, made, from time to time, direct on the general superintendent; and, when requested by regimental commanders, the superintendents will endeavor to have suitable men elected from the recruits, or enlisted, for the regimental bands. 970. At every dep6t pains will be taken to form from the permanent party a body of competent cooks, some of whom will be sent with every large draft of recruits ordered to regiments. 971. To give encouragement to the recruits, and hold out inducements to good conduct, the commanding officer of the dep6t may promote such of them as exhibit the requisite qualifications to be lance corporals and lance sergeants, not exceeding the proper proportion to the number of recruits at the dep6t. These appointments will be announced in orders in the usual way, and will be continued in force until they join their regiments, unless sooner revoked. No allowance of pay or emoluments is to be assigned to these appointments: they are only to be considered as recommendations to the captains of companies and colonels of regiments for the places in which the recruits may have acted; but such non-commissioned officers are to be treated with all the respect and to have all the authority which may belong to the stations of sergeant and corporal. 972. Permanent parties at dep6ts, and recruiting parties and recruits, will be mustered, inspected, and paid in the same manner as other soldiers. Recruits will be mustered for pay only at dep6ts, and, when paid there, one-half of their monthly pay will be retained until they join their regiments. 973. WThen recruits are received at a garrisoned post, the commanding officer will place them under the charge of a commissioned officer. 138 REV18ED REGULATIONS

Page  139 D~~~~~O TEAM. _'9 Inspection of Recruits at Depots and Posts. Rejected Recruits. 974. Recruits are not to be put to any labor or work which would interfere with their instruction, nor are they to be employed otherwise than as soldiers, in the regular duties of garrison and camp. 975. The Rules and Articles of War are to be read to the recruits wvery month, after the inspection; and so much thereof as relates to the duties of non-commissioned officers and soldiers will be read to them every week. INSPECTION OF RECRUITS AT DEPOTS AND POSTS. 976. The superintendent or commanding officer will cause a minute and critical inspection to be made of every recruit received at a depot, two days after his arrival; and should any recruit be found unfit for service, or to have been enlisted contrary to law or regulations, he shall assemble a Board of Inspectors, to examine into the case. A board may also be assembled in a special case, when a concealed defect may become manifest in a recruit, at any time during his detention at the depot. 977. Every draft of recruits ordered from a dep6t to any regiment or post, shall, immediately preceding its departure, be critically inspected by the superintendent or commanding officer, and surgeon; and, when necessary, a Board of Inspectors will be convened. 978. Recruits received at a military post or station shall be carefully inspected by the commanding officer and surgeon, on the third day after their arrival; and if, on such inspection, any recruit, in their opinion, be unsound or otherwise defective, in such degree as to disqualify him for the duties of a soldier, then a Board of Inspectors will be assembled to examine into and report on the case. (See paragraphs 979, 980, 981.) 979. Boards for the inspection of recruits will be composed of the commanding officer, the senior medical officer of the army present, and, if possible, the three senior regimental officers present on duty with the troops. REJECTED RECRUITS. 980. In all cases of rejection, the reasons therefor will be stated at large in a special report, to be made by the board; which, together with the surgeon's certificate of disability for service, will be forwarded by the superintendent or commandant of the post direct to the Adjutant-General. In all such cases the commanding officer will cause the articles of clothing, which may have been issued to the recruit, with the price of each article, to be endorsed on the certificates of disability. If the recommendation of the board for the discharge of the recruit be approved, the authority therefor will be endorsed on the certificate, which will be sent back to be filled up and signed by the commanding officer, who will return the same to the Adjutant- eneral's Office. FOR THE ARMY. 189

Page  140 4O REVISED REQULATIONS Recruits sent to Regiments. 981. The board will state in the report whether the disability, or other cause of rejection, existed before his enlistment; and whether with proer care and examination it might not have been discovered. RECRUITS SENT TO REGIMENTS. 982. An officer intrusted with the command of recruits ordered to regiments, will, on arriving at the place of destination, forward the following papers: 1. To the Adjutant- General and the Supertntendent, each, a descrip tive roll and an account of clothing of such men as may have deserted, died, or been left on the route from any cause whatever, with date and place; also, a special report of the date of his arrival at the post, the strength and condition of the party when turned over to the commanding officer, and all circumstances worthy of remark which may have.occurred on the march. 2. To the Commanding Officer of the regiment, or- post, the muster and descriptive roll furnished him at the time of setting out, properly signed and completed by recording the names of the re cruits present. and by noting in the column for remarks, opposite the appropriate spaces, the time and place of death, desertion, ap prehension, or other casualty that may have occurred on the route. 983. Should an officer be relieved in charge of a party of recruits en route, before it reaches its destination, the date and place, and name of the officer by whom he is relieved, must be recorded on the roll of the party. Without the evidence of such record, no charge for extra pay on account of clothing accountability of the party, where equal to a company will be allowed. 984. The "original muster and descriptive roll" of every draft, with remarks showing the final disposition of each recruit, and the regiment and letter of the company to which he may be assigned, will be signed and forwarded to the Adjutant-General by the commanding officer who makes the assignment. If the recruits embraced in one roll happen to be assigned to different posts, the -original roll is to continue with the last party to its destination, each commander completing it so far as concerns the recruits left at his post. When this is not practicable, extracts from the original roll are to be made by the authority which distributes the recruits, to accompany the several parties, and to be forwarded to the Adjutant-General as in case of the original roll. REGIMENTAL RECRUITING SERVICE. 985. The regimental recruiting will be conducted in the manner pre. scribed for the general service. REVISED REGULATIONS 140

Page  141 FOR THB ARMY. Regimental Recruiting Service. 986. Every commander of a regiment is the superintendent of the recruiting service for his regiment, and will endeavor to keep it up to its establishment; for which purpose he will obtain the necessary funds, clothing, &c., by requisition on the Adjutant-General. 987. At every station occupied by his regiment, or any part of it, the colonel will designate a suitable officer to attend to the recruiting duties; which selection will not relieve such officer from his company or other ordinary duties. The officer thus designated will be kept constantly furnished with funds, and, when necessary, with clothing and camp equipage. 988. The regimental recruiting officer will, with the approbation of the commanding officer of the station, enlist all suitable men. He will be governed, in rendering his accounts and returns, by the rules prescribed for the general service; and, when leaving a post, will turn over the funds in his hands to the senior company officer of his regiment present, unless some other be appointed to receive them. 141

Page  142 FORM[ A. . THE UNITED STATES, To - --, Specia C For rations issued to recruits under the command of i-, at - panying abstract: -- complete rations, at - cents - - lbs. extra soap, at - cents -. - - - lbs. extra candles, at - cents - Due contractor - Received from the United States dollars and cents, in full of the a

Page  143 FORM B. Attract of rations issd to recruits statwued at -, under commana Date. No. of No. of No. of Commencing Ending No. of d. return. men. women..drawn f Total number of complete rations...................................... I certify that I have carefully compared the above abstract with the original returns - complete rations.

Page  144 REVISED REGULATIONS Recruiting Service.-Forms. FORK C. Abstract of disbursements on account of contingencies of the recruiting service, by, in the quarter ending, 18-, at Amount. N.o Daeopa- T hmpi. O htacut I t $ Recruiting 00 o. I w 6

Page  145 FOR THE ARMY. 145 Recruiting Service. Forms. FORM D. THE UNITED STATES, To I DR. Dolls. For I certify that the above account is correct. Recruiting Offcer. Received - -this day of, 18-, of - -, recruiting officer, - dollars and cents, in full of the above account. $ (DUPLIcATe.) 10 FOR THE ARMY. -145 Date. Cts,

Page  146 146 RE,VISED REG~ULATIONS Recruiting~ Service.-Forms. : 4, * o, I 0 E4 * : *-~It 0 0) :!i: I ;a t;, 94 r-) .4 a a 'ti I 0 11 P. g tI -9 I.0 11 1 6 QIz Q t .5 Im pq E-4 rn A pq z pq t4 E-4 94 A

Page  147 3~~~~~O ~l.RY 4 Public Property, Money, and Accounts. ARTICLE XLI PUBLIC PROPERTY, MONEY, AND ACCOUNTS. 989. All officers of the Pay, Commissary, and Quartermaster's Depart. ments, and military store-keepers, shall, previous to their entering on the duties of their respective offices, give good and sufficient bonds to the United States fully to account for all moneys and public property which they may receive, in such sums as the Secretary of War shall direct; and the officers aforesaid shall renew their bonds every four years, and oftener if the Secretary of War shall so require, and whenever they receive a new commission or appointment. 990. The sureties to the bond shall bc bound jointly and severally for the whole amount of the bond, and shall satisfy the Secretary of War that they are worth jointly double the amount of the bond, by the affidavit of each surety, stating that he is worth, over and above his debts and liabilities, the amount of the bond or such other sum as he may specify; and each surety shall state his place of residence. 991. The chiefs of disbursing departments who submit requisitions for money to be remitted to disbursing officers, shall take care that no more money than actually needed is in the hands of any officer. 992. The Treasury Department having provided, by arrangement with the assistant treasurers at various points, secure depositories for funds in the hands of disbursing officers, all disbursing officers are required to avail themselves, as far as possible, of this arrangement, by depositing with the assistant treasurers such funds as are not wanted for immnediate use, and drawing the same in convenient sums as wanted. 993. No public funds shall be exchanged except for gold and silver. When the funds furnished are gold and silver, all payments shall be in gold and silver. When the funds furnished are drafts, they shall be presented at the place of payment, and paid according to law; and pay ments shall be made in the funds so received for the drafts, unless said funds or said drafts can be exchanged for gold and silver at par. If any disbursing officer shall violate any of these provisions, he shall be suspended by the Secretary of War, and reported to the President, and promptly removed from office or restored to his tiust and duties as to the President may seem just and proper. (Act August 6, 1846.) 994. No disbursing officer shall accept, or receive, or transmit to the Treasury to be allowed in his favor, any receipt or voucher from a creditor of the Urited States without having paid to such creditor, in such funds as he ieceivcd for disbursement, or isuch other fun(s as be is FOR TIIE JRMY. 147

Page  148 REVISED RE(}ULAT.ONS Public Property, Money, and Accounts. authorized by the preceding article to Lake in exchange, the full amount specified in such receipt or voucher; and every such act shall be deemed to be a conversion to his own use of the amount specified in such receipt or voucher. And no officer in the military service charged with the safe-keeping, transfer, or disbursement of public money, shall convert to his own use, or invest in any kind of merchandise or property, or loan with or without interest, or deposit in any bank, or exchange for other funds, except as allowed in the preceding article, any public money intrusted to him; and every such act shall be deemed to be a felony and an embezzlement of so much money as may be so taken, converted, invested, used, loaned, deposited, or exchanged. (Act August 6, 1846) 995. Any officer who shall directly or indirectly sell or dispose of, for a premium, any Treasury note, draft, warrant, or other public security in his hands for disbursement, or sell or dispose of the proceeds or avails thereof without making returns of such premium and accounting therefor by charging it in his accounts to the credit of the United States, will forthwith be dismissed by the President. (Act August 6, 1846.) 996. If any disbursing officer shall bet at cards or any game of hazard, his commanding officer shall suspend his functions, and require him to turn over all the public funds in his keeping, and shall immediately report the case to the proper bureau of the War Department. 997. All officers are forbid to give or take any receipt in blank for public money or property; but in all cases the voucher shall be made out in full, and the true date, place, and exact amount of money, in words, shall be written out in the receipt before it is signed. 998. When a signature is not written by the hand of the party, it must be witnessed. 999. No advance of public money shall be made, except advances to disbursing officers, and advances by order of the War Department to officers on distant stations, where they cannot receive their pay and emoluments regularly; but in all cases of contracts for the performance of any service, or the delivery of articles of any description, payment shall not exceed the value c? the service rendered, or of the articles delivered, previously to such payment. 1000. No officer disbursing or directing the disbursement of money for the military service shall be concerned, directly or indirectly, in the purchase or sale, for commercial purposes, of any article intended for, making a part of, or appertaining to the department of the public service in which he is engaged, nor shall take, receive, or apply to his own use ,my gain or emolument, under the guise of presents or otherwise, for negotiating or transacting any public business, other than what is or may be allowed by law. 148

Page  149 Public Property, Money, and Accounts. 1001. Nowagon-master or forage-master shall be interested or concerned. directly or indirectly, in any wagon or other means of transport employed by the United States, nor in the purchase or sale of any property procure-l for or belonging to the United States, except as the agent of the United States. 1002. No officeer or agent in the military service shall purchase from ny other person in the military service, or make any contract with any such person to furnish supplies or services, or make any purchase or contract in which such person shall be admitted to any share or part, or to any benefit to arise therefrom. 1003. No person in the military service whose salary, pay, or emoluments is or are fixed by law or regulations, shall receive any additional pay, extra allowance, or compensation in any form whatever, for the dis. bursement of public money, or any other service or duty whatsoever, unless the same shall be authorized by law, and explicitly set out in the appropriation. 1004. All accounts of expenditures shall set out a sufficient explanatior of the object, necessity, and propriety of the expenditure. 1005. The facts on which an account depends must be stated and vouched by the certificate of an officer, or other sufficient evidence. 1006. If any account paid on the certificate of an officer to the facts is afterward disallowed for error of fact in the certificate, it shall pass to the credit of the disbursing officer, and be charged to the officer who gave the certificate. 1007. An officer shall have credit for an expenditure of money or property made in obedience to the order of his commanding officer. If the expenditure is disallowed, it shall be charged to the officer who ordered it. 1008. Disbursing officers, when they have the money, shall pay cash, and not open an account. Heads of bureaus shall take care, by timely remittances, to obviate the necessity of any purchases on credit. 1009. When a disbursing officer is relieved, he shall certify the out. standing debts to his successor, and transmit an account of the same to the head of the bureau, and turn over his public money and property appertaining to the service from which he is relieved to his successor, unless otherwise ordered. 1010. The chief of each military bureau of the War Department shall, under the direction of the Secretary of War, regulate, as far as prac.. ticable, the employment of hired persons required for the administrative service of his department. 1011. When practicable, persons hired in the military service shall be FOR THE ARMY. 149 N 2

Page  150 REVISED REGULATIONS Public Property, Money, and Accounts. paid at the end of the calendar month, and when discharged. Separate pay-rolls shall be made for each month. 1012. When a hired person is discharged and not paid, a certified statement of his account shall be given him. 1013. Property, paid for or not, must be taken up on the return, and accounted for when received. 1014. No officer has authority to insure public property or money. 1015. Disbursing officers are not authorized to settle with heirs, executors, or administrators, except by instructions from the proper bureau of the War Department upon accounts duly audited and certified by the proper accounting officers of the Treasury. 1016. Public horses, mules, oxen, tools, and implements shall be branded conspicuously U. S. before being used in service, and all other public property that it may be useful to mark; and all public property having the brand of the U.S. when sold or condemned, shall be branded with the letter C. 1017. No public property shall be used, nor labor hired for the public be employed, for any private use whatsoever not authorized by the regulations of the service. 1018. When public property becomes damaged, except by fair wear and tear, or otherwise unsuitable for use, or a deficiency is found in it, the officer accountable for the same shall report the case to the commanding officer, who shall, if necessary, appoint a Board of Survey. 1019. Boards of Survey shall have no power to condemn public property. They are called only for the purpose of establishing data by which questions of administrative responsibility may be determined, and the adjustment of accounts facilitated; as, for example, to assess to amount and kind of damage or deficiency which public property may have sustained from any extraordinary cause, not ordinary wear, either in transit or in store, or in actual use, whether from accident, unusual wastage, or otherwise, and to set forth the circumstances and fix the responsibility of such damage, whether on the carrier, or the person accountable for the property or having it immediately in charge; to make inventories of property ordered to be abandoned, when the articles have not been enumerated in the orders; to assess the prices at which damaged clothing may be issued to troops, and the proportion in which supplies shall be issued in consequence of damage that renders them at the usual rate unequal to the allowance which the Regulations contemplate; to verify the discrepancy between the invoices and the actual quantity or description of property transferred from one officer to another, and ascertain, as fai as possible, where and how the discrepancy has occurred, whether in the lands of the carrier or the officer mak-ng the transfer; and to make 150

Page  151 }'OR THE ARMY. 151 Public Property, Money, and Accounts. inventories and report on the condition of r,public property in the possession of officers at the time of their death. The action of the board for these authorized objects will be complete with the approval of the commanld ing officer, provided that neither he nor any of the board are interested parties; but will be subject to revision by higher authority. In no case, however, will the report of the board supersede the depositions which the law requires with reference to deficiencies and damage. 1020. Boards of Survey will not be convened by any other than the Commanding officer present, and will be composed of as many officers, not exceeding three, as may be present for duty, exclusive always of the commanding officer and the officer responsible in the matter to be reported on; but in case the two latter only are present, then the one not responsible will perform the duties, and the responsible officer will perform them only if there be no other recourse. The proceedings of the board will be signed by each member, and a copy forwarded by the approving officer to the head-quarters of the department or army in the field, as the case may be, duplicates being furnished to the officer accountable for the property 1021. All surveys and reports having in view the condemnation of public property, for whatever cause, will be made by the commanding officers of posts or other separate commands, or by Inspectors-General, or inspectors specially designated by the commander of a department or an army in the field, or by higher authority Such surveys and reports having a different object from those of Boards of Survey, will be required independently of any preliminary action of a board on the same matter. 1022. When public property is received by any officer, he will make a careful examination to ascertain its quality and condition, but without breaking packages until issues are to be made, unless there should be cause to suppose the contents defective; and in any of the cases supposed in the preceding paragraph, he will apply for a Board of Survey for the purposes therein set forth. If he deem the property unfit for use and that the public interest requires it to be condemned, he will, in addition, report that fact to the commanding officer, who will make, or cause to be( made, a critical inspection of it-according as he may be commander of a post only, or have a higher command. If the inspector deem the property fit,.it shall be received and used. If not, he will forward a formal inspection report to the commander empowered to give orders in the case. The same rule will be observed, according to the nature of the case, with reference to property already on hand. The person accountable for the property, or having it in charge, will submit an inventory, which will accompany or be embodied in the inspection report, stating how long the property has been in his possession, how long in use, and from whom it was received. The inspector's report will state the exact condition of each FOR THE ARMY. 151

Page  152 152 REVISED REGULATIONS Public Property, Money, and Accounts. article, and what disposition it is expedient to make of it: as, to be de. stroyed, to be dropped as being of no value, tG be broken up, to be repacked or repaired, or to be sold. The inspector will certify on his report that he has examined each article, and that its condition is as stated. If the commanding officer, who ordinarily would be the inspector, is himself accountable for the property, the next officer in rank present for duty will act as the inspector. The authority to inspect and condemn will not, without special instructions, be exercised by commanding officers of arsenals with reference to ordnance and ordnance stores, but only in regard to other unserviceable supplies. 1023. An officer commanding a department, or an army in the field may give orders, on the report of the authorized inspectors, to sell, destroy, or make such other disposition of any condemned property as the case may require-ordnance and ordnance stores alone excepted, for which the orders of the War Department must always be taken. But if the property be of very considerable value, and there should be reason to suppose that it could be advantageously applied or disposed of elsewhere than within his command, he will refer the matter to the Chief of the Staff Department to which it belongs, for the orders of the War Department. No other persons then those above designated, or the General-in. chief, will order the final disposition of condemned property; saving only in the case of horses which should be killed at once to prevent contagion and of provisions or other stores which are rapidly deteriorating, when the immediate commander may have to act perforce. Inventories of condemned property will be made in triplicate, one to be retained by the person accountable, one to accompany his accounts, and one to be forwarded through the department or other superior head-quarters to the Chief of the Staff Department to which the property belongs. Separate inventories must be made of the articles to be repaired, of those to be broken up, those to be sold, to be dropped, &c. 1024. Every inspector, member of a Board of Survey, and commander acting on their proceedings, shall be answerable that his action has been proper and judicious, according to the Regulations and the circumstances )f the case. 1025. As far as practicable, every officer in charge of public property, whether it be in use or in store, will endeavor by timely repairs to keep tt in serviceable condition, for which purpose the necessary means will be allowed on satisfactory requisitions; and property in store so repaired will be issued for further use. Unserviceable arms will be sent to an arsenal for repair. Provisions and other perishable stores will be repacked whenever it may be necessary for their preservation and their value will justify tbo expense, which will be a legitimate charge against the depart 152 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  153 -~~~~O TH RM Public Property, Money, and Accounts. ment to which they belong. Public animals will not be condemned for temporary disease or want of condition, but may, by order of the com manding officer after inspection, be turned in for rest and treatment, if unfit for the service for which they are immediately required. 1026. Public property shall not be transferred gratuitously from one staff department to another; nor shall the funds of one be used to liquid ate the debts of another. 1027. If any article of public property be lost or damaged by neglect or fault of any officer or soldier, he shall pay the value of such article, or amount of damage, or cost of repairs, at such rates as a Board of Survey, with the approval of the commanding officer, may assess, according to the place and circumstances of the loss or damage. And he shall, moreover, be proceeded against as the Articles of War provide, if he demand a trial by court-martial, or the circumstances should require it. 1028. Charges against a soldier shall be set against his pay on the muster-roll-but only on clear proof, and never without an inquiry, if he demand it. Charges against an officer to be set against his pay shall be promptly reported to the Secretary of War.* 1029. If any article of public property be embezzled, or by neglect lost or damaged, by any person hired in the public service, the value or damage, as ascertained, if necessary, by a Board of Survey, shall be charged to him, and set against any pay or money due him. 1030. Public property lost or destroyed in the military service must be accounted for by affidavit, or the certificate of a commissioned officer, or other satisfactory evidence. 1031. Affidavits or depositions may be taken before any officer in the list, as follows, when recourse cannot be had to any before named on said list, which fact shall be certified by the officer offering the evidence: 1st. a civil magistrate competent ta administer oaths; 2d. a judge advocate; 3d. the recorder of a garrison or regimental court-martial; 4th. the adjutant of a regiment; 5th. a commissioned officer. 1032. Military stores and other army supplies regularly condemned, and ordered for sale, shall be sold for cash at auction, on due public notice, and in such market as the public interest may require. The officer making the sale will bid in and suspend the sale when, in his opinion, better prices may be got. Expenses of the sale will be paid from its proceeds. The auctioneer's certified 4ecount of the sales in detail, and the vouchers for the expenses of the sale, will be reported to the * If the pay of any officer or soldier's wrongfully withhold for arrears or liabilities to the United States, a civil remedy is prt ided by the act of January 25, 1828. FOR THE ARIIIY. 154

Page  154 15 RIIE EUAIN Public Property, Money, and Accounts. chief of the department to which the property belonged. The net pro ceeds will be applied as the Secretary of War may direct. 1033. No officer making returns of property shall drop from his return any public property as worn out or unserviceable until it has been condemned, after proper inspection, and ordered to be so dropped. 1034. An officer issuing stores shall deliver or transmit to the receiving officer an exact list of them in duplicate invoices, and the receiving officer shall return him duplicate receipts. 1035. When an officer to whom stores are forwarded has reason to suppose them miscarried, he shall promptly inform the issuing and for. warding officer, and the bureau of the department to which the property appertains. 1036. When stores received do not correspond in amount or quality with the invoice, they will be examined by a Board of Survey, and a copy of the report of the board be communicated to the proper bureau, to the issuing and forwarding officer, and to the officer authorized to pay the transportation account. Damages recovered from the carrier or other party liable, will be refunded to the proper department. 1037. On the death of any officer in charge of public property or money, the commanding officer shall appoint a Board of Survey to take an inventory of the same, which he shall forward to the proper bureau of the War Department, and he shall designate an officer to take charge of the said property or money till orders in the case are received from the proper authority. 1038. When an officer in charge of public property is removed from the care of it, the commanding officer shall designate an officer to receive it, or take charge of it himself, till a successor be regularly ap. pointed. Where no officer can remain to receive it, the commanding officer will take suitable means to secure it, and report the facts to the proper authority. 1039. Every officer having public money to account for, and failing to renjer his account thereof quarter-yearly, with the vouchers necessary to its correct and prompt settlement, within three months after the expiration of the quarter if resident in the United States, and within six months if resident in a foreign country, will be promptly dismissed by the President, unless he shall explain the default to the satisfaction of the President. (Act January 31, 1823.) 1040. Every officer intrusted with public money or property shall render all prescribed returns andl accounts to the bureau of the department in which he is serving, whire all such returns and accounts shall pass through a rigid administrative scrutiny before the money accounts REVISED REGULATIONS 154

Page  155 FOR TIlE ARMY. Contracts and Purchases. are transmitted to the proper offices of the Treasury Department for settlement. 1041. The head of the bureau shall cause his decision on each account to be endorsed on it. He shall bring to the notice of the Secretary of War all accounts and matters of account that require or merit it. When an account is suspended or disallowed, the bureau shall notify it to the officer, that he may have early opportunity to submit explanations or take an appeal to the Secretary of War. 1042. When an account is suspended or disallowed in the proper office of the Treasury Department, or explanation or evidence required from the officer, it shall be promptly notified to him by the head of the mili tary bureau. And all vouchers, evidence, or explanation returned by him to the Treasury Department shall pass through the bureau. 1043. Chiefs of the disbursing departments shall, under the direction ok the Secretary of War, designate, as far as practicable, the places where the principal contracts and purchases shall be made and supplies procured for distribution. 1044. All purchases and contracts for supplies or services for the army, except personal services, when the public exigencies do not require the immediate delivery of the article or performance of the service, shall be made by advertising a sufficient time previously for proposals respecting the same. 1045. The officer advertising for proposals shall, when the intended contract or purchase is considerable, transmit forthwith a copy of the advertisement and report of the ease to the proper bureau of the War Department. 1046. Contracts will be made with the lowest responsible bidder, and purchases from the lowest bidder who produces the proper article. But when such lowest bids are unreasonable, they will be rejected, and bids again invited by public notice; and all bids and advertisements shall be sent to the bureau. 1047. When sealed bids are required, the time of opening them shal] be sl1ecified, and bidders have privilege to be present at the opening. 1048. When immediate delivery or performance is required by the public exigency, the article or service required may be procured by open purchase or contract at the places and in the mode in which such articles are usually bought and sold, or such services engaged, between individuals. 1049. Contracts shall be made in quadruplicate; one to be kept by the officer, one by the contractor, and two to be sent to the military bureau, one of which for the office of the Second Comptroller of the Treaury. 155

Page  156 156 REVISED REGULATIONS Contracts and Purchases. Abstracts. 1050. The contractor shall give bond, with good and sufficient security, for the true and faithful performance of his contract; and each surety shall state his place of residence. 1051. An express condition shall be inserted in contracts that no memiber of Congress shall be admitted to any share or part therein, or any benefit to arise therefrom. 1052. No contract shall be made except under a law authorizing it, or an appropriation adequate to its fulfilment, except contracts by the Secretary of War for the subsistence or clothing of the army, or the Quartermaster's Department, which shall not exceed the necessities of the current year. 1053. It is the duty of every commanding officer to enforce a rigid economy in the public expenses. 1054. The commander of a geographical district or department shall require abstracts to be rendered to him, at least once in each quarter, by every officer under his orders who is charged with the care of public property or the disbursement of public money, showing all property received, issued, and expended by the officer rendering the account, and the property remaining on hand, and all moneys received, paid, or contracted to be paid by him, and the balances remaining in his hands; and where such officer is serving under any intermediate commander, as of the post, regiment, &c., the abstracts shall be revised by such commander; and both the accounting officer and the commanding officer shall accompany the abstracts with full explanations of every circumstance that may be necessary to a complete understanding, by the commander of the department, of all the items on the abstracts. These abstracts, where the accounting officer is serving in more than one staff department, will be made separately for each. 1055. The commander of the department shall promptly correct all Irregularities and extravagances which he may discover. He shall also forward, as soon as practicable, the money abstracts to the bureau of the War Department to which the accounts appertain, with such remarks as may be necessary to explain his opinions and action thereon. 1056. All estimates for supplies of property or money for the public service within a department shall be forwarded through the commander of the department, and carefully revised by him. And all such estimates shall go through the immediate commander, if such there be, of the officer rendering the estimate, as of the post or regiment, who shall be required by the department commander to revise the estimates for the service of his own command. 1057. The administrative control exercised by department commanders shall, when troops are in the field, devolve on the commanders ot 156 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  157 FOR TIHE ARMY. divis'ons; or, when the command is less than a division, on the commander of the whole. 1058. No land shall be purchased for the United States except under a law authorizing such purchase. 1059. No public money shall be expended for the purchase of any land, nor for erecting armories, arsenals, forts, fortifications, or other permanent public buildings, until the written opinion of the Attorney-General shall be had in favor of the validity of the title to the land or site, nor, if the land be within any State of the United States, until a cession of the jurisdiction by the Legislature of the State. 1060. No permanent buildings for the army, as barracks, quarters, hospitals, store-houses, offices, or stables, or piers, or wharves, shall be erected but by order of the Secretary of War, and according to the plan directed by him, and in consequence of appropriations made by law. And no alteration shall be made in any such public building without authority from the War Department. 1061. Complete title papers, with full and exact maps, plans, and drawings of the public lands purchased, appropriated, or designed for permanent military fortifications, will be collected, recorded, and filed in the Bureau of the Corps of Engineers; of the public lands appropriated or designated for armories, arsenals, and ordnance depots, will be collected, recorded, and filed in the Ordnance Bureau; of all other land belonging to the United States, and under the charge of the War Department for barracks, posts, cantonments, or other military uses, will be collected, recorded, and filed in the office of the Quartermaster-General of the army. 1062. A copy of the survey of tte land at each post, fort, arsenal, and depot, furnished from the proper bureau, will be carefully preserved in the office of the commanding officer. SIGNAL OFFICER. 1063. The signal officer shall have charge, under the direction cf thlo Secretary of War, of all signal duty, and of all books, papers, and appa. ratus connected therewith. 0 157 Signal Officer.

Page  158

Page  159 IREVISED REGULATIONS FOR THE ARMY. Quartermaster's Department.-Barracks and Quarters. ARTICLE XLII. QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 1064. This department provides the quarters and transportation of the army; storage and transportation for all army supplies; army clothing; camp and garrison equipage; cavalry and artillery horses; fuel; forage; straw; material for bedding, and stationery. 1065. The incidental expenses of the army paid through the Quarter master's Department include per diem to extra-duty men; postage on public service; the expenses of courts-martial, of the pursuit and apprehension of deserters, of the burials of officers and soldiers, of hired escorts, of expresses, interpreters, spies, and guides, of veterinary surgeons and medicines for horses, and of supplying posts with water; and generally the proper and authorized expenses for the movements and operations of an army not expressly assigned to any other department. BARRACKS AND QUARTERS. 1066. Under this head are included the permanent buildings for the use of the army, as barracks, quarters, hospitals, store-houses, offices, stables. 1067. When barracks and quarters are to be occupied, they will be allotted by the quartermaster at the station, under the control of the commanding officer. 1068. The number of rooms and amount of fuel for officers and men are as follows: Cords of Rooms. wood per month.* n X g E; iInf A Major-General............................................... 5 1... It 5 A Brigadier-General or Colonel...................................... 4 1... 1 4 A Lieutenant-Colonel or Major...................................... 3 1... 1 3i A Captain or Chaplain.................................................. 2 1... 3 Lieutenant................................................... 1... + 2 Military store-keeper....................................................1 1. The General commanding the army...................................... 3....3... The commanding officer of a division or department, an as sistant or deputy Quartermaster-General.................2..... 2 ~ Or coal, at the rate of 1500 lbs. anthracite, or 30 bushels bituminous, to the cord. t Two cords of pine wood for fuel may, at the discretion of a department commander be issu(ed in lieu of one cord of oak, pr)vided the cost be not greater. 159

Page  160 Quartermaster's Department.-Barracks and Quarters. Cords of Rooms. wood per month. . So -, t 9 G _ - - _ 1. - P,.: 9. e 4P The commanding officer of a regiment or post, Quarter master, Assistant-Quartermaster, or Commissary of Sub sistence.................................................................. The senior Ordnance Officer stationed at the Head-Quarters of a Military Department........................................... The Assistant Adjutant-General at the Head-Quarters of the Army, the Assistant Adjutant-General, the Medical Di rector and Medical Purveyor of a Military Department, each...................................................................... Officers of the Pay Department...................................... An acting Assistant-Quartermaster, when approved by the Quartermaster-General.............................................. Wagon and forage master, Sergeant-MAajor, Ordnance Ser geant, Quartermaster-Sergeant, Medical C det, or Prin cipal Mlusician......................................................... Each non-commissioned officer, musician, private, officer's servant, and washerwoman...................................... Each necessary fire for the sick in hospital, to be regulated by the surgeon and commanding officer, not exceeding....... Each guard-fire, to be regulated by the commanding officer, not exceeding.......................................................... A commissary or quartermaster's store-house, when neces sary, not exceeding.................................................... A regiment or post mess.............................................. To every six non-commissioned officers, musicians, and pri vates, servants and washerwomen, 225 square feet of room north of 38~ N., and 256 square feet south of that latitude. t 1 1069. Merchantable hard wood is the standard; the cord is 128 cubic feet. 1070. A particular set of quarters will be set apart at every chaplainpost for the chaplain. He will not be disturbed in these further than by a reduction of his allowance when that of the other officers is reduced Nor will he be alloyed to choose other quarters. 1071. No officer shall occupy more than his proper quarters, except by order of the commanding officer when there is an excess of quarters at the station; which order the quartermaster shall forward to the Quartermaster-General, to be laid before the Secretary of War. But the amount of quarters shall be reduced pro r ata by the commanding officer when the number of officers and troops make it necessary; and when the public buildings are not sufficient to quarter the troops, the commanding officer shall report to the commander of the department for authority to hire quarters, or other necessary orders in the case. The department commander shall report the case, and his orders therein, to the Quarterm[-ter General. n REVI,SED RE'GULA'TIONS 160 1 1 I I ...... ... ... ... ... ...... 1... ...... 1... ...... 1 1 Ii l i 1 2 3, 1 1 ...... ......... ... ...... ............ I..-......

Page  161 Quartermaster's Department. —Barracks and Quarters. 1072. A mess-room, and fuel for it, are allowed only when a majo(rity of the officers of a post or regiment unite in a mess; never to less than thiree officers, nor to any who live in hotels or boarding-houses. Feel for a mess-room shall not be used elsewkere, or for any other purpose. 1073. Fuel issued to officers or troops is public property for their use; what they do not actually consume shall be returned to the quartermaster and taken up on his quarterly return. With this exception, however: that the fuel issued to troops, and not actually used in quarters, may be used in baking their bread. 1074 In November, December, January, and February, the fuel is increased one-fourth at stations from the 39th degree to the 43d degree north latitude, and one-third at stations north of the 43d degree. 1075. Fuel shall be issued only in the month when due. 1076. In allotting quarters, officers shall have choice according to rank, but the commanding officer may direct the officers to be stationed convenient to their troops. 1077. An officer may select quarters occupied by a junior; but, having, made his choice, he must abide by it, and shall not again at the post displace a junior, unless himself displaced by a senior. 1078. The set of rooms to each quarters will be assigned by the quar termaster, under the control of the commanding officer; attics not counted as rooms. 1079. Officers cannot choose rooms in different sets of quarters. 1080. When public quarters cannot be furnished to officers at stations without troops, or to enlisted men at general or department head-quarters, quarters will be commuted at a rate fixed by the Secretary of War, and fuel at the market price delivered. When fuel and quarters are commuted to an officer by reason of his employment on a civil work, the commutation shall be charged to the appropriation for the work. No commrutation of rooms or fuel is allowed for offices or messes. 1081. The following rates of monthly commutation for quarters, when officeers are serving without troops and at posts where there are no publio qual ters which they can occupy, have been established: 1. At Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington City, Charleston, Key West, Mob,le, and New Orleans, and at all posts and stations in Texas, and in the Territories of New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington, $9 per room. 2. At Detroit, Chicago, and St. Louis, and at all places east of the Rocky Mountains, not heretofore enumerated, $8 per room. 8. At San Francisco, $20 per room, and at all other places in Cali fornia, $12 per roam. 02 11 FOR TIIE ARMY. 161

Page  162 REVISED REG:ULATIONf Quartermaster's Department. Barracks and Quarterl. 1082. An officer is not deprived of his quarters and fuel, or commuta tion, at his station, by temporary absence on duty. 1083. Officers absent from their appropriate duties for a period exceed. ing six months, either with or without leave, shall not receive the allow. ances authorized by the existing laws for servants, forage, transportation of baggage, fuel, and quarters, either in kind or in commutation. (A.ct5 Aug. 1861, chap.- 38, sect. 20.) 1084. Officers and troops in the field are not entitled to commutation for quarters or fuel. 1086. An officer arriving at a station shall make requisition on the quartermaster for his quarters and fuel, accompanied by a copy of the order putting him on duty at the station. If in command of troops, his requisition shall be for the whole, and designate the number of officers of each grade, of non-commissioned officers, soldiers, servants, and washerwomen. 1087. Bunks, benches, and tables provided for soldiers' barracks and hospitals, are not to be removed from them, except by the quartermaster of the station, or order of the commanding officer, and shall not be removed from the station exceptby order of the Quartermaster-General. 1088. The furniture for each office will be two common desks or tables, six common chairs, one pair common andirons, and shovel and tongs. 1089. Furniture will be provided for officers' quarters when special appropriations for that purpose are made. Sales to officers of materials for furniture may be made at cost, at posts where they cannot be otherwise obtained. 1090. When buildings are to be occupied or allotted, an inspection of them shall be made by the commanding officer and quartermaster. Statements, in triplicate, of their condition, and of the fixtures and furniture in each room, shall be made by the quartermaster, and revised by the commanding officer. One of these shall be retained by the commanding officer, one by the quartermaster, and the third forwarded to the Quartermaster-General. 1091. Like inspection of all buildings in the use of troops will be made at the monthly inspections of the troops, and of all buildings which have been in the use of officers or troops, whenever vacated by them. Damages will be promptly repaired if the quartermaster has the means Commanding officers will take notice, as a military offense, of any neglect by any officer or soldier to take proper care of the rooms or furniture in his use or occupancy; but such officer or soldier may be allowed to pay the cost of the repairs when the commanding officer deems that sufficient in the case. Commanding officers are required to report tc the Quarter. 116-a

Page  163 t v A Quartermaster's Department. Army-Transportation. master-General their proceedings in all cases pf neglect under this regulation. 1092. An annual inspection of the public buildings at the several stati:ns shall be made at the end of June by the commanding officer and quartermaster, and then the quartermaster shall make the following reports: 1st. of the condition and capacity of the buildings, and of the additions, alterations, and repairs that have been made during the past year; 2d. of the additions, alterations, and repairs that are needed, with plans and estimates in detail. These reports the commanding officer shall examine and forward, with his views, to the Quartermaster-General. 1093. Necessary repairs of public buildings, not provided for in the appropriations, can only be made by the labor of the troops. 1094. When private buildings occupied as barracks or quarters, or lands occupied for encampments, are vacated, the commanding officer and quartermaster shall make an inspection of them, and a report to the Quartermaster-Geneial of their condition, and of any injury to them by the use of the United States. 1095. Military posts evacuated by the troops, and lands reserved for military use, will-be put in charge of the Quartermaster's Department, unless otherwise specially ordered. ARMY TRANSPORTATION. 1096. When troops are moved, or officers travel with escorts or stores, the means of transport provided shall be for the whole command. Proper orders in the case, and an exact return of the command, including officers' servants and company women, will be furnished to the quartermaster who is to provide the transportation. 1097. The baggage to be transported is limited to camp and garrison equipage, and officers' baggage. Officers' baggage shall not exceed (mess.. chest and all personal effects included) as follows: In the field. Changing stations. General officers............................... 125 pounds. 1000 pounds. Field officers............................. 100 " 800 " Captains................................ 80 " 700 Subalterns................................. 80 " 600 " These amounts shall be reduced pro rata by the commanding officer when necessary, and may be increased by the Quartermaster-General on transports by water, when proper in special cas s. FOR TII-E -ARMY. 163

Page  164 16f REIE EUAIN Quartermaster's Department.-Army Transportation. 10. The regimental and company desk prescribed in army regular tions will be transported; also for staff officers, the books, papers, and instruments necessary to their du,ties; and for medical officers, their medical chest. In doubtful cases under this regulation, and whenever baggage exceeds the regulated allowance, the conductor of the train, or officer in charge of the transportation, will report to the commanding officer, who will order an inspection, and all excess to be rejected. 1099. Estimates of the medical director, approved by the commanding officer, for the necessary transportation to be provided for the hospital service, will be furnished to the quartermaster. 1100. The sick will be transported on the application of the medical officers. 1101. Certified invoices of all public stores to be transported will be furnished to the quartermaster by the officer having charge of them. In doubtful cases, the orders of the commanding officer will be required. 1102. Where officers' horses are to be transported, it must be authorized in the orders for the movement. 1103. The baggage trains, ambulances, and all the means of transport continue in charge of the proper officers of the Quartermaster's Department, under the control of the commanding officers. 1104. In all cases of transportation, whether of troops or stores, an exact return of the amount and kind of transportation employed will be made by the quartermaster to the Quartermaster-General, accompanied by the orders for the movement, a return of the troops, and an invoice of the stores. 1105. Wagons and their equipments for the transport sernice of the army will be procured, when practicable, from the Ordnance Department, and fabricated in the government establishments. 1106. Spring wagons or carriages will not be used except on extraordinary occasions, and then only on the written order of a department commander or the commander of an army in the field, a copy of which order will be transmitted to the Quartermaster-General. The purchase of this description of conveyance is prohibited, unless specially authorized by the War Department. 1107. When army supplies are turned over to a quartermaster for transportation, each package shall be directed and its contents marked on it; and duplicate invoices and receipts in bulk will be exchanged between the issuing and forwarding officer. 110t. )n transports, cabin passage will be provided for offioers, and reasonable and proper accommodation for the troops, and, when possible, separate apartment for the sick. 1109. An fficer who travels not less than ten miles without troops, l64 REVISED REGTJLATION',R

Page  165 F()R THE ARMY. 165 Quartermaster's Department.- Army Transportation. escort, or military stores, and under special orders in the case from a superior, or a summons to attend a military court, shall receive ten cents mileage, or, if he prefer it, the actual cost of his transportation and of the transportation of his allowance of baggage for the whole journey, provided he has traveled in the customary reasonable manner. Mileage will not be allowed where the travel is by government conveyances, which will be furnished in case of necessity. 1110. If the journey be to cash treasury drafts, the necessary and actual cost of transportation only will be allowed; and the account must describe the draft and state its amount, and set out the items of expense, and be supported by a certificate that the journey was necessary to procure specie for the draft at par. 1111. If an officer shall travel on urgent public duty without orders, he shall report the case to the superior who had authority to order the journey; and his approval, if then given, shall allow the actual cost of transportation. Mileage is computed by the shortest mail route, and the distance by the General Post-Office book. When the distance cannot be so ascertained, it shall be reckoned subject to the decision of the Quartermaster-General. 1112. Orders to an officer on leave of absence to rejoin the station or troops he left, will not carry transportation. 1113. In changes of station, an officer entitled to mileage, or actual cost of transportation, shall be entitled to actual cost of transportation of his authorized servants; and in other cases than change of station, an officer entitled to transportation, who, from wounds or disability, requires and takes one servant, shall be entitled to the actual cost of his transportation. 1114. The Inspectors-General, when on tours of inspection where they are obliged to take a servant, shall be entitled to the actual cost of his transportation. 1115. Citizens receiving military appointments join their stations without expense to the public. 1116. But assistant surgeons approved by an examining board and commissioned, receive transportation in the execution of their first order to duty, and graduates of the Military Academy receive transportation from the academy to their stations. 1117. When officers are permitted to exchange stations, or are transferred at their own request from one regiment or company to another, the public will not be put to the expense of their transportation. They must bear it themselves. 11 18. A paymnaster's clerk will receive the actual expenses of his traul,-i)ortation, while traveling under orders in the discharge of his duty, F,OR THE ARMY. 166

Page  166 16 RVSE REUAIN Quartermaster's Department.-Forage.-Straw. upon his affidavit to the account of expenses, and the certificate of the paymaster that the journey was on duty. 1119. Travel of officers on business of civil works will be charged to the appropriation for the work. 1120. No officer shall have orders to attend personally at Washington to the settlement of. his accounts, except by order of the Secretary of War on the report of tile bureau, or of the Treasury, showing a necessity therefor. FORAGE. 1121. The forage ration is fourteen pounds of hay and twelve pounds of oats, corn, or barley. For mules, fourteen pounds of hay and nine pounds of oats, corn, or barley. 1122. The allowance of forage to mounted officers will apply for mules equally as for horses, when the exigencies of the service make it necessary to use the former instead of the latter. This will not: authorize officers to make the substitution on drills and parades, or, under ordinary circumstances. oh any duty under arms. 1123. Forage shall be issued to officers only in the month when due, and at their proper stations, and for the horses actually kept by them in service, not exceeding in number as follows: In time of war, MajorGeneral, seven horses; Brigadier-General, five; Colonels who have the cavalry allowance, five; other Colonels, four; Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors who have the cavalry allowance, four; other Lieutenant-Colonels and Majors, three; Captains who have the cavalry allowance, three; all other officers entitled to forage, two; and in time of peace, general and field officers, three horses; officers below the rank of field officers in the regiments of dr agoons, cavalry, and mounted riflemen, two horses; all other officers entitled to forage, one horse. 1124. No officer shall sell forage issued to him. Forage issued to public horses or cattle is public property; what they do nor actually consume is to be properly accounted for. 1125. Whenever the state of the supplies or circumstances of the service make it necessary to issue a part, only, of the ration, in kind, comaianding, officers will prescribe what part shall be so issued. STRAW. 1126. In barracks, twelve pounds of straw per month for bedding will be allowed to each man, servant, and company woman. 1127. The allowance and change of straw for the sick is regulated by the surgeon. 1128. One hundred pounds pq monte;' allowed for bedding to each horse in public service. I REVIS-ED REGULATIONS ,lf36

Page  167 FOR THE ARMY. 167~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Quartermaster's Department.-Stationery. 1129. At posts near prairie land owned by the United States, hay will be used instead of straw, and provided by the troops. Straw not actually used as bedding shall be accounted for as other public property. STATIONERY 1130. Issues of stationery are made quarterly, in amount as follows: A .* A. I 0~ 0 Commander of an army, department, or division (what may be necessary for himself and staff for their public duty.) Commander of a brigade, for himself and staff...... Officer commanding a regiment or post of not less than five companies, for himself and staff......... Officer commanding a post of more than two and less than five companies................................. Commanding officer of a post of two companies.... Commanding officer of a post of one company or less, and commanding officer of a company....... A Lieutenant-Colonel or Major not in command of a regiment or post........................................ Officers of the Inspector-General's, Pay, and Quar termaster's Department (the prescribed blank books and printed forms, and the stationery re quired for their public duty). All officers, including Chaplains, not enumerated above, when on duty and not supplied by their respective departments.................................. Steel pens, with onelholder to 12 pens, may be issued in place of quills, and envelopes in place of envelope paper, at the rate of 100 to the quire. 1131. When an officer is relieved in command, he shall transfer the office stationery to his successor. 1132. To each office table is allowed one inkstand, one stamp, one paper-folder, one sand-box, one wafer-box, and as many lead-pencils as may be required, not exceeding four per annum. 1133. Necessary stationery for military courts and boards will be furnished on the requisition of the recorder, approved by the presiding officer. 1134. The commander of an army, department, or division, may direct orders to be printed, when the requisite dispatch and the number to be distributed make it necessary. The necessity will be set out in the order for the printing, or certified on the account. 1135. Regimental, company, and post books, and printed blanks for the officers of Quartermaster and Pay Departments, will be procured by timely requisition on the Quartermaster-General. FOR THE ARMY. 167 I i z .i .1. I I 0 z ,g, 4 I.1 I v I D.. o 1.I .5 (21 -i I I I 10 I -S 12 .10 8 6 6 .3 1 1 50 40 30 - 26 20 12 1 8 6 6 4 3 2 2 2 2 I 2 1 1 1 1 i i i i i I 1 1 1 I I I lii6 11 ii

Page  168 168 REVISED REGULATIONS Quartermaster's Department.-Horses for Mounted Officers. 1136. Printed matter procured by the Quartermaster-General for use out of Washington may be procured elsewhere, at a cost not to exceed the rates prescribed by Congress for the public printing increased by the cost of transportation. EXPENSES OF COURTS-MARTIAL. 1137. An officer who attends a general court-martial or court of in quiry, convened by authority competent to order a general court-martial, will be paid, if the court is not held at the station where he is at the time serving, one dollar a day while attending the court and traveling to and from it if entitled to forage, and one dollar and twenty-five cents a day if not entitled to forage. 1138. The Judge Advocate or Recorder will be paid, besides, a per diew of one dollar and twenty-five,cents for every day he is necessarily employed in the duty of the court. When it is necessary to employ a clerk to aid the Judge Advocate, the court may order it; a soldier to be procured when practicable. 1139. A citizen witness shall be paid his actual transportation or stage fare, and three dollars a day while attending the court and traveling to and from it, counting the travel at fifty miles a day. 1140. The certificate of the Judge Advocate shall be evidence of the time of attendance on the court, and of the time he was necessarily employed in the duty of the court. Of the time occupied in traveling, each officer will make his own certificate. EXTRA-DUTY MEN. 1141. Duplicate rolls of the extra-duty men, to be paid by the Quartermaster's Department, will be made monthly, and certified by the quartermaster, or other officer having charge of the work, and countersigned by the colmmanding officer. One of these will be transmitted direct to the Quartermaster-General, and the other filed in support of the pay-roll. PUBLIC POSTAGE. 1142. Postage and dispatches by telegraph, on public business, paid bl an officer, will be refunded to him on his certificate to the account, and to the necessity of the communication by telegraph. The amount for postage, and for telegraph dispatches, will be stated separately. The telegraph should be used only in cases of urgent and imperative necessity, where the delay of the mail would be prejudicial to the public interest. Copies of the telegrams must accompany vouchers for their payment. HORSES FOR MOUNTED OFFICERS. 1143. In the field, on the frontier, or in active service, the commanding

Page  169 FOR THE ARMY. Quartermaster's Department. Allowance of Clothing. officer may authorize a mounted officer to take from the public stables one or two horses at a price one-third greater than the average cost of the lot from which he selects, or at the actual cost of the horse when that can be ascertained; providing he shall not take the horse of any trooper. A lhorse so taken shall not be exchanged or returned. Horses of mounted officers shall be shod by the public farrier or blacksmith. 1144. The horses of a field battery will be shod by the artificers of the company, one of whom shall be a farrier. No other compensation than the pay and allowances of that grade will be made for these services. CLOTHING, CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE. 1145. Supplies of clothing and camp and garrison equipage will sent by the Quartermnaster-General from the general depot to the officers of his department stationed with the troops. 1146. The contents of each package, and the sizes of clothing in it, will be marked on it. 1147. The receiving quartermaster will give duplicate receipts for the clothing as invoiced to him, if the packages as received and marked agree with the invoice, and appear rightly marked, andin good order; if otherwise, an inspection will be made by a board of survey, whose report in case of damage or deficiency will be transmitted, one copy to the Quartermaster-General and one to the officer forwarding the supplies. In case of damage, the board will assess the damage to each article. 1148. ALLOWANCE OF CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPAGE. .2 S A General....................................................... 1...... Field or staff officer above the rank of Captain... 1... 2...... Other staff officers or Captains 1....................... I. Subalterns of a company, to every two................... To every 15 foot and 1I mounted men.................. 1 2 2 2 2 5 1149. Bed-sacks are provided for troops in garrison, and iron pots may be furnished to them instead of camp-kettles. Requisitions will be sent to the Quartermaster-General for the authorized flags, colors, standards, guidons, drums, fifes, bugles, and trumpets. ALLOWANCE OF CLOTHING. 1150. A soldier is allowed the uniform clothing stated in the following table, or articles thereof of equal value. When a balance is due him at ttie end of a year, it is added to) his allowance for the next: p 169

Page  170 REVISED REGULATIONS Quartermaster's Department. Allowance of Clothing. FOR FIV YES. Y1-E R 2d. 3d. 4th. 5th. i 1 2 1 1 7 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 5 ... 1... 2 I ~~~2 1 2 1 2 8 2 3 2 3 13 3 3 3 3 15 2 2 2 2 11 4 4 4 4 20 4 4 4 4 20 ... i...... 2 ............ 1 I...... 2 1 1 1 1.5 1..... 2 Cap, complete.................................................... Hat with trimmings complete............................... Fatigue forage caps, of pattern in the Quartermaster General's Office, will be issued, in addition to hats Pompon............................................................. Eagle and ring.................................................... Cover....................................... 1 1. Coat................................................................. Trowsers........................................................... Flannel shirt....................................................... " drawers................................................. Bootees,* pair............................................... Stockings, pair................................................... Leather stock..................................................... Great-coat......................................................... Stable-frock (for mounted men)............................ Fatigue overalls (for engineers and ordnance)......... Blanket............................................................. * Mounted men may receive one pair of "boots" and two pairs of " bootees" instead of four pairs of bootees. 1151. One sash is allowed to each company for the first sergeant, and one knapsack with straps, haversack, and canteen with straps, to each enlisted man. These and the metallic scales, letters, numbers, castles, shells, and flames, and the camp and garrison equipage, will not be returned as issued, but borne on the return while fit for service. They will be charged to the person in whose use they are, when lost or destroyed by his fault. 1152. Commanders of companies draw the clothing of their men, and the camp and garrison equipage for the officers and men of their company. The camp and garrison equipage of other officers is drawn on their own receipts. 1153. When clothing is needed for issue to the men, the company commander will procure it from the quartermaster on requisition, approved by the commanding officer. 1154. Ordinarily the company commander will procure and issue clothing to his men twice a year; at other times, when necessary in special cases. 1155. Such articles of clothing as the soldier may need will be issued to him. When the issues equal in value his allowance for the year, further issues are extra issues, to be charged to him on the next muster-roll. 1156. The talmas furnished the mounted troops will be accounted for as company property, and the men to whom they are issued will be held responsible foi their preservation. 1157. The money value of' the clotl,;ng, and of each articlc of it, will I 170 CLOTHING. Ist. 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 4' 4 1 1 I 1 1

Page  171 FOR ~fIE ARMY. 171 Quartermaster's Department.-Allowance of Clothing. be ascertained annually, and announced in orders from the War Department. 1158. Officers receiving clothing, or camp and garrison equipage, will render quarterly returns of it to the Quartermaster-General. 1159. Commanders of companies will take the receipts of their men for the clothing issued to them, on a receipt-roll, witnessed by an officer, or, in the absence of an officer, by a non-commissioned officer; the witness to be witness to the fact of the issue and the acknowledgment and signature of the soldier. The several issues to a soldier to be entered separately on the roll, and all vacant spaces on the roll to be filled with a cipher. This roll is the voucher for the issue to the quarterly return of the company commander. Extra issues will be so noted on the roll. 1160. Each soldier's clothing account is kept by the company commander in a company book. This account sets out only the money value of the clothing which he received at each issue, for which his receipt is entered in the book, and witnessed as in the preceding paragraph. 1161. When a soldier is transferred or detached, the amount due to or by him on account of clothing will be stated on his descriptive list. 1162. When a soldier is discharged, the amount due to or by him for clothing will be stated on the duplicate certificates given for the settlement of his accounts. 1163. Deserters' clothing will be turned into store. The invoice of it, and the quartermaster's receipt for it, will state its condition, and the name of the deserter. 1164. The inspection report on damaged clothing shall set out, with the amount of damage to each article, a list of such articles as are fit for issue, at a reduced price stated. 1165. Commanding officers may order necessary issues of clothing to prisoners and convicts, taking deserters' or other damaged clothing when there is such in store. 1166. Officers of the army may purchase, at the regulation price, from the quartermaster of their post, such articles of uniform clothiing as they actually need-certifying that the articles so drawn are intended solely for their own personal use. 1167. But-with the exception of under-clothing and shoes, of which, when there are no other means of procuring them, a reasonable quantity may, on the officers' certificate to that effect, be purchased for them from the quartermaster-no officer's private servant, not a soldier, shall be permitted to draw or to wear the uniform clothing issued to the troops. 1168. In all cases of deficiency, or damage of any article of clothing, or camp or garrison equipage, the officer accountable for the property is required by law "to show by one or more depositions setting forth tbe

Page  172 172 REVISED REGULAT [ONS Quartermaster's Department.-Returns. circumstances of the case that the deficiency was by unavoidable accident or loss in actual service, without any fault on his part, arid, in case of damage, that due care and attention were exerted on his part, and that the damage did not result from neglect." RETURNS IN THE QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 1169. All officers and agents having money and property of the De partment to account for, arc required to make the monthly and quarterly returns to the Quiartermaster-General prescribed in the following articles: 1170. Monthly returns, to be transmitted within five days after the month to which they relate, viz.: A summary statement (Form 1); report of persons and things (Form 2); roll of extra-duty men (Form 3); report of stores for transportation, &c. (Form 4); return of animals, wagons, harness, &c. (Form 5); report of forage (Form 6); report of fuel and quarters commuted (Form 7); report of pay due (Form 8); an estimate of funds for one month (Form 9) will be sent with the monthly returns. It will be for the current month, or such subsequent month as may give time to receive the remittance. Other special estimates will be transmitted when necessary. 1171. Quarterly returns, to be transmitted within twenty days after the quarter to which they relate, viz.: An account current of money (Form 10), with abstracts and vouchers, as shown in Forms Nos. 11 to 22; a return of property (Form 23), with abstracts and vouchers, as shown in Forms Nos. 24 to 45; a duplicate of the property return without abstracts or vouchers; and a quarterly statement of the allowances paid to officers (Form 46). 1172. A distinct account current will be returned of money received and disbursed under the appropriation for "contingencies of the army." (See Forms Nos. 47, 48, and 22, for the forms of the account current, abstracts, and vouchers.) Necessary expenditures by the quartermaster for the Medical Department are entered on Abstract C. (See Forms 49 and 50.) The account will, ordinarily, be transferred from "army contingencies" to the appropriation for the Medical and HIospital Department, in the Treasury. 1173. Forms 51 and 52 are the forms of the quarterly returns of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and the receipt-roll of issues to soldiers. 1174. When persons and articles hired in the Quartermaster's Department are transferred, a descriptive list (Form 53) will be forwarded with them to the quartermaster to whom they are sent. 1175. Officers serving in the Quartermaster's Department will report to the Quartermaster-General useful information in regard to the routes and means of transportation and of supplies.

Page  173 No. 1. MONTHLY SUMMARY STATEMENT. Me United States in account with, at, in the month of,186. DR. CR. To amount of purchases within the month To amount of expenditures within the month....................................... To amount of advances made to officers, per abstract............................... By balance per last statement................ By cash received from.......................... By cash received from Treasurer of the United States, being amount of war rant No. -................................. to a0 so I-* ? ID CD Idp OF hd .10 Balance due the United States, carried to next statement............................ I certify that the above is a true statement of all the moneys which have come into my hands on account of the Quartermaster's Department, during the month of, 186, and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. The balance due the United States is deposited in A. B., Quartermaster. NOTE.-NO vouchers accompany this statement; abstracts of advances or transfers only, when the number of them makes the abstract necessary. 0 PH tt Otd 4 I I I 10 CR. Di&. -1 C^

Page  174 REVISED REGULATICNS Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 2. Report of Persons and Articles empiloyed and hired at I X Rate of hire or compensation. Designation and occupation. Names of persons and articles. Service during the month. 1 31 31 3 31 29 1 31 31 1 31 -,31 1 31 31 l 31 31 l 31 31 7 10 4 7 12 6 22 31 7 1 31 31 . PI Amount. $40 00 31 O0 1.0 00 22,000 00 700 00 100 00 75 00 2 00 40 00 2 00 20 00 Day, month, or voyage. Month. Month. Month. Voyage Month. Month. Month. Day. Month. Day. Month. House, 3 rooms House, 4 rooms 8house, 2 rooms Ship Fanny.... Schr. Heroine. Wagon & team Chas. James... Isaac Lowd.... Peter Keene... John Peters... Thos. Cross.... United States Steamer Fashion Jas. Corwin... Geo. Pratt...... John Paul...... Amount of rant and hire during the month,.......................... I certify that the above is a true report of all the persons and articles employed the head of Remarks, and the statement of amounts due and remaining unpaid, Examined. O,. D,, C(,mmanding. I I I I I I I 1.74 t a, 1. 6 4 1 2 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 ]Date of contract, agreement, or entry into service. July 1, 1860. Dec. 3,18,59. Dec. 3,1859. May 3, 1860. June4,1860 Jan.1,1860 Dec. 3,1860 Jan. 7,1861 Jan. 7,1861 Jan.1,1861 May 3,1860. Quarters... Storehouse Gu,,ird 11 Transport. Transport. ............... Clerk....... In.terpreter Express.... Bl,,,tcksinith Laborer.... I . 2 3 1 2 1 .1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 1 1 2 1 3 1 Captain"" Eiagineer,, M.t".. 1 31 31 1 31 31 1 31 31 150 00 100 00 50 00 Dec. 1,1860. Dec. 1,1860. Dec. 1,1860. Month. Month. Month.

Page  175 FOR THE ARMY. 175 Quartermaster's Department.- Forms. No. 2. 2 186 by-. during the month of Remarks showing by whom the buildings were occupied, and for what purpose, and how the vessels and men were em ployed during the month. (Transfers and discharges will be noted under this head.) 1860. Dec. 1. Dec. 3. 1861. Jan. 1. Jan. 1. *......... .......... ........... .......... Major 3d Infantry................ Subsistence Store and Office... Companies I & K,'d Infantry Transporting stores to Benicia $80 00 60 00 completed. 700 00 100 00 oooooooo, ..oooooo, ..... ooo. ......... Transporting stores to Brazos. Hauling stores to San Antonio Quartermaster's Office.......... Employed by Com'ing General Express to Indianola............ Shoeing public horses.......... Helping blacksmith.............. Steamship sent to Brazos... { .............. 1303 74 Total amount due and remaining unpaid......... 1240 00 and hired by me during the month of -, 186, and that the observations under are correct. E. F., Aig, Qr. Master. 175 FOR THE ARMY. Time and amount due and remaining unpaid. A-mount of rent or pay in the month. By whom owned.. From. To. Am't. 1861. Jan. 31. Jan. 31. ......... not 1861. Jan. 31. Jan. 31. ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... A. Byrne... Jas. Black. Jas. Black. G. Wilkins. $40 00 29 00 10 00 ......... T. Browne. Jas. Barry. 700 00 100 00 75 00 8 00 7 74 14 00 20 00 150 00 100 00 60 00 July 1. July 1. July 1. July 31. July 31. July 31. 150 00 100 00 60 00

Page  176 No. 3. Roll of Noon-commissioned Officers and Privates employed on extra duty, as mecha? month of, 186, by Term of service. an 4 0 0 F. Is6 _Z By whose order employed. . -M be I certify that the above is a correct roll of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and p: direction, during the month of, 186, and that the remarks opposite their names are Quarte7 Examined. C. D., Commanding. I i i Rank or designation. Nature of service. o .a No. Names.

Page  177 W;o. 4. Report of Stores received for Transportation and Distribution at by - Marks. No. Contt From whom By whom To whom sent, s,.. Conents..ro wh *o m u Mars. N oCotenreceived. received. and where. *_e *~~~~~~~~H 186. 186. June 1. W. S. &c. 1 to 3. Clothing. Capt. A. B., Sloop Sally, June 3. Capt. C.,Asst. Asst. Quar- Capt. A. W. Quar'master, termaster,. St. Louis. Boston. I certify that the above report is correct.

Page  178 Mont7ly Returm of Public Animals, Wayons, Harness, and other means of transportation in the possession o at, dering the month of ) 186. ~. A, ~ On hand.................................. Purchased during the month....... IReceived from officers................ Total to be accounted for............ Transferred.............................. Sold and worn out..................... Died and lost........................... Total issued and expended......... Remaining on hand................... AD 0o S. I certify that the above return is correct. NoTE.-No other articles than those above enumerated will be placed on this return. A. B., Quartermastet No. 5. s-) Remarks. td ~ t'd rp 3 (Z) tn

Page  179 No. 6. Monthly Report of Forage which 7has been issued to Itorses, Au7les, and Oxen in i durin# the month of 186. Public. Private Toal- Quantity issued. Av t~~~~ al., Date. To whom issued. - C3 c 0 I Pounds. Pounds. $ c. Field and staff officers...... 6..12... 18 6,480... 1,350......... 100 CompanyA, lstDragoons.. 61...... 4... 65 23,400... 2,240 B, 2d " 47........4... 51 18,360... 2,100................. K, 1st Artillery.. 45...... 6... 51 18,360............ 1,640........ Qr. Master's Department... 60 300 80...... 440 158,400... 33,000 Total...................... 219 300 80 26... 625 225,000... 38,690 1,640 I certify that the above report is correct

Page  180 No. 7. Report of Officers of the Army stationedl at -, whose Quarters and Fuel a' 186,by Quarters. Fuel. Period. Names. Rank. Corps. Rate per Amount. Wood Price per Names. Rank. month. W oo d. month. Aon~cord. From. To. 0 ~ ~~~~~,4.. Amoount of Fuel, $ I certify, that the above report is corret,. i r i Amou .i ;g s I Amount of Quarters, $

Page  181 No. S. Report of Per?sons Hired and Employed in the Quartermaster's Department at have been discharged the service withpay due, during the month of RATE OF PAY OR TIME FOR, AND AMOUNT RENI HIRE. UNPAID. No. Names. Occupation. Dolls. Cts. PerFrom. To. I month. ~...._ 11 George Peters Blacksmith 2 00 Day.......... 1 Aug., 1860. 30 Sept., 1860. 27 John Smith.... Teamster... 25 00 Month...... 1 Sept.,1860. 15 Sept., 1860. 39 Peter Davis.... Laborer.... 20 00 Month...... ISept., 1860. 15 Sept., 1860. $ I certify that the above is a true report of all persons hired and employed by me in deceased, deserted, or been discharged the service with pay due, and that the statement ( and the remarks, are correct and just. NOTF. —This report must contain all the information required, to enable the Departm deceased persons, to examine into the cases of deserters, and to examine and verify the co: of discharge

Page  182 L8 HEIE REU -IN Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 9. Estimate of Funds required for the service of the Qu?artermaster's -Department at I by ---- in the month of,2 186. Dolls. For Fuel................................................................... Forage................................................................ Straw................................................................ Stationery........................................................... Materials for building. (State what, and for what purpose.)......................................................... Hire of mechanics. (State for what work.)............. Hire of laborers. (State for what service.)............. Hire of teamsters. (State on what service.)............ Pay of extra-duty men. (State for what work.)......... Pay of wagon and forage masters........................... Hire of clerks, guides, escorts, expenses of courts martial, of burials, of apprehending deserters, and other incidental expenses.................................... Hire or commutation of officers' quarters.................. Hire of quarters for troops, or ground for encamp ment or use of military stations........................... Hire of store-houses, offices, &c. (For what use.)..... Mileage to officers................................................. Army transportation,-viz.: Of troops and their baggage............................... Of Quartermasters', subsistence, ordnance, and hos pital stores................................................... Purchase of horses and mules (Q. M. Dept.)............. Purchase of wagons and harness do............. Purchase of horses for mounted troops, —viz.: Horses for Company Dragoons...................... Horses for Company - Artillery, &c., &c........... Outstanding debts....................................................... Deduct actual or probable balance on hand...................... I t82 REVISED REGUL.A-TIONS Cts. 1 2 3 4 6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Page  183 The United States in account current with -, Quartermaster United States, on account of the Quartermaster's Department at I in the quarter ending on the day of,186. DR. Ca.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ To amount of purchases, per Abstract A... To amount of expenditures, perAbstract B. To amount of transfers to officers, per ab stract B b......................................... To balance due the United States carried to new account................................. By balance on hand, per last account. By cash received from Treasurer of the United States, being amount of warrant No. -........................... By cash received of sundry of.icers, per abstract B b b....................... By cash received from sales of public property, as per account herewith. el CD 19 i n to ID F, okI 0 $ $ I certify that the above is a true account of all the moneys that have come into my hands, on account of the Quartermaster's Department, during the quarter ending on the day of, 186, and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. A. B., Quartermaster. NOTE.-Moneys for clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and contingencies of the army, are not accounted for in this account current. Abstracts B b and B b b are used only where the number of transfers make them necessary. I I I i I o.10. Du. CR. 186. March 31. 41 31. is 31. is 31. 186.' Jan. 1 - 11 15. March 31. It 31. Pt tt P. OK) CZ

Page  184 NO. 11.-(ABSTRACT A.) Abstract of Purchases paid for at - in the quarter edind1g on t Classes. Fuel. Forage Amount. Wood. Coal. a Date. Q From whom v o purchased. > urhsd Dolls. Cts. Cords. Feet. Ins. Lbs. Bu. Bu. LI Purchased prior to the quarter.... Purchased within the quarter Purchased within the quarter...... l l l-~~~~ Total paid within the quarter...... NOTE,.-This abstract will be suipported by vouchers (Form 12), and must exhibit all purcli,ise(l within or prior to the quarter, except purchases of clothing, camp and gi OontingenIcies." I I

Page  185 NO. 12. —(VOUcHzr FOR PURCHASES TO ABSTRA( To Date of purchase. For 20 cords of wood, at - per cord...................................... 20,352 pounds of straw, at - per 100 lbs............................... 100 bushels of coal, at - per bushel.................................. I certify that the aoove account is correct and just; the articles are to be (or have beei tue - quarter ending on the day of, 186. Received at, the of, 186, of C. D., Quartermaster U. S. Army, - above account. (Signed duplicates.) NOTE -The certificate made by the officer whlo purchased t?,poperty. The rece The United States, June 3, 1860....... " 10,......... " 29, "....

Page  186 186 REVISED REGULATIONS Quartermaster's D)epartment.-Forms. - 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~t p 0 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~0 0 0 0 P. 00 t* t)* 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 00 186 REVISED REGULATIONS 9 Q 9 t3 ;2 tm .i E5 E4 0 f& E-PA D m 1 C6 6 0 0 P: 0

Page  187 FOR THE ARMY. 187 Quartermaster's D~epartment.-Formis. 0 p 0 0 14 0 00 Z5 4)4) 0 0 d; 4) 4) FOR THE ARMY. 187 16 40 PAEl u pq I 4 6

Page  188 INo. 15.-(VOUOHER TO ABSTRACT B.) We, the subscrnbers, do hereby acknowledge to have received of, Assistant Q sums opposite to our names respectively, being in full of our pay for the period h hereof. Amount Am't of Amo Period of service. Rate of pay. of pay. stopge. reei of pay. stop'ges. recei, Date. No. Name. Occupation. A A 0 A- 7 S~~~~ ~ ~~~~~ _ _0 0 I certify, that the above receipt-roll is correct and just.

Page  189 FOR THE ARMY. 189 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. 75 0 x0 0i F. 0 4) 0 I 94 I- I I I FOR THE ARMY. 189 .i u 14 p 0 0 $4 4 ?i 19 0 to 00 .2 zz r, 4 .t; C) 4) ;4 Ei 0 0 4

Page  190 No. 17.-(VOUCHIRI TO ABSTRACT B.) ne United States, To Date. For expenses incurred for transportation of self and allowance of baggage, ing from to, per annexed statement............................... I certify that the above account is correct and just; that I have performed the journey for the purpose of -, and necessarily incurred the expenses as stated; that I have tr and not returning from leave of absence to the station or troops I left; that I have not be( money in lieu thereof, for any part of the route. The approval of the journey by the pro Received at, the of, 186, of, Assistant Quartern ctnts, in full of the above account. (Signed in dupli Dolls. TO Certificate in case ofjourney under orders. I certify that this account is correct and just; that I performed the journey, and unde incurred the expenses as stated; that I traveled in the customary reasonable manner; th' ;Lo the station or troops I had left; that I have not been furnished with public transporta atf the route.

Page  191 NO. 18.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT B :'he United States, To I Date. For mileage from to, pursuant to annexed copy of Order (or annexed summons to attend) a court-martial at, distance cents per mile................................................................ days' attendance on said court-martial, being from the of, 186, inclusive (per annexed certificate), at $.......... days' traveling on the of, going to, and on the - ing from, the court, at $...................................................... I certify that the above account is correct and just; that I have actually performed 1 stated, in obedience to the authority hereunto annexed; that I have not been furnish money in lieu thereof, for any part of the route charged for. Received at, the of, i86, of, Assistant Quartermaster U in full of the above account. (Signed in dupl! I

Page  192 NO. 19.-(VouCHER TO ABSTRACT B.) Date. Dollars. For the actual expense of his transportation, while traveling unler orders in the discharge of his duty as clerk to Major, Paymaster United States Army, from to -, per annexed statement................................................................................................ $ I certify that was, during the time above specified, employed as a clerk in the Pay Department, United States Army, and that the journeys charged for in the above account were performed by him in the discharge of his official duties, under my orders. , Pcymater U.S. Army. 10 r_ c-1 CD OF c a,. Itl qO c-~ 10p h4 I -I m 02 tt C)g COUNTY, 838. On this day of, one thousand eight hundred and sixty, personally appeared before me, the subscriber, a justice of the peace in and for the county aforesaid,, and made oath in due form of law, that the above account is correct and just, and exhibits the actual expense of his transportation for and during the journey above specified. (Subscribed in duplicate.) _ -, Justice of the Peace. Received at, the of, 186, of, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army, dollars and cents, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) Dollars Ad I I 0cc LIO The United States, TO Dia. Cents. -

Page  193 NO. 20.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT B.; The United States To Date. For cash paid for postage on letters and packages on public servi( him from the of, 186, to the of, I certify that the foregoing account is correct and just; that the letters and packag stated, were all on public service; that I have actually paid the amount charged. Received at, the of, 186, of, Assistant quartermaster 1 in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) A 0 cow

Page  194 NO. 21.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT B.) 7he Uanited States, To Date. For commutation of quarters at, from the of , 186, inclusive......................................................... For rooms, at dollars each, per month.................................. For commutation of fuel for the same period: For myself, cords feet inches, at do] For my servant, - cords feet inches, at I certify that there were no quarters owned or hired by the public at the above stati, the above period, and that the fuel is charged at the average market price for the month I certify that the above account is correct and juist; that I have been regularly statio period charged for; that I have not been furnished with quarters, rent, or fuel by the pi lieu thereof. Received at, the of - 186, of, Quartermaster of the U.' full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) oTzL-The certificate mut show by whose order the officer was stationed, and the first accour

Page  195 FOR THE ARMY. 9 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. 00 4) 0 0 6 '4). '4) I 195 94 9z el

Page  196

Page  197 REVISED REGULATIONS. Quartermaster's Department. Forms. No. 23. QUARTERLY RETURN OF QUARTERIMASTER'S STORES received, issued, and remanining on hand ot, in the quarter ending on the of -, 186. A. B., Quartermaster. NOTE. The property on this return (which does not include clothing, camp and garrison equipage) will be classed as follows: Fuel. Forage. Straw. Stationery. Barrack, Hospital, and Office Furniture, Means of Transportation, including Ilarness, &O. Building Materials. Veterinary Tools and Horse Medicines. Blacksmiths' Tools. Carpenters' Tools. Wheelwrights' Tools. Masons' and Bricklayers' Tools. Miscellaneous Tools for Fatigue and Garrison Purposes. Stores for Expenditure, such as Iron, Steel, Horse-Shocs, R(:pe, &c., &c., to be eias,se(d all habetically. R2 197 I a

Page  198 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 23. Quarterly Return of Quartermaster's Stores, received and issued at by C]asses.................................... 1. Fuel. Wood. Coal. 4) Date. Abstracts, & a.,, No. No. No. Lbs. Bu. Per last return. On hand....................... Abstract D...... Received by purchase..... E...... " from officers.... N...... Fabricated, taken up, &c. Total to be accounted for................. Fue l............................. Forage......................... Straw........................... Stationery.................... Special issues................ Expended, sold, &c......... Transferred................... Total issued and expended............... Total remaining on hand................. Condition 1.........- In good order................ 2............... Unfit for service, but re pairable.................... " 3............... Totally unfit for service... ii I I I 198 REVISED REGULATIONS Per Abstract F.. 16 G.. 11 H.. 11 I... 11 K.. 11 L. - 11 M.

Page  199 Oats. Hay. ? a Fodder. ? For Bedding. I olcpPpr c: o ~D gt 0' 0 t -l Is - J~ oo Two-quire blank-books. l l l re-luiebi books. I I I I I I I I I i I I I v Corn. T Ot 'I0 p N 9 to 0 IP t 'ICD 19 p CD It t=l 19 19 CD iz SI 0 19 i-3 bd Ott 4 ul

Page  200 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 23. Quarterly Return of Quarte~master's Stores, received and issued at 4. Stationery. o 0 Abstracts, m 0' &c a) e<) - -- a I e No. Bottles. Papers. Ozs. Ozs. No. Gross. No. Pieces. No. No. 0. H. 0. H........... D............... E............... N.......*...... F.......... G............... H.............. I................ K. 'K............... L.............. m ~ ~ ~.......... .11 I I 200 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  201 FOR THE ARMY. Quartermaster's Department. Forms. No. 23. I in the guarter ending on the of - 186 X by Continued. 4. Stationery. - 0 0 No. No. No. No. I certify that the foregoing return exhibits a true and correct statement of all1 the property which has come into my hands on account of the Quartermaster's Department during the quarter ending on the - of, 186. A. B., Quartermaster. i I I I 201

Page  202 NO. 24.-(ABSTRACT D.) Abstract of Articles purchased at, in the quarter ending on the of, 186, by. Classes.................... Fuel. Forage. Straw. Stationery. Date. g Amount. Wood. Coal. From whom p)urchased..._ _ ____ __ _. - _ _ ___ Articles purchased and paid for...... Articles purchased and not paid for Total purchased within the quarter 2 td }-4 t4 2 ED CD ED Io CD 0 NOTE.-This abstract appertains exclusively to the Property Return, and is designed to show all the supplies purchased by the Quartermaster, whether paid for or not. No vouchers of the purchases paid for accompany this abstract. They are in the second division of Abstract A. Purchases not paid for are vouched as in Form No. 25. to I certify that the above abstract is correct. A. B3., Quarterma-ster.

Page  203 No. 25.-(VOUCt:ER TO ABSTRACT D.) The United Atates, To Date of purchase. For cords of wood, at per cord................... For pounds of hay, at - per 100 lbs I certify that the above account is correct and just; that I purchased the articles a prices therein charged, amounting to dollars and cents, and that I have iot non-payment.)

Page  204 No. 26.-(ABSTRACT E.) Abstract of Artices receivedfrom officers at -, in the quarter ending on the - of - -, 186, by Classes....................Fuel. Forage. Straw. Stationery. Wood. Coal. Date. ~ From whom received. otlrciv,.......... Total received.................... 0 so CD It to -t F F9 lD tt o )X2 I certify that the above abstract is correct. A.B., Quartermaster. NOTE.-All property received from other officers will be entered on this abstract, whether receipted for or not. For vouchers see Form No.27 OP

Page  205 No. 27.-(VoUIciru TO AnSTRACT E.) List of Quartermaster's Stores, &c., delivered 6jy to, at Number or quantity. Articles. Cost when ne 40 Forty............................................... Felling axes......... $1 00 each....... 300 Three hundred pounds.......................... Bar iron, assorted.. 6 per pound 1,000 One thousand pounds........................... Cut nails..............5 per pounc 656 Six hundred and fifty-six bushels........... orn............... 1 00 per bushe 30,500 Thirty thousand five hundred pounds.... a...............1 00 per hundr 10 Ten................................................. Wheelbarrows....... 4 00 each....... 5 Five................................................... Wagons (4-horse)... 150 00 each........ 5 Five................................................. Wagons do....... 150 00 each I certify that I have this day delivered to A. B., Quartermaster United States Army, the NOTE..-When no invoice is received, the receiving officer will substitute for this form c tified by himself. When the person responsible for the property entered without invoice i:

Page  206 No. 28.-(ABSTRACT F.) Abstract of Fuel issued at - in the quarter ending on the - a>@~~~~~~~~~~ ~Wood. Date. t- To whom issued. For what period. 11 Q 6 P. -, C) z u Total issued................................................................. i certify that the above abstract is correct NOTE.-For vouchers, see Forms No 29 and No. 30. All fuel issued is entered on this a to be accounted for by them, is entered on Abstract I I I

Page  207 No. 29.-(VOUcHER TO ABSTRACT F.) Requtsitionfor Fuelfor -- Company, Reygiment of -, commanded I TOTAL Wood. O. w v 0 0 r 6 < C0 C, Total................................................................................. I certify that the above requisition is correct and just, and that fuel has not been draw Received,. 186, of, Assistant Quartermaster U.S. Army, cords - of coal, in full of the above requisition. (Signed duplicates.1 I I I I 0.w Q. 0. C),~. r w S r~ . 4. 3 0qc ;z It Station. ,,a ;z c3 .6 li o4 -5

Page  208 No. 30 —(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT F.) Requisition for Fuel for, stationed at for the mn Wood. ~~Cow Pa C — $ 0 06 C, u Q -~~ ~ 0 for myself.................................. For private servant...................... Total............................... [ I certify that the above requisition is correct and just, and that I have not drawn fuel f( Received,, lbb, of, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army, - and of coal, in full of the above requisition. NorTE.-This form will be used for individual officers hospitals, guards. &c. I Z.~ - I_ Wood.

Page  209 No. 31.-(AB Lbstract of Forage issued at -, in the quarter e n Frwha, I Total Corn. c Date. ~~~~ To who;;m isud.__ , 4 o;4 c ;z 0 0 cq PA ~~ pq ~C Total..................................... I certify that the above abstract is correct. NoTE.-For vouchers, see Forms Nos. 32, 33, 34. All-forage issued will be entered on officers, to be accounted for by them, will be entered on Abstract M. I I I I 1.Q Date. -. - I,c I (D 0 a,.l o cD ;4 ;z 0 :z R. ;i 4 0 o F. To whom issued. I o I E0 . — y

Page  210 NO. 32.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT G.) Requisition for Forage for Public Horses, Mules, and Oxen, in the service of of, 186, and ending on the of Im~ I |Daily allowance to each animal. 'a 0 a o ~ Corn. 0 t ~ a a 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T o be suppliedo o...................................... o i _ VRequired..................................................................... On hand, to be deducted................................................ To be supplied.............................................................. I certify that the above requisition is correct and just; that I have nowv in service t: required; and that forage has not been received for any part of the time specified. Received at, on the day of, 186, of, Quartermaster Uni - --- pounds of barley, pounds of oats. nmunds of hay, pounds of k-i,,ned duplicates.' Total allowance Barley. Oats. ] 0 c0 o o o o P4 P

Page  211 Wo. 33.-(VOUcHER TO ABSTRACT (-.A Requisition for Forage for Jrivate Jiorses in tle service of -, J. S. Army, at, for days, commencing the of, - ad ending the of - 186. Daily allowance for each. .6 0 0 Ao :z Hay. Fodder 0 o 0 C, rrom. Corn. pq- o g:) e0 AD o Sn i l It o r1 I __________ Total..................................................... I certify that the above requisition is correct and just, and that I have not drawn forage for any part of the time above charged. Received at, the of, 186, of, Assistant Quartermaster U. S. Army, b bushels corn . 3 bushels oats, pounds hay, pounds fodder, in full of the above requisition. (Signed duplicates.) _j I I I i I f I I I Period. Total allowance. I Oats. -.6 9 Corn. .i 0 0 0 Hay. .i 0 0 P-4 Oats. , z ;E 0 -i 0 p 1- p, Date. Remarks. To. H t-I 4 LIO I I

Page  212 No. 34.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT G.) Statement of Foraye issued to and consumed by the Public Animals under my direction at, during the month of , 186. Remarks. 0 Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. CD 19 CD CD Idp CD Sor I Total, Total............ FH rA I certify that the above statement is correct; that the forage was issued to the Public Animals as stated, and that the issues were necessary. Approved: A. B., Quartermaster. R. S., Commanding I I L I I LID p

Page  213 NO. 35.-(ABSTRACT H.) Abstract of Straw issued at,in the quarter endify on t7e For what period. 0. c3 - eE O Q 0 From- To - ~~~~0e ~ To whom issued. Total......................................................... I certify that the above abstract iS correct. NOTE.-For voucher, see Form No. 36. Issues on this abstract. Transfers on Abstract M I I r4 S0 C6 Date. a1, :3 .i 11 a, m c3 P. 0 From To

Page  214 No. 36.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT H.) Requisition for Straw for- Company, - Regiment of, commnanded by, for the month of, 18 o X ,! ~ Monthly allowance otal allowance 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Total allowance. =~ ~~ ~:3 ~~~~~to each. o Station. a' a,Total drawn for. Remarks. a c, as = sPounds. Pounds. o0, Total...... I I certify that the above return is correct and just, and that straw has not been drawn for any part of the time charged. G. H., Commanding Company. Received at -, the of, 18, of, U. S. Army, pounds of straw, in full of the above requisition. (Signed duplicates.) G. H., C7ommanding Company. to am 0 o CD I I I I I i I I 4 t'd -11 I cn t —i tt m (!!i L-4 t4 m

Page  215 NO. 37.-(AnSTRACT I.) Abstract of Stationery issued at, in the quarter endi?g on the For what period. ~~~~~ a) Date. To whom issued. From. To. ~ ~, Totalz'.................... Total............................................................. I certify that the above abstract is correct. NOTE.-For voucher, see Form No. 38. The stationery used by the Quartermaster in the and all issues by him. Transfers on Abstract M

Page  216 To. 38.-(VOUCH.ER TO ABSTRACT I.) Aeu'isition for Stationery for, stationed at, for the, comment o, the - of, 186. ID xI 0 - o) 0a a) ~~ao 0~~~~1 " 0 o a) ~~~~~~~ 0 0 ~~~~~~.,. a) a) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ a) a)~~~~~~~~~... I certify that the above requisition is correct, and that I have not drawn stationery for a, Received at, on the of, 186, of, Assistant Quartermaster quires of foolscap paper, quills, ounces of wafers, ounces of seal of cartridge paper, papers of ink-powder. (Signed duplicates.) I I I I

Page  217 FOR TilE ARMY. 217 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. I I I I I I C I 11 0a 0 * I -I I z~ 00* (Z o I * * 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 4,0 ;g Q ~~~~ * *~1 __ C~~~~ m C) '*C ~~~~~4 T I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I I I I I I I I I FOR THE ARMY. 217 i rc t; Is co r m .4

Page  218 No 40.-(VoUCIIER TO ABSTRIACT K.) SP.EIAL REQUISITION. Io For o I i I certify thliat the above requisition is correct, an(l that the articles specified are absolutely requisite for the public service, rendered so by the following circumstances: [here the officer will insert such reasons as he may think fit to give, tendingto show the necessity for the supplies.] Captain J. B, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army, will issue the articles specified in the above requsition. C. 1)., Command'ing. Received sit, the - of, 18-, of, Assistant Quartermaster United States Army rhere insert the articles] in full of the above requisition. (Signed duplicates.) NOTE.-The cost of articles issued on special requisitions, and oraers of commanding officers, will be entered on the requisition and on the list or invoice furnished the receiving officer. I.: ., . - ------ I 40 $3 -1 14 0 p 0 It tzf CD Id p 0 CD ts I -!d 0 14

Page  219 No. 41.-(ABSTRACT L.) Abstract of Articles Expecndc(, Lost, Destroyed(, ii tlhe j)tbl,'.':e.So(I,, &c., ( in the quarter eii(Iiijy on the - o' _k _- _. Classes................... By whom made. 0 4. 0 d Total....................... I certify that the above abstract is correct. I I I1 I Date.

Page  220 RLEVISED REGULATIONS Quart~ormaster's Department.-Forms. .2 0 0 0 -.~ Is 0. gi 0 0 0f 0 220 0 P. 0 4, 0 a) 14 0F. 4 A E,'o PA FA 'otg ;D 0 4 6 ;q .i .2

Page  221 FOR TUE ARMY. 221 Quartormaster' Department.-Forms. __________ 0 0 I 0 4) 4) 4) 4)4) 4)* 0 *4) 0 4) 4). 0) E, o z * 0 ;s Q, 0 4) Ii II I I I F 0 R T IT E A R'Al Y. 221' Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. ."I I I It, t .9 0 Q4 .-t. oo m .2 1 :z 0 c; z

Page  222 No. 44.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT L.) Account Sales of articles of public property sold at tpublic auction at, und of, 186. Number or quantity. Articles. Purchaser. I certify that the above account sales is accurate and just. I certify that the above enumerated articles were sold at public auction as above stated. D

Page  223 FOR THE ARMY. 223 Quartermaster' 5 Department, -Forms. I I 0 E-4) FA 0E. l, a) 00 -;t E-0. __ I a) 4, -6 ____ __________ a) .0 I I i I I i I I I I I I i FOR THE ARMY. 223 .2 Is 'st m .4 .5 H m 4 Q

Page  224 ID~ 0 C' C D -1 H ___________ No. tv -P No. of'invoice, &C. !Z ;' ,0 p z ea CD:! ; o r: Cords. -- 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Feet. 0 Inches. 0 '0 ? I Bushels. Corn. (i lbs.) Bushels. I 0.t 0~ I I I I r c3 CD _,. Pt 11 0 5 4 -CD 0 0 'ICD CD 2. 4 F" 9t ;t

Page  225 i

Page  226 ~!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 861i. 1 ISCII. I -.Jaly, Aug., Sep.. 96 ()00).ly,l Aug., Sep.. JI.................. -o () July, Aug., p T \I ( 1 ~~\lI)Au~u~(.;50 ol0'July, Aug., Step 85 ).. Auguist.............. 30 t 0 J I Y,A Sel. I B C I Eiigrs...30 00July, Aug., Sop.. 5)0)S 0 A g Ist..............0 illy Atig. Sep. .~Illy, Auig., S(I..'I O3 ) Aug.,Sup.......... .Jlly, Aug., Sep.. 30 00....................... ..........................................J..A... J. l.Ar.. ul, Aug. 20 0......................Jy A Jul, Aug........). J12 00....................... July, Aug.......1200 I I I 1 186 I. ]20 00............... 80 10'0............... Id 0() 0................ So90 0............... 80 0 0'July......... 80 00............... ....... YJul', 4u, ....... July, Aig.. .......,July, Aug.. W. S...... J. T...... lrig. ( enl... K. J.... CS,,I. Aj t. (; 1.. T. 5I... (7ol. Q}.M\. l). T. I. aj. Pay Dt. 14. B.... C,,I. En-girs... B. L.... 5Ij.T. E~ngs.. B. 5I. (Col. Drags.... J. C..... Col. Art...... F. E.... Maj. inftyT.... ... 3 o...I ... I "'i 4 1 4

Page  227 B 1, 7, 9-1 9.. 19 2, 1 1,14-I 4. B 17.............. 13 21.............. B 4, 20-G 13. 13 19............... B 26, 27........ 13 27, 30-)-( 1I. 1328, 32-11 2. 4-I11 6........ 120 00 00 00 I....... 60 00 ....... 100 O0 30 00 70 00 ....... I certify that the above is correct. A. B., Quartermaster. NOTe'.-When officers occupy quarterq owned by:he public, the numiber of rooms only will bc reported. I[ 40 00 ....... ....... ....... ,...... 40 00 ....... ....... so on 15 00 ....... ....... ....... :....... ....... ....... 396 00 215 0I)0 120 00 110 0 0 230 0 0 130 00 110 0 0 139. 5() 126 50 12 50 ....... ...... ....... 30;"0 ....... 35 00 ....... ........ ...... ....... 30 00 ....... 37' 50 ...... ....... ...,.... ....... ....... ....... ....... ....... 2(00 1 50) 50 Public quarters

Page  228 No. 47. he United States in account current with. for expenditures on account o; Departments, in the quarter ending on the o0) DR. Dolls. Cts. To amount of expenditures, perAbstract C. By balance By cash re By cash rN the Unit rant No. Sept. 80. To balance due the United States, carried to new account................................. $ I certify that the above exhibits a true account of all moneys which have come into m; army, daring the quarter ending on the of. 18-, and that the disbursemen I .... Date. Sept. 30. Date. July 1. July 8. Aug. 4.

Page  229 FOIL THE ARMY. Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. 0 94 et 00 CD a) a)~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.. a) 0 0 E-C 0 0 0*a a) I 229 -2 ts Zs t 14 Is 0 v 13 I Is ;a A (O 9 0 .3 ,4 0: 0 0

Page  230 230 lEVISED lEGULATIONS Quartermasterl's,,Department.-Forms. ID :t 0 4)a 4. ill I 230 REVISED REGULATIONS 6 9 Q Z, 4 ts Is I t3 94 PA C3 t10 0.

Page  231 NO. 50.-(VOUCHER TO ABSTRACT C.) Bill of Medicine, &c., when purchased by an officer of the Quarte Te United States, it Date of purchase. For I certify that the prices of the articles above charged, for the use of the sick at reasonable and just. Received,, 186, of, - dollars and cents, in full of the above ac( (Signed duplicates.) NoTE.-The above certificate may be signed by the surgeon making the requisition, or b3 irg to the army. The requisition on which the purchase may be made must be attached to in Abstract C, and the articles not noticed in the property returns. iI To -

Page  232 RIEVISED REGULATIONS Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 51. Quarterly Return of Clothing, Camp, and Garrison ~Equil)age of -- 186 POMPON8 Color. O F WHOM RECEI'VED. o .0 4.0_ To 6 e di = E . cd al t3 v1 c.o 3 Vt On hand per last return Total to be accounted for........................... o WUEN ISSUED. TO WHOM ISSUED. o Total issued......................................... On hand to be accounted for................ I I 232 WHZN RZCZIVED. .3 li I d u 4) P0o d u

Page  233 FOR THE ARMY. Quartermaster's Department.-Form's. No. 51. received and issued at, in~ the quarter ending on the d-y by CLOTHING. HNTALLIC UNIFORM COATS. ~~~SEALS. AKTS -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- 0 0 fr 0 - d ~ 4) 4 Id_ w) )~ I 0 0-~. 4) .P4) - 4 Q Q ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~____________ U 2 I I I I I 23,1, COAI!S. -S P.. ,e9 C, 0k u zo 9 b.0 ,v m ID bo 4) 0 't 9 C) 0 .0 z 0 d bb k m ?L 1. 9 .le ID bo pq 9 d 4) .!i 0 .4 0 9 bo k rn 4 F. 0 k0 u e01 k

Page  234 Sergeants'. f~: oprl' Privates'. 11 Yards of binding. Ba Q Q Co - I II I I I'ITalmas. l I l I |I~ Blankets. I I I I |KKnapsacks and straps. ! I!I1 I Haversacks. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I te C) P4, r',0 i;o g t,3 C4 4 Corporals'. to id IP .1,CD 19 ICD It 1. u CD Idp 19 CD ts -I I 0 0 !O t-d co bd ti t4 td pi, 0 t4 m Ln 0 .3 t4 p t4 p cn

Page  235 FOR THlE ARMY. 3 Quartormastor's Departmenlt.-Forn J. No. 51. Eguipage, received and issued,c.Cniud &o.-Continued. EQUIPAGE. -1 BACKS. It 4) - - -'5'5'50~~~~ 0 ~~~ ~ ~ 4) ~~~ 4) 4) ~~~~b 4) 4)'5''5 - -~~~~~l -.60 4). 4) ~~~ 4) a '5:5 ) 4) Co I I I I 235 .61 d 44 bo e. $Z 0 d a 'A It -t 0 d 41 0 d u .i 9 't2 ;g 0 0 It 0 U. bo u 9 .3 0 't-IR s e. u .i E d li sz It 16 u E e. u a, m .6 m m 0 0 :z (Z

Page  236 Trump, I Bugles, Fifes. I Comple .Heads, I I I ~~~~~~~~~~~~Heads, I Slings. Stioks, _ Drum-s C Cords. I Snares, I Wall-te I Wall-te I Wall-te CI ommo: Commoo [Iron po ! Pickaxi I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .I II I I I I

Page  237 Quartermaster's D~epartmenlt.-Forms. No. 51. rison FauT aye, received and issued, &c.-Continued. BOOKS AND BLANKS. 'I I I 237 FOR THE ARMY.

Page  238 REVISED REGULATIONS Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 52. We, the undergned Non-commisoned Officers, Articers, Mlsicians and several articles of Clothing set UNIFORM JACKETS. Name and designation of the soldier. 16 b0 D dt pq 0 PI 0 u< 0 .2 NOTES.-Erasures and alterations of entries are prohibited. Regular and extra issues will be distinguished on the receipt-roll. Each signature, whether written by the soldier or acknowledged b. mark, must be witnessed. Vacant space will be filled by a cipher. Mounted men may receive one pair of "boots" and two pairs of "boot ees," instead of four pairs of bootees. I I 238 LINIFORM COATS. Date of the issue. u 9 :z w bo a) m 0 u I 0 C, 4) co m ID k P4 06 ri ;4 .i .3 C-)

Page  239 FOR TIlE ARMY. 23 Quartermaster's Department.-Forms. No. 52.-Continued. Privates of, do hereby acknowledge to have received of the opposite our respective names. It '3 P fp -4 c0 ;A .! p; b 4~ 41 Signatures. o 4,0 s0 c3 A) n: d R9 a6 .!I It bo 10 0. ., Pa 4) Es4 As the metallic shoulder-scales, letters, numbers, castles, and shells and flames will last for many years, they will be borne on the returns as company property, in the same manner as are sashes, knapsacks and straps, haversacks, canteens and straps, and other articles of camp and garrison equipage, and will be charged to the soldier only when lost or destroyed through neglect, I I I I FOR THE ARMT. 239 I .1 16 .2 i !5 C, )4 4) 0 9 4 PR 0 0 .5 m Witness. .i 0 tI? 2 ,v 0 p;

Page  240 No. 53. Descrtptive Lis.t of Persons and Articles employed and hired in the Quarterm at, to, Quartermaster at -- on the Period for which pay is due. Raste of hire or compensation. .o O I-' d. 0o Designation Articles and names esignation a ud occu of persons. aiocu pation. . - So I Po Total amount due...................................................................... I certify that the above is a true list of persons and articles transferred by me to - 186-; and that the periods of service, raLes of hire or compensaLion, and at 'Am di PI c to or ct 5~ .6 I. 0 .4 0 Gu Pa I o I

Page  241 FOR THE ARMY. Subsistence Department.-Contracts. ARTICLE XLIII. SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 1176. The Commissary-General of Subsistence will designate, as far as practicable, the places where contracts and purchases for subsistence supplies shall be made, and, under/the direction of the Secretary of War, assign to stations and duties the officers and agents of his Department. SUBSISTENCE SUPPLIES. 1177. These supplies comprise: 1st, articles composing the ration, such as pork, flour, coffee, candles, &c., called SUBSISTENCE STORES; 2d, the necessary means of issuing and preserving these stores, such as stationery, scales, measures, tools, &c., called COMMISSARY PROPERTY. Subsistence supplies shall not be transferred gratuitously to another staffdepartment, nor obtained, issued, sold, or otherwise disposed of, except as herein prescribed. CONTRACTS.* 1178. Subsistence stores for the army, when time and circumstances permit, shall be procured under written contracts with suitable bonds, made by the Commissary-General or other authorized officer of the Subsistence Department. The Commissary at the place of delivery, if not provided with funds for payment, shall receipt for the articles accepted, on duplicate inspection certificates (Form 18),- one of which he shall give to the contractor, and the other forward to the Commissary-General or officer authorized to pay for the stores, with a report on the quality of the articles and the condition of the packages. The inspector shall be one holding his appointment by law, if at the place of delivery there be such an officer, for the articles to be inspected. 1179. Contracts for subsistence stores shall be made after due public notice, and on the lowest proposal received from a responsible person who produces the required article. These agreements shall expressly provide for their termination at such time as the Commissary-General may direct, and for the exclusion of any interest in them on the part of members of Congress, officers or agents of the Government, and all persons employed in the public service. (Forms 36 and 37.) 1180. A contract shall be executed in quintuplicate: one copy to be kept by the contractor, and one by the contracting officer or agent; two copies to be sent to the Commissary-General (with the bond), and the remaining one to the Returns-Office, at Washington, D.C. (See Act, * See Act, approved July 17, 1862. 241

Page  242 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department.-Purchases. approved June 2, 1862.) The copies of the contract for the CommissaryGeneral and the Returns-Office will be sent by the officer making and signing them, as soon as possible after completion, accompanied by the advertisement and one copy of every bid received. 1181. Under the provisions of the excise law, each copy of every contract for subsistence supplies is liable to a stamp duty of five cents for every sheet or piece of paper upon which it is written, and each copy of the bond to these contracts is likewise liable to a stamp duty of twenty-five cents.* The adhesive stamp for each copy of a contract, and for each copy of the accompanying bond, must be furnished, affixed, and cancelled by the contractor. The stamp is cancelled by the contractor writing on its face his initials and the date. 1182. When bids to furnish subsistence are solicited, the advertise.ment or notice shall call for sealed proposals, in. duplicate. If the bids received be deemed unreasonable, or if there be other sufficient cause for not accepting them, they will be rejected, and others again invited. The time and place of opening proposals shall be stated in the advertisement, and bidders allowed to be present at the opening. PURCHASES. 1183. Subsistence stores for such corps or posts as, by reason of their position, the climate, or other cause, the Secretary of War may authorize to be so supplied, will be procured in open market, on due public notice, and from the lowest bidder who produces the required article. The advertisement, and all the bids received, will be sent to the CommissaryGeneral as soon as the purchasing-officer has accepted the proposals. 1184. When a deficiency of subsistence stores makes an additional supply necessary, the Commissary where they are needed will make a requisition for them on the proper purchasing or issuing Commissary. (Form 15.) If the stores can be obtained in his vicinity, of good quality, and on terms advantageous to the Subsistence Department, the Commissary requiring them shall represent such facts by a detailed statement to the officer charged with the duty of providing him with subsistence, and, when authorized, will himself procure the stores in the manner prescribed in preceding paragraphs. 1185. A disbursing officer, or agent of the Subsistence Department, when provided with sufficient public funds, shall pay for supplies purchased by him. (Form 23.) When not in funds he shall furnish the seller with a certified account of the purchase, in duplicate, stating thereon the : A bond for the performance of duties pertaining to an office (a Commissary's bond, for example) is liable to a stamp duty of fifty cents. The officer executing this bond furnishes, affixes, and cancels the stamp required.

Page  243 -~~~~~O Tw RY 4 Subsistence Department.-Storage. cause of its non-payment, and on what Return he has taken up the articles. (Form 24.) 1186. Subsistence supplies purchased by a Commissary, or agent, whether paid for or not, must be accounted for by him on the proper Return. (Forms I and 8.) The name of each person from whom stores have been purchased during a month, date of purchase, articles and quanttities procured, must be entered on the Returns of Provisions for that month (Form 1); or, when the purchase bills are many, oit the Abstract which accompanies the Return. (Form 6.) When stores are purchased but not paid for, a note to that effect will be entered by the purchasing officer or agent, in the column of "Remarks" to his Return of Provisions. or its accompanying Abstract. 1187. Salt meats and flour, whether procured under contract or otherwise, must be inspected before acceptance, and by a legal inspector for these articles when the services of such an officer can be obtained. A certificate of inspection, in duplicate (Form 18), will be taken and attached to the voucher for payment. 1188. The Subsistence Department will purchase at cost-prices, without including cost of transportation, all soItit(l articles of subsistence saved by troops or employees by an economical use or managemnent of the ration, -molasses, green or desiccated vegetables, and articles furnished as antiscorbutics, excepted. This is intended to embrace savings of companies, of bakeries, and all savings from the ration made by an organized command. The purchase-bill (Form 26) will be made out in the letter or ,name of the company to which the savings belong, and in tuat7ttuplicate; two copies for the Commissary who takes up the stores (one to accompany his Return of Provisions to the Conmmissary-General), and two copies for the Commissary who pays the bill. Payment for these savings will be made to the actual commanders of conmpanies, to officers in charge of bakeries, &c., by any officer of the Subsistence Department having funds for the purpose, and on proof that the Commissary certifying to the bill has made a Return to the Commissary-General satisfactorily accounting for the stores. STORAGE. 1189. Good and sufficient storehouses, sheds, paulins, or other proper and adequate means of covering and protecting subsistence supplies, will be provided by the Quartermaster's Department. Care mnust be taken to keep the store-rooms dry and well ventilated. (For information on storing, see "Miscellaneous Items," page 301.) FOR TIIE ARMY. 243

Page  244 244 FVISEI) REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. The Ration. THE RATION.* 1190. A ration is the established daily allowance of food for one person. For the United States army it is composed as follows: twelve ounces of pork or bacon, or, one pound and four ounces of salt or fresh beef; one pound and six ounces of soft bread or flour, or, one pound of hard bread, or,: one pound and four ounces of corn meal; and to every one hundred rations, fifteen pounds of beans or peas,t and ten pounds of rice or hominy; ten pounds of green coffee, or, eight pounds of roasted (or roasted and ground) coffee, or, one pound and eight ounces of tea; fifteen pounds of sugar; four quarts of vinegar; one pound and four ounces of adamantine or star candles; four pounds of soap; three pounds and twelve ounces of salt;t four ounces of pepper; thirty pounds of potatoes,t when practicable and one quart of molasses. The Subsistence Department, as may be most convenient or least expensive to it, and according to the condition and amount of its supplies, shall determine whether soft bread or flour, and what other component parts of the ration, as equivalents, shall be issued. 1191. Desiccated compressed potatoes, or desiccated compressed mixed vegetables, at the rate of one ounce and a half of the former, and one ounce'of the latter, to the ration, may be substituted for beans, peas, rice, -hominy, or fresh potatoes. 1192. Sergeants and corporals of the Ordnance Department (heretofore classed as armorers, carriage-makers, and blacksmiths) are entitled, each, to one and a half rations per day; all other enlisted men, to one ration a day. 1193. Officers in chbre of principal depots and purchasing stations will render to the Commissary-General monthly statements of the cost and quality of the ration, in all its parts, at their stations. The annexed table (pp.306,307.) shows the quantity in builk of each part of the ration, in any number of rations, from one to one hundred thousand. ISSUES IN BULK. 1194. Stores longest on hand shall be issued first, whether the issue be in bulk or on ration returns. .-'" After the present insurrection shall cease, the ration shall be as provided by law and regulations on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-one." (Section 13, Act approved August 3, 1861.) t Beans, peas, salt, and potatoes (fresh) shall be purchased, issued, and sold by weight, and the bushel of each shall be estimated at sixty pounds. Thus, 100 rations of beans or peas will be fifteen pounds, the equivalent of eight quarts; 100 rations of salt will be three pounds and twelve ounces, the equivalent of two quarts; and 100 rations of potatoes (fresh) will be thirty pounds, the equivalent of half a bushel. 244 P,EVISET) REGULATION-S

Page  245 FOR TIIF ARMY. 245~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Subsistence Department. — Issues. 1195. A Commissary required to send off subsistence supplies will turn them over to the Quartermaster for trasportation, each package directed and its contents marked thereon. He will give the Quartermaster duplicate transportation invoices of the packages and their contents, as marked (Form 29), and take from him like receipts* (Form 30). The Comnmissary who transfers the supplies shall also transmit duplicate invoices of them to the Commissary for whom they are intended, who shall return receipts for the supplies received (Form 32), and account as wastage on his next Return of Provisions for any ordinary loss of stores accruing in transportation. 1196. Any deficiency of supplies not attributable to ordinary loss in transportation, any damage, or discrepancy between the invoices and the actual quantity or description of supplies received, shall be investigated by a board of survey. (See paragraph 1019.) The officer revising the action of'the board shall immediately transmit a copy of its proceedings to the Commissary-General of Subsistence, and a copy to the issuing Commissary. A copy of the proceedings of the board shall also accompany the receiving Commissary's Return of Provisions to the Commissary-General of Subsistence. Where the carrier is liable, the issuing Commissary shall report the amount of loss or damage to the Quartermaster authorized to pay the transportation account, in order that this amount may be recovered for the Subsistence Department. 1197. Invoices shall express the prices of articles named thereon. ISSUES TO TROOPS. 1198. Subsistence shall be issued to troops on ration returns signed by their immediate commander, and approved by the commanding officer of the post or station. (Form 13.) These returns, ordinarily to be made for a few days at a time, shall, when practicable, be consolidated for the post or regiment (Form 14), and shall embrace only the strength of the command actually present. At the end of the calendar month, the Commissary shall enter on sepa)ate Abstracts, for each class of troops (see paragraph 1224), every return upon which he has issued provisions in that month; which Abstracts the commanding officer shall compare with the original ration returns, and if correct, so certify. (Form 2.) 1199. When men leave their company, the rations they have drawn and left with it shall be deducted from the next ration return for the comnpany; a like rule, when men are discharged from hospital, shall govern the hospital return. .When subsistence supplies are transferred from one Commissary to another, at the same post or station, they may be invoiced and receipted for according to Forms 31 and 32. V2 0 FOR THF, AIIMY. 245

Page  246 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. —Issues. 1200. Four women, as laundresses, are allowed to a company, and one ration per day to each when present with the company. In order that an authorized woman (laundress) of a company may draw rations while temporarily separated from it, the officer commanding the company must designate her by name and in writing to the commanding officer of the post or station where she may be living, as attached to his company, and entitled to rations. The rations of company women are not to be commuted, and they can only be drawn at a military post or station where subsistence is on hand for issue. ISSUES TO CITIZENS. 1201. One ration a day may be issued to each person employed with the army, when such are the terms of his engagement, on returns similar to Form 13. These returns will be entered on a separate Abstract (Form 3), compared, certified to, &c., as prescribed in paragraph 1198. No hired person shall draw more than one ration per day. ISSUES TO INDIANS. 1202. When subsistence can be spared from the military supplies, the commanding officer is authorized to allow its issue, in small quatitities, to Indians visiting military posts on the frontiers or in their respective nations. The return for this issue shall be signed by the Indian agent (when there is one present), and approved by the commanding officer of the post or station. 1203. Regular daily or periodical issues of subsistence to Indians, or issues of subsistence in bulk to Indian agents for the use of Indians, are forbidden. ISSUES EXTRA. 1204. The issues authorized under this head shall be made on returns signed by the officer in charge of the guard, by the Assistant AdjutantGeneral or Adjutant of the head-quarters, by the Quartermaster or other officer accountable for the animals, by the officer in charge of the working party, &c., as the case may be, and approved by the commanding officer of the post or station. At the end of the calendar month these returns shall be entered on an Abstract (Form 4), compared and certified to, as prescribed in paragraph 1198. 1205. Extra issues will be allowed as follows, viz.: ADAMANTINE CANDLES. To the principal guard of each camp or garrison, per month 12 pounds. And when serving in the field, not exceeding the follow ing rates per month, viz.: To the head-quarters of a regiment or brigade................. 10 pounds. - I.. 1. --- 246

Page  247 FOR TIIE ARMY. 247 Subsistence Department.-Issues. To the head-quarters of a division................................ 20 pounds. To the head-quarters of a corps................................. 30 pounds. To the head-quarters of each separate army, when composed of more than one corps.......................................... 40 pounds. SALT. Two ounces a week to each public animalw The number of animals to be supplied, and the period drawn for, will be stated on each return for extra issues, and so entered on the Abstract. (Form 4.) WHISKY. One gill per man daily, in cases of excessive fatigue, or severe exposure. The number of men issued to will be stated on each return for extra issues, and so entered on the Abstract. (Form 4.) Under "Remarks," on the return and on the Abstract, the letters of companies to which the men belong; number and designation of regiment, &c., will be given. 1206. Oil, candles, or gas, with which to light a fort, barrack, or stable, are not allowed from the Subsistence Department. Extra issues of subsistence, except as prescribed in preceding paragraph, are forbidden. (See Notes, page 265.) ISSUES TO HOSPITAL. 1207. Subsistence shall be issued to a hospital on ration returns signed by the medical officer in charge, and approved by the commanding officer of the post or station. These returns (Form 13) will be made for a few days at a time. 1208. Medical cadets and female nurses employed in permanent or general hospitals are entitled, each, to one ration per day, either in kind, or by commutatioi at the cost of the ration at their station. 1209. The Abstract of issues to a hospital shall be made by the Coiniissary, and certified to by the Surgeon and the commanding officer. (Form 5.) The Surgeon's certificate to this Abstract shall include the provisions issued to hospital from the subsistence storehouse, and the amount of purchases for it in the month. 121( Medical officers will not be allowed to sell or exchange any portion of the ration saved in hospital. HOSPITAL FUND. 1211. The sick in hospital, not needing full rations for their subsistence, only such parts thereof are issued as are actually required for the support of themselves and authorized attendants. The difference between the number of rations due a hospital, at cost price of a complete ration at the station, and the value of the stores issued to it, during the same period I i

Page  248 24J REIE REtLAI Subsistence Department.-Hospital Fund. and at the same prices, constitutes a credit with the Subsistence Department in favor of the hospital. This credit is called "Hospital Fund." 1212. The Commissary who issues to a hospital (post, regimental, field, general, or any military hospital) is authorized, on the requisition of the medical officer in charge, to expend its Hospital Fund in purchasing the following articles, or in paying for the same, when procured by the medical officer, on accounts Duly niade out and certified to by him (Form 25), viz.: 1st. Food, solid or fluid, to be used for the diet of the sick, and not furnished by the Subsistence Department or Medical Department. 2d. Articles to be used in either the preparation or serving of the food, embracing principally cooking utensils and table furniture, and not furnished by the Quartermaster's Department or Medical Department. 3d. Gas, oil, and other means of illumination, to be used instead of candles, which are part of the soldier's ration. 1213. The Hospital Fund being thus a means for supplying the suffering sick with food and conveniences needful for their health and more comfortable condition, not otherwise to be obtained, its management should be held as a sacred trust, and its expenditure confined strictly to the purposes which this fund is designed to accomplish. Medical and hospital supplies, quartermasters' supplies, and all objects of expenditure from the appropriations of the different departments of the military service, are not proper charges against the hospital credit. (For articles furnished by the Medical Department, see Subsistence Regulations of 1863, pamphlet edition, pages 69 and 70.) 1214. An expenditure of money by the Commissary for the subsistence or convenience of the sick in hospital is accounted for in the manner prescribed for other disbursements of the Subsistence Department. At large depots or general hospitals, this fund may be partly expended for the benefit of the sick at dependent posts or in detachments, on requisitions approved by the Medical Director or senior Surgeon of the district. 1215. A "Statement of the Hospital Fund" is made out at the end of each calendar month, and appears as a part of the Commissary's "Abstract of Issues to Hospital" for that month. On it are entered the balance of credit (if any) to hospital at the end of the preceding month, and the number of rations due it in the month, at cost price; also, the stores which have been issued by the Commissary to the hospital, and articles purchased by him for the sick, during this period, with the cost of each set opposite. The difference between these two amounts (credit and debit) leaves an ascertained balance of credit (if the hospital fund for the month has not been entirely used up), applicable to authorized expenditures for the subsistence or convenience of the sick in hospital 48 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  249 t~~~~FI TH ARY 249\v Subsistence Department. Hospital Fund during the following month. This statement may be prepared in the same manner, at any day, should there be occasion for ascertaining the exact state of the credit of a hospital at any particular date. An "Abstract of Issues to Hospital," and a "Statement of the Hospital Fund," shall be made out monthly for each s,)parafe hospital. 1216. At the request of the Surgeon-General, and on instructions from the Commissary-General of Subsistence, Hospital Fund may be transferred as follows: The Commissary directed to transfer any portion of this credit from a hospital he supplies to another one, drops the amount specified from his next statement of its Hospital Fund as transferred to the hospital designated in the instructions, giving (when informed) the name, rank, regiment or'corps, and station of the Commissary who issues it. The Commissary directed to receive a stated amount of this credit, takes up the same in favor of the designated hospital supplied by him, on his next statement of its Hospital Fund, and as received from the one mentioned in the instructions, giving (when informed) the name, rank, regiment or corps, and station of the Commissary who issues to such hospital. When an officeer is relieved from subsistence duty, he shall give his successor a certified statement of the hospital credit of each separate hospital supplied by him, and shall note such action on the hospital Abstract. His successor shall take up these credits in favor of each separate hospital he issues to, in manner as above explained. Hospital Fund, being a credit only, cannot be transferred from one officer's papers to another's as money. 1217. Mode of ascertaining the cost at which the ration shall be credited the hospital, and commuted to soldiers while on furlough, cost of transporting stores not included: 100 complete rations consist of, say100 rations of pork or bacon are 75 pounds, at 6 cents per pound... i 100 rations of fresh beef are 125 pounds, at 4 cents per pound......$4 75 100 rations of flour are 1371 pounds, at 4 cents per pound.............. 5 50 100 rations of beans or peas are 15 pounds, at 4 cents per pound... 60 100 rations of rice are 10 pounds, at 5 cents per pound............... 100 rations of hominy are 10 pounds, at 3 cents per pound.......... is 40 100 rations of coffee are 10 pounds, at 15 cents per pound........... 100 rations of tea are 1~ pounds, at 48 cents per pound............. is 1 11 100 rations of sugar are 15 pounds, at 8 cents per pound............. 1 20 100 rations of vinegar are 4 quarts, at 4 cents per quart............... 16 100 rations of adamantine candles are 1} pounds, at. 20 cents per poun...........-.........................25 25 20 4 $14 21 Carried forward................................... 240 FOR THE ARMY. t k i I

Page  250 -5O REVISED:'EGULAT~S. Subsistence Department. —Wastage. Brought forward....................................... 1 00 rations of pepper are 4 ounces, at 1 cents per ounce............ 100 rations of potatoes are 30 pounds, at 2 cents per pound.......... 100 rations of molasses are 1 quart, at 12 cents per quart............ Cost of 100 rations.............................................. or one ration costs 15 cents. The proportions here given are fixed, but the prices of the component parts of the ration are variable. The Cominmissary's invoices of stores received in the month will give the prices from which to calculate the cost of the ration for that month. WASTAGE. 1218. Wastage on issues from evaporation, leakage, &c., will be ascertained monthly, or when most convenient. The actual deficiency thus found will be reported on the Return of Provisions. Ordinary waste on issues to troops, &c. should not exceed, say three per cent. on salt meats, flour, hard bread, corn-meal, sugar, vinegar, soap, and salt; and one per cent. on beans, peas, rice, hominy, coffee, tea, candles, and pepper. No wastage is allowed on stores turned over in bulk from one officer to another, or on issues of fresh beef furnished directly from the butcher. Surplus stores shall be taken up on the Return of Provisions (Form 1) as "gained in issuing." 1219. Loss on issues exceeding ordinary waste, errors in the estimated weight of beef on the hoof, and loss on cattle strayed, stolen, or died, must be accounted for by affidavit, board of survey, certificate of a commissioned officer, or other satisfactory evidence, according to the magnitude of the loss and the circumstances of the case. BEEF CATTLE. 1220. When practicable, beef~cattle presented for acceptance, whether procured under contract or purchased in open market, must be weighed on the scales. From the live weight of a steer thus ascertained, his net weight shall be determined by deducting forty-five per cent. when his gross weight exceeds thirteen hundred (1300) pounds, and fifty per cent. when less than tha, and not under eight hundred (800) pounds. When it is impracticable to weigh on the scales, one or more average steers must be selected, killed, and dressed in the usual manner. The average net weight of these (necks, shanks, and kidney tallow excluded) shall be accepted as the average net weight of the herd. 1221. In all written instruments for the delivery of beef cattle, the manner prescribed above for determining net weight must be inserted; in verbal agreements (which will be allowed only when time does not admit REVISF,D REGULATIONS 260 $14 21 . 7 -1 60 12 $15 00

Page  251 FOR ARMY. -251 Subsistence Department. Abstracts of Issues. of reducing to writing the terms agreed upon) this mode must be understood and accepted by the party delivering the cattle. 1222. Hay, corn, and other forage will be procured for beef cattle when the pasture is insufficient. 1223. Beef received on the hoof, whether under contract, by open purchase, or otherwise, shall be accounted for on the Return of Provisions by the number of cattle, and by their net weight in pounds. When beef cattle are transferred, they should be appraised, if possible, and their loss or gain in weight since previous appraisement reported by the officer delivering the cattle. ABSTRACTS OF ISSUES. 1224. Issues to troops (regulars), to volunteers and militia, to sailors, to marines, to prisoners of war or State, to citizens employed with the army, to Indians, to "contrabands," to hospitals, and -extra issues, shall be entered on separate Abstracts, each certified to by the commanding officer of the post or station. The "original ration returns" will be retained by the officer who certifies to the Abstract-the latter, after completion, being the Commissary's voucher for the issues. 1225. Abstracts of issues shall show, in column of "Remarks," the corps or detachment issued to on each ration return; and if to citizens, the particular department in which they are employed. When they require more than one sheet, the sheets will be numbered in series-the total at the foot of each carried to the head of the next, &c. DAMAGED SUPPLIES.* 1226. When supplies on hand become damaged, the Commissary accountable for them shall report it to the commanding officer, who will make, or cause to be made, a critical inspection of them. (See paragraphs 1018 to include 1025; also Form 17.) Under orders from the proper authority (paragraph 1023), the supplies examined shall be disposed of as advised by the inspector. Prior to inspection, the Commissary shall examine damaged parcels and separate and repack sound parts. SALES. 1227. Sales of subsistence supplies by the Governmnent, except sales * Wheel public property is presented to an inspector for condemnation, the officer responsible will certify on the inventory that the property had not been previously condemned. The inspector will mark the letters I. C. (Inspected-Condemned) upon all property condemned and ordered to be dropped from the returns, with a brand, stencil, cold chisel, steel-cutter, or punch, depending upon the material to be marked. Should it happen, when final action is had, that the Inspector's recommendation is disapproved, the marks will be cancelled, and a certificate of the fact will be given to the officer accountable. FOR T-HE ARMY. 251

Page  252 1-1 ~ ~ I -11P -I EUAION Subsistence DIepartment. Sales. of stores to officers for their - personal use, and in like cases, shall be on due public notice, and in such market as the interests of the service may require. The order for the sale, the auctioneer's bill of sale exhibiting the names of purchasers, articles, and quantities sold, prices obtained, &c., and a copy of the inspection report, shall accompany the Return of Provisions to the Commissary-General. 1228. Subsistence supplies, in good condition, but not required for use, will be disposed of by orders from the Commissary-General. In urgent cases, and on the advice of an inspecting officer, they may be sold as prescribed in preceding paragraph. 1229. An officer may purchase subsistence from the Commissariat, paying cash for it on delivery, at cost prices, without including cost of transportation, on his certificate that it is for the use of himself and family. These certified lists the commanding officer shall compare with the Commissary's monthly Abstract of Sales to Officers, and if correct, so certify. (Form 7.) Commanding officers of companies may, in the same way, when authorized by the post commander, purchase subsistence for their company mess. 1230. When provisions can be safely spared from the public supplies, the commanding officer is authorized to allow their sale, in sntall quantities, to persons employed with the army, when they cannot otherwise procure food, and to Indian agents for issue to Indians in their respective nations, or when visiting military posts. Such sales shall be for cash, at cost, including all expenses. 1231. Subsistence supplies may be sold to any department of the military service for public use, when the amount on hand will admit of it. Such sales shall be for cash, at cost, without including cost of transportation. 1232. The articles and quantities of stores sold during any month shall be reported on the Commissary's Return of Provisions for that month; and the net proceeds of all sales of subsistence supplies shall be credited to the United States in his Summary Statement and Account Current, for the month. (Forms 9 and 10.) 1233. Empty barrels, boxes, hides, &C., shall be sold, and the net proceeds of sale accounted for as indicated in preceding paragraph. 1234. Savings from the ration, when the articles are sound, shall only be sold to the Subsistence Department. (See paragraph 1188.) ABSTRACTS OF SALES. 1235. Sales to officers, to citizens employed with the army, to Indian agents, at auction, to departments of the military service, &c., shall be 252 itEV1819i) REGULATIONS

Page  253 FOR THE ARMY. 253 Subsistence Department.-Recruiting Service. Subsistence Department. —Recruiting Service. entered on separate Abstracts. One copy of each shall accompany the Return of Provisions, and one copy the Account Current. RECRUITING SERVICE. 1236. When subsistence cannot be advantageously issued by the Commissariat to recruiting parties, it will be procured by the officer in charge, on written contracts for complete rations. When a contract is for board and lodging, the amount to be paid for each must be separately mentioned therein (Form 36); board otlj will be paid by the Subsistence Department. (See articles "Contracts" and "Purchases," pages 241 and 242.) 1237. Under circumstances rendering it impossible to make a contract, the recruiting officer may pay from subsistence funds the actual necessary expenses of subsistiig his party. 1238. When the recruiting officer does not disburse subsistence funds, the contractor will send to the Commissary-General for payment, monthly, his accounts for rations issued (Form 20), accompanied by the Abstract of Issues, certified to by the recruiting officer. (Form 19.) In that case, the expense of subsistence at branch rendezvous, and of advertising for proposals, &c., will be paid for by the contractor at the principal station, and included in his acounts. 1239. Issues of subsistence will be made on the usual ration returns (Form 13), and board will be furnished on a return showing the number of men and of days, dates, &c. SPECIAL SERVICE. 1240. The commanding officer will detail a suitable non-commissioned officer or private soldier for special service in the Subsistence Department, when such service is needed. The soldier so detailed will be under the orders of the Commissary, and will be exempt from company or garrison duty. No extra pay for this service is allowed. COMMUTATION OF RATIONS.* 1241. No persons, except those who are by law entitled to rations, will be allowed commutation therefor. * The commutation of rations allowed by the Secretary of War in exceptional cases, since April 24, 1862, is not affected by these regulations. NOTES.-When the care of sick and wounded soldiers is assumed by the States from which they come, the Subsistence Department will commute their rations at twenty-five cents. The rations of prisoners held in the rebel States shall be commuted for and during the period of their imprisonment, on rolls or accounts prepared and certified to by the Commnissary-General of Prisoners; the commutation to be rated at cost price of the ration. The settlement of accounts for the board of soldiers in private hospitals is assigned to the Surgeon-General's Department.

Page  254 254 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. Expenditures. 1242. Commutation, in lieu of subsistence in kind, will not be allowed to recruiting parties while at their stations, nor to soldiers serving where subsistence is provided by the Government. When practicable, persons entitled to rations must draw them at the place and time they are due, or forfeit their claim to them. 1243. Commutation will be allowed to soldiers while on furlough by competent autho7-ity, to medical cadets, to female nurses employed in permanent or general hospitals, and to persons entitled to rations when stationed where the Government has not provided subsistence for them, on satisfactory evidence that they have not received rations, or an equivalent therefor, during the time for which commutation is claimed. (Form 22.) The rate of commutation in these cases shall be the cost of the ration at the station where it is due. The authority competent to give a furlough is indicated in the General Regulations of the Army, or is announced from time to time in orders from the War Department. Payment of commutation to a soldier while on furlough shall not be made until he has returned to duty, or until he is discharged from the military service, when furloughed to that date; and when the voucher for payment is not accompanied by the furlough, the fact of payment, fully and officially attested, shall be entered on the furlotyh. (Form 35.) 1244. When a soldier is travelling on detached command, and it is impracticable to carry rations with him, his subsistence may be commuted at a rate not exceeding seventy-five cents a day, to be paid by the Commnissary when due, or in advance on the order of the commanding officer. The voucher shall show on its face the nature and extent of the duty the soldier was directed to perform, and be certified by the officer under whose order the journey was made, that it was impracticable for the soldier to carry rations with him. (Form 21.) EXPENDITURES. 1245. Subsistence funds shall not be used in payment of supplies or services pertaining to another staff department, nor applied to purposes other than those for which these funds have been appropriated by Congress. 1246. Vouchers for disbursement of' public funds shall specify the quantity and price of each article bought, date of purchase, hame of person from whom procured, &c. (Forms 23, 25, and 26.) When the vouchers are for services rendered, and like cases, they shall state the nature of duty, period of service, rate of pay per day or month, &c. They shall also set out a sufficient explanation of the object, necessity, and propriety of the expenditure, attested by the certificate of an officer or other satisfactory evidence. (Forms 21, 22, 27, and 28.) 1247. Receipts for subsistence funds disbursed or transferred shall 254 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  255 FOR THE ARMY. 255 Subsistence Department.-Returns and Accounts. state place and date of payment or transfer, nate, rank, and regiment or corps, of officer from whom the money is received; and the amnount shall be expressed in words. (Forms 21 and 33.) 1248. As soldiers are expected to preserve, distribute, and cook their own subsistence, the hire of citizens for any of these duties is not allowed. When bakeries are not managed by the Subsistence Department, their expenses for hops, yeast, furniture, sieves, cloths, the hire of bakers, &c., are paid from the post fund, to which the profits then accrue by army regulations. (See paragraph 198.) Ovens may be built or paid for by the Subsistence Department, but not bake-houses. 1249. When a claim for authorized supplies is presented to a Commissary for articles delivered to his predecessor or other officer of the Subsistence Department, he shall require a certified voucher in duplicate from the officer to whom the articles were delivered (Form 24), and the affidavit of claimant that he has not been paid, directly or indirectly, for the supplies, nor has authorized any person to receive payment for him. Such voucher, before being paid, will be forwarded to the Commissar.yGeneral of Subsistence for approval or instruction in the case. 1250. No officer or agent of the Subsistence Department, disbursing public money, will pay any claim or account presented through agents or collectors, except on regular power of attorney, executed after the account or claim is due and payable, and unless such agent or collector is considered by the disbursing officer amply able to reimburse the United States, or the disbursing officer, in case such claim or account shall, subsequent to payment, prove to be unjust or fraudulent; and when an account is presented in person by an individual who is not known to the disbursing officer, the latter will require such evidence of identity as will secure the Government against fraud. RETURNS AND ACCOUNTS. 1251. Every officer and agent of the Subsistence Department intrusted with its supplies or funds shall render monthly to the Commissary-General of Subsistence, and to the Third Auditor of the Treasury, all Returns and Accounts, with the vouchers thereto belonging, which they may require. 1252. The following are the usual Returns, Abstracts, &c., to be rendered to the Commissary-General of Subsistence monthly, viz.: Return of provisions and forage for beef cattle received, issued, &c., in the month, with the invoices and receipts thereto belonging... Form 1 Abstract of issues to troops........................................................ " 2 Abstract of issues to citizens....................................................... " 3 Abstract of issues extra......................................................... 4 Abstract of issues to hospital...................................................... " 5 FOR THE ARMY. 255

Page  256 256~~~ REIE REX ULATIO. S Subsistence Department.-.Returns and Accounts. Abstract of provisions and forage purchased (see paragraph 1186)... Abstract of sales to officers......................................................7 Return of all property in the Department, except provisions and forage, with the invoices and receipts thereto belonging............ Summary statement of funds received, expended, &c., in the month 1253. The following are the usual Accounts, Abstracts, &c., to be rendered to the Third Auditor of the Treasury monthly, or forthwith, when a disbursing officer, for whatever cause, ceases to be such, viz.: Account current...................................... " 10 Abstract of provisions and forage purchased and paid for in the month, with vouchers..................................................................... " 11 Abstract of allexpenditures in the month, except for provisions and forage, with vouchers..........................................................." 12 Abstract of sales to officers............................................... " 7 Receipts for funds transferred............................... " 83 1254. In transmitting official papers to the Commissary. General and Third Auditor for examination or other action, the following rules will be observed, viz.: I. Invoices and receipts for subsistence stores, bills of company savings, abstracts of issues, abstracts of sales, boards of survey, inspection reports, summary statements, Return of Commissary Property (with its invoices and receipts), &c., will be offcially signed, properly endorsed, carefitly assorted, and put up (by a wrapper of strong paper, for example) with the Return of Provisions for the same month. II. Receipts for funds, abstract of purchases, and abstract of contingencies (each with its appropriate vouchers), abstract of sales to officers, &c., will be officially signed, properly endorsed, carefully assorted, and put up in like manner, with the Account Current for the same month. 111. In all cases, official papers will be accompanied by a letter of advice, enumerating them, and briefly giving necessary explanations. (See paragraphs 1263, 1264, 1265, and Form 34.) 1255. When an officer or agent of the Subsistence Department is relieved, he shall certify the outstanding debts to his successor, and turn over to him the public funds and supplies for which he is accountable, unless otherwise ordered. His Return of Provisions and Return of Commissary Property will be closed, but his money accounts kept open until the end of the month, unless he has ceased to disburse. (See paragraph 1253.) 1256. A book will be kept by the Commissary at each permanent post, in which shall be entered the Return of Provisions received, issued, &C., in' the month. (Form 1.) It shall show from whom the purchases have 256 REVISE-D REGULATIONS Form 6 11 1 7 11 8 11 9

Page  257 ~~~~~O TH ARY 257 Subsistence Department.-Remarks. been made, and whether paid for. It is called the Commissary's Book and will not be removed from the post. REMARKS. 1257. Disbursing officers and agents of the Subsistence Department are required to retain one complete set of official papers (see paragraphs 1252 and 1253) for reference or other use. 1258. No charge for printing blank forms will be allowed. When practicable to provide them, these forms will be furnished officers by the Subsistence Bureau. When officers are not thus furnished, they must rule out forms for use from the public stationery to correspond with those prescribed. The want of printed blanks will furnish no excuse to an officer for delay or failure in the rendition of his Returns and Accounts. 1259. The envelops of all official communications to the CommissaryGeneral of Subsistence will be marked "Official," with the signature thereto of the officer writing the communication. 1260. Under existing laws, packages to the Commissary-General of Subsistence on official business are carried in the United States mail free of0 posta]e, and should be intrusted to the Post Office Department for delivery whenever practicable. Packages for the Commissary-General of Subsistence, on official business, will not be committed to express agencies for delivery unless all charges for the service are prepaid. 1261. Postage and despatches by telegraph on public business, paid by an officer, will be refunded to hirm by the Quart((r)-faster's Department. These expenses are not to be paid for with subsistence funds. 1262. Officers doing duty in the Subsistence Department should be particular to forward with their Returns and Accounts, in addition to the required vouchers, all orders of commanding officers, and other papers, upon which they may rely to relieve themselves from responsibility. 1263. An official letter addressed to the Commissary-General of Subsistence, whenever its length will permit, shall be written on a half-sheet of letter-paper, and shall refer to one matter only. 1264. The post-office address of an officer's station shall be given in his official letters. "In the field," "Head-Quarters," "Camp ," and other similar indefinite expressions of locality, do not of themselves indicate the place at or near which an officer is stationed. 1265. Persons in the military service, when signing official letters, Returns, Accounts, &c.,%should write their names plainly. Underneath the name, their rank, company, and regiment, corps, or other official designation, should be written leyibly. Official papers shall be signed by the officer to whom they belong, and not by his clerk or any deputy. A reyginmental officer on staff duty (a Commissary to a brigade or division, w2 FOR THE- A it Mlt. 1257 I

Page  258 258 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department.-Remarks. for example) should not omit to write under his signature the number of his regiment, and the State, District, or Territory to which it belongs. 1266. On the first day of each month, the officers of the Subsistence Department will report by letter to the Commissary-General their stations and duties during the preceding month. This letter is required from Commissaries of Subsistence only, and not from officers acting as such. 258 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  259 FOR THE ARMY. 259 Subsistence Department. List of Forms. LIST OF FORMS. No. Return of Provisions received, issued, &c........................................... 1 Abstract of issues to Troops (regulars), volunteers, &c.............................. 2 ~" " Citizens................................................................ 3 " Extra................................................................... 4 ~" " Hospital............................................................... 5 " provisions and forage purchased............................................ 6 " sales to officers................................................................... 7 Return of Commissary Property............................................................ Summary Statement............................................................................. 9 Account Current................................................................................. 10 Abstract of Purchases paid for.............................................................. 11 ", Contingencies.................................................................... 12 Ration return for a company, or for sick in hospital................................... 13 1" " regiment, or for part of a regiment............................. 14 Requisition for subsistence stores........................................................... 15 Estimate of funds required.................................................................... 16 Inventory and Inspection Report............................................................ 17 Inspection certificate and receipt to a contractor...................................... 18 Abstract of complete rations issued........................................................ 19 Voucher for payment of complete rations issued...................................... 20 commutation of rations while travelling on detached command... 21 " " " on furlough.............................22 " purchase of subsistence supplies paid for...............................23 ~~~~~~~1" " " not paid for..........................24 cc "~ ~articles for use in hospital..................................25 ~" " ~savings from the ration....................................... 26 " services rendered............................................................... 27 ".."..". (Pay-Roll).................................................28 Invoice of stores transferred to a Quartermaster for transportation.............29 Receipt for " " c c "............. 30 Invoice of stores transferred by one officer to another at the same station.... 31 Receipt for " ". 32 'eceipt for funds transferred................................................................ 33 ,etter of advice, enclosing accounts, &c., to Commissary General............... 34 'urlough........................................................................................... 35 'ontract for complete rations................................................................. 36 " fresh beef.............................................. 37 ;ond to a contract............................................................................. 38 NoTr.-The following blank forms, viz., numbers 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9,10, 11,12, 13, 14, 23, 25, 26, 27, 31, , and 33, will be supplied by the Subs,'stence Bureau to principal Commissaries, for distribution to "cers acting under their orders. The other numbers are not printed for distributior FOR THE ARMY. 259

Page  260 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department.-Forms. FOR Return of Provisions received, issued, &c., and remaining on hand at - Regiment 'AND 5. 3. C S s 1 3-sr. 3 5355 z, 4 4 r 5 4 4 4 4 I. 55 55 l I 55 O a ois(ac a o51ja a C a a a a oa o a nja a a 0; ~I~ ii 4 P FROM WHOM RECEIVED 186. A ) TO WHOM ISSUED, ETC. 1. FROM WHOM RECEIVED. Balance on hand, per last Return............. Jan. 10 1 Lieut. John Smith, 4th Infantry, A. C. S....... " 15 2 tW. J. Walker, Con tractor for fresh beef " 15 3 George Jones, Special Agent, Subs. Dept.... " 20 4 Maj. Thomas, J. H., C.S. 31 5 Invoices, per Abstract " 31 6 S. B. Allen, Contractor for flour.................. 31 7 Purchased this month, per Abstract........... " 31 8 Purchased this month, per Abstract (Com pany savings)......... ' 31 9 Captured from the enemy, per Abstract " 31 Found at the post...... " 31 Gained in issuing....... Total to be accounted for...... TO WHOM ISSUED, ETC. Jan. 31 10 To troops (regulars), per Abstract............ 31 11 To volunteers, per Au stract..................... " 31 12 To citizens, per Ab stract..................... " 31 13 To extra issues, per Abstract................. " 31 14 To sick in hospital, per Abstract................. 31 15 To sales to officers, per Abstraot................. 10 16 Lieut. G. T. H., 4th In fantry, A. C. S.......... " 15 17 Captain W. W. C., A.Q.M. (a).............. " 31 18 Receipts, per Abstract 20 19 To sales at auction...... " 31 Wastage (ordinary) on issues..................... 31 20 Loss, per Certificate..... " 11 21 Dropped, per Inspec tion Report............ 10 22 Loss, per Board of Sur vey........................ " 15 23 Loss, per Affidavit...... Total issued, &c.................... ~alance remaining on hand... To be eudoreod as follows: - Return of Provisiou In the outh of — A 186 By Lieut. A — B — -- Regiment of —. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 '260

Page  261 (a) For transportation to Lieut. II- R-, - Regt. of -, A.C.S., at-. ~~~~~~~~~~ \\-.- - - I ii I certify that the above "Return",'is:correct. - Li t.-Reft. f —, A. C. S

Page  262 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. —Forms. FORM Abstract of provisions issued to*, in the service of the Uitited B -, R(giment RATIONS 186. 1. Jan'y1 " 6 " 5 " 10 " 13 " 16 " 20 I e 0 I t 0 0 e ~ A a 0 c; Number of rations............................... Quantity in bulk............................. i I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the original ration returns rations of Salt Beef, rations of Fresh Beef, rations of Flour, rations of Hominy, rations of Coffee, rations of Tea, rations of Sugar, rations of rations of Pepper, rations of Potatoes, rations of Molasses. * Issues to Troops (Regulars), to Volunteers and Militia, to Sailors, &c., will be entered provisions will be drawn for a few days at a time. t Beans, peas, salt, and potatoes (fresh) shall be purchased, issued, and sold by weight, NOTES.-All ration returns issued upon must be entered, and on the proper Abstract; under tion of Regiment, &c., will be given. Subsistence stores will not be issued to Officers, or to their servants unless they are count or Pay-Roll. An Officer may purchase subsistence from the Commissariat, paying cash for it on deli of himself and family. When an Abstract requires more than one sheet, on account of the number of ration re in series, and not pasted together; the total at the foot of each carried to the head of f 262 14 I m 0 2 1 3 ..... 2 ..... ..... I 5 ;4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1. m z 80 36 ..... 570 565 10 3 li PI I t 14 :z z 5 2 5 3 5 3 2 4 14 8 m i I. P4 9 P4 L 0 1;g0 ;A Janly 5 11 7 11 9 11 12 " 17 " 18 11 21 1; t .Q 9 ;q Id 82 37 3 570 567 10 3

Page  263 -~~O TH RY 6 Subsistence Department. —Forms. 2. States, at, in the month of, 186 of,A.C.S. OF '5, p-' . Remarks. . ,.I, g; ' 5 o't a ~ ,t,, I ID 4 c3 o m 5 Company A, 2d Ohio Volunteers. Detachment Co. A, 2d Ohio Vols. Laundress Co. B, 5th Penn. Vols. Cos. A, B, C, D, E, & F, 4th N.Y. Vols. Cos. A, B C, D, E, & F, 4th K.Y. Vols. Detachment of Re cruits 3d MIo. Vols. Three men of Co. A, 2d Ohio. Vols. a li~ .; Iz XO 9' DO p r, 0 -... l, 0 0 rn. 0:Z PW t rations of Pork, rations of Bacon, rations of Pork, — rations of Bacon, as, rations of Rice, rations of tions of Soap, - rations of Salt, Col. - Reg't of Comd'g Post. on separate Abstracts, in form like this one. Ordinarily, and the bushel of each shall be estimated at sixty pounds. "Remarks," the letters of Companies, number and designa enlisted men and are so reported on the Officer's Pay Acveri,, at cost prices, on his certificate that it is for the use turns to be entered upon it, the sheets will be numbered the next, &c. To be endorsed as follows: Abstract of Issues to, In the month of,186, By Lieut. A, - Regiment of -. ,3 :z FOR THE AltMY. .263 , by Lieut. A. I I 11 0 .I 0 t4 14 pq 4 a 14 bo .;z E-4 w 'A I=. g. ;z;A o;z I 4 0. 9 . 0 r, 0 Iz'A 'W. 0. ;z0 0:Z 0 .5 li -C. 0. 0;, P, 0 .I Z 9, i 0 IV Iz Iz 0" — 0 0, 'A 0 9

Page  264 . FORM 3. Abstract of Provision issued to citizens employed with the Army at - - by Lieut. A B, Regiment of RATIONS OF 186. X E! md An- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s. _ 1 5 5 January 1.... January 5.... 2 4 5 3........ 3 2 3 10....... No. of rations...................................... Q * * I tit m - m - I -. 1... -. In - {ia -... Quantity in bulk. I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the original ration returns now in my of' Pork, - rations of Fresh Beef, - rations of Flour,- rations of Beans, - rations of Rice,- r Yinegar, - rations of Adamantine Candles, - rations of Soap, - rations of Salt, - rations of Pepper. * Beans; peas, salt, and potatoes (fresh) shall be purchased, issued, and sold by weight, and the bushel of each shall be estimated at sixty pounds. NOTs.-One ration a day may be issued to each person employed with the Army, when such are the terms of his engagement. No hired person shall draw more than one ration per day. All ration returns issued upon must be entered, and on the proper Abstract; under "Re marks," the Department in which the citizens are employed will be specified. ;I r!

Page  265 FORMI 4. Abstract of Extra Issues at, in the month of —, 186, by Lieut. A 0 ~ Whisky. a, u) ~ Iv I 6 S alt lbs. Company H, 2d 0 Mules belonging t Guard at Fort Guard at CampHead-quarters, 3d Head-quarters, Ai Quantity.... I I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the original retui and find that they amount to pounds of Adamantine Candles, - pounds and quarts of Whisky. I C - NOTES.-Salt, not exceeding two ounces a week, may be issued topublic animals. The number of animals, and theperiod drawn for, will be stated on each return. One gill: of whisky per ma is allowed daily, in cases of excessive fatigue or sever exposure. The number of men issued to will be stated on each return; 'and under "RemarlO," the letters of Companies designation of Regiment, &c., will be specified. To be 4 I x o Itb lbs. BE 0 1 2 - 3 4 5: 6 4 1. . 6 186. qts. 2 OZS. galls. 1 48 49 4 24 8 12 12 10 40

Page  266 I66 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. Forms. FORM Abstract of Provisions issued to the Sick and Authorized Attendants in Jios in the gno nth of, 186, by Lieut. A e- ~~~~~~~~~~~~RATIONS I bD Jan. 1 " 4 " 15 " 2 1 "2 " 3( I18 5 20 ...... 25 ........ 30 25 14 5 ......... 1......9 ......... ......... 5 5 70 ......... 80 10 ......... Number of rations due hospital 493 Number of rations issued.............. | 2'n 2t 2 i: |%ua - 7 17 0 75 160 [z~; z 7 PI- is I- P, Quantityin bulk...............37 8 9312218122331275.24.10.18 1.1230126 7 I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the original ration returns now in its hospital, and find that they amnount to fifty rations of Pork, seventy-five rations of Salt Beef, one one hundred andl seventy rations of Flour, seventy-five rations of Hard Bread, one hundred and sixty one hundred and eighity-one rations of Coffee, fifty rations of Teat, two hundred and five rations of Sugar, gar, two hundred and forty-six rations of Adapaantine Candles, ohe hundred and thirty rations of Soap, that the purchases of articles for the subsistence and convenience of the sick, amounting to three dollars were issued to,'the sick under my charge. Compared with the Morning Report of the Sick in IHospital, and found correct. C D-, Col. Beg't of, Comd'g Post. * Beans, peas, salt, and potatoes (fresh) shall be purchased, issued, and sold by weight, and the pounds. t iospital Fund may be expended for the following objects: 1st. Food, solid or fluid, to be used for Subsistence Department or Medical Department. 2d. Articles to be used in either the preparation or Subsistence Departpilent or Medical Department. 3d. GCas, oil, and other meacns of illumination. Medical and all supplies of the different Departments of the Army, are not to be purchased out of Hospital Funed. NOTES.-Issues to a hospital will be on returns signed by the medical officer in charge, approved by the such subsistence only as is actually required therein for the sick and their authorized few days at a time. An Abstract of I.sses to Ilospital, and a Statement of the Ilospital Fund, will be made out No portion of the rations saved in hosI)ital will be sold or exch-anged by medical officers. I I I' 6 5 0 0 I I .1 2 II 266 - I 4 ;z 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 I o 4 2 'i 2 3 F, It 0 - .,g -1. 9:, ;z I I ;z 5 10 20 5 15. 25 50 Iz I 1. ,f 0 3 2 5 4 5 5 2 -4 I pq 9 ........ .... 6 15 iso j 'I pq a ::1 1 112 " 2 113 14 4 In 14 le b,O 21 60 ....... 0I pq 10 ........ .50 ........ ........ 21 0 ... 6.. ........ ........ 14 bk 0 m 15 10 90 .... 6.. 6 0 9 E ........ 10 ........ 21 20 105 28 90 125 104 5 ........ 30 ........ ........ ........ 50 75 ,-' 6 I I 0 r. .:1. = 0 0 37 8 93 12 1,15 ,i, r. - 9 0:z 0 218 112 100 ;z9 0 10... 181 ,6 6 9. ;z 9 PI 0 18 1 50 i 16 g. ;, 9 .;z I - ... 12 205 ,A 6 0 r. Al 30 12 171 ,d ;ze IV 6 7 Quantity in bulk...........................

Page  267 FOR TR ARMY. 267 Subsistence Department.- Forms. 5. pital at, un'der Charge of E F., Surgeon - B, Reiment of, A. C. S. OF- CR. t STATEMENT OF T~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~lE hOSPIT~~~~~AL UD By balance of credit last month................... 493 rations, being the number due this month, at 15 cents per ration............................... From Captain J. K., issuing Commissary to Douglas Hospital, at St. Louis, Mo., for in structions from the Coimmissary-General of Subsistence............................................. . *t m cd 0 1 It 21 ........ 50 75 ........ ItI 15 ........ 50 ........ ........ 100 ........ s o DR. ISSUED. To the following provisions, at contract prices: 378 lbs. of Pok..........at 6 cts. per lb. $21 93~ lbs. of Salt Beef....at 8cts.perlb. 7 2140 lbs. of Fresh Beef...at 4cts. per lb. 8 23'.{ lbs. of Flour........at 4 cts. per lb. 9 75 lbs. of lIard Bread(..at 5 cts. per lb. 3 221 lbs. of Beans.........at 4 cts. per lb. 1 lbs. of Rice..........at 5cts. per lb. 18~G lbs. of Coffee at 1'5 cts. per lb. 2 T lb. of Tea............at 48 cts. per lb. 30~ lbs. of Sugar........at 8cts.per lb. 2 68 quarts of Vinegar..at 4 cts. per qt. 3,6 lbs. of Adamantine Candles............t 20 cts. per lb. 5~3 lbs. of Soap.at 5 cts. per lb. 6 e lbs. of Slt.......... at I t. per lb. lbs. of Pepper......at - cts. per lb. gall. of Iola sses..at-cts. per gal. - lbs. Dried Apples...at- cts. per lb. In 10 20 40 .... 20 ........ 40 130 513 C 1 PURCIIASED. 4 chickens, at 25 cts. each......... $1 O0 2 dozen eggs, at 18 cts. per dozen 36 2 lbs. of butter, at 25 cts. per lb... 5 12 comn6on cups and sau cers....... 5 4 quarts of miilk, at 7 cts. per qt. 28 3 dozen oranges, at 25 cts. per doz. 73 my possession, for subsistence actually required hunidred anid seventy-five rations of Fresh Beef, rations of Beans, one hundred rations of Rice, one hundred and seventy-one rations of Vineo n e hundred and sixty-five rations of S alt; and a n d thirty-nine cents, were required for, a ad Issued and purchased.................... Transferred to Lieut. J. C., 1st Infantry, A. C. S., issuing Coinnfissary to the Lin colin I-ospital of Washillngton, D.C., per instructions from the Commissatry General of Subsistence..................... bushel of each shall be estimated at sixty thle diet of the sick, and not furnished by the serving of the food, and not furnished by the and hospital supplies, quartermaster's supplies, [ To be endorsed as follows: Abstract of Issues to IIospital, ............................................ In tlhe month of - 186, *tdt TBy Lieut. A B, Regiment of monthly for each separate hospital. I '267 FOR THE ARMY. FUND. $10.00 73 95 OF Iz I A 1; P. 100 00 183 95 246 ,i Z 5 - 5 0 0 3 1 165 9 0 6 3 Iz z 16 ,2 I ";z I v ...... ,i 6 r. -Z .:z 0 ...... i ... I... I' I -I...I... 3 39 43 12 F, F I Surgeon General of Subsistence..................... 80 00 Balance of credit, this - day of. 186 123 12 60 83 commanding officer of the post or station, for attendants. These returns will be made for a

Page  268 FORM 6. Abstract of Purchases on account of Army Subsistence, in te hmonth of B -, Regiment of - A. 186. From whom pur- ~ - chased. eu C, e e a Bbls. Lbs. No. Lbs., net. Bbls. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Lbs. Galls. Lbs. Jan. 1 Leonard Wallace.... 10........5 2,500................................ 100 20 3 James Parker, jr.100. 2. 4. 10 Thomas Cook....................................................... 500 - 50. 15 Richard Doe & Co.... 30.......................,000 20 John Wright................................5........20.....................15 31 JohnJohn Lawrence 1,8......3......... 200. Quantity....................... I certify that the purchases were made agreeably to the above "Abstract," and at the lowest market-price; a the "Remarks" opposite to each are correct. NoTaEs.-This Abstract accompanies the Return of Provisions only when the purchases in the month have been m and there is not room on the Return to enter them conveniently. When purchases are notpaidfor, it must be so stated in the column of "Remarks." Vouchers for purchases made do not accompany this Abstract. (See Notes, Form 11.)

Page  269 FORliE 7. Ab)stract of provisions sold to officers at, to t te month of, 186, by Lieut. A. B, - Reiment of A. C. S. AMOUNT. Articles and quantity. Dolls. Cts. Ca ID Eo CD O io . 1 pounds of pork.....................at cents per pound.................................................................... pounds of fresh beef...............at cents per pound................................................................... pounds of flour.....................at cents per pound................................................................... pounds of beans,*..................at cents per pound................................................................... pounds of coffee.....................at - cents per pound................................................................... pounds of sugar.................. at cents per pound................................................................... gallons of vinegar..................at cen ts per gallon................................................................... pounds of adamantine candles, at cents per pound................................................................... pounds of salt,*.....................at - cents per pound.................................................................. gallons of molasses................at cents per gallon................................................................... ____ I Amount.................................................................................................................. I certify that the above "Abstract" is a correct statement of all sales of Subsistence Stores made by me to officers at this post in the month of, 186 A B Lieut. - Beg't of, A. C. S. I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the officers' certified lists of purchases for their own use and the use of their familes, and find the Abstract correct. C D * Beans, peas, salt, and potatoes (fresh) shall be purchased, issued, and sold by weight, and the Col. - Rg't of-, Cos'g Post. bushel of each shall be estimated at sixty pounds. NoTFSs. —overnnment supplies are always sold for cash., To be endorsed as follows: The "Anionnt" of this Abstract must be credited on Summary Statement (Form 9) and on Ac- Sales to Officers count (Clrrent (Form 10). In the month of - 186 This Abstract should be in quadruplicate; one cepy to accompany the Account Current, one the By Lieut. A B, Return of Provisions, and two to be filed with the corresponding retained papers. - Regiment of - Ot 0 0 0, to

Page  270 270 ~REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department.-Forms. I IIIII 1I I I II I I I I ~~I IIIII ~~~~I I ~ "I I ___ .1I IIII I IIIII 00 P4.~ o I I I I I 1 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I _____ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I I - I I I I I * I I 0 I I I I I 0 I k 00 II I 0 ,J~0j~MI. ~ ~ 0 0 00 O0 - 0 0*0 0 S o ~~~~~~ - -. I 0 I *0 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 270 6 I It 11 m I I I I I I I I ;z iE 0 P% r. :o .4 IC ii I 4 I., I I It 0 -6 r. 0 0 .8 9 5 ;q

Page  271 FORM 9. Summary Statement of funds received, disbursed, and transferred at by Lieut. A B, - Reyiqnent of I DR. 186. Dolls. Cts. 186. January 31 To amount disbursed this month..................... By balance, l 10 To transfer to Lieut. A- B-, - Reg't of- January 31 By sales to o 15 To transfer to Capt. W N-, C. S. Vols............. 31 By sales to - 10 By sales of si 15 By sales of b 20 By cash fron 31 To balance due United St ates................................... 23 By cash fron I certify that the above is a true statement of all moneys received, expended, and transferred by me in the and that the balance of - dollars and - cents is due the United States by me, and is in my hands in Unite -f - dollars and - cents, which is with the United States Assistant Treasurer at - NOTE.-The money value of subsistence supplies sold must be entered on the Summary Statement for the month in which the sales are made. Vouchers for funds disbursed or transferred do not accompany the Summary Statement. (See Notes, Form 10.) 'To

Page  272 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department.-Forms. ~Q I ::a: i 1 0 0 0 0 E- E- E - E ~) ~ i. 0 a .~~ ~ 0000 "I E)~a) tl~~~Ia r4 ;q 0 ~ .1 ~i -1 I a I0 a) a) a)a) a)4 I 0a)a) 0 I a)000 a) 0a)a) - - 0 - a) '272 4 0 14

Page  273 FORM 11. Abstract of Purchases on account of Arnmy Subsistence, in the month of Regiment of, A. C. S. Q No. Lbs. net. Bbs b.No. Lbs. net.Bbs Ls. L. Lb. Ls Lbs. Lbs. From whom purchased. Lbs Labs. bs L~bs. Leonard Wallace............ Thomas Cook.................. Richard Doe & Co........... John Lawrence............... Quantity and amount............................. I certify that the purchases were made agreeably to the above "Abstract," and at the lowest market pri, that the sums were actually paid as charged. Nora.-This Abstract is always accompanied by its proper vouchers. Vouchers to this Abstract embrace stores purchased by an officer or agent, cendpaid for by him. Vouchers for the payment, on a certificate, of articles purchased by another officer, should be entered on "Abstract of Contingencies" (Form 12). The artictles and quantities of subsistence purchased by an officer or agent during a month whether paid for or not, must be accounted for on his Return of Provisions for that month. Lbs. 100 ......... ........ 200 ~I -6 ;4 Bbls. 6 Bbls. 186. Lbs. ......... ......... 1,000 ......... January 1 10 15 31 1 2 3 10 10 ... ......... 5 ...... 3 2,500 ............ ............ 1,860 ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ... ......... ......... ..... ......... .........

Page  274 FORM 12. Abstract of disbursements on account of Contingencies, in the month of - - 186, by Lieut. A B, — Regimentt of, A. C. S. AMOUNT. 186.. To whom paid. On what account. z. > Dolls. Cts. Jan. 5 1 Private Jas. Welch, Company F, 6th Infantry.. Commutation of rations..................... 10 2 James Smith, jr.......................................... Commissary Property (stationery, scales, measures, &c.)..................................i Services as clerk................................ 31 Pay-roll of citizens employed....................... Services in Subsistence Department....... Hospital contingencies......................... Services in Subsistence Department....... .. l,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .0 ~O t4 rA oz CD . to CD CD >e A B Lieut. Reg't of, A. C. S. NOTES.-This Abstract is always accompanied by its proper vouchers. Vouchers to this Abstract, such as for commutation of rations, hire of clerk, hire of laborers, purchase of articles for hospital, &c., *,ust be certified to according to the nature of each case. To be endorsed as follows: Abstract of Contingencies In the month of, in, By Lieut. A B Regiment of o $ i I

Page  275 FORM 13. Ration return of Comnpian, Reginent of, for days, com, and ending the day of, 186 RATIONS OF ;i a .2 It Io ;4 Station. 'i >I ;4 0c Q ._ 14 'A Pa C C C' ~~~~~~~~ C C ~ C ~ 0 CC C ~ 0. 9 The A. C. S. will issue on the above return. C 1)I Col. - Reg't of, Cbmd'g Post. NOTES.-This return must embrace only the actual strength of the Companypresent, including the authorized Con The sick in Hospital and authorized attendants therein will be returned for by the medical officer in char Subsistence stores for the use of officers, their families, and authorized servants, may bel)urchased from I Provisions should ordinarily be drawn for a few days at a time. I I I C) Io sI 4.: s9 fo 14 .t 14 C6 Qo -I El c3

Page  276 FORM 14. Consolidated ration return for Regiment of, for days, co 186, and ending the day of, 1 RATIONS OF Pa ot 'o AH0 0 PiQ P* 'o cH eo Station. c! c ,t.,. v A A P0 9 C Non - commissioned staff and band............ Company A.................... Company B.................... Company C.................... Company M................... Total....................... The A. C. S. will issue on the above return. C — D, JMajor Col. Reg't of, Comd'g Post. NOTES.-This return must embrace only the strength of the Regiment actually present, elsewhere. a Rations must not be issued to officers' servants unless they are enlisted men. servants will be stated in the column of "Remarks." Every return upon which provisions have been issued must be entered on the prop o C, I Pi ,, ,. v3 st It 44 lw .. 0, It ~ O ~

Page  277 FORM 15. Requisitiol for Subsistence Stores for the use of Troops, &c., at, for days, commnencing the day of , 186, and endiny the day of, 186. RATIONS OF E P. on I . E C: Remarks. I .. - o. a n' ~~~~~~ -~~ -~~' I elX a, m. * 0 00 ~ 00 ~ ~ b~a0 00 ~ - - -~ e r To ~ ~ ~ ~.-~00 0O - ~0 0 P. el I: Fresh beef is obtained at the post by contract. For issue to troops.. -" citizens " extra... Sales to officers... No. of rations needed for uses No. of rations on hand....... No. of rations to be furnished * This number to be given with such approximation to accuracy as may be practicable. Examin ed a a approved. C DI Col. Reg't of, Cornd'# Post. I I I I I I I z It .r. ,t:z 00 ebz Iz e tn ID 9 P. e_ rn F" 11 ID ts 0 CD t:f CD S. 11 5 cl, ;s 0 15 p Station. ,4 PI Is 4 1.4 0 0 c; u C5, c; ud -d I.t C) tt 1-3 td 0tt 9 4. t OG m11 0 0 ;4 bc C, I -14 P. Ili t0 pq 14 0 0 4t p; P. It 0, m m i 6 M a, 9 A B I Lieut. Reg't f A. C. S. -1 -4

Page  278 FORM 16. Estimate of funds required for Ipu~chasing fresh beef, and for contingencies, at * PI It o Gw 0 P. It 0 sw s0 Troops. oP ~ o 11 4.0 a, o o~ ,.. Dolls. Cts. Company H, 2d Artillery...... 40th Reg't Pa. Vol. Infantry 3d Reg't Ohio Cavalry.......... Stationery.......................... Hospital contingencies........ Amount required for use........................................................................................ Probable amount that will be on hand month ending —, 186.............................. Amount to be furnished......................................................................................... Examined and approved. C- D Col. Reg't of, Command'g Post. * Salt meat is to be issued a certain number of days in o Cts. ~. c3 ;z lw o .2 Dolls. Amount.

Page  279 FORM 17. laventory and Inspection Pelport of Sutsistence Stores* for which Lieut. A B, - Regment of A. C. S., is responsible, and which have been inspected by Col. G II, I),spector-General. Inspection Report. Number or Articl Tow,,n in ow l on g in From whom re- Conition of articles. ow quantity. Artiles. Condition of articles. quantity. posses ion. use. ceived. of. I certify that the above is a correct Inventory of Subsistence Stores for which I am responsible, and which in my opinion require the action of an Inspector; also, that the stores have not been heretofore condemned. A B, Lieut. Reg't of, A. C. S. I certify that I have, this - -day of, 186, examined each of the above-named articles of Subsistence Stores, and that under "Inspection Report" I have stated its present condition, and what disposition should be made of it. G -H — (Signed in triplicate.) Co. nd Insp V ~~~~Col. alnd Inspector-General. * Commissary Property presented for the action of an Inspector must be entered on a separate Inventory and Inspection Report. NOTE. —Paragraph 1023 indicates the officer authorized to order the disposition of condemned supplies. (See, in this connection, paragraph 1019 to 1040.) Inventory. r'n m a, CD ED t:1 c~ -1 !9 .a~ O It C) wp tco

Page  280 FORM 18. Inspection Certificate and Commnissaryj's Receipt to COUNTY OF,I. State of, Ss Personally appeared before me, M N, inspector for, that, at the request of the parties concerned, he inspected the provisions below ( troops at Fort, Va., on the contract of P - R, commencin found them to be in quantity and quality as undermentioned: barrels of corn-fed pork, in quality, &c. as stipulated in the contract -- barrels of superfine flour. pounds of good, sound beans. - gallons of good cider (whisky or wine) vinegar. pounds of good hard soap. pounds of clean, dry, fine salt. Sworn to and subscribed before me } this day of, 186, Justice of te Peace. Jitstice of the Peace. Received at Fort, Va., this day of, 186 2 the provisio (Signed in duplicate.)

Page  281 FORM 19. Abstract of conplete rations issued to recruits at --, under command of 1 of, by James Gordon, Contractc No. of return.'No. of men. No. of days. Number of complete rations furnished........................................................... I certify that I have carefully compared the above "Abstract" with the original ra that they.amount to complete rations. NOTE.-This abstract must accompany the voucher (Form 20) for the payment of complete i i Ending. Commencing. 186.

Page  282 FORM 20. THE UNITED STATES To Jamnes Gordon, Contractor, 186. For rations issued in the month of, 186, to recruits at A B, Regiment of -, Recruiting Officer, as r complete rations, at cents per ration............................. Due contractor................................................ Received at, this day of, 186, from the United States (or Lieui Recruiting Officer*), dollars and cents, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) * When recruiting officers are supplied with funds for the pulpose, they will pay the accounts of their conti To be endorsed as follows: Voucher No.. Abstract of Contingencies In the month of, 186. JAMES GORDON. $.

Page  283 FORM 21. THE UNITED STATES To Seryeant Thomas Jones, Company A, 4th Regime) 186 January 3......... For commutation of rations while travelling on detached command to Baltimore, Maryland, from the 1st to the 3d of January, 1863 seventy-five cents* per day...................................................... * Commutation, at a rate exceeding the cost of the ration, is not a while travelling on detached command, and in cases of sick and of whom is assumed by the States from which they come. I certify that the above account is correct and just; that it was impracticable for E him, and that he was detached by my orders for the following duty:. Received, at Fort Mclenry, Maryland, this 4th day of January, 1863, from Lieut , A. C. S., two dollars and twenty-five cents, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) Witness to signature WILLIAM JENKINS. t When a signature is not written by the hand of a party, it must be witnessed by a disinterested third person.

Page  284 FORM 22.* THE UNITED STATES To Private James Welch, of Company F, ( 1863. February 5...... For commutation of rations while on furlough, from January 27 to F ten days, at fifteen cents per day, the cost of the ration............ (NOTB.-The soldier's furlough should be attached to the voucher foi When this is not practicable, the Commissary who pays th, on the furlough, over his official signature, the date and a I certify that the above account is correct and just; that Private James Welc~- has lent in money therefor, during the time above specified, and that he was on furlough Received, at —, this - day of —, 186, from Lieutenant C D —, — R eents, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) * A similar form, with the necessary variations, will be used for the commutation of rations of medical cadets, and of soldiers sta tioned where subsistence is not provided by the Government. (For en MI I 111

Page  285 FORE 23. :THE UNITED STATES To Leonard Wallace, 1863. Dolls. Cts. January 1...... For ten barrels pork, at twelve dollars per barrel.............................................120................. 00 five beef cattle, aggregate net weight 2,500 pounds, at four cents per pound, net.................. 100 00 one hundred pounds of sugar, at eight cents per pound............................................ 8 00 twenty pounds of adamantine candles, at twenty cents per pound..................................... 4 00 five tons of hay, at fifteen dollars per ton............................................................... 75 0 0 307 00 Received, at Baltimore, Md., January 1, 1863, of Capt. B N, C. S., three hundred and seven dollars, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) LEONARD WALLACE. 0 s eft 'o 10 NOTEs.-Commissary Property purchased is entered on vouchers separate from those for the purchase of Subsistence Stores. Subsistence supplies purchased by a Commissary or agent, whether paid for or not, must be accounted for by him on the proper Returns. (Forms 1 and 8.) Receipts for money paid must be signed by a principal, and not by his clerk or any deputy. I I I rI I 4 DR. Ot 0 to 6% bd td x H To be endosed as follows: Voucher No. -. Abstract of Purchases In the month of January, 1863. LEONARD WALLACE. $307. R

Page  286 FORM 24. THE UNITED STATES To James Parker, Jr. 1863. January 3...... For one hundred pounds of fresh beef, at four cents per pound.......... two barrels of flour, at seven dollars and eighty-four cents per bai four gallons of vinegar, at sixteen cents per gallon...................... one hundred pounds of salt, at one cent per pound...................... I certify that the above account for twenty-one dollars and thirty-two cents is corre Want of funds; that the articles specified were purchased at the lowest market price, an( Lisions for the month of January, 1863. The purchase was necessary for the following Approved: C D Col. 4th Reg't of Infantry, Com'd'g Post. Received, at —, this - day of, 186, from Capt. - -, C. S., dollar (Signed in duplicate.) Nolxs.-In this voucher, the certificate will be signed by the officer making the purchase and the receipt taken in the name of the officer who pays for the stores. This voucher accompanies "Abstract of Contingencies" (Form 12).

Page  287 FORM 25. THiE UNITED STATES To 186. Dolls. For four chickens, at twenty-five cents each........................................................................... two dozen eggs, at eighteen cents per dozen..................................................................... two pounds of butter, at twenty-five cent s p er pound.................................................... twelve common cups and sau c e r s................................................................................. four quarts of milk, at seven cents per quart.................................................................. three dozen oranges, at twenty-five cents per dozen........................................................... Cts. O0 36 50 5O 28 75 39 I certify that the above-specified articles were purchased, on my requisition, for the use of the sick in hospital under my charge, and that the expenditure was warranted by the amount of hospital credit due at the time. E F I Surgeon Received at, this - day of, 186, from Lieut. A B, -Regiment of, A. C. S., dollars and - cents, in full of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) NoTEs.-Purchases for a hospital may be paid for by a Commissary to the extent of its hospital (For endorsement, see Form 20.) credit, and must be confined to the objects indicated in paragraph 1212. No officer or agent in the military service shall purchase from any other person in the military service. DP.. I m r_ c:r I CD ti CD S.Id E., ts 71 I i 0 14 ?I 14 ti p 4 as 4 .4i

Page  288 FORM 26. o o0 THE UNITED STATES To - Company, Regiment of 186. Dolls. Cts. For (NOTEs.-Sales of company savings, except to the Subsistence Department, are prohibited. Molasses, green or desiccated vegetables, and all articles furnished as a cure for, or preventive of, scurvy, are not to bepurchased as company savings.) I certify that the articles above specified are the actual savings of my company for the month of, 186 Examined. IH R C D, Capt. Reg't of, Comd' Company. Col. - Reg't of, Comd'g Post. I certify that the above account is correct and just; that the articles and quantities specified have been taken up on my Return of Provisions for the month of, 186, and that I have not paid the account M N, (Signed in quadruplicate.) Capt. and C. S. Vols. Received, at,this day of, 186, from Capt.R T,C. S., - dollars and cents,infull of the above account. *E -F (Signed in duplicate.) Lieut. Reg't of —, Comd'g Company. * The amount of a bill for company savings is paid to the offficer commanding the company at the date of payment, and by a Commissary having funds for thatpurpose. DR. cil 91 ti 0 .u 0 15 CD ts il 0 1 19 t7-j I I m tz t-d (7i 0,;4 0 . CD

Page  289 THE UNITED STATES 1863. May 6............ For services in the Subsistence Department, as Clerk to Capt. H from May 1 to include June 6, 1863, one month and six days, at sever Deduct direct tax (see* Form 28).................................................... I certify that the above account is correct and just; that the services were renderE service, and have been paid for by me as charged. Received, at, this day of, 186, from Capt. H N, C. of the above account. (Signed in duplicate.) * When several persons (citizens) are employed by an officer during a month, th vices rendered by them may be diminished by using Form 28. NOTE.-Period of service, rate of pay per day or month, nature of duty, &c., should be st in this voucher. FORM 27.* TO

Page  290 FORK 28. We, the subscribers, do hereby acknowledge to have received at, from Lieut A. C. S., the amounts set opposite to our names, respectively, in fb sistence Department during the period herein expressedj having signed duplica Period of service. 186. No. Names. Occupation. Per Month. From- TO- Days. Months. Doll - IAmn. I certify that the above is a correct Pay-Roll of citizens employed in the Subsistence Department, under my dii vices were rendered as stated, were necessary for the public service, and that the "amount" was actually paid by ir Examined and approved. C D-, (Signed in duplicate.) Cog. - Reg't of -, Comnzd'g Post. * A tax of three per cent. on sums exceeding $50 a month must be deducted from the salaries of employees the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. t When a receipt on a Pay-Roll or account is not signed by the hand of the party, the payment must be wJ witness to be a commissioned officer, when practicable. Novss.-When a hired person is discharged and not paid, a certified statement of his account, in duplicate, shall be I When practicable, persons hired in the military service shall be paid at the end of the calendar month, a charged. Separate Pay-Rolls shall be made for each month. Amount................

Page  291 FORM 29. Invoice of Subsists Stores* transferred at, this day of, 186, to Capt. E F. A. Q. M., for transportation and delivery to Lieut. A B B Regiment of A. C. S., at -. Cost. Dollars. Cents. Articles and Quantities. No. of Pack. ages. . v cb m al) 19 o CD gi ? 100 barrels Pork.................................................................................... per barrel... 50 sacks Bacon...................................... 5,000 pounds.......................... pound... m 50 barrels Flo u r.................................................................................... barrel... 75 sacks Beans.....................................9,000 pounds.......................... pound... 25 boxes Soap.........................1,000 pounds............. pound... 10 kegs Molasses.................................. 80 gallons.......................... gallon... NoTE.-When Supplies are to be conveyed to a distance by water, the name of the vessel carrying them should be stated on the Invoice. When the transportation is by land, it should be so stated on the Invoice, and the route designated. (Signed in quadruplicate.) C D _, Capt. arnd C. S. To be endorsed as follows: Invoice No. Subsistence Stores. In the month of, 186. C.and. S. Capt. and C. S. * Comiarj property must be separately invoiced. Gross Weight in lbs. Mark. 0 i-3 bt P. 4 to co

Page  292 FIORM 30. Received at, this - day of -, 186,fromn Capt. C D-. under-mentioned packages of Subsistence Stores,* for transportation an( - Regiment of —, A. C. S., at Mark. No. of packages. Articles and quantiti( 100 barrels Pork. Q 50 sacks Bacon. 50 sacks Bacon............................................................................. 50 barrels Flour. o 75 sacks Beans.................................................................. 25 boxes Soap............................................................................... 10 kegs Molasses.......................................................................... (Signed in duplicate.) * Commissary Property must be separatety receipted for. NOTE. —When the receipt of an officer to whom supplies have been sent is not received in time to accompany the issuing Commissary's Return of Provisions (or Return of Commissary Property), the Quartermas ter's receipt for the packages shall accompany the Return, and the Commissary's receipt be forwarded to the Commissary-General as soon as received. I

Page  293 FOR THE ARMY. 293 Subsistence Department.-Forms. 0 pqI t4 40 4) r4 ~ A zt 4. P4) 4) 2 -:g 44 -~~ *0fr0~C> 0 Z2 298 FOR THE ARMY. 0 C) .,W. P4 0; 0 Ca :1 a, Id 011 m m i4 C4 0 P4 4, e 0 :i .5 19 0 .!f s

Page  294 FORM 32. Received at - this day of - 186, from Lieut. A B thefollowing Subsistence Stores:* Articles and quantities. Pork. Bacon.................................................................................... Ham................................................................................... Salt beef................................................................................. Flour..................................................................................... Corn meal............................................................................... NOTE.-One copy of each receipt must accompany the "Return o (Signed in duplicate.) (Fo * Commi8sary Property must be separately receipted for. No. of packages.

Page  295 FORM 33. Received at, this day of,186,from.Li'ut. A B, Regime?t of A. C. S., the following Subsistence Funds, for which I am accountable at the Treasury of the United As, z.: $2,900 61. Twenty-nine hundred dollars and sixty-one cents. C DI)- Lieut. - Rey't of, A. C. S. 0 2. NOTES.-The amount of Funds received should always be expressed in words. Receipts for Subsistence Funds transferred (one receipt in each case of transfer) will be enclosed with the Account Current. When there is a large number of receipts for funds transferred during a month, they may be entered on an Abstract, and the total amount of Abstract entered in Account Current, instead of the separate vouchers. The receipts accompany the Abstract and Account Current. To be endorsed as follows: Receipt No. - Subsistence Funds. In the month of, 186. Lieut. C D. Regiment of. $2,900 r,. ct I;t a,0 11 so 0 19 CD tsI n, (Signed in duplicate.)

Page  296 FORM 34. Letter enclosing Returns, &c., to the Commissary- General IIAGERSTOW SIRa: I have the honor to transmit herewith the following papers pertaining to duty month of January, 1863. Return of Provisions received, issued, &c. Abstract of Purchases. Abstract of Issues to Volunteers. Abstract of Issues to Hospital. Abstract of Sales to Officers. Summary Statement of Funds. Return of Commissary Property. Very respectfully, sir, Your obedient se Lieut. and R. To Commissary- General of Subsistence, Washington City, D. C. NOTES.-An officer's post-office address shall be indicated in his official letters. " ("Camp -," and similar expressions of locality, are too indefinite should always be legibly written, his rank, reygiment, corps, or other offi Letters on letter-paper will be folded in three folds. parallel with the writ I!

Page  297 FOR THE ARMY. Subsistence Department.-Forms. FORM 35. To all whom it may concern: The bearer hereof, -, a - of Captain, company,- - regiment of; aged - years; feet,inches high; - complexion, eyes, hair, and by profession a; born in the of-, and enlisted at -, in the of -, on the - day of,eighteen hundred and ,to serve for the period of -, is hereby permitted to go to, in the county of -, State of -, he having received a FURLOUG] from the - day of, to the day of , at which period he will rejoin his company or regiment at - or wherever it then may be, OR BE CONSIDERED A DESERTER. Subsistence has been furnished to said - to the - day of , and pay to the - day of, both inclusive. Given under my hanid, at -, this - day of —, 18-. NOTE.-When practicable, the soldier's furlough should accompany the voucher for payment of commutation. *FORM 36. ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT entered into this day of, eighteen hundred and, between - -, an officer in the service of the United States of America, of the one part, and - t of the county of-, in the State of, of the other part. This agreement witnesseth, that the said -, for and on behalf of the United States of America, and the mid -, for himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators (or for themselves, their heirs, executors, and administrators, as the case may be), have mutually agreed, and by these presents do mutually covenant and agree, to and with each other, as follows, viz.: First. The said -, his (or their) heirs, executors, and administrators, shall supply, or cause to be supplied and issued, at - all the rations, to consist of the articles hereinafter specified, that shall be required for tl use of the United States recruits stationed at the place aforesaid, commencing on the - day of, eighteen hundred and, and ending on the - of, eighteen hundred and —, or such earlier day as the Commissary-General of Subsistence * Forms 36 and 37 will be observed in all contracts for subsistence supplies, with the variations which circumstances may make necessary. t When a firm is contracting, the full names of the individuals composing it will be stated in the contract, togeter with the business name or style of the oopartnership. 297

Page  298 29 - REIE REGULTION Subsistence Department.-Forms. may direct, at the price of cents and mills for each complete ration, in the funds furnished by the United States for public disbursement. Second. The ration to be furnished by virtue of this contract shall consist of the following articles, at the following prices for each article, viz.: [Here insert the component parts of the ration and the price per pound, quart, &c., for which the articles shall be furnished. The component parts of the ration are prescribed in paragraph 1190, page 244.] Third. Fresh beef shall be issued at least twice in each week, and oftener, if required by the commanding officer. Fourth. The provisions stipulated to be furnished under this contract shall be of the first quality. Should any difficulty arise respecting their quality, then the commanding officer shall appoint a disinterested person to meet one of the same description to be appointed by the contractor. These two thus appointed will have power to decide on the quality of the provisions; but should they disagree, then a third person is to be chosen by the two already appointed, the whole to act under oath, and the opinion of the majority to be final in the case. Fifth. No member of Congress, officer or agent of the Government, or any person employed in the public service, shall be admitted to any share herein, or to any benefit which may arise herefrom. In witness whereof, the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands and seals, the day and date first above written. Witnesses: . [L. s.] .- [L. s.] FORM 37. ARTICLES OP AGREEMENT entered into this day of, eighteen hundred and, between., an officer in the service of the United States of America, of the one part, and* of the county of - in the State of - -, of the other part. This agreement witnesseth, that the said - -, for and on behalf of the United States of America, and the said -, for himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators (or for themselves, their heirs, executors, and administrators, as the case may be), have mutually agreed, * When a firm is contracting, the full names of the individuals composing it will be stated in the contract, together with the business name or style of the eopartnership. 298 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  299 FOR THE ARMY. Subsistence Department.-Forms. and by these presents do mutually covenant and agree, to and with each other, as follows, viz.: First. That the said - shall deliver at, fresh beef of a good and marketable quality, in equal proportion of fore and hind quarter meat (necks, shanks, and kidney tallow to be excluded), in such quantities as may be from time to time required, and on such days as shall be designated by the commanding officer. This contract to be in force for months, or such less time as the Commissary-General of Subsistence may direct, commencing on theday of, eighteen hundred and Second. The necks of the cattle slaughtered for beef to be delivered under this agreement shall be cut off at the fourth vertebral joint, and the breast trimmed down. The shanks of fore-quarters shall be cut off from three to four inches above the knee-joint, and of hind-quarters from six to eight inches above the gambrel or hock joint. Third. The said - shall receive -cents and mills, per pound, for the fresh beef accepted under this contract. Fourth. Payment shall be made monthly for the quantity of fresh beef accepted and in the funds furnished by the United States for public disbursement; but in the event of the Commissary who receives the beef being without funds to pay for it, then payment to be made as soon after as funds may be received for that purpose. Fifth. Whenever the beef to be issued by this contract shall, in the opinion of the commanding officer, be unfit for issue, or of a quality inferior to that required by the contract, a survey shall be held thereon by two officers, to be designated by the commanding officer; and in case of disagreement, a third person shall be chosen by those two officers; the three thus appointed and chosen shall have power to reject such parts (or the whole) of the fresh beef as to them appear unfit for issue, or of a quality inferior to that contracted for. Sixth. In case of failure or deficiency in the quality or quantity of the fresh beef stipulated to be delivered, then the Commissary at -- shall have power to supply the deficiency by purchase, and the said will be charged with the difference of cost. Seventh. No member of Congress, officer or agent of the Government, or any person employed in the public service, shall be admitted to any share herein, or to any benefit which may arise herefrom. In witness whereof, the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands and seals, the day and date first above written. Witnesses: . [L. S.] . [L. s.] 299

Page  300 30 R.IE REv ULATIONS Subsistence Department. Forms. FORIM 38. KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, That we,* --, of the county of, State of -; - of the county ofState of -; and, -, of the county of- ---, State of -—, are held and firmly bound to the United States of America in the sum of dollars lawful money of the United States; for which payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, and each of us, our and each of our heirs, executors, and administrators, for and in the whole, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents. Sealed with our seals, dated the day of in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and. The nature of this obligation is such, That if [here insert name of contractor, or names of contractors, as the case may be] his (or their) heirs, executors, and administrators, or any of them, shall and do in all things well and truly observe, perform, fulfil, accomplish, and keep, all and singular, the covenants, conditions, and agreements whatsoever, which, on the part of the said -, his (or their) heirs, executors, or administrators, are or ought to be observed, performed, fulfilled, accomplished, and kept, comprised, or mentioned, in certain articles of agreement bearing date the day of,eighteen hundred and - between and the said, concerning the supply of rations at - ---- (or of fresh beef at ), according to the true intent and meaning of said articles of agreement, then the above obligation to be void; otherwise to remain in full force and virtue. Witnesses: t.[L. S.] * [L.s.] * [L. s.] NOTE.-Bonds to contracts for subsistence supplies shall be executed in duplicate; one copy to be retained by the contracting officer or agent, and the other to be sent to the Commissary-General of Subsistence with the copies of the contract required to be furnished him. (See paragraph 1180.) * The name of the contractor (or names of contractors, as the ease may be) will be inserted in the bond, in addition to the names of at least two sureties thereto. t The signature of contractor (or signatures of contractors) will be affixed to the bond. 30,0 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  301 _..,.F.IL. T._l. A a,,, MY g_. 801S Subsistence Department.- Miscellaneous Items. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 1. When practicable, each kind of subsistence stores shall be placed by itself,-the packages stored so as to allow circulation among them, and to permit the quantity and age (date of purchase) of each lot being easily ascertained. At short intervals of time the stores and packages shall be carefully examined, and, when necessary, separated for inspection, early issue, repacking, rebrining, &c., as circumstances may require. 2. When there is no flooring under stores, they must be placed on skids, or be otherwise properly dunnaged. 3. Salt meats in barrels should be piled in tiers only when limited store-room makes such storage necessary, and then never more than three tiers high, each tier resting on skids placed near the ends of the barrels. 4. Salt meats in pickle are not safe from injury unless there is undissolved salt in the barrel. The barrels should be rolled over monthly, and never be exposed to a hot sun. 5. Most subsistence stores being readily perishable, unremitting care is indispensable to their preservation. 6. The second chime-hoop on all barrels of pickled meats should be of iron. Two iron hoops on a barrel (one on each end) will generally be sufficient. 7. Vinegar-kegs should be painted, and the bungs capped with tin. 8. Liquid measures and scoops should be made of treble X tin. 9. The size, form, strength, &c. of packages designed to hold subsistenice stores will be determined by the purchasing Commissary, who will be governed in these particulars by the kind of transportation offered, by the size of the wagons used, by the convenience of handling the packages, &c. 10. When hard bread is put in boxes (the best packages for field transportation), they should be made of fully-seasoned wood, of a kind to impart no taste or odor to the bread, and as far as practicable of single pieces. When two pieces are used in making the same surface, they should be tongued and grooved together. 11. A box 26 x 17 x 11 inches, exterior measure, is an average box for pilot bread, under the usual circumstances of land transportation. The ends of a box of this size should be made of inch, and the remainder of five-eighths, stuff, tlc package well strapped with green hickory or other suitable wood. 12. Hard bread, after thorough cooling and drying, should be pressed closely in its packages, each package containing a uniform weight of bread, for the convenience of calculation. It can be re-dried in boxes 2A F-OR TIIE ARMY. 801

Page  302 REVISED REGULATIONS Subsistence Department. Miscellaneous Items. without removal therefrom, by being exposed for about forty hours to a temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit. 13. The army wagon being 22 x 42 x 114 inches, inside measurement, boxes for bacon, made 20 x 20 x 28 inches outside measurement (which will contain 225 pounds of bacon) are convenient forfield transportation. The boxes should be strapped, and the material be one and one-fourth inch thick, tongued and grooved. 14. A box, 4 x 4 inches square, and 3.6 inches deep, will contain one quart, or 57.75 cubic inches. 15. A box, 5 x 5 inches square, and 4.6 inches deep, will contain a half-gallon, or 115.5 cubic inches. 16. A box, 24 x 16 inches square, and 28 inches deep, will contain one barrel (large whisky barrel), or 10,752 cubic inches. 17. A box, 8 x 8.4 inches square, and 8 inches deep, will contain one peck, or 537.6 cubic inches. 18. A box, 16 x 16.8 inches square, and 8 inches deep, will contain one bushel, or 2,150 cubic inches. Rate per bushel at which certain cereals, esculent roots, &c. shall be estimated. bushel of corn (on the cob) " corn (shelled) "t corn-meal ( "' hominy rye "~ buckwheat barley ' " C wheat beans " peas onions " beets carrots turnips potatoes C "' fine salt bran malt " dried apples dried peaches } oats .............................. .................I............ CCt...................... 60 " ...................... .............,o.........o....o.o e e..................**....* ~' 8-0-2 70 pounds. 56 cc 50 11 45 cc 56 11 52 cc 48 cc One (i cc cc (I 4 c 4 c c c cc cc c c i c c 4 tt cc c c (C 9 c c c cc c c .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. .............................. t'.............................. 20 11 38 11 24 tc 32 cc (4 ..............................

Page  303 FOR TH ARMY. 803 Subsistence Department. Schedule of tares prescribed by the Treasury Department for the govern ment of the collectors of customs and others interested. Cheese, 10 per cent. for casks or tubs. Coffee, Rio, 1 per cent., single bags; 2 per cent., double bags. All other coffee, actual tare. Cocoa, 2 per cent., bags; 8 per cent., ceroons. Chicory, 2 per cent., bags. Melado, 11 per cent. Pepper, 2 per cent., bags; 4 per cent., double bags. Pimento, 2 per cent., bags. Rice, 2 per cent., bags. Sugar, 121 per cent. for hogsheads; 12 per cent. for tierces; 10 per cent., barrels; 14 per cent., boxes; 2 per cent., bags; 2~ per cent., mats. Salt, fine, in sacks, 3 pounds for each sack. Coarse or ground alum, 2 pounds each. Teas, duty to be levied on the net number of pounds, as per invoice, when from China or Japan. All others, actual tare by weight. FOR THE ARMY. 803

Page  304 804 ILVIE \ ULTI Subsistence Department. TABLE SHOWING THE WEIGHT AND BULK OF 1,000 RATIONS.* 1,000 Rations. Net Gross Bulk in Reinarks. weight. weight. barrels. Pounds. 1,253 883 2,239 1,507 1,211 1,262 162 108 122 108 102 19 161 97 163 44 403 4 345 34 1161 753 91, Po rk.................................................. Bacon sides, shoulders, and hams.......... S alt b eef............................................. Flour................................................. Hard bread, in barre ls......................... Hard bread, in boxes............................ Bean s and peas.................................... Rice and hominy.................................. Coffee, green....................................... Coffee, roasted.................................... Coffee, roa sted and ground.................... Tea..................................................... Sugar................................................. Vinegar.............................................. Candles, adamantine........................... Soap................................................... Salt.................................................... Pepper............................................... Potatoes, fresh..................................... Molasses............................................. Desiccated potatoes............................... Desiccated mixed vegetables.................. Whisky............................................... Consisting of + pork, 4 salt beef, 4 bacon; a flour,' bread, in boxes; boans or peas; rice or hominy; i roasted and ground coffee, ~ tea; sugar; vinegar; adamantine candles; soap; salt; pepper; molasses; pota toes. 1,000 complete rations........................... 3,031.09 3,885.6 19.1218 1 complete ration................................. 1,000 complete rations.......................... gonsisting of' pork,, salt beef, + bacon; bread, in boxes; beans or peas; rice or hominy; I roasted and ground coffee, + tea; sugar; vinegar; ada mantine candles; soap; salt; pepper; molasses. 1 complete ration................................. 1,000 complete rations.......................... 2,918.5 onsisting of i pork, ~ salt beef, L bacon; flour; beans or peas; rice or hominy; i roasted and ground coffee, + tea; sugar; vinegar; adamantine candles; soap; salt; pepper; molasses. 1 complete ration................................. * This table is constructed upon the basis of a ration constituted as laid down in paragraph 1190, and as ordinarily put up for transportation. The weight (net and gross) and bulk of 1,000 rations will, of course, vary with the component parts put up, and with the kind of packagse u. REVISE,D REGULATIONS Pounds. 750 750 1,250 1,375 1,000 1,000 150 100 100 80 80 15 150 80 12-1 40 37.1 2-L 300 32-1 93i 621 77 4.6 4.5333 7.6666 7.0153 11.1111 9.6. .6666 .5188 .6453 .8326 .7592 .16 .6 .4121 .0888 .14 .1402 .346.6 1.8285 .1133 .7708 .4342 .4033 calculating the bulk of Subsistence Stores for purposes of storage or transportation, six and one-fourth (6,-,) cubic feet are considered a bar2-eZ. 3.0 3.8 18.5857 2,543.5 3,418.0 2.5 3.4 ............ 3,M.08 le. 2.91 3.6 I..........

Page  305

Page  306 000 0000000 " ...~~~~~~~~~~~~~r PC .0 W., C,~~~~... I... 0: o ~~g0 PC I., 1- -I l.9t~ 1t.~ 0... 11 - p~::: jPo 0: b: b: %, :::1.:1.:: Po, S..:::: .,::::: .~~~~~~: I . 0~~~ C. 0,,,::::: 00000~............. ooo:....~" :::::..P F I,pI u ~~~~~~~~~~:::::: 1::::. Pi ::::.:.:.:.:.. - ::::, I ou no~~~~~~~~~~................ n::::. *:: 0 0*:: 0 0 0Gl ......... ...... ...... ....... 0................ ......... cl, C. " " 11 - C. ,, - PC 'IO' C. I.. I- I O-r ................:..:..:.. .: . :- .. ............::.:::.:. :. 1.. :..1 - & I ou ::::: : '..:: :.:- I Oti .:..:::...... ........... .....::::::::: :::,::......... ...:::::::: I Qua ..:::........

Page  307 FOR THE ARMY. Subsistence Department. :rumber of Rations, from 1 to 100,000. .5 I Si N R ER 14 Pt ,. ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... o 9 Iq 4 P D, If r~ v 0 g ..........1.....1.........4 21 1 1 ........ 961....... 1.........0 2 .........1......1........4 4 1 ......2...24................ 51 3 1 ......14.....8 20...28 2...... 5. 69 4 6 1............36 7........72 8 6 1 ............ ............ ............ 1...... 2...... 2...... 3...... 3...... 0~~~ Ma~~~ o 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 0~. _0 1 9 ........... 4 0. ............ ............ I 1 2 2 2 ......6......5.2........8.32 2.4......0.4.....12....... .......8........76......5..3 21.2........72.....1.5 ;4 PIP .........o... .1 ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ 1 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 ~ 0 o 0 ~ 0 Q 0 ~ 3 0 * 8 1.B 3. 4.5 6. 7.5 9. 10.5 12. 13.5 15. 14. 13. 12. I11. 10. ;9. 8. 37. )6. 312. 32. r8. ,14. 34. j10. ...... 6. 312. 312. 78. 78. 5...... 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 1,500 3,000 15,000 30,000 bushel of each shall be estimated at ssxty pounds. hominy, and at the rate of potatoes (fresh), -iz.: thirty pounds to 100 rations. of the ration, of equal money value. . I 2 6 8 2 6 0 7 1 5 8 2 6 0 3 7 7 5 5 0 307 !S pq t, p 16 'I ;z 0 ;4 ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ........ i 1 2 3 3 19 2 11 x t ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ....i 2 3 'I IPI PI ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... .... i. 1 1 1 2 2 2 12 25 125 250 0 0 .04 .08 .12 .16 .20 .24 .28 .32 .36 .40 .80 1.2 1.6 2. 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4. 8. 12. ....... 4. 8. 12. .... 8. 8. ....... ....... ....... 9 9 1 2 a 4, 6 6 7 8 9 10 4 14 8 2 12 6 ... i6... 4 8 u 8 12 .... i... 8 8 0.64 1.28 1.92 2.56 3.2 3.84 4.48 5.12 5.76 6.4 12.8 3.2 9.6 12.8 3.2 9.6 0.i ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... i 1 1 ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ........... ............ ............ ............ ............ ........... i 2 3 5 6 Iz I 9 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1. 1.2 1.4 1.6 ]-.8 2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14. ... 4' 8' 12. ... S. 12. . i... 8. 8. ...... ...... ...... Iz 9I 0 -0.6 1.2 1.8 2.4 3. 3.6 4.2 4.8 5.4 6. 12. 2' 8' 14' 4' 10. ..6... 12' 8' 4' ...... 12. 8. 4. ...... 12. 8. 8. ...... ...... ...... 4.8 9.6 14.4. 3.2 8. 12.8 1.6 6.4 11.2 6 0.08 0.16 0.24 0.32 0.40 0.48 0.56 0.64 0.72 0.80 1.60 2.40 3.20 4. 4.8 5.6 6.4 7.2 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ....... ....... ....... 3 4 6 6 7 8 9 4 93 4,68 9,37 I 1 2 2 3 3 20 40 2, 4, 12 18 26 31 37 6 6 6 31 62 3,12 6,25 I I 1 2 .2 3 3 3 18 37 1,87 3,75 2 3 ""'i 2 2 ...... ...... ...... I I 6 12 62 1,25 1 2 12 25 ......... ......... .........

Page  308 0

Page  309 vO ~ Ii E.A-..., \r. 3 09.._ *. best xv I - - Medical Department. ARTICLE XLIV. MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 1266. The medical supplies for the army are prescribed in the standard supply tables. 1267. The medical purveyors and the senior medical officer of each hospital, post, or command, will make the necessary requisitions for medical and hospital supplies, in duplicate (Form 1). If the supplies are to be obtained from the principal purveying dep6ts, the requisitions will be made upon the Surgeon-General on the 31st day of December annually; if from department or field depots, they will be made upon the medical director at such times and for such periods as he may direct. Good vaccine matter will be kept on hand by timely requisition on the Surgeon-General. 1268. The medical purveyors at the principal depots will issue medical and hospital supplies only on the order of the Surgeon-General; those at department or field dep6ts will issue on the order of a medical director. In particular and urgent cases, issues may be made on a special requisition (Form 2), approved by a commanding officer; a like authority will be required in transfers of medical supplies. 1269. When it is necessary to purchase medical supplies, and recourse cannot be had to a medical disbursing officer, they may be procured by the quartermaster on a special requisition (Form 2) and account (Form 3). 1270. When any requisition for medical supplies is not according to the supply table, the reason therefor must be set out. 1271. In every case of special requisition, a duplicate of the requisition shall, at the same time, be transmitted to the Surgeon-General, for his information, giving the name and station of the officer upon whom it is made. 1272. Medical purveyors will make to the Surgeon-General, at the end of each fiscal quarter, returns in duplicate (Form 4) of medical supplies received, issued, and remaining on hand, stating to whom, or from whom, and where and when issued or received; other medical officers in charge of medical supplies make similar returns of them annually, on the 31st December; and all officers, when relieved from the duty to which their returns relate. The returns will show the condition of the stores, and particularly of the instruments, bedding, and furniture. Medical purveyors will furnish abstracts of receipts and issues, with their returns (Form 5), giving the name of the person from whom received and to whom issued. 1273. An officer transferring medical supplies will furnish a certified FOR THE ARMT. 309

Page  310 310 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. invoice to the officer who is to receive them, and transmit a duplicate of it to the Surgeon-General. The receiving officer will furnish a receipt to the officer making the issue, with a report of the quality and condition of the articles, and transmit a duplicate of the receipt and report to the Surgeon-General. A medical officer who turns over medical supplies to a quartermaster for storage or transportation will forward to the SurgeonGeneral; with the invoice, the quartermaster's receipt for the packages. 1274. Medical officers will take up and account for all medical supplies of the army that come into their possession, and report, when they know it, to whose account they are to be credited. 1275. In all official lists of medical supplies the articles will be entered in the order of the supply table. 1276. Medical disbursing officers will, at the end of each fiscal quarter, render to the Surgeon-General, in duplicate, a quarterly account current of moneys received and expended, with the proper vouchers for the payments, and certificates that the services have been rendered, and the supplies purchased and received for the medical service, and transmit to him an estimate of the funds required for the next quarter. 1277. The senior medical officer of a hospital will distribute the patients, according to convenience and the nature of their complaints, into wards or divisions, under the particular charge of the several assistant surgeons, and will visit them himself each day, as frequently as the state of the sick may require, accompanied by the assistant, steward, and nurse. 1278. His prescriptions of medicine and diet are written down at once in the proper register, with the name of the patient and the number of his bed; the assistants fill up the diet table for the day, and direct the administration of the prescribed medicines. HIe will detail an assistant surgeon to remain at the hospital day and night, when the state of the sick requires it. 1279. In distributing the duties of his assistants, he will ordinarily require the aid of one in the care and preparation of the hospital reports, registers, and records, the rolls, and descriptive lists; and of another in the charge of the dispensary, instruments, medicines, hospital expenditures, and the preparation of the requisitions and annual returns. 1280. He will enforce the proper hospital regulations to promote health ,nd prevent contagion, by ventilated and not crowded rooms, scrupulous cleanliness, frequent changes of bedding, linen, &c. 1281. He will require the steward to take due care of the hospital stores and supplies; to enter in a book, daily (Form 6), the issues to the ward-masters, cooks, and nurses; to prepare the provision returns, and receive and distribute the rations. 1282. He will require the ward-master to take charge of the effccts 310 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  311 FOR THE ARMY. Medical Department. of the patients; to register them in a book (Form 7); to have them numbered and labeled with the patient's name, rank, and company; to receive from the steward the furniture, bedding, cooking-utensils, &e., for use, and keep a record of them (Form 8), and how distributed to the wards and kitchens; and once a week to take an inventory of the articles in use, and report to him any loss or damage to them, and to return to the steward such as are not required for use. 1283. The cooks and nurses are under the orders of the steward; he is responsible for the cleanliness of the wards and kitchens, patients and attendants, and all articles in use. He will ascertain who are present at sunrise, and sunset, and tattoo, and report absentees. 1284. At surgeon's call the sick then in the companies will be conducted to the hospital by the first sergeants, who will each hand to the surgeon, in his company book, a list of all the sick of the company, on which the surgeon shall state who are to remain or go into hospital; who are to return to quarters as sick or convalescent; what duties the convalescents in quarters are capable of; what cases are feigned; and any other information in regard to the sick of the company he may have to communicate to the company conmmnander. 1285. Soldiers in hospital, patients, or attendants, except stewards, shall be mustered on the rolls of their company, if it be present at the post. 1286. When a soldier in hospital is detached from his company so as not to be mustered with it for pay, his company commander shall certify and send to the hospital his descriptive list, and account of pay and clothing, containing all necessary information relating to his accounts with the United States, on which the surgeon shall enter all payments, stoppages, and issues of clothing to him in hospital. When he leaves the hospital, the medical officer shall certify and remit his descriptive list, showing the state of his accounts. If he is discharged from the service in hospital, the surgeon shall make out his final statements for pay and clothing. If he dies in hospital, the surgeon shall take charge of his effects, and make the reports required in the general regulations concerning soldiers who die absent from their companies. 1287. Patients in hospital are, if possible, to leave their arms and accoutrements with their companies, and in no case to take ammunition into the hospital. 1288. When a patient is transferred from one hospital to another, the medical officer shall send with him an account of his case, and the treat ment. 1289. The regulations for the service of hospitals apply, as far as practicable, to the medical service in the field. 18 Bil

Page  312 RB VISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. 1290. The senior medical officer of each hospital, post, regiment, or detachment, will keep the following records, and deliver them to his successor: a register of patients (Form 9); a prescription book (Form 10); a diet book (Form 10); a case book; a meteorological register (Form 11); copies of his requisitions, annual returns, and quarterly reports of sick and wounded; and an order and letter book, in which will be transcribed all orders and letters relating to his duties. 1291. He will make up the muster and pay rolls of the medical cadets, hospital steward, female nurses, and matrons, and of all soldiers in hospital, sick or on duty, detached from their companies, on the forms furnished from the Adjutant-General's office, and according to the directions expressed on them. 1292. He will make the rolls of the cooks and nurses for extra-duty pay, which will be paid by the paymaster, in the absence of a medical disbursing officer, as in other cases of expenditures for the medical department (Form 12). 1293. The senior medical officer will select the cooks, nurses, and matrons (and, at posts where there is no hospital steward appointed by the Secretary of War, a soldier to act as steward), with the approval of the commanding officer. Cooks and nurses will be taken from the privates, and will be exempt from other duty, but shall attend the parades for muster and weekly inspections of their companies at the post, unless specially excused by the commanding officer. 1294. Ordinarily, hospital attendants are allowed as follows: to a general hospital, one steward, one nurse as ward-master, one nurse to ten patients, one matron to twenty, and one cook to thirty; to a hospital where the command exceeds five companies, one steward and ward-master, one cook, two matrons, and four nurses; to a post or garrison of one company, one steward and ward-master, one nurse, one cook, and one matron; and for every two companies more, one nurse; at arsenals where the number of enlisted men is not less than fourteen, one matron is allowed. The allowance of hospital attendants for troops in the field will be, for one company, one steward, one nurse, and one cook; for each additional company, one nurse; and for commands of over five companies, one additional cook. 1295. Medical officers, where on duty, will attend the officers and enlisted men, and the servants and laundresses authorized by law; and at stations where other medical attendance cannot be procured, and on marches, the hired men of the army, and the families of officers and soldiers. Medicines will be dispensed to the families of officers and soldiers, and to all persons entitled to medical attendance; hospital stores to enlisted men. 1296. Medical officers, in giving certificates of disability (Form 13), are to take particular care in all cases that have not been under their 312

Page  313 FOR TIlE ARMY. 313 Medical Department. charge; and especially in epilepsy, convulsions, chronic rheumatism derangement of the urinary organs, ophthalmia, ulcers, or any obscure disease liable to be feigned or purposely produced; and in no case shall such cer tificate be given until after sufficient time and examination to detect any attempt at deception. 1297. In passing a recruit the medical officer is to examine him stripped; to see that he has free use of all his limbs; that his chest is ample; that his hearing, vision, and speech are perfect; that he has no tumors, or ulcerated or extensively cicatrized legs; no rupture or chronic cutaneous affection; that he has not received any contusion, or wound of the head, that may impair his faculties; that he is not a drunkard; is not subject to convulsions; and has no infectious disorder, nor any other that may unfit him for military service. 1298. Medical officers attending recruiting rendezvous will keep a record (Form 14) of all the recruits examined by them. Books for this purpose will be procured by application to the Surgeon-General, to whom they will be returned when filled. 1299. As soon as a recruit joins any regiment or station, he shall be examined by the medical officer, and vaccinated when it is required. 1300. The senior medical officer of each hospital, post, regiment, or detachment, will make monthly to the medical director, and quarterly to the Surgeon-General, a report of sick and wounded, and of deaths, and of certificates for discharge for disability (Form 15), and transmit to him monthly a copy of the meteorological register (Form 11), and a copy of the "statement of the hospital fund" (Form 19). 1301. After surgeon's call, he will make a morning report of the sick to the commanding officer (Form 16). 1302. Every medical officer will report to the Surgeon-General and to the medical director the date when he arrives at a station, or when he leaves it, and his orders in the case, and at the end of each month whenever not at his station, whether on service or on leave of absence, and when on leave of absence his post-office address for the next month. 1303. The medical director will make to the Surgeon-General a monthly return of the medical officers of the command (Form 17), and a consolidated monthly report of the sick and wounded (Form 15) from the several reportst made to him. 1304. When it is necessary to employ a private physician as medical officer, the commanding officer may do it by vitten contract, conditioned as in Form 18, at a stated compensation not to exceed $50 a month when the number of officers and men, with authorized servants and laundresses, is 100 or more; $40 when it is from 50 to 100, and $30 when it is under 50S FOR TIIE ARMY. 313

Page  314 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. 1305. But when he is required to abandon his own business, and give his whole time to the public service, the contract may be not to exceed $80 a month; and not to exceed $100, besides transportation in kind, to be furnished by the Quartermaster's Department, where he is required to accompany troops on marches or transports. But a private physician will not be employed to accompany troops on marches or transports, except by orders from the War Department, or in particular and urgent cases by the order of the officer directing the movement, when a particular statement of the circumstances which make it necessary will be appended to the contract. 1306. And when a private physician is required to furnish medicines, he will be allowed, besides the stipulated pay, from 25 to 50 per cent. on it, to be determined by the Surgeon-General. 1307. In all cases, a duplicate of the contract will be transmitted forthwith by the commanding officer to the Surgeon-General, and the commanding officer for the time being will at once discontinue it, whenever the necessity for it ceases, or the Surgeon-General may so direct. 1308. The physician's account of pay due must be sent to the SurgeonGeneral for payment, vouched by the certificate of the commanding officer that it is correct and agreeable to contract, and that the services have been duly rendered. But when it cannot conveniently be submitted to the Surgeon-General from the frontier or the field, it may be paid on the order of the commanding officer, not to exceed the regulated amount, by a medical disbursing officer, or a quartermaster. 1309. When medical attendance is required by officers or enlisted men on service, or for the authorized servants of such officers, and the attendance of a medical officer cannot be had, the officer, or, if there be no officer, then the enlisted man, may employ a private physician, an(d a just account therefor will be paid by the medical bureau. 1310. The account will set out the name of the patient, the date of and charge for each visit and for medicines. The physician will make a certificate to the account in case of an officer, or affidavit in the case of an enlisted man, that the account is correct, and the charges are the customary charges of the place. 1311. The officer will make his certificate, or the enlisted man his affidavit, to the correctness of the account, that he was on service at the place, and stating the circumstances preventing him from receiving the services of a medical officer. 1312. When the charge is against an officer, he will pay the account if practicable, and transmit it to the medical bureau for reimbursement; in all other cases tho account will be transmitted to the medical bureau for settlement. 314

Page  315 FOR THE ARMY. 315 Medioal D)epartmeat. 1313. If the charge is against a deceased officer or enlisted man, the physician will make the affidavit, before required, to the account, and that he has been paid no part of it. 1314. No charges for consultation fees will be paid by the medical bureau, nor will any account for miedical attendance or medicines be paid, if the officer or enlisted man be not on service. 1315. A board of not less than three medical officers will be appointed from time to time by the Secretary of War, to examine applicants for appointment of assistant surgeons, and assistant surgeons for promotion. And no one shall be so appointed or promoted until so examined and found qualified. 1316. The board will scrutinize rigidly the moral habits, professional acquirements, and physical qualifications of the candidates, and report favorably, either for appointment or promotion, in no case admitting of a reasonable doubt. 1317. The Secretary of War will designate the applicants to be examined for appointment of assistant surgeon. They must be between 21 and 28 years of age. The board will report their respective merits in the several branches of the examination, and their relative merit from the whole; agreeably whereto, if vacancies happen within two years thereafter, they will receive appointments and take rank in the medical corps. 1318. When an assistant surgeon has served five years, he is subject to be examined for promotion. If he decline the examination, or be found not qualified by moral habits or professional acquirements, he ceases to be a medical officer of the army. 1319. An applicant for appointment failing at one examination, may be allowed a second, after two years; but never a third. 1320. Medical Cadets will be selected, from among the applicants who have been examined and approved by a Medical Board, by the Surgeon General, who will assign them to duty at such places and in such num bers as the service may require. These candidates will be enlisted for the full term, by the Surgeon-General, or by a medical officer of the army authorized by him, who will at once cause to be administered to the Cadet the following oath: I, - —, appointed a in the army of the United States, do solemnly swear, or affirm, that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever; and observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United States. Sworn to and subscribed before me, at-, this -day of -,186 -- Justice of the Peace

Page  316 31 lEIE RExAIN Medical Department. 1321. Medical Cadets will have the rank and pay of the Cadets at the Military Academy, and be under the direction and control of medical officers alone. They will be entitled each to one room as quarters, and fuel therefor, as allowed a Sergeant-Major, and will take choice next after Brevet Second Lieutenants in the selection of quarters. Transportation will be allowed them as in cases of paymaster's clerks. 1322. On the fifteenth day of the last month of his term of service, each Medical Cadet will report the fact to the medical officer in charge whose duty it is to report the same to the Surgeon-General, together with a report of the general character and competency of the Cadet. 1323. The Secretary of War will appoint from the enlisted men of the army, or cause to be enlisted, as many competent hospital stewards as the service may require, not to exceed one for each post. 1324. The senior medical officer of a hospital requiring a steward may recommend a competent non-commissioned officer or soldier tobe appointed, which recommendation the commanding officer shall forward to the AdjutantGeneral of the army, with his remarks thereon, and with the remarks of the company commander. And, as the object of these more permanent appointments is to procure the services of a more competent body of hospital stewards, no soldier, nor citizen, must henceforth be recommended for appointment who is not known to be temperate, honest, and in every way reliable, as well as sufficiently intelligent, and skilled in pharmacy, for the proper discharge of the responsible duties likely to be devolved upon him. 1325. When no competent enlisted man can be procured, the medical officer will report the fact to the Surgeon-General.* Applications and testimonials of competency, from persons seeking to be enlisted for hospital stewards, may be addressed to the Surgeon-General. 1326. The commanding officer may re-enlist a hospital steward at the expiration of his term of service, on the recommendation of the medical officer. 1327. HIospital stewards, whenever stationed in places whence no post return is made to the Adjutant-General's office, or when on furlough, will, at the end of every month, report themselves by letter to the Adjutant-General and Surgeon-General, as well as to the medical director of the military department in which they may be serving; to each of whom *The current wants of the service may, however, be supplied by a detail from the command, on the recommendation of the medical officer, of a soldier to act as temporary steward, thus affording the means of a careful probation of all soldiers so detailed, whe are ambitious of one day deserving a permanent appointment. Stewards thus detailed at posts, or with a body of troops of more than four companies, will receive the pay and allowances of a sergeant of ordnance; and at all other posts, or with smaller bodies of troops, the pay and allowances of a sergeant of infantry. (See Act July 5,15 3S., sac. 12.) 316 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  317 -~~~~~O ilARY 1 FOR THE ARMaY. Medical Department. they will also report each new assignment to duty, or change of station, ordered in their case, noting carefully the number, date, and source of the order directing the same. They will likewise report monthly, when on furlough, to the medical officer in charge of the hospital to which they are attached. 1328. The accounts of pay, clothing, &c., of hospital stewards must be kept by the medical officers under whose immediate direction they are serving, who are, also, responsible for certified statements of such accounts, and correct descriptive lists of such stewards, to accompany them in case of transfer-as, also, that their final statements and certificates of discharge are accurately made out, when they are, at length, discharged from service. AMBULANCES. 1329. The following amount and kind of transportation for the sick and wounded may be provided for troops on marches and in campaigns against Indians: 1. For commands of less than five companies, to each company, one two-wheeled ambulance. 2. For a battalion, of five companies, one four-wheeled and five two wheeled ambulances. 3. For a regiment, two four-wheeled and ten two-wheeled ambu lances. 1330. The following schedule of transports for the sick and wounded and for hospital supplies will be adopted for a state of war with a civilized enemy: 1. For commands of less than three companies, one two-wheeled transport cart for hospital supplies, and to each company one two-wheeled ambulance. 2. For commands of more than three and less than five companies, two two-wheeled transport carts, and to each company one two wheeled ambulance. 3. For a battalion of five companies, one four-wheeled ambulance, five two-wheeled ambulances, and two two-wheeled transport carts. For each additional company less than ten, one two wheeled transport cart. 4. For a regiment of ten companies, two four-wheeled ambulances, ten two-wheeled ambulances, and four two-wheeled transport carts; and for greater commands in proportion. 1331. Ambulances will not be used for any other than the specific purpose for which they are designed, viz.: the transportation of the sick and wounded; and those herteafter provided for the army, will be madle 2B2 317

Page  318 318 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. -Ambulances. according to a pattern to be furnished the Quartermaster's Department by the Surgeon-General. 1332. The transport carts must be made after the models of the twowheeled ambulances (their interior arrangement for the sick excepted), and to have solid board flooring to the body. 1333. Hlorse-litters may be prepared and furnished to posts whence they may be required for service on ground not admitting the employment of two-wheeled carriages; said litters to be composed of a canvas bed similar to the present stretcher, and of two poles each sixteen feet long, to be made in sections, with head and foot pieces constructed to act as stretchers to keep the poles apart. 1334. The allowance of hospital attendants in the field will be, for one company, one steward, one nurse, and one cook; for each additional company, one nurse; and for commands of over five companies, one additional cook. HOSPITAL TENTS. 1335. Hospital tents must in future be made according to the pattern of the present tent and of the same material, but smaller, and having on one end a lapel so as to admit of two or more tents being joined and thrown into one with a continuous covering or roof. The dimensions to be these: In length, 14 feet; in width, 15 feet; in height (centre), 11 feet, with a wall 4~ feet, and a "fly" of appropriate size. The ridgepole to be made in two sections after the present pattern; and to measure 14 feet when joined. Such a tent will accommodate from 8 to 10 patients comfortably. 1336. The following will be the allowance of tents for the sick, their attendants and hospital supplies: |Commands. Hospital Sibley Common tents. tents. tents. For one company....................... 1... 1 For three companies....................... 1 1 1 For five companies.......................2 1 1 For seven companies......................2 1 1 For ten companies.......................... 1 1337. Upon the march or in battle, medical officers will habitually be attended by an orderly carrying a hospital knapsack. This knapsack to be made of light wood and of the ordinary size; to be divided into four 318 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  319 FOR THE ARMY. Medical Department.-Hospital Allowance. compartments or drawers, and to be covered with canvas or other suitable material: the object being to carry in an accessible shape such instruments, dressings, and medicines as may be needed in an emergency on the march or in the field. 319

Page  320 FORM 1. Reuisiton for Medwical and foTital Suppi Station:. Period: From to Command: Officers,; Enlisted Men, -.; All others entitled to M, Articles, and characters or quantities. I Articles, and c] o. Acacim.......................................................lb. Acidi acetici........................... lb. " arseniosi..........................................oz. Date: N.B.-Requisitions will exhibit the quantity of each and every article "on hand," wh, transmitt.ed in duplicate, and by different mails. I

Page  321 FORM 2. SPECIAL REQUISITION FOR SUPPLIES OF MEDICI: Requisition for flednes (hospital stores, &c.) required at - Acet. plumbi, lb. i. Pulv. cinchona, lbs. x. &c., &C. &c., &c. I certify that the medicines above required are necessary for the sick at, in co damage, &c., &c.], and that the requisition is agreeable to the supply table. Approved: Received,, 18-, of, the articles above enumerated

Page  322 Account for JIediciTes, &c., purchased by a Surgeon or an Oficer of tZ The United States, To A. B., Acet. plumbi, lb. i., at 50 cts.................................................................. Pulv. cinchona, lbs. x., at $2................................................................. &c., &c., &c. I certify that the articles above charged, for the use of the sick at -, are agreeable charges are reasonable and just. Received,, 18-, of, dollars and cents, in full of the above NOT.. —The above certi-cate may be signed by the Surgeon making the requisition, or by img to the army. FR0M I

Page  323 FORI'& 4. Return of Medical and Hospital Property. Articles, and characters or quantities. 5 - - I o ~ ~- r4 0 I certify that the above return i;s correct, to the'best of my knowledge, and that the med the aiek belonging to the army alone. N.B.-Keturns will always be transmitted in duplicate, and by different mails.

Page  324 - t C ID: e, D 2.: ::5 CD ~~~~.. CD ~~~~.. C - .. tP I C~~~~~w C D~~~~~C DI o0 0 l::r' Sp CD r C. 2-, CD st Q o 0 <D C0 -. I I Vou. No. 1. (Name.) Vou. No. 2. (.Name.) fi (Name.) CD CD You. No.3. Vou. No. 3. (.Name.) You. No. 4. (Name.) Vou. No. 5. (Name.) I -d O 2.~ CD n 2. 5o c~ G1 SP C5 Total. 21 cc, ~a -1 CZi R Q p e Q a You. No. 1. (Name.) Vou. No. 2. (Namne.) Vou. No. 3. (Name.) I (Name.) I cm E0 o Fd

Page  325 0 2. Rice. a, Sugar. 0 Tea. - Wine. 10 Brandy: . C. p &C 2ofe I ____________ II -s~o -4o4id~ liTpc~ ' l aW V E~l Llu 0 d~ I i z; v p tt <D 5 fp.I w 91 999.

Page  326 _ _ I WI Numnber. tD II Company. Coats. Jackets3. Overalls. Muskets. Knapsacks. &C. &C. i 0 0o 0 CDD CD CD CD~ CD CD o D6CD0 ,fmi a -umad( l13orpoX i I I I I I I I I -1 I I I I tt CD 5 IP I w El 998 SXOlilV'I.a-DEEU ([aSlAa'd

Page  327 No.of ward or kitchen. Bunks. Bed-sacks. Sheets. Blankets. Kettles. Spoons. Knives. Forks. &c. &c. c0 cs cz b R. it __ I Lost. Worn out. Destroyed by order. Returned to steward. Id: o &' ~:' T 0 tv 1p1t O 1 ;zm 2, 4 P 'suxjog'uom o( IvG0olPox '.t{dV aHJ uIOi I I I I I I I I I 4 Ki 0 w x 90 tv tD 0 p .1 w LZB

Page  328 FORM 9. Regisrer. NmsCo* l Naes. ~' Names. I, Complaint. C 0 co M M~ Q: 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ N.B.-Both Christian and sur-name will be registered. I I1

Page  329 FORM 10. Prescription Book, Diet Book, and Diet Table. Names. Sunday. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday. Saturday. 0 Qa tli CD 1.d s1 0 00 The spaces in the Prescription Book are to be filled up with the prescriptions at length, the times of administerng the medicines, and the quantities to be given at each time. The diet of the patients will be divided into full, half, and low, to be designated in the Diet Book by the letters F., H., and L.; and in order that the steward may have precise instructions for delivering the hospital stores, &c., the surgeon will, from time to time, insert in the Diet Book written directions of the quantity of each article in his storeroom, which he may think necessary to each degree of diet. To each ten patients, for example, on low diet, a certain quantity of tea, sugar, &c. To each ten on half diet, a certain quantity of rice, milk, &c. These proportions will soon become familiar to the steward, who his only to refer to the letters in the Diet Book to ascertain the whole quantity of any article to be delivered for the day, as well as the quantity for each ward. When any liquor is directed, or any other article not contained'2 these generalinstructions of the surgeon, the precise quantity directed for each patient will oe noted in the Diet Book. The Diet Tables are to be filled up daily from the Diet Book, and hung up in each wara of a general hospital. I I I I I 0 Pt 0 t'd 0 C* to

Page  330 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department.- Forms. FORM 11. METEOROLOGICA Station, Lat.,... Long. 186. ~B~ometer. Therm. atd. Thermometer. Hygrometer 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Monthly mean. .I I .I I I I I aso

Page  331 FOR THE ARMY. 831 Medical Department.-Forms. FORK 11. REGISTE R Alt. of Bar. above feet. Winds. Weather. Rain. I).F.. F 1) F.A...... an ed tt. i I 1. I I 831 ,FOR THE ARMY.

Page  332 832 REVISED REGULATIONS MKedical Department.-Forms. FORE 11.-(METEOROLOGIoAL SUMMARY OF WINDS AND WEATHER. N. N.E. E. B.E. S. S.W. W. N.W. z 94. z 94 z 94 z 94 z p z 94 z~~~~~~~~~~~~~~_. S O t 8 s s. s s~ ~,. . =. =. _ No. of dys No. of days No. of days No. of days VAIR. C | LOUDY. | of RAIN. | of SNOW. 832 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  333 Medical Department.-Forms. REGIsTER.)-Continued. REMARKS. This register is to be mailed to the Surgeon-General monthly without a letter of transmittal. All fractions are to be expressed in decimals carried out two points. The thermometer and hygrometer, if not connected, will be suspended side by side. One-third of the sum of the three daily observations will be registered as the daily mean. The direction (D.) and force (F.) of the winds will be expressed in accordance with existing regulations. The whole number of times any point of the compass is recorded during the month gives the "number of observations;" and that num)er divided by 3 gives the number of days from that point. The results thus obtained are to be recorded under "Summary of winds and weather." Observations on the weather will be recorded as lAIR or CLOUI)Y; and the number of fair and cloudy days during the month will be ascertained by dividing the sum total of each record by 3. The number of days on which it rains or snows will be noted separately. SUrGEON-GENERLAL'S OFFICE,, March, 1860. Surgeon U. S. Army. (ENDORSEMENT.) METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER FOR THE Month of, 18-. Transmitted by Surgeon U. S. Army. Rec'd S. G. Off3e,,18-. FOR THE ARMY. 333 Station: II

Page  334 FORM 12. Rol of Soldiers employed on extra duty as Cooks and NVurses in the Hospital i 186, by --, Surgeon. Term of service. By whose Rank or By ose Nature of No. Names. designation. P order I employed. I 0 Q 0$ 0 6 . I u 9 z I certify that the above is a correct roll of the enlisted men employed on extra duty, undo 186, and that the remarks opposite their names are accurate and just. Examined: , Commanding. I

Page  335 FOR THE ARMY. 835 Medical Department.-Forms. FORM 13. ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES. Coat of Arms. Certifieate of Disability for Discharge. (To be used, in duplicate, in all cases of discharge on account of disability.) A. B., of Captain -—'s company (-), of the - regiment of United States, was enlisted by -, of the - regiment of -, at on the - day of —, to serve -- years; he was born in, in the State of -- is years of age, feet- inches high;. - complexion, - eyes, - hair, and by occupation when enlisted. During the last two months said soldier has been unfit for duty - days. (The company commander will htere add a statement of all the facts known to him concerning the disease or wound, or cause of disability of the soldier; the time, place, manner, and all the circumstances under which the injury occurred, or disease originated or appeared; the duty, )r service, or situation of the soldier at the time the injury was received )r disease contracted, or supposed to be contracted; and whatever facts ,ay aid a judgment as to the cause, immediate or remote, of the disbility, and the circumstances attending it.) C. D., Commandin?g Company. When thefacts are not known to the company commander, the certifi.ate of any officer, or affidavit of other person having such knowledge, ill be appended. I CERTIFY that I have carefully examined the said - of Captain 's company, and find him incapable of performing the duties of a -ldier, because of [here describe particularly the disability, wound, or isease; the extent to which it deprives him of the use of any limb or culty, or affects his health, strength, activity, constitution, or capacity , labor or earn his subsistence. The surgeon will add, from his know dge of the facts and circumstances, and from the evidence in the case, ;s professional opinion of the cause or origin of the disability.] E. F., Suryeon. (Dupli c ates.) DISCHAaRGED this -- day of, 186, at Commandiny the Post. _OT? I.-When a probable case for pension, special care must be taken to state the -1ce of disability. sOT, 2.-The place where the soldier desires to be addressed may be here added. Towrs- County- State FOR TEHE ARMY. 835

Page  336 FORM 14. Record of Recruits examined by, at WHIERN BORN. Town or State or county. kingdom. = — -- - I i I I Date. Name. By whor Age. . Profession. I I | I"! lI lIl l'',

Page  337 FORM 15. Report of the Sick and Wounded at,for the quarter ending, 186 TAKEN SICK OR RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DURING THE QUARTERL. Total by each Total by each Classes of Diseases. pS *S A 4) 0)c v 1 #~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4 )~4 Febris Congestiva................. Febris Continua Communis..... Febris Intermittens Quotidiana Febris Intermittens Tertiana... Febris Intermittens Quartana.. Febris Remittens.................. Febris Typhoides................. Febris Typhus..................... Febris Typhus Icterodes........ All other diseases of this class. Erysipelas.......................... Rubeola............................. Scarlatina........................... Variola.............................. Varioloides.......................... All other diseases of this ciass. Carry forward........ I li .i O> I 1 94 .6 a) 4 Q !5 4) 94 .i Cs u .6 A,4 <L> p 4,'A w u li A's p Specific Diseases. m ID 0 r_ t:i (D 10 8 i 19 ts r, a 19 lp t4 m p Fevers.......... i.. Eruptive Fevers - r. 4

Page  338 FORM 15.-Continued. TAKEN SICK OR RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DU Month.............. First. Second. Classes of Diseases. Specific Diseases. vn n Q ~ v Brought forward......... Cholera Asiatica.................. Cholera Morbus.................... Colica................................. Constipatio.......................... Diarrhoea Acuta................... Diarrhoea Chronica............... Dysenteria Acuta.................. Dysenteria Chronica............. Dyspepsia........................... Enteritis............................. Gastritis........... HEematemesis....................... Hepatitis Acuta.................... Hepatitis Chronica............... Icterus............................... Parotitis............................. Peritonitis........................... Splenitis............................. Tonsilitis............................ All other diseases of this class. Asthma.............................. Bronchitis Acuta.................. Bronchitis Chronica.............. N IV 'I. TA I I Diseases of the organs con nected with the digestive system. I

Page  339 OR TH ABMY. 839 Medical Department.-Forms. 0~ ~ ~ 0 4). 4). 4 0: 0 - 4 ). 4 4) ). 4) PI 4) I FOR TH,B ARMY. 339 4) 1. 10 m: 0, - 4. ': C, 0.: . d:z: 0) o o: ..;g d d;. C) W ..0;I - 94

Page  340 FORM 15.-Continued. TAKEN SICK OR RECEIVED INTO HOSPITAL DURK Month............... First. Second. T] Classes of Diseases. Specific Diseases. c3 ~ d = . Brought forward............. Bubo Syphiliticum.................... Calculus................................. Cystitis................................... Diabetes.................................. Enuresis................................. Gonorrhoea.............................. Ischuria et Dysuria................... Nephritis................................ Orchitis............................ Sarcocele................................ Strictura Urethr..................... Syphilis Primitiva.................... Syphilis Consecutiva.................. Ulcus Penis non Syphiliticum...... All other diseases of this class..... Anasarca................................ Ascites.................................... Hydrarthrus........................... Hydrocele.............................. Hydrothorax............................ All other diseases of this class..... Lumbago............................... Podagra................................ Rheumatismus Acutus............... Rheumatismus Chronicus........... All other diseases of this class..... IV Diseases of the urinary and genital organs, and venereal affections....... Diseases of the serous exha lent vessels..... Diseases of the fibrous and muscular structures.... r i t1 f l lIl

Page  341 FOR THE ARMY.34 Medical Department.-Forms. :: 4) . *. 4) 4) .4) .4) 0~~~ I-D::~ ~ .Z~~~~~~. -4 0 4 P" U, P,4 z 0: 4) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~4: 4 4): 1)2 341

Page  342 342 ~REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Departmenlt.-Forms. 4) P, E-4) OQ o 0 b.- 0............ 04~~~~~~~ 4. 4) ~~~~~~~~~4): 342 -STIJ130(i :A L) rA ;4 ;4 0 um Az w A 00 Iz d, d p0 4) P. rn

Page  343 FORM] 15.-Continued general Summary. Ratio per 1000 of mean strength. Cases. Deaths. Mean strength. Remaining last report. Deaths. EMn i s ted Months. Officers. med Total. men. P. r 0 25 s0 0 43 cQ o 4) - ho - Q -. Ratio per qr. DIRECTIONS.-In regard to this Report, the utmost punctuality and exactness will be required, and its nomenclature will be strictly observed. It will be accompanied with a general Sanitary Report, to be written on alternate pages of foolscap paper,with a margin of one inch on the left side of each page, and to be folded in four equal folds; in which the medical officer will furnish information respecting all those agencies which may have influenced the sickness and mortality of the troops-such as the medical topography of the station; the climate; prevalent diseases in the vicinity; the duty and employment of the troops; the nature of their barrack and hospital accommodations; diet, water, clothing, and general habits of the men as to cleanliness, temperance, &c. Cases of unusual interest will be reported in detail. Diseases of women and children, if given, must be reported separately. No duplicate of this report is required. In consolidated and other monthly reports of sick and wounded, the general arrangement and the nomenclature of this form will be followed. co I I Remaining. Number 04 41. 1. 14 :z C, 4) bo ;z 2 4,0 E —i m 0 t:l (D 1.Id 19 Im 0 r, 0 0 .5 P. 0 4) bz 0 0 m t?d ptt 0 4) Q d 0 0 u -i bo I p ID a) w p -4 't 0 E-4 m .2 m Total...

Page  344 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. Forms. FORM 15.-Continued. Discharges on Surgeon's Certificate and Deaths. Name. ~~~~~~~Name. ai, Date of I 0 ~~~~~~~~~~discharge Date of Christian Rank. Regiment. p Disease. from at Christiame. nam from death. Surnmsname. v h ia0 service. name. . ~ ~~~~~ - I IL REMARKS. NoTES.-Disoharges on Surgeon's certificate, and deaths occurring among those of the command not on sick report, will also be reported, but separated from the others by a double line drawn across the page. The remarks will in each case specify the manner in which the disease originated, when it is known. In every case of the death of an officer, whether on duty or not, a special report is to be made to the Surgeon-General. 344

Page  345 FOIL THE ARMY. 345 Medical Depaltment. Forms. FORE 15.-Continued. (Endor8ement.) REPORT OF SICK AND WOUNDED FOR THE Quarter ending, 186. Station: SURGEON U. S. ARMY. COMMAND. REGIMENTS. FOR THE ARMIY. 845 COMPANIBs.

Page  346 FORM 16. Morning Report of the Surgeon of a Regiment, Post, or Remaining Tt at last report. * Date. Company. e 0:z ) _~.~,.q,4.6 o -d .-, ~.,.. blO bJ.- Oa - - ~~~ - - -. i I I l

Page  347 FORM 17. Return of the Medical Officers of the Regular Army Volunteer Coros, and Mill contract, serving in the Department of,for the mon, Number. Names. Rank. Post or station. With NOTE.-The names will be arranged in the following order: 1st. Medical Officers of Corps and Militia; 3d. Private Physicians. In the column of "Remarks" will be noted and Private Physicians, whether on duty or on leave of absence; giving the number authorizing such change, the time of the departure of the officers from their posts, and i post, its position must be indicated by reference to some known point, as miles The remarks opposite the names of Private Physicians will state, in addition to the abov contract, the date thereof, the monthly compensation, and the date of their discharge fr( The Medical Directors wil require from the Medical Officers and Private Physicia reports to enable them to make out and transmit this Return to the Surgeon-General.

Page  348 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. Forms. FORM 18. Contract with a Private Physician. This contract, entered into this - day of, 18-, at, State of, between, of the United States Army, and Dr., of,in the State of, witnesseth, that for the consideration hereafter mentioned, the said Dr. promises and agrees to perform the duties of a medical officer, agreeably to the Army Regulations, at (and to furnish the necessary medicines) And the said promises and agrees, on behalf of the United States, to pay, or cause to be paid, to the said Dr. the sum of dollars for each and every month he shall continue to perform the services above stated, which shall be his full compensation, and in lieu of all allowances and emoluments whatsoever (except that for medicines furnished, which shall be at the rate of - per cent. on his monthly pay, to be determined by the Surgeon-General). This contract to continue till determined by the said doctor, or the commanding officer for the time being, or the Surgeon-General. [SEAL.] Signed, sealed, and delivered ) in presence of I [SEAL.1 I certify that the number of persons entitled to medical attendance, agreeably to regulations, at, is —, and that no competent physician can be obtained at a lower rate. , Cotnmmanding Oficer. 31.9 q

Page  349 FOR THE ARMY. 849 Medical Department. Forms. FORM 19. 4 Monthly Statement of the Hospital Fund at -, for the inonth of —, 186. DR. To balance due hospital last month......................................... 1532 rations, being whole amount due this month, at 9~ cents per ration.................................................................. ISSUED. Cn. By the following provisions, at contract prices: 283~ lbs. of pork, at 6 cents per pound.................. 690 lbs. of fresh beef, at 4 cents per pound.......... 16126 lbs. of flour, at 2 cents per pound.................. 10 lbs. of hard bread, at 3~ cents per pound........ 70 lbs. of rice, at 6 cents per pound................... 56 lbs. of coffee, at 9 cents per pound................. 19311 lbs. of sugar, at 8 cents per pound................. 171 quarts of vinegar, at 5 cents per quart........... 15$ lbs. of candles, at 12 cents per pound............ 61~ lbs. of soap, at 6 cents per pound.................. I6i quarts of salt, at 3 cents per quart............... 12 gallons of molasses, at 28 cents per gallon...... 01 60 24~ 35 20 04 51 851 67~ 501 36 18i PURCHASED. pairs of chickens, at 87~ cents per pair $1 75 quarts of milk, at 7 cents per quart.......... 28 dozen oranges, at 25 cents per dozen......... 75 Total expended..................................... Balance due this month...................................... Sr, qeon U. 8. Army. [Date.] (No letter of transmittal required.) I I FOR THE ARMY. 349 $0 145 00 64 $17 27 32 5 15 I 3 3 112 2 4 3 2 78 ............ 114 96f 80 57i 2B

Page  350 REVISED REGULATIONS Medical Department. Forms. FORKM 20. Form of a Mledical Certificate. of the regiment of, having applied for a certificate on which to ground an application for leave of absence, I do hereby certify that I have carefully examined this officer, and find that -.. [IIere the nature of the disease, wound, or disability, is to be fully stated, and the period during which the officer has suffered under its effects.] And that, in consequence thereof, he is, in my opinion, unfit for duty. I further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties in a less period than. [Here state candidly and explicitly the opinion as to the period which will probably elapse before the officer will be able to resume his duties. When there is no reason to expect a recovery, or when the prospect of recovery is distant and uncer. tain, it must be so stated.] Dated at,this day of Signature of the } Medical Officer. --- 350

Page  351 -~~~~~O TH RY 5 Pay Department. ARTICLE XLV. PAY DEPARTMENT. 1338. The troops will be paid in such manner that the arrears shall at no time exceed two months, unless the circumstances of the case render it unavoidable, which the paymaster charged with the payment shall promptly report to the Paymaster-General. 1339. The Paymaster-General shall take care, by timely remittances, that the paymasters have the necessary funds to pay the troops, and shall notify the remittances to the paymasters and commanding officers of the respective pay districts. 1340. The payments, except to officers and discharged soldiers, shall be made on muster and pay rolls; those of companies and detachments, signed by the company or detachment commander; of the hospital, signed by the surgeon; and all muster and pay rolls, signed by the mustering and inspecting officer. 1341. When a company is paraded for payment, the officer in command of it shall attend at the pay-table. 1342. When a receipt on a pay-roll or account is not signed by the hand of the party, the payment must be witnessed. The witness to be a commissioned officer when practicable. 1343. Officers are paid on certified accounts, as in Form 3; discharged soldiers, on accounts according to Form 5, and certificates, Form 4. An officer retiring from service must make affidavit to his pay account, and to the certificate annexed to it, and state his place of residence, and the date when his resignation or removal takes effect. Pay accounts of post chaplains are to be certified by the commanding officer of the post. 1344. When an officer is dismissed from the service, he shall not be entitled to pay beyond the day on which the order announcing his dismissal is received at the post where he may be stationed, unless a particular day beyond the time is mentioned in the order. 1345. No officer shall receive pay for two staff appointments for the same time. 1346. Officers are entitled to pay from the date of the acceptance of their appointments, and from the date of promotion. 1347. No account of a restored officer for time he was out of service can be paid, without order of the War Department. 1348. As far as practicable, officers are to draw their pay from the paymaster of the district where they may be on duty. 1349. No officer shall pass away or transfer his pay account not actually due at the time; and when an offcer transfers his pay account, he shall I FOR TIIE ARMY. 351

Page  352 352 REVISED REGULATIONS Pay Department. report the fact to the Paymaster-General, and to the paymaster expected to pay it. 1350. No person in the military service, while in arrears to the United States, shall draw pay. When the Secretary of War shall find by report of the Comptroller of the Treasury, or otherwise, that an officer of the army is in arrears to the United States, the Paymaster-General shall be directed to stop his pay to the amount of such arrears, by giving notice thereof to the paymasters of the army, and to the officer, who may pay over the amount to any paymaster. And no paymaster shall make to him any payment on account of pay until he exhibits evidence of having refunded the amount of the arrears, or that his pay accrued and stopped is equal to it, or until the stoppage is removed by the Paymaster-General. 1351. Officers having brevet commissions are entitled to their brevet pay and emoluments when on duty and having a command according to their brevet rank, and at no other time. (Act April 16, 1818.) 1352. Officers are on duty and have a command according to their brevet rank only when assigned to their brevet rank by the President with the appropriate actual command composed of different corps, or when serving on detachments composed of different corps, with such appropriate command. But in the regiment, troop, or company to which officers belong, they do duty and draw pay according to the commissions by which they are mustered in their own corps. 1353. The following are the appropriate commands to each grade: 1. For a captain, at least a company. 2. For a major, at least 2 companies. 3. For a lieutenant-colonel, at least 4 companies. 4. For a colonel, at least 1 regiment, or 10 companies. 5. For a brigadier-general, 2 regiments, or 20 companies. 6. For a major-general, 4 regiments, or 40 companies. 7. For a lieutenant-general, 8 regiments, or 80 companies. 1354. Officers charging brevet pay will state on their pay accounts the regiments and companies composing their commands. 1355. Double rations are allowed to the major-general commanding the army, and to every officer commanding in chief a separate army actually in the field; to the generals commanding the eastern and western geographical divisions; to the Quartermaster-General and the Adjutant-General; to the colonels or other officers commanding military geographical departments. 1356. Commanding officers of companies will not forfeit the allowances to which they are entitled by reason of such command when temporarily absent on duty, provided the absence is less than one month. 352 REVISED REGU'LA IIONS

Page  353 FOR 1HE ARMY. Pay Department. 1357. No officer or soldier shall receive pay or allowances for any time during which he was absent without leave, unless a satisfactory excuse for such absence be rendered to his commanding officer, evidence of which, in case of an officer, shall be annexed to his pay account. 1358. Every deserter shall forfeit all pay and allowances due at the time of desertion. Stoppages and fines shall be paid from his future earnings, if he is apprehended and continued in service and if they are adjudged by a court-martial; otherwise, from his arrears of pay. 1359. No deserter shall receive pay before trial, or till restored to duty without trial by the authority competent to order the trial. 1360. In case of a soldier's death, desertion, or discharge without pay, or the forfeiture of his pay by sentence of court-martial, the amount due the laundress and sutler will be noted on the muster-roll. 1361. The extra pay allowed to soldiers acting as cooks and nurses in hospitals will be paid by the Pay Department. Such extra services will be noted on the hospital muster-rolls, and for the sums thus expended, the Pay Department will be reimbursed by the Medical Department. 1362. When an improper payment has been made to any enlisted soldier, and disallowed in the settlement of the paymaster's accounts, the paymaster may report the fact to the commander of the company in which the soldier is mustered, who will note on the muster-rolls the amount to be stopped from the pay of the soldier, that it may be refunded to the paymaster in whose accounts the improper payment has been disallowed. 1363. Authorized stoppages to reimburse the United States, as for loss or damage to arms, equipments, or other public property; for extra issues of clothing; for the expense of apprehending deserters, or to reimburse individuals (as the paymaster, laundress, &c.); forfeitures for desertion, and fines by sentence of court-martial, will be entered on the roll and paid in the order stated. 1364. The paymaster will deduct from the pay of all enlisted men twelve and a half cents per month for the support of the "Soldiers' Home," and also the amount of the authorized stoppages entered on the muster-roll, descriptive list, or certificate of discharge. 1365. The additional pay of two dollars a month to a private soldier in virtue of a certificate of merit (Act March 3, 1847), commences at the date of the service for which the certificate is given, and continues while he remains a private soldier, if he has been continuously in service, or has a certificate of merit given for service in the war with Mexico (Act August 4, 1854.) 1366. Non-commissioned officers who were recommended by the com inm,ndin_z officer of their regiment for promotion by brevet for distinguished 2E2 353

Page  354 REVISED REGULATI-ONS Pay Department. service in the war with Mexico, and not promoted, receive two dollars a month additional pay, while in service as non-commissioned officers. (Act August 4, 1854.) 1367. The muster-rolls are to embrace all the data necessary to insure justice to the soldier, and to guide the paymaster in making his payments. Thus, when a man is entitled to the benefits of the 2d section of the Act of August 4, 1854, the following remark should be placed opposite his name: " $2 pr. mo. for 1st re-enlistment." If he be entitled to $1 additional for re-enlisting subsequent to its date,-the remark will then be, "$3 pr. mo. for 2d re-enlistment;" for a third re-enlistmnent, "$4 pr. mo. for 3d re-enlistment," &c. For soldiers coming under the provisions of the 3d and 4th sections of the act, note as follows: "$2 pr. mo. for cert. merit;" "$2 pr. mo. for 1St re-enlistment, $2 for cert. merit," &c., according to the facts of the case 1368. The retained pay is due to a discharged soldier unless forfeited by sentence of a court-martial, or as provided in paragraph 1340. 1369. The traveling pay is due to a discharged officer or soldier unless forfeited by sentence of a court-martial, or as provided in paragraph 1340, or the discharge is by way of punishment for an offense. 1370. In reckoning the traveling allowance to discharged officers or soldiers, the distance is to be estimated by the shortest mail route; if there is no mail route, by the shortest practicable route. Rations of soldiers, if not drawn in kind, are estimated at the contract price at the place of discharge. The price of the ration shall be stated on the certificate. 1371. Every enlisted man discharged as a minor, or for other cause involving fraud on his part in the enlistment, or discharged by the civil authority, shall forfeit all pay and allowances due at the time of the dis. charge, and shall not receive any final statements. 1372. Paymasters or other officers to whom a discharged soldier may apply, shall transmit to the Paymaster-General, with their remarks, any evidence the soldier may furnish relating to his not having received or having lost his certificates of pay due. The Paymaster-General will transmit the evidence to the Second Comptroller for the settlement of the account. 1373. No paymaster or other officer shall be interested in the purchase of any soldier's certificate of pay due, or other claim against the United States. 1374. The Paymaster-General will report to the Adjutant-General any case of neglect of company officers to furnish the proper certificates to oldiers entitled to discharge. 1375. Whenever the garrison is withdrawn from any post at which a .154

Page  355 FO Til ARY 5 Pay Department. chaplain is authorized to be employed, his pay and emoluments shall cease on the last day of the month next ensuing after the withdrawal of the troops. The Paymaster-General will be duly informed from the Adjutant-Gcneral's office whenever the appointment and pay of the post chaplain will cease under this regulation. 1376. Funds turned over to other paymasters, or refunded to the Trea. sury, are to be entered in accounts current, but not in the abstracts of payments. 1377. Whenever money is refunded to the Treasury, the name of the person refunding, and the purpose for which it is done, should be statec,l in order that the officers of that Department may give the proper credits. 1378. When an officer of the army receives a temporary appointment from the proper authority to a grade in the militia then in actual service of the United States higher in rank than that held by him in the army, he shall be entitled to the pay and emoluments of the grade in which he serves. But in no case can an officer receive the compensation of two military commissions or appointments at the same time. 1379. Whenever the Paymaster-General shall discover that an officer has drawn pay twice for the same time, he shall report it to the Adjutant General. 1380. The Paymaster-General shall transmit to the Second Auditor, in the month of May, a statement exhibiting the total amount during the year up to the 31st December preceding, of stoppages against officers and soldiers on account of ordnance and ordnance stores, that the amount may be refunded to the proper appropriations. These stoppages will be regulated by the tables of cost published by the chief of the Ordnance Department, and shall have precedence of all other claims on the pay of officers or soldiers 1381. The following returns are to be transmitted to the Paymaster General after each payment: 1st. Estimate for succeeding months (Form 1). 2d. Abstracts of payments (Form 6), accompanied by the vouchers — 3d. General account current (Form 7). 4th. Monthly statement of funds, disbursements, &c. (Form 9). 1382. The accounts and vouchers for the expenditures to the regular army must be kept separate and distinct from those to volunteers and militia. 1383. Pay-roll of militia will be according to Form 8, the certificate at the foot to be signed by all the company officers present. 1384. No militia or volunteers shall be paid till regularly mustered into service, as provided in the General Regulations.* + But see chap. 16, July 24, 18()1, vol. xii. p. 274. FOR THE ARMY. 355

Page  356 856 REVISED REGULATIONS~~~~~~~~_ - Pay Department. 1385. In order to afford enlisted men of the army a secure deposit for the amounts from their pay, and to relieve the muster and pay rolls from accumulated credits of pay, the following provisions are made: 1. All enlisted men present with their companies or detachments at the time of payment shall hereafter sign the receipt for their monthly pay. 2. Soldiers may deposit with the paymaster any portion of their pay, not less than $5 at one time, provided that no amount so deposited shall be withdrawn until the expiration of the soldier's enlistment. 8. At the time of first deposit, a check-book will be given to the soldier, and a certificate of every deposit made, signed by the paymaster and company commander, shall be entered therein at the time of making the same. 4..The company commander shall keep an account of every deposit made by a soldier on the company book, and shall transmit to the Paymnaster-General, after each payment, a list of the depositors and the amounts deposited by them respectively.' b. In case of the transfer of a soldier, his descriptive roll shall exhibit the several amounts deposited by him. 6. On the discharge of a soldier, the amount of his deposits shall be entered on his final statements, and paid on settlement of the same. 7. On the death of a soldier, his deposits shall be accounted for in the inventory of his effects and on the accompanying final state ments. 8. The money deposited by any soldier shall not be liable to forfeit ure by sentence of court-martial. 9. Paymasters will receive the deposits of the soldiers in their respective districts, credit the same in their accounts current, and furnish a list of the depositors, with the several sums deposited by each, to accompany their accounts and vouchers of disburse ments. The sums thus received by the paymasters may be again used by them in the payment of troops. 10. The Paymaster-General shall keep in his office such record as may be necessary to show the deposits made by the enlisted men of each company. 1386. Paymasters will afford Sutlers every facility in the collection of the amounts due them in accordance with regulations 217 and 218. 1387. Officers absent from their appropriate duties, either with or without leave, for six months, will thereby forfeit all the emoluments and allowances to which thev would otherwise be entitled. 356 REVISED REGUL.A.TIONS

Page  357

Page  358 TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &c. OF THIE U.S. ARMY. Subsist Pay. Subst Forage. ence. 0 Al - 4 GRADE.0.... m - 0 x A ~ i 0 i. 4. 4) 4. o ~ ~ ~ 4) 0 0 64 z~ z~ LieuteDant-General...................................................................................... Major General............................................................................................. Senior Aide-de-Camp to General-in-Chief........................................................ Aide de-Camp, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieutenant......................................... Brigadier-General....................................................................................... Aide-de-Camp to Brigadier, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieutenant*..................... Adjutant-General....................................................................................... Assistant Adjutant-General, with the rank of Colonel....................................... Assistant Adjutant-General, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel........................ Assistant Adjutant-General, with the rank of Major......................................... Assistant Adjutant-General, with the rank of Captain....................................... Judge Advocate.......................................................................................... Inspector-General....................................................................................... Assistant Inspector-General, with the rank of Major......................................... Signal Officer, with the rank of Major............................................................ Quartermaster-General................................................................................. Assistant Quartermaster-General................................................................... Deputy Quartermaster-General...................................................................... Quartermaster.......................................................................................... 604 43 Assistant Quartermaster............................................................................... P'tymaster-G-neral, $2740 per annum. Deputy 1'ayL.ster-General.................................................... C* 00 t4 t'd bd , -d CD L —i P. t4 m $270 220 80 24 124 20 124 110 95 80 70 80 110 80 80 124 110 80 70 95 50 a mo. 7 4 2 5 5 4 4 3 4 6 1 4 4 6 6 4 4 3 4 forage. 3 3 1 3 1 3 3 8 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 - a 4 4 2 ..i ..i 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 40 16 4 ... y ...i 6 6 4 4 4 6 4 4 12 . 6 6 4 4 5 IP 14 t:l CD S. 19 CD ts 2

Page  359 Paymaster................................................................................................ Commissary-General of Subsistence.............................................................. Assistant Commissary-General of Subsistence.................................................. Commissary of Subsistence, with the rank of Major.......................................... Commissary of Subsistence, with the rank of Captain....................................... Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieutenant*........ Surgeon-General, $2740 per annum. Surgeon of ten years' service in that grade...................................................... Surgeon, less than ten years' service.............................................................. Assistant Surgeon of ten years' service........................................................... Assistant Surgeon of five years' service........................................................... Assistant Surgeon, less than five years' service................................................ MILITARY ACADEMY. Superintendent, not less than the Professor of Natural and Experimental Philo sophy. The Commander of Corps of Cadets, not less than the Professor of Ma thematics. Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy, $2240 per annum. Assistant Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy............................. Professor of Mathematics, $2240 per annum. Assistant Professor of Mathematics...............................................................7 04 31 Professor of Engineering, $2240 per annum. Assistant Professor of Engineering, and Instructor of Practical Engineering, each...................................................................................................... Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology, $2240 per annum. Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology, and Assistant Pro fessor of Ethics, each............................................................................... Chaplain and Professor of Ethics, $2240 per annum. Professor of French, and Professor of Drawing, each $2240 per annum. Assistant Professor of French, and Assistant Professor of Drawing, each.............. Professor of Spanish, $2240 per annum. Instructor of Cavalry and Artillery Tactics...................................................... Adjutant of the Military Academy.................................................................. Master of the Sword, $1500 per annum. Teacher of Music....................................................................................... Cadet........................................................................................................ I 11 80 oo 110 00 96 00 80 00 70 00 20 00 80 00 80 00 70 00 70 00 63 33i 4 6 6 4 4 ...... 8 4 8 4 4 4 6 4 4 8 ...... 4 4 3 8 2 8 8 8 8 1 ...... 3 3 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 IV 0 H t4 4 I'd 14 t:f CD .11.Id 19 CD ts 70 00 70 00 4 4 8 3 1 1 1 1 70 00 4 8 I 1 70 00 4 8 I 70 00 70 00 63 33i 60 00 30 00 4 4 4 8 8 2 1 I I 1 1 2 co WI ...... ..... ...... ..... ...... ......

Page  360 TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &, GRADZ. ENGINEERS AND TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEEIS. Colonel.................................................................................... Lieutenant-Colonel.............................................................. Major....................................................................................................... Captain. Cnaptain..................................................................................................... Lieutenants, 1st and 2d, and Brevet 2d........................................................... Enlisted men, same as Sappers and Miners. ORDNANCE. Chief of Orlnance....................................................................................... Colonel.................................................................................................... Lieutenant-Colonel..................................................................................... Major....................................................................................................... Captain..................................................................................................... Lieutenants, 1st and 2d, and Brevet 2d........................................................... Master Armorer, Master Carriage-Maker, or Master Blacksmith......................... Armorer, Carriage-Maker, or Blacksmith........................................................ Artificer................................................................................................... Laborer.................................................................................................. I I I

Page  361 cAVALRY. Colonel..................................................................................................... iLieutenant-Colonel................................................................................... 'Major.....................................................e Captain..................................................................................................... Lieutenants, 1st and 2d, and Brevet 2d....................................................... Adjutant, in addition to pay, &c., ofLieutenant............................................. Regimental Quartermaster, " " ".............................................. Sergeant-Major.......................................................................................... Quartermaster-Sergeant................................................................................ Chief Bugler.............................................................................................. First Sergeant............................................................................................ Sergeant and Saddle Sergeant, Veterinary Sergeant, and Company Quartermaster Sergeant................................................................................................. Corporal........................................... Bugler....................................................................................................... Farrier and Blacksmith............................................................................... Private.................................................................................................... ARTILLERY AND INFANTRY. Colonel...................................................................................................... Lieutenant-Colonel...................................................................................... MIa j or........................................................................................................ Adjutant, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieutenant............................................ Regimental Quartermaster, in addition to pay, &c., of Lieutenant..................... Captain...................................................................................................... First Lieutenant.......................................................................................... Second Lieutenant...................................................................................... Sergeant-Major.......................................................................................... Quartermaster-Sergeant............................................................................... Principal Musician of Infantry..................................................................... First Sergeant................................ Ordnance Sergeant, in addition to pay of Sergeant........................................... Sergeant, and Company Quartermaster-Serge ant.............................................. Corporal.................................................................................................. I $1 I II!

Page  362 TABLE OF PAY, SUBSISTENCE, FORAGE, &o.,-Continued., Subsist ence. C e c3 . 6 I a H $4 4.o ci ...... ...... 'i 4 . s aw - -.. ,; 0 - i GADIL C) o. 00 tv' H o it A ,6Ho O SZ Artificer of Artillery.................................................................................... Private..................................................................................................... Musician................................................................................................... SAPPERS, MINERS, AND PONTONIERS. Sergeant.................................................................................................. Corporal.................................................................................................. Private of the 1st class................................................................................ Private of the 2d class................................................. 1. Musician.......................................................................................... MILITARY STOREREEPERS, &C. Military Store-keepers attached to the Quartermaster's Department; at armories, and at arsenals of construction; the store-keeper at Watertown arsenal, and s+,ore keepers of ordnance serving in Oregon, California, and New Mexico, $1490 per annum. At all other arsenals, $1040 per annum. Post Chaplain, to be determined by the Council of Administration, not to exceed... Medical Cadet........................................................................................... Hospital Steward, appointed by the Secretary of War, and at posts of more than four companies, pay of Ordnance Sergeant................................................... Other Hospital Stewards............................................................................. I i i i I I i I I i i i I I (M Pay. Forage. .-4 . 9 0 t; P4 $15 00 13 00 12 00 tt t-I I I rA m tt L!d "O ci .0 0 !A m old p 14 u CD Id 9 -.6 III ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 34 00 20 00 17 00 13 00 12'00 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... I 60,00 30 00 22 00 20 00 4 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......

Page  363 Matron.................................................................................................... Female Nurses, 40 cents per day and one ration. Master Wagoners (by Act 3d August, 1861).................................................... Wagoners (by Act 3d August, 1861).............................................................. BANDS. Leader............................................................................ One-fourth of the Musicians.......................................................................... One-fourth of " ".......................................................................... One-half of " ".......................................................................... Drum-Major.............................................................................. The commanding officer of a company is entitled to $10 per month for responsi bility of arms and clothing. 0 Officers' subsistence is commuted at thirty cents per ration; forage, $8 per month for each horse actually owned and kept in service. Officers are entitled to the pay of private soldier, $2 50 per month, clothing, and one ration per day for each private servant actually employed. Every commissioned officer below the rank of Brigadier-General is entitled to one additional ration per day for every five years' service. Two dollars per month is to be retained from the pay of each private soldier until the expiration of his term of enlistment, and 12~ cents per month from all en listed men, for the support of the " Soldier's Home." All enlisted men are entitled to $2 per month additional pay for re-enlisting, and $1 per month for each subsequent period of five years' service, provided they re-enlist within one month. Paymaster's clerks, $700 per annum, and 75 cents per day when actually on duty. The Adjutants, Quartermasters, and Commissaries of Battalions will receive the emoluments now provided by law for Regimental Adjutants. * Entitled to only three rations per day as Lieutenant. NoTE.-Chaplains, $40 per month and 4 rations. Upon the recommendation of the Council of A 'Chaplains $20 per month in addition. Chaplains in volunteers, by Act of July, 1861, are paid as Cal For Army Pay List, see Appendix, pages 524-526. $6 17 14 45 34 20 17 17 4p,

Page  364 1 60 1 78 2 00 2 16 2 40 2 60 12 80 3 03 31 20 3 46 3 60 3 90 4 00 4 33 4 40 4 76 4 80 5 20 5 2 0 5 63 5 60 6 06 6 00 6 50 6 40 6 93 6 80 7 36 7 20 7 80 7 60 8 23 8 00 8 66 8 40 9 10 8 80 9 53 9 20 9 96 9 60 10 40 10 00 10 83 10 40 11 26 10 80 11 70 11 20 12 13 11 60 12 56 X 01 18 O I0 I I IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. 'X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. XXI. XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV. XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII. XXIX. XXX. 93 1:!16 1- 40 1 63 1 86 2 10 2 33 2 56 2 80 3 03 3 26 3 50 3 73 3 96 4 20 4 43 4 66 4 90 5 13 5 36 5 60 5 83 6 06 6 30 6 53 6 76 7 00 97 1 22 1 46 1 71 1 95 2 19 2 44 2 68 2 93 317 3 42 3 66 3 90 415 4 39 4 64 4 88 5 13 5 37 561 5 86 6 10 6 35 6 59 6 84 7 08 7 33 i V1 33 -1 60 1 86 2 13l 2 40 2 66 2 93 3 20 -3 46 3 73 4 00 4 26 4 53 4 80 5 06 5 33 5 60 5 86 6 13 6 40 6 66 6 93 7 20 7 46 7 73 8 00 ~V 1 20 I 50 1 80 2 10 2 40 2 70 3 00 3 30 3 60 3 90 4 20 4 50 4 80 5 l' 5 40 5 70 6 00 6 30 6 60 6 90 7 20 7 50 7 80 8 10 8 40 8 70 9 00 1 33 1 66 2 00 2 33 2 66 3 00 3 33 3 66 4 00 4 33 4 66 5 00 5 33 5666 6 00 6 33 6 66 7 00 7 33 7 66 8 00 8 33 8 66 9 00 9 33 9 66 lo 00 1 46 1 83 2 20 2 56 2 93 3 30 3 66 4 03 4 40 4 76 5 13 5 50 5 86 6 23 6 60 6 96 7 33 7 70 8 06 8 43 8 80 9 ]6 9 53 9 90 10 26 10 63 11 00 66 83 100 116 133 160 1 66 1 83 2 00 2 16 2 33 2 50 2 66 2 83 3 00 3 16 3 33 3 60 3 66 3 83 4 00 4 16 4 33 4 50 4 66 4 88 5 00 80 1 00 1 20 1 40 1 60 1 80 2 00 2 20 2 40 2 60 2 80 3 00 3 20 3 40 3 60 3 80 4 00 4 20 4 40 4 60 4 80 5 00 5 20 5 40 6 60 5 80 6 00 88 11 1 33 155 177 199 22 244 266 288 310 33 355 377 399 421 44 466 488 510 522 55 577 699 621 643 66

Page  365 3 33 4 44 555 6 66 7 77 8 88 9 99 11 11 1 2 22 13 33 14 44 15 55 1 6 66 17 77 18 88 19 99 21 11 22 22 23 83 24 44 25 65 26 66 27 77 28 88 29 99 31 11 32 22 33 33 2( (if 3 55 4 44 5 33 6 22 7 10 7 99 8 88 9 77 10 66 11 55 12 44 13 33 14 21 15 10 15 99 16 88 17 77 I8 66 19 55 20 43 21 32 22 21 23 10 23 99 24 88 26 77 26 66 6 00 6 66 8 33 10 00 11 66 13 33 15 00 16 66 18 33 20 00 21 66 23 33 25 00 26 66 28 33 30 00 31 66 33 33 35 00 86 66 38 33 40 00 41 66 43 33 46 00 46 66 48 33 60 00 16 O0 20 60 23 60 25 60 26 66 30 60 33 83 40 60 50 60 60 60 75 0 2F2 33 416 O00 583 66 750 833 916 10 00 83 66 2 50 3 33 14 16 5 00 5 83 6 66 7 50 8 33 19 16 20 00 20 83 21 66 22 50 23 33 24 16 25 00 3 00 4 00 6 00 6 00 7 00 8 00 9 00 10 00 11 00 12 00 13 00 14 00 16 00 16 00 17 00 18 00 19 00 20 00 21 00 22 00 23 00 24 00 25 00 26 00 27 00 28 00 29 00 30 00 4 00 5 33 6 66 8 00 9 33 10 66 12 00 13 33 14 66 16 00 17 33 18 66 20 00 21 33 22 66 24 O0 25 38 26 66 28 00 29 33 30 66 32 00 33 33 34 66 36 00 37 33 38 66 40 00 6 00 8 00 10 00 12 00 14 00 .16 00 18 00 20 00 22'00 24 00 26 00 28 00 80 00 32 00 34 00 36 00 :8 00 40 00 42 00 44 00 46 00 48 00 50 00 02 00 64 00 56 00 68 00 60 00 760 10 00 12 0 15 00 17 50 20 00 22 50 25 00 27 60 80 00 32 60 35 00 37 50 40 00 42 50 45 00 47 60 50 00 62 60 65 00 67 50 60 00 62 60 65 00 67 50 70 00 72 50 75 0~ 2 13 2 66 3 20 3 73 4 26 4 80 5 33 6 86 6 40 6 93 7 46 8 00 8 53 9 06 9 60 10 13 10 66 11 20 11 73 12 26 12 80 13 33 13 86 14 40 14 93 15 46 16 00 11 uv 2 66 3 33 4 00 4 66 5 33 6 00 6 66 7 33 8 00 8 66 9 33 10 00 10 66 11 33 12 00 12 66 13 33 14 00 14 66 15 33 16 00 16 66 17 33 18 00 18 66 19 33 20 00 306 3 83 460 586 6 13 690 7 66 8 43 920 9 96 1073 11 60 12 26 13 03 13 80 14 56 16 33 6 10 16 86 17 63 18 40 9 16 19 93 20 70 21 46 22 23 23 00

Page  366 PORMK 1.-(ESTIMATE roR FUNDS.) Estimate of Funds repired for the pay, subsistence, forte, and clothing of the troops of the Uited Sate* of whih is Paymaster, from the 1st of, 18-, to the 1st of, 18-, two months, founded on the actual number of said troops. Clothing for officers' ser Pay. Subsistence. Forage. Description and enumeration Commence-E-piration. Amount. Expi~~~~~~~~~~~~~ranti,oon.y of troops. ment. * o in lieu thereof. Dolls. Cts. Dolls. Cts. Dolls. Cts. D olls. Cts. Dolls. Cts. Dead and discharged men.... Casual payments................ ! i ~ Arrears due prior to com r ~ ~. mencement of this esti mate......................... Aggregate amount. Deduct balance on hand....... Amount required................ I certify that the above estimate is founded on the best data, as to the actual number of troops, to be obtained. ... -. Paymaster U. S. A. co ~ tt q) ci L-q: CD cq am 9 F t VI I

Page  367 FORK 2, Receipts to be rendered by Paymasters for remitt Received of, this day of - 18-, at, in the Stat day of --, 18-, the sum of dollars and cents, on accoun United States, as follows: Pay.............. Subsistence................................................ Forage....................................................... Clothing..................................................... Amour For which amount I am accountable (Signed triplicates.) NoT].-One receipt for the Paymaster-General, one for the Second Auditor, and one i

Page  368 FORM 3.-(OFFICERS' PAY ACCOUNT.) The United States to Commencement and Term of service expiration. charged. On what account. From - To - Months- Days. PAY For myself.............................................. For private servant, not soldier.................... FORAGE For horse................................................. CLOTHING For private servant, not soldier.................. a4 .2. o o 6 It 0 r. C; z ~~ h or whe PI O le z~ SUBSISTENCE For myself for years' service............... For private servant, not soldier................... I I I S. -g 0.2 e .3 o o

Page  369 I hereby certify that the foregoing account is accurate and just; that I have not been absent without leave during any part of the time charged for; that I have not received pay, nor drawn rations, forage, or clothing in kind, or received money in lieu of any part thereof, for any part of the time therein charged; that I actually owned and kept in service, the horses, and employed the private servants for which I charge, for the whole of the time charged; and that I did not, during the term so charged, or any part thereof, keep or employ a soldier as a waiter or servant; that the annexed is an accurate description of my servant; that, for the whole period charged for my staff appointment, I actually and legally held the appointment and did duty in the department; that I was the actual and only commanding officer at the doubleration post charged for; and that no officer, within my knowledge, has a right to claim, or does claim, for said services for any part of the period charged; that for the whole time brevet pay is claimed, I had the command stated; that I was actually in the command of a company for the whole time additional pay is charged; that I have not been in the performance of any staff duty for which I claim, or have received, extra compensation during the time an additional ration is charged for; that I have been in the United States Army as a commissioned officer for the number of years stated in the charge for extra rations; that I am not in arrears with the United States on any account whatsoever; and that the last payment I received was from Paymaster -, and to the day of, 18-. I at the same time acknowledge that I have received of -, Paymaster, this- day of, 18, the sum of --- dollars, being the amount in full of said account. DESCRIPTION OF SERVANTS. I ~~~~~~~~Height. Name. Complexion. Eyes. Hair. Name.-~ ~Feet. Inches. L' I j Amount....... Forage.................. Clothing............. I'd G. 14 u (D Id n 0 CD ti SI I -Id 0 4 19 ki 0 tt m m O. tt x 04 (si.qned duplicates.) Pay..................... Subsistenee......... -.. cc <n CP Amount............8

Page  370 REVISED REGULATIONS Pay Department.-Forms. a! FD~' FOR. 2 02 8 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ e v. b~0 e 4 Certificate to be given a soldier at the time of his discharge. I CE ~TIFY that the within named-, a of Captain company (-) of the regiment of , born in, in the State of aged - years, feet - inches high, complexion, eyes, - hair, and by profession a, was enlisted by -- , at, on the day of -, eighteen hundred and, to serve for- years, and is now entitled to a discharge by reason of The said - - was last paid by Paymaster - to include the - day of, eighteen hundred and - and has pay due from that time to the present date. There is due to him dollars retained pay. There is due to him - dollars on account of clothing not drawn in kind. HIe is indebted to the United States - dollars on account of extra clothing, &o. He is indebted to —--- -, laundress at-,dollars. The contract price of the ration at is -- -cents. Given in duplicate at, this -day of-, 18-. Commanding Company. NoTE.-When a soldier transfers his certificates, the transfer must be made on them, witnessed by a commissioned officer, when practicable, or by om other reputable person known to the Payer. I 870 FORM 4. ,

Page  371 FOR THB ARMY. Pay Department.-Forms. FORM 5. Te United Staies, To - discharged from Company, Regiment of-, DR. Dolls. For pay from - of -, 18-, to - of -, 18-, being months, - days, at dollars per month................................................................ For retained pay due............................................... For pay for traveling from, the place of my dis charge, to, the place of my residence, - miles, at twenty miles per day, equal to - days, at dollars per month.......................................... For subsistence for traveling as above, - days, at - cents per ration or day................................... For clothing not drawn............................................ Amount................................... Deduct for Army Asylum...........................$ Deduct for clothing overdrawn................... Balance due......................................... Received of -, Paymaster United States Army, this- day of ,18O, -- -- dollars and - - cents, in full of the above account. Pay....................... Subsistence.............. Clothing.................. Dollars............. 871 Centis. (Si.qned in duplicate. )

Page  372 REVISED REGULATIONS Pay Department. Forms. FORM 6. Abstract of Payments made by --, .iFZ~ ] 0 ] < Commencement 41 0~~~~~4 a>. A Aexpiration. 0 6 _ o I do hereby certify that the foregoing Abstract contains an coaurate state i I 372

Page  373 -~~~~~O TH RY 7 Pay Department. Forms. FORM 6. Paymaster, for the months of I I Clothing Clothing Forage. of of servants. soldiers. Dolls. Cts. Dolls Cts. Dolls. Cts. Dolls. Cts, ment of the payments made by me, as therein expressed. Paymaster. I I I FOR THE KRMY. 873 Amount. .i .4 0 pg Dolls. Cts. Dolls. Cts. 2 G

Page  374 FORM 7.-(AccouNT CURRENT.) DR. 77Te United States, in account current with - -, Paym 4) 4).. 0 n o -.. - - -. 4) 0 0 0 0 0 Q Q Q 186 For amount expend ed, as per abstract andvouchers here with, in paying the troops since the of -—, 186, the date of the last account rendered........... By cash received , as' my receipt da the of 186............. For amount turned over to -....... Due the U. States, to be accounted for in next ac count................. I I I I i I I i I I By balance to be counted for, stated in last count............ 186 186 By amount redeiT of for......

Page  375 FOR TIlE A.RM-Y. Pay Department.-Forms. 00 * ~ ~;: a0a: 0~~~~ I I I I__ 'o 0 i I I I I i 11 I I I I I I I I I I I. I I il 7 5 E Is eel

Page  376 876~~ llVS-IEUAIN Pay Department..Forms. FORM 8, — We, the subscribers, do hereby acknowledge to have received of the fqtll of our pay and allowances for the period Period of service. a) :z C ~ e d 14 IV 0o c; ~ ._ 7A 'o 0 o o r 6 c0 We certify that we actually employed the servants, and owned and kept inll charged, and did not, during any part of the time, employ a soldier as a servant. non-commissioned officers and privates of the company to which we belong, who them in service for the time paid for, although, in some cases, they may not have company. I I II 376 REVISED REGULATIONS A , cq ,2 0 4 1 -0 . . er, o . M ID 0'5 , 0 IV :z i CT I 9 C, Q 0 0 A 0 a) le P4 ;i .2 It m pq 1: 4) 0 ;j z .6 9 0 .i 0 d 0 .e 9 .6 PI .4 .I

Page  377 -~~~~~O rH RY 7 Pay Department. Forms. (PAY ROLL OF MILITIA.) ., Paymaster, the sums annexed to our names respectively, being herein expressed, having signed duplwates thereof. reling oances 4) o .I as Remarks. .i bo 11). 0Pmo o 0 E3 E-4 service the horses, for which we have received payment, for the whole of the time The names and description of our servants are below. We also certify that the are made up for pay, &c., as having horses and arms, actually owned and had been valued. We also certify that we witnessed the payment of the whole -, Captain, servant named-. , 1st Lieut., do. -.. -, 2dLieut., do. --, Ensign, do. —. 2G2 I I FOR fHE A.RMY. 3-77 P. C) 9 d 43 A d; .5 0 m 16 d, -5 A4

Page  378 FORM 9. Statement of moneys reeived and expended, and on hand, for the month ending ~~Date. s. c, goma emr0s .- Amount on hand from last month Received from the Treasurer..... Received from Paymaster......... Received from............ Total received...............$ Expended in paying the troops Turned over to Paymaster........ Total expended..............$ Balance to be accounted for.....$ at L Fd 4p 19 CD Accountable for iron safe. I I I I I -1 I C) .0 ;j rn I cc I 00 tt t-d m t-i t4 C) ci 01-3 0 m , Paym'a8te

Page  395 I ARTICLE XLVI. (pages 379 to 395, par. 1388 to 1405) contains the REGULATIONS OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEE,s, whc]h is published in pamphlet form, and distributed to those officers who require it, by the CHIEF ENGINEER.

Page  396 396 EVISD RGULAION Ordnance Department. ARTICLE XLVII. ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 1406. The Ordnance Department has charge of the arsenals and armories, and furnishes all ordnance and ordnance stores for the military service. 1407. The general denomination, "Ordnance and Ordnance Stores," comprehends all cannon and artillery carriages and equipments; all apparatus and machines for the service and manceuvres of artillery; all small arms and accoutrements and horse equipments; all ammunition; all tools and materials for the ordnance service; horse medicines, materials for shoeing, and all horse equipments whatever for the light artillery. 1408. Models or patterns proposed bythe Ordnance Board and approved by the Secretary of War, of all ordnance and ordnance stores for the land service of the United States, with the standard gauges, weights, and measures, shall be deposited in the model office at the Washington arsenal; and no change or variation from them shall be allowed, except on the recommendation of the board, approved by the Secretary of War. The ordnance board is composed of such officers of that department as the Secretary of War may designate. 1409. Directions in detail for the inspection and proof of all ordnance and ordnance stores shall be issued by the chief of ordnance, with the approbation of the Secretary of War. Ordnance and ordnance stores procured by contract or open purchase are required to pass the same inspection and proof as if fabricated at the arsenals. (See Ordnance Manual.) 1410. The purchases and contracts for cannon, projectiles, powder, small arms, and accoutrements are made, or specially ordered by the chief of ordnance, under the direction of the Secretary of War. 1411. In each case the inspector shall give to the contractor triplicate inspection certificates (Forms 30, 34, 38), and transmit to the ordnance bureau an inspection repot (Forms 31, 32, 39). 1412. The inspecting officers shall transmit to the ordnance bureau a consolidated report, in July (Form 33), of their inspections of ordnance and projectiles during the year ending 30th June, and quarterly and annual reports (Forms 35, 36, 37) of their inspections of small arms, barrels, &c. Inspectors shall retain copies of their inspection reports, to be turned over to their successors; at an armory, the quarterly and annual inspection reports (35, 36, 37) are signed by the superintendent and master armorer. 1413. Reports of defects in the quality or condition of ordnance supplies will. in all eases, besides naming the articles, describe the particular 396 itEVISED REGULATIONS

Page  397 R T Ordnance Department. pattern or model, when and where made, and whence, when, and from whom received, with such other information as will aid the Ordnance Department in taking the proper measures for correcting the defect. 1414. The inspectors of small arms will procure necessary assistants from the national armories. No assistant shall inspect oftener than twice in succession the arms made at the same private establishment. The inspector will have the accepted arms boxed and sealed in his presence. 1415. In time of peace, ordnance and ordnance stores are to be issued from the arsenals and armories only by authority from the ordnance bureau of the War Department; in war, to supply troops in service, on the order of any general or field officer commanding an army, garrison, or detachment; provided, in issues to the militia, that they shall have been regularly mustered into the service, and the requisition (Forte 23) be approved by the mustering and inspecting officer of the United States, or a general or field officer commanding in the regular service. In case of an issue not specially directed from the ordnance bureau, the order for the issue will be promptly transmitted to the bureau by the issuing officer. 1416. The arms, accoutrements, and horse equipments required by an officer for his own use in the public service may be issued to him on payment of the regulated price (Form 19), to be passed to the credit of the proper appropriation at the ordnance bureau. 1417. Requisitions (Form 22) for ordnance and ordnance stores for companies or posts may, in urgent cases, be sent direct to the AdjutantGeneral's office, a duplicate being forwarded at the same time to Department head-quarters. Requisitions for the military academy are to be transmitted to the chief engineer. Requisitions for supplies for arsenals and armories are sent direct to the ordnance bureau. 1418. Requisitions for horse equipments will be made according to the form prescribed for ordnance requisitions, the various articles being classi. fied in the requisitions and returns under heads, as follows: Under the head of SADDLE will be included every thing embraced thereunder in the published statement of equipments, until further orders, (see " General Orders," No. 23, of 1859,) excepting stirrus, saddle-bags, girths, and surcingles, which will be entered separately. CURB BRIDLES. The various kinds of curb bits, as Bits No. 1. Bits No. 2. Bits ANo. 3. I Brass scutcheons and curb-chains ince.uded. Bits No. 4. Leather fittings complete. FOR THE ARMY. 397

Page  398 REVISED REGUL..TIONS Ordnance Department. WATERING BRIDLES., Snaffle-bits, chains and toggles. included. Watering reins. :alters. - Spurs, straps included. Curry-combs. Horse-brushes. The minor parts of any article may be called for separately when necessary, and in that case will be borne on the return until expended to per. feet articles that are deficient. The injury or destruction of the minor parts of any article, particularly of leather, will not be a sufficient reason for condemning it, but, on the contrary, the necessary repairs will be made in the company by means of extra-duty men, or artificers, or at the depots. (See "General Orders," No. 22, of 1859, paragraph 7.) 1419. When arms, accoutrements, and equipments need repairs that cannot be made by the troops, the commanding officer may sen-. them to be repaired to the most convenient arsenal. 1420. The commander of each company or detachment will be accountable for all ordnance and ordnance stores issued to his command. The commander of each post will be accountable for all ordnance and ordnance stores at the post, not issued to the company or detachmwnt commanders, or not in charge of an officer of ordnance or a store-keeper. Ordnance sergeants will account for ordnance property only where there is no commissioned officer of the army or store-keeper. 1421. Commanding officers of the militia in service of the United States shall return and account for ordnance and ordnance stores in the use of troops as required in the regular service. And all arms and equipments issued to such militia shall be charged against the person to whom the issue is made on the muster-roll or pay account, to be accounted for to the mustering and inspecting officer, before receiving pay during service and on his discharge. 1422. Enlisted men who lose, or dispose of, the Colt's revolver pistols intrusted to their care, will hereafter be charged forty dollars in each case; that oeing the amount of pecuniary damage sustained by the United States, as estimated by the Ordnance Department. 1423. When a mustering and inspecting officer relieves such person from charge for loss or damage to his arms or equipments, satisfactory evidence, by affidavit or otherwise, setting out the facts of the loss or 398 Picket-pins. Lariat-ropes. Cavalry blankets. Artillery blankets. Nose-bags. HUitching-snaps.

Page  399 FOR THE ARMY. 399~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Ordnance Department. damage, and showing that it was not by his fault, shall be annexed to the pay-roll or account. 1424. When charges on account of ordnance stores are made against a soldier, the property return shall give his name and the pay-roll or account in which the charge is made. 1425. Arm-chests are to be preserved and'accounted for as other ordnance stores. 1426. Every officer commanding a regiment, corps, garrison, or detachment shall make, at the end of February, April, June, August, October, and December, a report to the chief of ordnance, stating all damages to arms, equipments, and implements belonging to his command, noting those occasioned by negligence or abuse, and naming the officer or soldier by whose negligence or abuse the said damages were occasioned (Act of February 8, 1815), from which reports the necessary instructions shallbe issued to the armories and the ordnance inspectors to correct defects in the manufacture. 1427. Inspections shall be made of the armories and arsenals of construction annually, and of other arsenals every two years, by such officers of the department as the Secretary of War shall designate, and a report of each inspection made to the ordnance bureau. 1428. The charge of an armory in the absence of the superintendent devolves on the master armorer, unless the chief of ordnance shall otherwise direct; of an arsenal, on the military store-keeper in the absence of an officer of ordnance. 1429. The officer in charge of an arsenal or armory shall, under the direction of the chief of ordnance, make and publish the rules for its internal government; procure the necessary materials and tools; engage the workmen, assign their grade, and appoint the necessary foremen. The cause for discharging or displacing a foreman shall be reported to the ordnance bureau. 1430. The military store-keeper shall disburse the funds on the certificate of the officer in charge upon each pay-roll or other account, stating the sum total in words, and, under the direction of the officer in charge, have the care and custody and make the returns of the ordnance and ordnance stores, except those in the current service, for which, including draft animals, the officer in charge is accountable. 1431. Where there is no store-keeper, the commanding officer is accountable for all the ordnance property, unless authorized by the ordnance bureau to devolve the accountability on another officer. 1432. Orders for the issue of supplies from an arsenal or armory are directed to tkh officer in charge, who shall transmit them to the storekeeper, and see to their execution. For transportation, the stores will be FOR THE A.RMY. 899

Page  400 40 ILVIE REGLATON REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Dppartment. turned over to the Quartermaster's Department, with duplicate invoice (Form 2); a third shall be transmitted to the officer who is to receive the stores 1433. Materials to be consumed or expended are issued on the written orders of the officer in charge to the store-keeper, who shall make quarterly abstracts of such issues (Form 9) as his voucher, to be certified by the officer in charge. 1434. The officer in charge shall turn over to the store-keeper the invoices (Form 2) of stores received, to be receipted for by him (Form 7), and shall furnish to him invoices of articles fabricated, purchased, repaired, &c., from which the store-keeper shall make the quarterly abstracts to be certified by the officer in charge (Forms 3, 4, 5, 6). At an armory, all articlJes purchased, fabricated, or repaired are to be inspected by the master armorer before being paid for, or turned into store 1435. The date when orders for supplies are received, or stores received at or issued from an arsenal or armory, shall be reported on the report of work done (Form 27). 1436. Hired men in the ordnance service (except slaves) shall be engaged on daily wages, except men on piece-work, and paid only for such days or parts of days as they actually work. Working time, by daylight only, shall average ten hours throughout the year. When men are paid for extra time or night-work, the necessity shall be explained on the pay-roll. 1437. Workmen in an armory shall be paid, as far as practicable, by piece-work. The price of piece-work shall be fixed, according to the skill and labor it requires, by the superintendent, under the direction of the chief of ordnance. 1438. Any increase of wages shall be promptly reported to the ordnance bureau, with the necessary explanations. 1439. The money value of any piece of work spoiled by the fault or incompetency of a workman shall be charged to him on the pay-roll. 1440. A fair rent shall be charged monthly on the pay-roll to the hired men who occupy public quarters, except the master armorer and clerks at ian armory. The rent-roll (Form 12) shall be returned quarterly to the ordnance bureau. 1441. Armory officers and hired men in the ordnance service will receive ten cents mileage for travel on duty under orders. 1442. No buildings or other permanent works or improvements will be undertaken without the sanction of the Secretary of War. The plans and estimates for them are to be sent to the ordnance bureau by the month of August. 1443. No trees on the public grounds will be removed or destroyed without authority from the ordnance bureau. 400

Page  401 FORP THE ARMY. Ordnance Department. 1444. None but strong draft horses are to be purchased for the ord. nance service, nor without authority from the chief of ordnance. 1445. The enlisted men of ordnance shall be enlisted in the grade of laborer. They may be mustered, at the discretion of the officer in command, in any grade for which they are competent, except the grade of master workman. Promotions to that grade require the sanction of the chief of ordnance. Enlistments (Form 24) are to be in duplicate; one filed at the post, the other forwarded to the ordnance bureau. The number of enlisted men at each arsenial will be directed by the chief of ordnance. 1446. Expenses of the issue and delivery of ordnance and ordnance stores to the States, at any point within the State designated by the governor, if on navigable water or otherwise easily accessible, are paid by the United States from the appropriation for arming and equipping the militia. The officers of the Ordnance Department provide for the transoortation and the payment of the expenses. 1447. The accounts with the several States and Territories are kept in terms of muskets; but other small arms, accoutrements, field artillery, and equipments of equal value and of the patterns adopted for the troops of the United States, may be issued. at the request of the State or Territory, if the government supplies will permit. 1448. Receipts (Form 8) will be prepared in triplicate by the issuing officer, and transmitted for the signature of the governor, or officer or agent appointed by him to receive the stores; one of which, when returned, shall be forwarded by the issuing officer to the ordnance bureau. 1449. The returns and reports prescribed in the following articles are required to be sent to the ordnance bureau. 1450. Monthly returns, within five days after the quarter to which they relate, viz.: by the officer in charge of an arsenal: 1st, of the officers and men of ordnance (Form 25); 2d, of hired men (Form 26); 3d, of work done (Form 27); and by the officer in charge of an armory, a return of armory officers and men, and small arms and appendages manufactured (Form 28); and by the officer in charge of an arsenal or armory, a summary statement by the disbursing officer of money received and expended (Form 20). 1451. An estimate by the officer in charge of an arsenal cr armory? at the beginning of the quarter, of the funds required' during the quarter (Form 21). 1452. Quarterly returns, within twenty days after the quarter, viz.: 1st, by every disbursing officer, a money account current (Form 18), with abstract of disbursements (Form 17), and vouchers (Forms 13, 14,15, 16), and a duplicate of the abstract and of the account current, with endorsed statement (Form 20); 2d, a property return (Form 1), with vouchers 2H 401

Page  402 402 REVISED REGULATOS Ordnance Department. (Forms 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 19), by every person accountable foi ordnance and ordnance stores, except those in current service at arsenals and armories. The return for a post will be distinct from that for a company or detachment. 1453. An annual return, in July, by the officer in charge of an arsenal or armory, of all ordnance stores, tools, and draft animals in current service (Form 1). 1454. An annual inventory, in August, by the officer in charge of an arsenal or armory (Form 29), with a report, in a condensed form, of the principal operations of the post during the year ending 30th June, including an account of experiments, of the construction and repairs of buildings, machinery, &c. 1455. Letters of transmittal are to accompany reports and returns to the ordnance bureau. 1456. Every officer required to make a return of ordnance and ordnance stores shall take an inventory of them (Form 11) in the month of June, and certify on his return for the second quarter that the inventory has been taken and his return made in conformity with it. The same form of inventory is to be used at inspections. 1457. In all official lists, ordnance and' ordnance stores are to be arranged according to the classification furnished by the Ordnance Department.* 1458. The following records of their reports and returns are required. to be kept by ordnance officers and turned over to their successors: 1. A company return book, consisting of the retained duplicates, bound together; 2. A monthly return book, ontaining the other monthly returns and statements; 3. An account book, containing copies of the quarterly accounts current and their endorsed statements, of abstracts of money dis bursed, and of estimates for funds; 4' A letter book of copies of all letters sent; 5. Files of letters received; 6. Files of orders received; 7. An annual inventory book, by binding together the retained inventories; 8. At armories and arsenals of construction, such other books may be kept as may be necessary to show the details of the operations. 1459. All books and files are to be submitted to inspecting officers, when called for. 1460. Printed blanks allowed will be furnished from the ordnance office, unless otherwise directed, on requisitions in May for a year's supply. * Infrmatiop,. conni1a prices of al ay a nd o tts, and th6 dlasifieatIon of ordnance an'd ordnance st'rn, O dn e tained of t- ChieT o r O'ern. 402 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  403 REVISED REGULAT1ONS FOR THE ARMY. Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 1. RET URN oJ )RDNANCE AND ORDNANCE STORES RECEIVED, ISSUED, AND REMY ING ON HAND, AT I ARSENAL. COMMNANDED BY IAJOR A. B., DURING TIlE QUARTER ENDING -i, 1. -. - - 403 ,1.

Page  404 I

Page  405 PART FIRST. ARTILLERY, SMALL ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND OTHER ORDNANCE STORES. 2 H 2 t 405

Page  406 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 1. CLASS I.-ORD BRASS GUNS. English Mexi- trophies. can. DATA. -- 1.SECOND QUARTER, 8-. - X v April...... 1 On hand from last quarter........................ 15 1 Received from C. D., Military Storekeeper.. May......o.10 2 Do. do. E. F., contractor at - "22 3 Do. do. Capt. -. H., - regiment of artillery.......................................... June..... 30 4 Fabricated at the post during the quarter, per abstract........................................ " ~ Purchased during the quarter, per ab s tract............................................ "4 " 6 - Repaired during the quar ter..................... Total to be accounted for............ Mlay........ 15 7 Condemned and dropped from the return by order of the President of the United States................................................. June...... 30 8 Issued to sundry persons, per abstract...... June 3~0 -U Is a " 9 Expended at the post, per abstract............ " " 10 Issued for c urrent service, per abstract..... a " 6 Repaired during the quarter..................... ".... M iliar. toee Total issued and expended.......... pe- a_etract _____ Remaining on hand to be accounted for next quarter....................................... by orde of thePresidet of th Unite 406 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  407 -- - - - -- -, - -.- -~ i; -j I I 11 ;t

Page  408 ______________ I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~! ~~~~I2i I I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~iI~~4 Tr: I I I I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Mt $ ____________ I I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Lii llo I I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~S I ~~~~~~~~~~32 I ~~~~~~~~~Ta I I ~~~~~~~~~~Ta I I ~~~~~~~~~~~Tt I I I I I I - I I II I I I .I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I.~ t I I' I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I &II I .I F( I F(

Page  409 FOR THE ARMY. 4O Ordnance Department. Formil. (PROPERTY RETURN.)-Continued. SHOT. SHELLS. SPHERICAL S O, S H R C L 5 R P ~ U R T. R F E. PSOS C A S E. F I E D. C A S E F I X E D. S H O T. 0660 D~~~~~~~~~~1 -~~~ 0~~~ ~~ 0c H ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~.~~~~~~1 -0 0- . o . DEC. U. a P3 II 4!0 H H 9 I. ___ __ I i .FOR TIIE ARMY. 409 AL 6 .RIFLES. PISTOLS. I 6 SPHERI CASE, F-I 6 15 I .w A 14 14 0 PA 14 P4 0 .2 1 !g a P. 14 0I Im C, 4 ?4 ;A .4 A a 1. i aq i 9 a

Page  410 11~~ ~ = 5 ~ -0. 1 i 6 l I 8 4. 4

Page  411 FOR THlE ARMY.41 Ordnance Department.-Formij. .(PnP-OPnFTY RI~TUP,,.)-Continued. CLASS IX.-PARTS 0OF ARTILLERY CAP.,RAG}ES. CLASS X.-MSCBLLANNOUYS. BrAS3N PAILTh FOR YLIJ CARLA,GES. 1I. 04 i i.0 4 i I I i I 411 t ,I 8 1 N .0 -0 -11 E z :o A ;A i 4.1 .3 4 .5. 'A 0 1 m -i 9 I li -E 9 Pi4 1. A OQ ..3 .a Ia .9 1 - 0 z 9. P4 A .3 9 I u .9 2 VI 9 m A s .W 2. .u 11 i i

Page  412 I

Page  413 PART SECOND. TOOLS AND MATERIALS. 413 2 I

Page  414 414 ~REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Deopartment.-Forms. FORM l. CLOTH, RLOPE, TIIREAD, &C. FRG. IOMNEY O IO. NAILS. 0 0 6 06 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~.6 i II i I i i I I I I 414 IRONMONGEILY, &a. FORAGE. IR 16 9 0 0 0 ;z 0 .5 .d 78 Q r. .3 0 C) 6 6 t P. e4 1. E-4 6 tz 0 .M e d PI 0 6 z c; :1 Q 4' 0 f. I C7 It r.z 0 lw 6 0 9 .i w 0 T I 0 :z p P-. u It w co i I I

Page  415 e ~~~FOR THE ARMY. 1 Ordianace Department.-Forms. (PROP.ERTY IRETURN. )-Continued. LABORATORY STORES.GUN CARRIAGE TIMBER. FOR FIELD) CAR 12-pdr. riages. RIAGES.FOR 24-PDR. BARtBETTE CARRIAGIES. gun ar- aissns. Gun carriages. Chassis. 6 6066 U 6 16a a a o a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. a a ~~~ a).- a) U 55~~~~~~~~~~~~~1 a 0. 0 a) a)~~~~ a a ~~~~ a a) ~~~~ a U ~~~~ -4 'A -; 5~~a..5 Ca) aa 0 ). a ) a - u ) ) a u - a) U C? - 11 I-LL i I I 415, LABORATORY STORES. .6 C, 04 .3 OQ .6 0 04 t 0: ;A .i .6 w t, I. r, .i :z co 9 Iz ID :z bi) 0 0 E-4 0 Q -P I 0 .1

Page  416 416 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordaauce Departmeut.-Forms. ____ FORM 1.-(PROPERTY RETURN.)-Continued. PAINTS AND OILS. I.I o . 0 o c3 0 STATIONERY. C'A a) 5, oQ dk ID ad MISCELLANEOUS. . 55 ) ai o o 0 d _ .i 0 bo 0. c3 c3 s PI 0 V 5, a) 55~~~~c '5~ ~ ~~ ~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~, - a ) S R ~ A), ~ a 5, ma) 5 - 0 0.. ,A 5 S .4 0 ,.Q -6 t .,.-i4 ~ i,.) ci3 t -~ _-_ Ij _I ~~~~~~~~~I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I certify that the foregoing Return exhibits t correct statement of tbe publio property in my charge during the quartel, 18-. A. B., Captain Commanding. U. S. ARSENAL (ARMORY ORt POST), , 18-. NOTE.-For the quarter ending 30th June add a certificate that an accurate inventory of property has been made, and the return corrected accordingly. Abstracts of the receipts and issues will be made when their number mak.s it more convenient. I I REVISED REGULATIONS 416 0 Ordnance Department.-Forms. TOOLS. .0 .5 4) ii 5 14 m m lp $4 4) P. k 11 .r :z 9 !Z 0 0 :8 t_x 0 u ,tB o: 11 0) It Pk PI 6 C) 41 4) 3 A4 d' -Z 6 6 - 0 .1 47 i4 4 0 m

Page  417 PORM 2. Invoice of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores turned over by A. B., Captain or Ililitary Storekeeper, to lieutenant C. D. Assistant Quartermaster, for transportation to Arsenal, in obedience to order for Supplies No. -. NO. OF BOXES OR MARKS. TOTAL CONTENTS. EET OR PACKAGES. From 1 to 7................... Captain A. B., commanding 140 muskets, complete, N. A., new, brown.. 2100 lbs. arsenal, near P., Pennsylvania. From 8 to 10.................. Lieutenant A. B., commanding 300 cartridge boxes, infantry; 300 cart. 1000" arsenal, near R., Virginia. box belts; 300 gun slings. CD fp CD l E. I certify that the above is a correct invoice of ordnance and ordnance stores turned over by me, this day of, 18-, to Lieutenant C. D., Assistant Quartermaster, for transportation to Arsenal. (Signed duplicates.) A. B., Captain Commanding, or Military Storekeeper. Endorsement to be as follows: No. - Invoice of stores turned over to Quarter master for transportation, - quarter,, 18-. L. o tz H WI . t

Page  418 FORM 3. Ab.stract of Articles fdbricated at - Arsenal during the - Appropriation. _. I I Ordnance service............................................................................................... Arming the militia.................................................................... 210 Armament of fortifications..................2 1 4........................... Ordnance and ordnance stores... 2......................2............ 200 Total............................. 10 2 1 4 200 210 I certify that the abcve is correct. NOTE.-This abstract is designed to include such articles only as are completed, and service. (To be made in triplicate. Two to be forwarded with the return.) Endorsement to be as follows: No. Articles fabricated at Arsenal, - quarter, 18-.

Page  419 FORM 4. .aostract of Articlespurchased at Arsenal during the Appropriation. | 0~~~~:Y Ordnance service.................................. 1570....................................... Arsenals............................................................. 720 Armament of fortifications........300.............1000............720 Ordnance and ordnance stores 250............ 760................ 750 800 Arming the militia....................................................... 144........ Total............................. 550 1570 1750 864 5 1520 I certify that the above abstract is correct. (See vouchers Nos. 2, 5, 7, 8, 12, of the ca, (To be made in triplicate. Two to be forwarded with the return.) Endorsement to be asfollows: 0No. Abstract of articles purchased at Arsenal, - quarter. 18-.

Page  420 FORM 5., Statemet of Articles repaired at during the Number 1 or ma( able a] ARTIcLES. )-pounder field carriages....................................................................... 2 unse 24 " barbette chassis................................................................... 5 12 " sponges and rammers........................................................... 7 Muskets...................................................................................170 Bayonets........................................................................................... 170 I certify that the above statement is correct. (Signed) (Triplicate. Two to be forwarded with the return.) Endorsement to be as follows: No. Articles repaired at Arsenal, - quarter,, 18

Page  421 -~~~O TH RY 2 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 6. Statement of serviceable materials obtained from the breaking up of condemned Ordnance or Ordnance Stores, by order of the Secretary of War, of, 18-. (See Form 10.) lbs. wrought ilcn. " cast iron. " brass. " copper. " old rope for junk. " leather. A. B., Captain Comnmanding. (In duplicate.) Endorsement to be as follows: No. -. Materials obtained from condemned stores, - quarter, —, 18-. FORM 7. R?eceived, this- day of, 18-, of Captain - commanding, the following Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, &c. 4 832-pounder iron cannon. 3 24 " casemate carriages, complete. 8 24 " barbette carriages, complete. 500 muskets, new, brown. C. I)., Major Commanding. (In duplicate.) Endorsement to be as follows: No.-. Receipts for issues to the Army, - quarter,, 18-. NoTr.-When the receipt of the officer to whom the stores are issued is n,t received by the issuing officer in time to accompany his property return, his certified invoice and the receipt of the quartermaster for the packages will be substitute( for this voucher. FOR THE ARMY. 421 400 200 60 30 60 20 (Signed)

Page  422 422 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 8. I hereby acknowledge to have received of the United States, by the hands of -, of the United States Army, the following arms and accoutrements, viz.: 100 common rifles, equal in value to.................... 123 1-13 muskets. 100 sets accoutrements (black leather) for rifles, equal in value to.................................... 21 11-13 do. 350 pistols.....................equal in value to......... 215 5-13 do. 50 artillery swords...........do.............. 16 4-13 do. 175 cavalry sabres.................. do................... 80 10-13 do. 175 do. belts........do................... 15 4-13 do. 1000 muskets..................do.................1000 do. 1.00 sets accoutrements for muskets (la,ck leather), equal in value to................................... 115 10-13 do. 4 6-pdr. iron cannon, 4 6-pdr. field carriages, with equal in value to 110 3-1., do. equipments complete, Total..... 1698 9-13 do. The whole being equivalent to sixteen hundred and ninety-eight And nine-thirteenth muskets, which are received on account of the quota of arms due to the of, under the Act of April, 1808, for arming the whole body of the militia, and for which I have signed triplicate receipts. Given at -, this -day of -, 18-. (Signed) A. B., Governor or Agent of the State of (To be given in triplicate.) Endorsement to be as follows: No. Receiptsr issues to the Militia' 422 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  423 FORM 9. Abstract of Jfaterials, &c., ex4pended or consumed at - Arsenal dui I.) c/2 It e Q o ........ 500 ......... ......... ......... ......... Re........ ......... ......... 1o000 1500 Expended or Consumed. I,<. -. m o P. 50 100 ... *...... ......... .......... .... *..... ......... .... *..... .........* ........, 150 61 ._ 0o ......... 2 ......... ......... .. *....... ......... ......... ......... ......... ........... 2 .5 ) 30 ...... ,..... ...... ...... ...... 3500 0o 9 5~ 0 wo o In experimental firing.....................ordnance. In making musket and rifle cartridges.......do...... In repair and preservation of the post.......do...... In preservation of stores.....................do...... In repair of tools and machinery..............do...... In office duties.......................do...... On account of public horses................do...... In repair and preservation of buildings... arsenals. In making sea-coast carriages.........fortifications. In making field and siege gins....ordnance stores. In fixing ammunition........................do. Total expended.....................89 150 1500 2 3500 620 I certify that the above abstract is correct, and that the stores were issued for the purpo, (Two with the return.) (To be signed in triplicate by the End(lorsement to be as follows: No. Abstract of articles expended or consumed at quarter, -, 18-. I i I , 9 .,4 ...... 350 ...... 620 39 ......... ......... ......... *......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... Total expended............................. 39

Page  424 FORM 10. List of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores condemned at, by, Inspector, at an inspection made on the Ioff, 18 In what manner disposed of. Articles condemned. Remarks. Broken up. Sold. Dropped. Total. 12-pounder brass guns, F r e n c h.............................................................................. 2 Recast. 0-pounder field carriages.........................................2 1................... 3 Sets of harness for two wheel horses........................................ 2...... 2 Muskets................................................................................... 1 170 Infantry cartridge-boxes........................................... 64 26 5 85 m m t; (:i To I certify that the above-enumerated articles have been inspected by me, in conformity to the regulations, and are hereby recommended to be disposed of as above. (Duplicates.) R.L.B.; Inspetor. Approved: M. F., President United States. NOTE.-The stores embraced in the above are to be retained on the property return until the purposes of the condemnation, as approved by the President, shall have been finally executed. Endorsement to be as follows: No. Condemned Stores, Arsenal, - uartr —, -,18 I I L-2 To .ta so cS ax CD FIa eq eqO l . _ 0o '

Page  425 FORM 1L Inventory of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on hand at, commanded by, inspected, 18. Commanding Officer's Remarks. quantity. mendations. 12-pounder brass cannon..1770 pounds. 4-pounder......do............350....do....5 3-pounder.....do............216....do.... Serviceable, model of 1840................ ....... do.......French.......................... ....... do......English, trophy, captured at Yorktown. Heavy, old patter n............................. Light...... do.................................... Unserviceable, French, worn out........ 18-pounder iron cannon...3800....do.... 18-pounder.....do.......... 3200....do.... 12-pounder brass cannon 1800....do.... Te be exchanged for new guns 6-pounder......do........ 70..7....do......... do............. o ......... do.........English, trophy, cap tured at Saratoga. New, serviceable.............................. Unserviceable, irreparable.................. 6-pounder field carriages, stocktrail.. Gun-house.......... 6-pounder.....do............................do................ Linseed-oil.................................... Store-house cellar. (To be signed by the Inspector- General or other author ized inspector.) O 1o CD tFf F i-s I go o .t NOTE.-The stores will be entered on the inventory in the order of the classification, which order should be observed as nearly as practicable in the arrangement of the articles in store. The commanding officer will describe, in the column of remarks, the kind, quality, and condition of the several articles, more in detail than it is practicable to do in the quarterly returns. He will also express his opinion, in the column of remarks, as to the manner in which the unserviceable stores should be disposed of. Endorsement to be as follows: No. -. Inventory for inspection, or for the correction of second quarter's return of property tz Number or quantity. Articles. Inspector's Recom mendations. Location. 6 2 1 8 6 2 1 8 2 15 galls. Arsenal yard....... ....... ........... ............ ............ ........... To be sold. tt t'd Ott 9 To be broken up. (To be 8iqned by the commanding officer.) W. .ll,

Page  426 REVISED REGULATIONS Ord-ance Department.- Forms. FORM 12. RENT-ROLL. Statement of Dwelling-Houses belonging to the United States at Armory (or Arsenal), and of the rents due thereon, on 186. TIME OC- |I I AI ] CUPIED.: N'' O Monthis. p4 o7 4 BY WHOM OCCUPIED. No. Of what kini Months. A.B., Com'dingofficer's clerk C. D., Master Armorer. E. F., Store-keeper. 4. H...................... 2........ J.K................................ L. M............................... N..O................................ P. Q................................ R.S............................... T. U., Paymaster's clerk..... V. W...d........................... X................................ Unoccupied. Brick, two story... Wood...... do......... Do......... do...,...... Do..... one story... '-Brick......do Do.... do......... Do....,two story... Do..... one story... Stone...... do......... ; Do.........do......... ; Do.........do...,..... I certify that the foregoing roll exhibits a correct account of the dwellinghouses at this armory, and of their occupation, and of the amount of rent now due for each. A. B., Comamandin Officer. ARMORY I ., 186.-I wdorsement to be as follows: No. -. Rent-roll. - Armory, quarter I 4;9 0 HOUSES. No. Of what kind. D. 0. - 0. 1 2 3 4 6 6 7 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 25 00 60 00 00 00 75 75 3 2 3 ij 3 ij 3 2 3 25 2 67 3 5Q 1 60 3 00 1 60 2 75 1 1*1 8 9 10

Page  427 The United States, To NATIONAL ARMORIES. 186. September... 10th. For 100 bushels charcoal, at 5 cents pe r bushel....................... $5 00............... November.... 8th. " 75 cords oak wood, at $3 50 per cord............................ 262 50............... Do......... 15th. " 5560 feet of pine boards, at $10 50 per thousand 8 38.............8 8............ $325 88 $325 88 ARMING THE MILITIA. Date..................... For 2000 feet oak timber, at $40 per thousand.......................... 80 00 80 00 $405 88 I certify that the above account is correct and just, amounting to four hundred and five dollars and eighty-eight cents. A. M., Commanding O.icer. ARSENAL OR ARMORY, ,186.' Received from -, Paymaster, dollars cents, in full of the above acoount. (Signed in duplicates.) E-ndorsement to be as follows: No.,A. B. November -,186. 8 National Armories.......... $825 88 Arming the militia......... 80 00 $405 88 I FORM 13.-(To be printed.) DR. REMAP.KS. Smith's shop. Fuel for workshops. ]For arm-chests. (lu,n-carriages. 0 f4 P4 gl, R tg —, t4 tt" K- It-0

Page  428 FORM 14.-(To be printed.) We, the subscribers, hereby acknowledge to have received of the sums set full for our services at Arsenal during the month of, 18-, having signed du] f I;B PAY IPER DAY. AMOUNT. No. Names. Occupation. o : Dollars. Cents. Dollars. Cents. 1 IA. B M... aster armorer...... 26 2 50 65 00 2 C. D... Blacksmith............ 24 1 50 36 00 8 E. F.........Carpenter.............. 20 1 20 24 00 325 00 ; t: 2~~~~~~~~~~ IE. F...............~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. I certify that the foregoing pay-roll is correct and just, amounting to three hundred and as follows:: Ordnance.. Arming mi. Arsenals... Armament Endorsemett to be as follows: No., hired men for October -, 18-. Ordnance.......................... $105 00 Arming militia............64 10 Arsenals............................ 39 90 Armament of fortitcations..... 116 00 * O5 QO [Date,.] '1',

Page  429 FORM 15.-(To be printed.) Pay-Rol of Clerks, Armorers, and others employed at the U. S. Armory,, durig the month of, 18-. I We, the subscribers, acknowledge to have received from -, Paymaster, the sums set opposite our respective names in the last column of figures, in full for our services during the month of, 18-. NATIONAL ARMORIES. Time or Wages or Arms and Names. Occupation or employment. number. prices. Amount. i Am n work. Musket. Rifle. * I 1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Clerk, Com'g Officer's office. 1 month.. Foreman, Armorer........... 25 days. Machinist....................... 20 do... Forging barrels............... 248.. Dr. for bursted barrels...... 16......1.. $55 00 50 00 so 00 44 80 $179 80 I certify that the foregoing pay-roll is correct and just, amounting to dollars and cents, to be charged as follows: Endorsement to be asfollows: lNational armories.............$00 00 No.. Aiming militia................00 00 Hired men for, 18-. Repairs and improvements.....00 00 Armories.............................. $00 00 00 Arming militia....................... 00 00 Repairs and improvements....... 00 00 $00 00 A. B., uperintendent. NoTE.-The printed forms will contain the requisite heads for disbursements under various appropriations. The amount on each page of the roll will be footed up separately, and these several amounts will be recapitulated on the last page. I i SIGNED IN DUPLICATE. Signatures. Witnesses. 0 t P. ts% 0 0 w CD, Id . 4- Io a I$. 04 0 tt H tt tt 4 -4 J.' 3 4 ........................ $50 -00............ ........................ $44 80 A. B...... C. D...... E. F...... 'G. If... I .$55 2 1 00 00 50 20 30 $.55 00 60 00 30 00 49 60 4 80 $5,i 00 ............ ............ A. B............. C. D............ E. F............ G. H............ ............... ............... ............... .......... ............... tc

Page  430 FORM 16.-(To be printed.) We, the subscribers, hereby acknowledge to have received of the sums se full for the services of our slaves at Arsenal during'the month of, 18-, hav: Time employed. Wages per Amount for month. each slave. A. B......................... A. Laborer........... C. do............ D. Blacksmith........ E. Laborer........... C. D...................... F. Laborer........... G. do............ II. do........... I certify that the above pay-roll is correct and just, amounting to dollars cen Arsenals..... Endorsement to be as follows8: Armament of No. Slave-roll for., 18-. Arsenals...............................$71 40 Armament of fortifications.............. 21 19 92 659 Name and occu pation. A ret From whom hired. 1 month..... 22-26 do...... 20-26 do...... 19-26 do...... I month..... 25-26 do...... 1 do...... $12 00 15 00 18 60 14 00 16 00 14 50 14 50 $12 00 12 69 14 23 10 23 16 00 13 94 14 50 $' [Date.] (E,

Page  431 FORM 17.-(To be printed.) Abstract of Disbursements at Arsenal by, in the NATURE OF THE DISBURSEMENT. If the voucher is, jr Services, add from to -..,18-, or for Ordnance 0s~ ~ ~ the month of, 18-. Ordnance Arsenal 18-. ~~service. Date of 0' To whom paid If for Articles, and there is sufficient payment. ~ room on the one line, state the quantity of each; or if not room for this, then say, "iron, nails, and paint-brushes," or whatever the H voucher may be for. Dolls. Cts. Dolls. C 18-. May 5... 1 A. B......... 500 lbs. bar iron; 20 lbs. cast steel 10 00......... ' 10.... 2 C. D.............. 100 lbs. harness leather; 4 calfskins..................... June30... 8 E. F............... 50 bushels oats; 1000 lbs. hay...... 35 00............ ... 4 Hired men...... Services for the month of June...... 300 00 50 C 345 00 50 C Endorsement to be as follows: Abstract of Disbursements. quarter, 18-. Ordnance service.......................... $345 00 Arsenals.................................... 50 00 Armament of fortifications............ 265 00 Ordnance and ordnance stores......... 426 00 $1086 00 (To be si Ill I*II

Page  432 FORM 18.-(To be printed.) The United States in account current with Captain Dates. To Expenditures. Amount. Dates. 186 186. December 31..... For ordnance service, per abstract $ October 1... Balar Arming the militia...do........... pei Arsenals................do..........." 20... Amos Armament of fortifications..do. Ordnance and ordnance stores November 15... Amos Balance to new account......... for December 31... Amos Dollars...................... December 31... Balai cai I certify that the above is a true account of all money of the Ordnance Department receiv( and that the disbursements have been faithfully made. Arsenal, —, 186. I Endorsement to be as follows: ACCOUNT CURRENT. Captain A. B., Arsenal, quarter, 186. DR. (To be signed andfur~

Page  433 FOR THE ARMY. 433 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 19.. Received,. Arsenal,,186, of Major One field officer's sword, One pair percussion pistols, k:which I have paid the said Major the cost price, 4olla, W. A. N., Major Artt7ekry. (To' mad6'n duplicate.) Endowmente to be as follows, in, o -. Receipt All stores issued to Major W\ A. N. for his own uAe. FOR THE ARMY. 433

Page  434 FORM 20. AStatement ofReceipts and Expenditures, under each appropriation, for the month of (or for the - uarter), 18-. Armament Ordnance Arming Arsenals. of fortifica- Amount. service. militia. ti tions. Due to the United States from last account, or last month.................... 69 62 87 21............. 157 83 Received in quarter, or month.................................................. 450 00.....80000 100 o 00 300 00 2550 00 Total to be accounted f o r.................................... 519 62 800 00 1087 21 300 00 2706 83 Due from the United States from last account, or last month.................................... 45 50................................ 45 50 Expended in quarter, or month................................................ 519 62 716 20 1104 80 231 50 2572 12 Total accounted for............................................ 519 62 761 70 1104 80 231 50 2617 62 To the United States................................. Balance due, 18-. From the United States............................. Due United States............... (To be signed by tAe disbursing officer.) NOTE.-Quarterly statement to be endorsed on the quarterly account current intended fur the Ordnance Office Endorsement on monthly statement to be. Money received and expended, -- Arsenal, Nov. -, 18 —. I td m bd tt ci P- 1-3 0 t4 I m 0 ;L ts p - ti 11 0 CD t:t . Id - p', 9. CD. .41 .t, 19. !I ................ 38 30................ 68 50 ................................ 17 59................ 106 80 17 59 89 21

Page  435 FOR THE ARMY. 43 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 21. Estimate of Funds required at — Arsenal during the fourth uarter of 18-. ORDNANCE SERVICE. Police and preservation of Post............................. Placing arms in racks......................................... Tools and machinery.......................................... Fuel for steam-engine..........................................80. Public horses...................................................... Office duties...................................................... $430 00 500 00 300 00 350 00 150 00 200 00 1930 68 130 68 ......... ooooo,oo Due U.S. from last quarter......... Amount required....................... ORDNANCE, ORDNANCE STORES, AND SUPPLIES. Making sling carts............................................. Making lifting jacks............................................ Purchase of lumber for packing boxes, &c............... Due from U. S. last quarter........... Amount required....................... Total amount required.................................. REQUIRED IN SUMS AS FOLLOWS: Ordnance, ord Month. Ordnace ser- nance stores, and Amount. vice,. supplies. Octolfr.............................. $500 00 $700 00 $1200 00 November........................... 500 00 600 00 1000 00 December........................... 800 00 500 O0 1800 00 Total..................... $1800 00 $1700 00 $3500 00 (7'o be signed by the commanding oficer.) FOR THE ARM:Y. 435 $1800 00 1027 48 800 00 150 00 222 62 .................. 1700 00 $3500 00

Page  436 VORM 22. Requisition for Ordnance and Ordnance Stores for -. Arsen 0 0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,_ Post or Place. d Required,18-............ 3 106 1000 50 1......... On hand (date)..................... 2 100 200 5.................. To be supplied............. 1 6 800 45......... [Here follow the explanations demanding the issue.] (Sif Endorsement to be as follows: Requisition for Ordnance Stores for [post or plan [Date]

Page  437 FORM 23. Requisition for Ordnance and Ordnance Stores for the use of of militia i?n the service of the United States. o~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~b I b'o H~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ to m -1 5> T @ it a X; i Remarks. -otal.o 2 0 - o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~- o 2 2................................ 120...... .49- 9 49 49 49 51 49...... 2500 Company of infantry of 58 non-com missioned officers and privates. Same form for Artillery, Riflemen, and Cavalry. Total... 2 2 49 9 49 49 49 51 49 120 2500 I certify that there are non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates under my command, called into the service of the United States and that the above requisition is made in conformity thereto. egiment of Militia of the State of Tennessee. NASHVILLE, June 1, 18-. The above requisition has been examined in conformity to the Ordnance Regulations, and is approve (Signed) C. D., Major United States Army. NASavILLEm, June 5, 18-. .Edorsement to be as follows: Requisition for Ordnance and Ordnance Stores,, 18-. .At o 9: iS Is a,l tit CD ti 13 OA co

Page  438 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 24. STATE OF: I -, born in, aged years, and by occupation a -, do hereby acknowledge to have voluntarily enlisted this fday of, 18, as a of ordnance, in the army of the United States of America, for the period of five years, unless sooner discharged by proper authority; do also agree to accept such bounty, pay, rations, and clothing, as is or may be established by law. And I,, do solemnly swear that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies and opposers whomsoever; and that I will observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the Rules and Articles of War, and the regulations which govern enlisted men of the Ordnance Department. J. G., Recruit. Sworn and subscribed to, at this day of, 18. S. M., Magistrate. I certify that I have carefully examined the above-named recruit, and that, in my opinion, he is free from all bodily defects and mental infirmity which would in any way disqualify him from performing the duties of a of ordnance. A. B., Examining Surgeon. I certify that I have minutely inspected the recruit,, previously tohis enlistment, who was entirely sober when enlisted; and that, to the best of my judgment and belief, he is of lawful age, and a competent mechanic (carriagemaker, or otherwise, as the case may be). This recruit has - eyes, hair, - complexion; is feet inches high. (Duplicates.) C. D., Recruiting (or Enlisting) Offcer. Endorsement to be as follows: Jonas Gould, Arsenal, February,18. NoTE.-In making up and endorsing enlistments, see General Regulations for the Army. 438

Page  439 WORM 25.-(To be printed.) Return of a Con.pany of Ordnance at the Arsenal, for th, Present. For duty. Sick. In arrest or confinement. 4). I .;.. - 4) 4) 4) bo 4)'n. S S .- a o - 4) a o - 0 0 0 . — . 0. - 4) Officers present and absent, and Remarks in explanation of alterations on the absentees accounted for. face of the return. Names, rank, or Remarks. No. Rank. Names. Date. Remarl grades. Endorsement to be as follows: Company, Arsenal, December, 18. Absent.

Page  440 FORM 26.-(To be printed.) Return of hired men employed at Arsenal for the month of, 18-. WAGES. AMOUNT. No. N a m e s. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Days IfO. Names. Trade and Employment employed. employed. Dolls. Cts. Dolls. Cts. 1 A...............Blacksmith, mounting cannon........................................ 25 1 50 37 50 2 B........................ Do.......repairing and making tools............................ 19 1 40 26 60 3 C........................ Wheelwright, making gun-carriages................................ 26 1 70 44 20 4 D........................ Do.........repairing......do............................. 16 1 60 25 60 5 E.......................Armorer, repairing arms............................................... 18 50 22 75 6 F........................ Do....cleaning arms................................................ 23 1 40 32 20 7 G........................ Carpenter, making packing-boxes................................... 25 25 31 25 8 H........................ Painter, painting gun-carriages...................................... 17 1 25 21 25 9 I........................ Laborer, removing earth............................................... 13........... 70 9 10 10.K..dg........................digging gravel............................................ 7........... 75 5 25 Amount...................................................: 255 70 -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.... t-j 00 ~p 00o (To be signed by thLe commanding officer.) Endorsement to be as follows: Hired men, Arsenal. December, 18 i Io I WI 0 To ts IP ts D Id 0f I I'n" -

Page  441 FO TH RY 4 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 27. Summaryj statement of work done at Arsenal in the month of , 18 Articles fabricated. 4 6-pounder field carriages. 200 12-pounder sponges. 100 port-fires. I 0,000 musket ball cartridges. 500 pounds of powder proved. 50 24-pounder cannon lackered. Inclosures repaired. Barracks painted and cleaned, &c., &o. Tools. 2 hand hammers. 20 powder measures. Suuvplies forwarded to —, in pur suance of Order No., received Unfinished. 2 6-pounder field carriages. 1 6-pounder caisson. 10 sets iron work for barbette car riages, &c., &c. 50 24-pounder cannon. .500 pounds cannon powder. 1000 sets of infantry accoutrements. Stairs finished in new store-house. This building is now completed, except plastering and painting. Enlisted men. 1 master workman. 10 mechanics. 6 laborers. 3 master workmen. 30 mechanics. 5 laborers. (To be signed by the commanding office.) NOTE.-This statement should exhibit such particulars as are necessary to give a correct view of what has been done at the post during the month, without descending into very minute details. Work may, when necessary, be reported ,n parts; but the articles reported as fabricated should accord with the quarterly abstract. In cases where new buildings or other extensive works are in progress, after stating the particulars of the work done, the extent to which the work has advanced, and its condition at the end of the month, should be stated. Endorsement to be as follows: Work done, Arsenal, December -, 18-. 2L2 I FOR THE AFMY. 441 Other work done. Received from Hired men.

Page  442 Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 28. Beturn of the Officers, Armorers, and others employed at the - the month b~~~~ bo 4 4) Musket work On salaries or wages... IAt piecework............ sifle work.... On salaries or wages... At piece-work............ Total.................................... ARMS AND APPENDAGES. * -._ -- 4) ~~~4)~~~4 Manufactured................................. Delivered to store-keeper................. _ 4 Manufactured at rifle factory.............. Delivered to store-keeper.................. I .3 442 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  443 FOR.THE ARMY. Ordnance Department. Forms. (To be Irinted.) Armory; and also the arms and appendayes manufactred during of., 186. JOBBERS. . 4 0)a iz C - ) n.4 4o 12 s0 .5 o) ~0 cq r62 .4 'A a) otp 4_( ._, c3 E-~ -. ~ 4).. 4 ~ 4) ~: - 0 4 ARMORY, Office of Superintendent,, 186. / A. B., Superintendett. NoTr.-This return will be limited to such operations as are carried on under the appropriation for armories. Persons employed, or work done, at armories, under other appropriations, will be separately reported. Endorsement to be as follows: MONTHLY RETURN. Armory, October, 186. 443 16 41 bo 0 0 0 .i 9 0 41 0 .6 41 0 $4 1 .i 0 pq Iz p .4 1 0 P-4 16 ID -3 60 w li

Page  444 REVISED RE(GULATIONB Ordnance Department. Forms. FORM 29. Inventory of Stores at - Arsenal, 30th June, 186, and report inventory was 0 ^ O 4) 0 - C1lass No. Prices which are not established by the regulations, or by instructions from the Ordnance Office, or the Inspector of Arsenals and Armories, will be determined by reference to the first cost of the property, when it can be ascertained, allowing for such alterations as may have affected the original value. In estimating the cost of the labor of enlisted men, their time will be charged at the following rates: Master workmen..................$1 50 per day Mechanics.......................... 90 " For the whole year, Sundays Artificers........................... 70 " included. Laborers.......................... 60 " _ I 444

Page  445 FOR THE ARMY. 445 Ordnance Department.- Forms. (To be printed.) of operations causing an increase or decrease at any time since the last rendered. o o ~~~'3~~~~~~~~ * mValuation of stores 'o *. remaining. 8.ss e c) * 4 Value per ' ~ ~ m A >, piece, per lb., coz ~ ~ Total value Tot al value of .:5 ~~~~~~of each 0e ~ ofeach class. A0 i t description. 0,C 0 p; Dollars. Cts. Dollars. Cts. Dollars. Cts. Amount carried forward..... NOTE.-In printing the inventories for the national armories, the necessary alterations are made in the headings of the several columns to adapt them to the circumstances of th- case. (Signed by the commanding officer.) FOR THE ARMY. 445

Page  446 446 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Department. —Forms. FORM 80. I hereby certify that I have, this - day of -, 18-, inspected and proved twenty twenty-four pounder iron cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or shells, as the case may be) manufactured by J. M.,'of C. D. C., under his contrast (agreement, or open purchase, as the case may be) with the United Stated, dated. And I do further certify that the said cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or shells, as the case may be) have been inspected and proved by me in exact accordance with the regulations established in the Ordnance Department for the proof and inspection of ordnance before its reception for the service of the United States; that the said cannon have been numbered and weighed, and that their numbers and corresponding weights are as follows, viz.: No. 20........................... 21........................... 22............................ &c., &c., &C. Total weight.................. lbs. The total weight of the cannon being equivalent to pounds. I further certify that the total weight of the shot (or shells, as the case may be) used in the proof of said guns amounts to pounds. Given under my hand, at the -, this day of, 18-. (Signed) W. J. W., Major of Ordnance, Inspector of Ordnance at the foundries. RECAPITULATION. 20 24-pounder cannon (or other ordnance, or shot, or shells, as the case may be). C.F.,,18-. To.L.., DR. For 20 24-pounder cannon, weight -- lbs., at $ per 100 lbs...... $000 00 For 24-pounder shot used in proving the same, weighing lbs., at -per lb........................................................................ 000 00 446 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  447 FOR HE ARMY. 447 Ordnance Department. —Forms. FORM 30.-Continued. Received,, 18-, on the ground of the C. F., the above 20 24-pounder cannon. A. M., Captain of Ordnance, or Military Store-keeper. (To be given in triplicate.) NoTr.-Two of the triplicates are to be forwarded by the contractor to the Ordnance Office-one being intended for the Treasury, and one for the Ordnance Office; the third is retained by the contractor. Endorsement to be as follows: Certificate of Inspection of- pdr. cannon (or shot, or shells), at — Foundry,, 18 —. FOR THE ARMY. 447 (Signed)

Page  448 44 REIE REUAIN Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORM 31. Inspection and Proof of NUMBERS. DIAMETERS-OF i ::sale nore 0 L _)0 _ Third.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.. Preponderance taken at the plane of the muzzle REVISED REGULATIONS 448 lbs.

Page  449 FOR TilE ARMY. 449 OrdnlaneDe opartment. —Forms. (To be prinlted.) at theFoundry, 1 8-. WIDTHS 4,. .3 DIAMZTBRS-OIFo ~ TrUL~dou Rimbses.Cylinder of lmbr 4).-~~~~~~~~~~ 4) 4)t 0 TrunBore. 4) 2 M I I FOR THE ARINTY. 449 Rimbases. Chamber. ell IDIt 0 tz 9 0 0 $44, s :z $4 F. 41 bo 11) r4 bb t. w .s 4 u A P4 . I

Page  450 FORM 31.-(INsPeCTIOO, &c.)-Continued. e 1 AXIS OP LINOTH FROM RPAR OP BABB RING-T0 o 0-' a0 .a P;NRP8OrRC cuAs MUI AXIS OP TRUNNIONS. 6 I. s f)3 00 4 0 0 I certify that the inspection and proof, as herein recorded, have been made in accordan( is in all respects correct. - Foundry, 18-. Endorsement to be as follows: Inspection report of pounder cannon, at - Foundry,, 18-. [ I i i I LENGTH OP TRUNNIONS. RP OF TRUNNIONS. FIRST REENFORCE. g I.I -1 Ci LE. . 0 In I 14 .8 tD .2 R IC -1I 2 9, -' O. ,3 .i :~.4 9 P4 PA i 8 $4 -. .

Page  451 -~~~~~O Tl RY ~ Ordnance Department. Forms. FORK 32. FOUNDRY,, 18-. Proof and Inspection of inch shells, pounder shot, &c. - ~~ I X .~ ~ 0 Z Pounds. Pounds. 77 72 A 4) Pounds. 15,000 ..!I h d :: g a) cS A ,O..' I 0 A~~sP 10 15 25 200 Total number of shells rejected, I as per certificate of inspection of this Total number of shells received date. I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully made, and that this report is in all respects correct. (Signed) W. J. W., Major of Ordnance, Inspector of Cannon and Foundries. Endorsement to be as follows: Inspection Report of - inch shells at I Fouxdry,, 18-. FOR TRB ARMY. 451 IL t = $4 4) .4.2 A 0) 0 I. .4 4. 0 IU I -W, .0.0 m ;g A 1 0 ,. 0 0 " ;,.v iL) k 93 -9 E-4 m 4, A A ;I 1,6 0 1 P. C) 11) 4) f4 0 14 -9 Remarks. I

Page  452 FORM 33. Annual Consolidated Report of the Inspection of Ordnance and Projectiles at the Fo - POUNDER GUNS (OR OTHER ORDNANCE). I II 9. 9-0 s W P. o c3 90.5 96.11 .6 !5 2 o 91 4) ) V0 z w .. 2,s 2000 1500 o o .4) o ,Q 0 12 10 .o 8)OO 150 .2 800a 10 Names of Foundries. 4) 4) 0 1340 C. F...................... W P. F.............180 2 8 174 96.11 1500 150 10 1340 I certify that the above has been carefully made up from my several inspection reports (Signed) W. Endorsement to be as follows: Annual Consolidated Inspection Report of Ordnance and at the foundries for the year ended June 30, 18 — POUNDER ROUND SHO' 16( 180 -i N ow Sz 2 3 ._ a4 b 174 174 W P.F................. I 11 7 I I " ii

Page  453 -~ ~~O TiEAMY Ordnance Department.-Forms. FORE 34. I hereby certify that I have, this - day of —, 18-, inspected and approved three hundred and twenty muskets, three hundred and twenty screwdrivers, three hundred and twenty wipers, thirty-two ball-screws, thirty-two spring vices, and three hundred and twenty spare flint caps, and sixteen packing-boxes (or rifles, pistols, carbines, Hall's rifles, and their appendages, cavalry sabres or swords, accoutrements, -&c., as the case may be), manufactured by A. W., of Millbury, Massachusetts, under his contract (agreement, or open purchase, as the case may be) with the United States, dated January, 18-. And I further certify that the said arms and appendages have been inspected according to the regulations established in the Ordnance Department, and that they conform to the standard models and the established gauges; that they are of good quality and workmanship; that they'ae securely packed in good strong boxes; and that they are, in all respects, conformable to the contract. I also certify that, according to my best judgment, the true value of each packing-box is - dollars and - cents. Given under my hand at Millbury,, this - day of, 18-. (Signed) J. M., Ass't. to Inspector of Arms. Approved: (Signed) R. K. C., Major of Ordnance, Inspector of the contract service. RECAPITULATION. 320 muskets and appendages (or other small arms, as the case may be), viz.: 320 muskets. 320 ramrods. 320 bayonets. 320 screw-drivers, &c. MILLBURY, MASS., November, 18-. Tle U7ited States, For 320 muskets, with bayonets and ramrods, at $12 each................... $000 00 320 screw-drivers, 1 320 wipers, W32 ball-screws Appendages, at cents for each musket..... 000 00 32 ball-sores,IApnae,a 32 spring vices, j 16 packing-boxes, at $2 50 each. Transportation of 16 boxes from Millbury, Massachusetts, to the Water town Arsenal, at $1 20 per box............................................... 000 00 2M2 FOR THE ARMY. 453 To A. W. DR. I

Page  454 REVISED REGULATIONS Ordnance Department. Forms. Received, Watertown Arsenal, November, 18-, sixteen boxes, containing three hundred and twenty muskets and appendages above mentioned. The transportation of arms from Millbury to Watertown Arsenal is estimated at one dollar and twenty cents per box. (Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ord. Com'g. (To be given in triplicate.) NOTES. -This form of certificate will be used for every species of small arms and accoutrements manufactured for the military service of the United States. Two of the triplicates are forwarded by the contractor to the Ordnance Office, one being intended for the Treasury, and one for the Ordnance Office; the third is retained by the contractor. Endorsement to be as follows: Certificate of inspection of muskets (rifles, pistols, &c.), --- quarter, -, 1-. 454

Page  455 -.',...L.,;,L..,.0 D)e pr.nl;etc..) Quarterly Inspection Report of musket barrels (or carbine, rife, or pistol barrels, ( the United States by, of,proved and insp REJECTED FOR DEFECTS. i o o o 20 t Q o o o .o * 0 .2 sH PA .3 c3 o c3 58 li o A a, 0 .6 c3 o o G,) ., c3 V ~ 0 0 ~ ~ ) Date of proof. 0 4:1 ! .IID ) ;I ~ 4 1::I OQ . o , .4 1 O> 4) ,4 'A O ,4 5 5 457 - 5 58 200 Jan.20, 18-........63 I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully made, and the (Signed) Approved: (Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ordnance, Inspector of the Contracz Service. NOTE.- This form will be also used at the U. S. Armories. Its heading, when there use National Armory service, in which it will be signed by the Mastor Armorer and the Superint Endorsement to be as follows: Inspection Report of Musket (Rifle or Pistol) barrel quarter,, 18-. POWDER. ..4 ,.e 0 Pt .El c~ o -I S 63 dS c~ ~D 0 El 457 Jan. 20, 18-..........

Page  456 FORM 36.-(To be printed.) Quarterly Inspection Report of AMuskets (Carbines, Rifles, Pistols, Swords, Sabres, for the United States by, of, inspect REJECTED FOR DEFECTS IN z~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~c ea TIME EMPLOYED IN THE INSPECTION. H 4) 0 DAYS,.D ~ fl Stocks.................................25.............. 325 5............ 5 Barrels............................................. 343 2 21............ 23 Breech-screws...................................... 320................................................ [Names of parts to be inserted according to the kind of arms inspected.] I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully made, and tl have been accepted. (Signed) Approved: (Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ordnance, Inspector of the NoTE.-This form will be also used at the U.S. Armories. Its heading, when there National Armory service, in which it will be signed by the Master Armorer and the SuperiE Endorsement to be as follows: Inspection Report of Muskets (Carbines, common Rifles, or Pistols), - quarter, 18-.

Page  457 FORM 37 Annual Consolidated Inspection Report of Muskets (or Carbines, Rifles, Pistolts, Swords, Sabres, &Ce as the case may be) manufactured on contract for the United States for the year ended the 30th June, 18 RATIO OR NUMBER APPROYED FOR EACH HUNDRID EXAMIN NAMES OP CONT0RATORS. A.B. C. D. E.F. G.H. J. K. L.M. N. O. Barrels from first inspection........................................... 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 Barrels from powder proof................................................. 96.75 97.88 99.54 99.41 99.48 83.90 94.32 Barrels from final inspection........................................... 75.19 85.95 90.08 91.23 87.60 83.14 89.12 [Names of parts to. be inserted according to the kind of arms inspected.] I certify that the above report has been carefully made up from my several quarterly inspection reports. (Signed) H. K. C., Major of Ordnance, and Inspector of the Contract Serzee. NOTE.-This form will be also used at the National Armories. Its heading, when there used, will be so altered as to suit it to the National Armory service, in which it will be signed by the Master Armorer and the Superintendent. This form for the Contract Service is represented with six or eight columns, but for the National Armory Service it will have but one; for the words "Names of Contractors" will be substituted "National Armory, Springfield," "National Armory, Harper's Ferry," &C. Endorsement to be as follows: Annual Consolidated Report of Muskets, &c. for, 18-. 0o t -11 ti S. s ED ID 19 o m -ts ia l Mean. 13 m bd 100 95.88 86.04 ia

Page  458 REVISED RBGIULATIONS Ordnance Department. Forms FORM 38. I hereby certify that I have, this day of —, 18-, inspected and proved ten barrels of cannon powder (or musket or rifle powder, as the case may be), rumbered 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, and 15, manufactured by A. B., of -, under his contract (agreement, or open purchase, as the case may be) with the. United States, dated,18-. And I further certify that the said cannon (or musket or rifle powder, as the case may be) has been inspected and proved by me in exact accordance with the regulations established in the Ordnance Department for the proof and inspection of gunpowder before its reception for the service of the United States, and that the weight of the powder in each of the above-mentioned barrels, saving only so much as was used by me in the proof and inspection, is one hundred pounds. Given under my hand, at the Powder Works of A. B., this - day of. 18-. (To be signed by the proving officer.) RECAPITULATION. 10 barrels cannon (or musket or rifle powder, as the case may be). A. B. POWDER WORKS. The United States, To A. B., DR. For 10 barrels of cannon powder, weighing 1000 lbs., at 15 cents per lb.. $150 00 For 10 barrels, $1 00 each........................................................... 10 00 $160 00 Received at the Arsenal,, 18-, of A. B., the above ten barrels of cannon powder. (Signed) ~~C. D., (Captcin of Ordnance, C. D., Caltain of Ordnance, or Military Store-keeper. (To be signed in triplicate.) NOTr.-Two of the triplicates are forwarded by the contractor to the Ordnance Office-one being intended for the Treasury and one for the Ordnance Office; the third is retained by the contractor. Endorsement to be as follows: Certificate of Inspection of- barrels of cannon (or musket) powder, at the Powder Works of A. B., - -, 18-. 458 (Signed)

Page  459 FOR THE ARMY. 459 Ordnance Department. Forms. FORM 39. Report of the Proof and Inspection of Cannon (AfIusket or Rifle) Powder, manufactured by -- for the Ordnaice Department at the Powder Works of (or at the Arsenal, as the case may be), this day of, 18-. BARRELS PROOF-RANGES. BARRELS REJECTED. RECEIVED. RECEIVED. .0 bo 1 ~~~~~~~~C 0 C) ~ ~ 4.- -). _ bo: b. bo CbO ,a O a; 9 a m m 1 318 306 312.......................................... Received........... 2 293 187 290.......................................... do............ 3 200 210 205 Rejected. 4 178 182 175 Rejected. 6 268 268 26'.......................................... do............. 6 192 190 191 Rejected. 7 261 265 263................................... do............ 8 260 250 255......................................... do............ 9 243 241 242.......................................... do............. 10 200 202 201 Rejected. 11 235 235 235.......................................... do. 12 203 203 203 Rej ected. 13 212 208 210 Rejected. 14 201 199 200 Rejected. 15 232 228 230.......................................... do............ Total number of barrels rejected, 7 ~ as per certificate of inspection of this date. Total number of barrels received, 8 f I certify that the proof and inspection above referred to have been carefully made, and that this report is in all respects correct. (To be signed, in duplicate, by the proving officer.) NOTES.-lst. Quick match will be used in priming the eprouvette. 2d. When government powder is inspected at the arsenals, the first four columns only are used. Endorsement to be as followtcs: Inspection Report of barrels of Cannon (or Musket) Powder, &c., at the Powder Works of A. B., (or at the Arsenal), -—, 18 FOR THE ARMY. 459

Page  460 460 RE'VIED REGULATIONS Proceedings in Civil Courts.-Arms of the United States. ARTICLE XLVIII. PROCEEDINGS IN CIVIL COURTS. 1461. When an officer is made a party to any action or proceeding in a civil court which may involve the interest of the United States; or when, by the performance of his public duty, he is involved in any action or proceeding in which he claims protection or indemnity from the United States, hlie shall promptly report the case to the Adjutant-General, to be laid before the Secretary of War. 1462. In ordinary cases, when an officer is called upon to show by what authority he holds a soldier in service, he can himself set forth the facts, and need not employ counsel. In important cases, if counsel be neces. sary, and there is not time to obtain the previous authority of the War Department, he will forthwith report the facts to the Adjutant-General. ARTICLE XLIX. ARMES OF THE UNITED STATES. 1463. Arms-Paleways of thirteen pieces, argent and gules; a chief, azure; the escutcheon on the breast of the American eagle displayed, proper, holding in his dexter talon an olive-branch, and in his sinister a bundle of thirteen arrows, all proper; and in his beak a scroll, inscribed with this motto: " E PLURIBUS UNUM." . For the crest: over the head of the eagle, which appears above the escutcheon, a glory breaking through a cloud, proper, and surrounding thirteen stars, forming a constellation, argent, and on an azure field. RE,-VISED REGULATIONS

Page  461 FOR THE ARMY. 461 Flags. Colors. ARTICLE L. FLAGS, COLORS, STANDARDS, GUIDONS. GARRISON FLAG. 1464. The garrison flag is the national flag. It is made of bunting, thirty-six feet fly, and twenty feet hoist, in thirteen horizontal stripes of equal breadth, alternately red and white, beginning with the red. In the upper quarter, next the staff, is the Union, composed of a number of white stars, equal to the number of States, on a blue field, one-third the length of the flag, extending to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe from the top. The storm flag is twenty feet by ten feet; the recruiting flag, nine feet nine inches by four feet four inches. COLORS OF ARTILLERY REGIMENTS. 1465. Each regiment of Artillery shall have two silken colors. The first, or the national color, of stars and stripes, as described for the garrison flag. The number and name of the regiment to be embroidered with gold on the centre stripe. The second, or regimental color, to be yellow, of the same dimensions as the first, bearing in the centre two cannon crossing, with the letters U. S. above, and the number of the regiment below; fringe, yellow. Each color to be six feet six inches fly, and six feet deep on the pike. The pike, including the spear and ferrule, to be nine feet ten inches in length. Cords and tassels, red and yellow silk intermixed COLORS OF INFANTRY REGIMENTS. 1466. Each regiment of Infantry shall have two silken colors. The first, or the national color, of stars and stripes, as described for the garrison flag; the number and name of the regiment to be embroidered with silver on the centre stripe. The second, or regimental color, to be blue, with the arms of the United States embroidered in silk on the centre. The name of the regiment in a scroll, underneath the eagle. The size of each color to be six feet six inches fly, and six feet deep on the pike. The length of the pike, including the spear and ferrule, to be nine feet ten inches. The fringe yellow; cords and tassels, blue and white silk intermixed. CAMP COLORS. 1467. The camp colors are of bunting, eighteen inches square; white for infantry, and red for artillery, with the number of the regiment )n them. The pole eight feet long. 2N

Page  462 RBVISED REGULATIONS Uniform, Dress, and Horse Equipments. STANDARDS AND GUIDONS OF MOUNTED REGIMENTS. 1468. -Each regiment will have a silken standard, and each company a silken guidon. The standard to bear the arms of the United States, enmbroidered in silk, on a blue ground, with the number and name of the regiment, in a scroll underneath the eagle. The flag of the standard to be two feet five inches wide, and two feet three inches on the lance, and to be edged with yellow silk fringe. 1469. The flag of the guidon is swallow-tailed, three feet five inches from the lance to the end of the swallow-tail; fifteen inches to the fork of the swallow-tail, and two feet three inches on the lance. To be half red and half white, dividing at the fork, the red above. On the red, the letters U. S. in white; and on the white, the letter of the company in red. The lance of the standards and guidons to be nine feet long, includ. ing spear and ferrule. ARTICLE LI. UNIFORM, DRESS, AND HORSE EQUIPMENTS. COAT. For Commissioned Officers. 1470. All officers shall wear a frock-coat of dark blue cloth, the skirt to extend from two-thirds to three-fourths of the distance from the top of the hip to the bend of the knee; single-breasted for Captains and Lieutenants; double-breasted for all other grades. 1471. For a Olajor-General-two rows of buttons on the breast, nine in each row, placed by threes; the distance between each row, five and one-half inches at top, and three and one-half inches at bottom; standup collar, to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the bottom, and slope thence up and backward at an angle of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs two and one-half inches deep to go around the sleeves parallel with the lower edge, and to button with three small buttons at the under seam; pockets in the folds of the skirts, with one button at the hip, and one at the end of each pocket, making four buttons on the back and skirt of the coat, the hip button to range with the lowest buttons on the breast; collar and cuffs to be of dark blue velvet; lining of the coat black. 1472. For a Brigadier-Genera-the same as for a Major-General, except that there will be only eight buttons in each row on the breast, placed in pairs. 1473. For a Colonel-the same as for a Major-GeneraI, except that there will be only seven buttons in each row on the breast, placed at 462

Page  463 FOIL THE ARMY. 463 Uniform for Enlisted Men. equal distances; collar and cuffs of the same color and material as the coat. 1474. For a Lieutenant- Colone-the same as for a Colonel. 1475. For a Major-the same as for a Colonel. 1476. For a Captain-the same as for a Colonel, except that there will be only one row of nine buttons on the breast, placed at equal distances. 1477. For a First Lieutenant-the same as for a Captain. 1478. For a Second Lieutenant-the same as for a Captain. 1479. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant-the same as for a Captain. 1480. Fora Medical Cadet-the same as fora Brevet Second Lieutenant. 1481. A round jacket, according to pattern, of dark blue cloth, trimmed with scarlet, with the Russian shoulder-knot, the prescribed insignia of rank to be worked in silver in the centre of the knot, may be worn on undress duty by officers of Light Artillery. For Enlisted Men. 1482. The uniform coat for all enlisted foot men, shall be a singlebreasted frock of dark blue cloth, made without plaits, with a skirt extending one-half the distance from the top of the hip to the bend of the knee; one row of nine buttons on the breast, placed at equal distances; stand-up collar to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the bottom and then to slope up and backward at an angle of thirty degrees on each side; cuffs pointed according to pattern, and to button with two small buttons at the under seam; collar and cuffs edged with a cord or welt of cloth as follows, to wit: Scarlet for Artillery; sky-blue for Infantry; yellow for Engineers; crimson for Ordnance and HUospital stewards. On each shoulder a metallic scale according to pattern; narrow lining for skirt of the coat of the same color and material as the coat; pockets in the folds of the skirts with one button at each hip to range with the lowest buttons on the breast; no buttons at the ends of the pockets. 1483. All Enlisted Men of the Cavalry and Light Artillery shall wear a uniform jacket of dark blue cloth, with one row of twelve small buttons on the breast placed at equal distances; stand-up collar to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it, to hook in front at the bottom, and to slope the same as the coat-collar; on the collar, on each side, two blind button-holes of lace, three-eighths of an inch wide, one small button on the button-hole, lower button-hole extending back four inches, upper button-hole three and a half inches; top button and front ends of collar bound with lace three-eighths of an inch wide, and a strip of the same extendir.g down the front and around the whole lower edge FOR THB ARMY. 463

Page  464 REVISED REGULATIONS Uniform. Buttons. of the jacket; the back seam laced with the same, and on the cuff a point of the same shape as that on the coat, but formed of the lace; jacket to extend to the waist, and to be lined with white flannel; two small buttons at the under seam of the cuff, as on the coat cuff; one hook and eye at the bottom of the collar; color of lace (worsted), yellow for Cavalry, and scarlet for -Ught Artillery. 1484. For all Musicians-the same as for other enlisted men of their respective corps, with the addition of a facing of lace three-eighths of an inch wide on the front of the coat or jacket, made in the following manner: bars of three-eighths of an inch worsted lace placed on a line with each button six and one-half inches wide at the bottom, and thencgradually expanding upward to the last button, counting from the waist up, and contracting from thence to the bottom of the collar, where it will be six and one-half inches wide, with a strip of the same lace following the bars at their outer extremity-the whole presenting something of what is called the herring-bone form; the color of the lace facing to correspond with the color of the trimming of the corps. 1485. For Fatigue Purposes-a sack coat of dark blue flannel extending half-way down the thigh, and made loose, without sleeve or body lining, falling collar, inside pocket on the left side, four coat buttons down the front. 1486. For Recruits-the sack coat will be made with sleeve and body lining, the latter of flannel. 1487. On all occasions of duty, except fatigue, and when out of quarters, the coat or jacket shall be buttoned and hooked at the collar. BUTTONS. 1488. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff-gilt, convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain border; large size, seveneighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 1489. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers-gilt, nine-tenths of an inch in exterior diameter, slightly convex; a raised bright rim, onethirtieth of an inch wide; device, an eagle holding in his beak a scroll, with the word "Essayons," a bastion with embrasures in the distance surrounded by water, with a rising sun-the figures to be of dead gold upon a bright field. Small buttons of the same form and device, and fifty-five hundredths of an inch in exterior diameter. 1490. For Officers of the Corps of Topographical Engineers-gilt. seven-eighths of an inch exterior diameter, convex and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the letters 7. in old English characters the other half; small buttons, one-half inch diameter, device and form the same. 464

Page  465 FOR TIlE ARMY. 465 Uniform.-Trowseors.-Hath 1491. For Officers of the Ordnance Department-gilt, convex, plain border, cross cannon and bombshell, with a circular scroll over and across the cannon, containing the words "Ordnance Corps;" large size, seveneighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 1492. For Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Cavalry-gilt, convex; device, a spread eagle with the letter A, for Artillery-I, for InfantryC, for Cavalry, on the shield; large size, seven-eighths of an inch in exterior diameter; small size, one-half inch. 1493. Aides-de-camp may wear the button of the General Staff, or of their regiment or corps, at their option. 1494. For Medical Cadets-same as for Officers of the General Staff. 1495. For all Enlisted M-en-yellow, the same as is used by the Artillery, &c., omitting the letter in the shield. TROWSERS. 1496. For General Officers and Officers of the Ordnance Department -of dark blue cloth, plain, without stripe, welt, or cord down the outer seam. 1497. For Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps, except the Ordnance-dark blue cloth, with a gold cord, one-eighth of an inch in diameter, along the outer seam. 1498. For all Regimental Officers-dark blue cloth, with a welt let into the outer seam, one-eighth of an inch in diameter, of colors corresponding to the facings of the respective regiments, viz.: Cavalry, yellow; Artillery, scarlet; Infantry, sky-blue. 1499. For Medical Cadets-same as for Officers of the General Staff, except a welt of buff cloth, instead of a gold cord. 1500. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light Artillery-dark blue cloth; sergeants with a stripe one and one-half inch wide; corporals with a stripe one-half inch wide, of worsted lace, down and over the outer seam, of the color of the facings of the respective corps. 1501. Ordnance Sergeants and rospstal Stewards-stripe of crimson lace one and one-half inch wide. 1502. Privates-plain, without stripe or welt. 1503. For Companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery-skyblue cloth. All trowsers to be made loose, without plaits, and to spread well over the boot; to be re-enforced for all enlisted mounted men. HAT. 1504. For Officers-of best black felt. The dimensions of medium size to be a follows: 2N2 FOR THEI ARMY. 465

Page  466 4C)6 BEVISED REGULATIONS Uniform.-Trimmings. Width of brim, 3i inches. Height of crown, 6i inches. Oval of tip, i inch. Taper of crown, ] inch. Curve of head, I inch. The binding to be i inch deep, of best black ribbed silk. 1505. For Enlisted Men-of black felt, same shape and size as for officers, with double row of stitching, instead of binding, around the edge. To agree in quality with the pattern deposited in the clothing arsenal. 1506. Medical Cadets will wear a forage cap according to pattern. Trimminys. 1507. For General Officers-gold cord, with acorn-shaped ends. The brim of the hat looped up on the right side, and fastened with an eagle attached to the side of the hat; three black ostrich-feathers on the left side; a gold-embroidered wreath in front, on black velvet ground, encircling the letters I. %. in silver, old English characters. 1508. For Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector-General's, Quartermaster's, Subsistence, A[edical and Pay Departments, and the Judye Advocate, above the rank of Captain-the same as for General Officers, except the cord, which will be of black silk and gold. 1509. For the same Departments, below the rank of Field Officers -the same as for Field Officers, except that there will be but two feathers. 1510. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers-the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered wreath of laurel and palm, encircling a silver turreted castle on black velvet ground. 1511. For Officers of the Topographical Engineers-the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered wreath of oak leaves, encircling a gold-embroidered shield, on black velvet ground. 1512. For Officers of the Ordnance Departmnent-the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered shell and flame, on black velvet ground. 1513. For Officers of Cavalry-the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be two gold-embroidered sabres crossed, edges upward, on black velvet ground, with the number of the regiment in silver in the upper angle. 1514. For Oficers of Artillery-the same as for the General Staff, except the ornament in front, which will be gold-embroidered cross-can REVISED REGULATIONS 466

Page  467 FOR THE ARMY. Uniform.-Forage Caps.-Cravat. non, on black velvet ground,- with the number of the regiment in silver at the intersection of the cross-cannon. 1515. For Officers of Infantry-the same as for Artillery, except the ornament in front, which will be a gold-embroidered bugle, on black velvet ground, with the number of the regiment in silver within the bend. 1516. For Enlisted Men, except companies of Light Artillery-the same as for officers of the respective corps, except that there will be but one feather, the cord will be of worsted, of the same color as that of the facing of the corps, three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, running three times through a slide of the same material, and terminating with two tassels, not less than two inches long, on the side of the hat opposite the feather. The insignia of corps, in brass, in front of the hat, corresponding with those prescribed for officers, with the number of regiment, fiveeighths of an inch long, in brass, and letter of company, one inch, in brass, arranged over insignia. 1517. For Hospital Stewards the cord will be of buff and green mixed. The wreath in front of brass, with the letters UJ. S. in Roman, of white metal. Brim to be looped up to side of hat with a brass eagle, having a hook attached to the bottom to secure the brim-on the right side for mounted men and left side for foot men. The feather to be worn on the side opposite the loop. 1518. All the trimmings of the hat are to be made so that they can be detached; but the eagle, badge of corps, and letter of company, are to be always worn. 1519. For companies of Artillery equipped as Light Artillery, the old pattern uniform cap, with red horsehair plume, cord and tassel. 1520. Officers of the General Staff, and Staff Corps, may wear, at their option, a light French chapeau, either stiff crown or fiat, according to the pattern deposited in the Adjutant-General's office. Officers below the rank of field officers to wear but two feathers. FORAGE CAPS. 1521. For fatigue purposes, forage caps, of pattern in the Quartermnaster-General's office: dark blue cloth, with a welt of the same around the crown, and yellow metal letters in front to designate companies. 1522. Commissioned officers may wear forage caps of the same pattern, with the distinctive ornament of the corps and regiment in front. CRAVAT OR STOCK. 1523. For all Officers-black; when a cravat is worn, the tie not to be visible at the opening of the collar. 467

Page  468 REVISED REGULATIONS Uniform.- Boots.-Bash.- Sword-Belt. 1524. Foi all Enlisted Men-black leather, according to pattern. Boors. 1525. For all Officers —ankle or Jefferson. 1526. For Enlisted Men of Cavalry and Light Artillery-ankle and Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern. 1527. For Enlisted Men of Artillery, Infantry, Engineers, and OC?idnance-Jefferson, rights and lefts, according to pattern. SPURS. 1528. For all Mounted Officers-yellow metal, or gilt. 1529. For all Enlisted Moutnted Men-yellow metal, according to pat tern. (See par. 1648.) GLOVES. 1530. For General Officers and Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps-buff or white. 1531. For Officers of Artillery Invfantry, Cavalry, Dragoons, and Riflemen-white. SASI. 1532. For General Officers-buff, silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twioe around the waist, and to tie behind the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie. 1533. For Officers of the Adjutant- General's, Inspector- General's, Quartermaster's, and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers, Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, Artillery, Infantry, Cavalry, and the Judge Advocate of the Army-crimson silk net; for Officers of the , iedical Department-medium or emerald green silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; to go around the waist and tie as for General Officers. 1534. For all Sergeant Majors, Quartermaster Sergeants, Ordnance Sergeants, Hospital Stewards, First Sergeants, Principal or Chief Mu. sicians and Chief Buglers-red worsted sash, with worsted bullion fringe ends; to go twice around the waist, and to tie behind the left hip, pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie. 1535. The sash will be worn (over the coat) on all occasions of duty of every description, except stable and fatigue. 1536. The sash will be worn by " Officers of the Day" across the body, scarf fashion, from the right shoulder to the left side, instead of around the waist, tying behind the left hip as prescribed. SWORD-BELT. 1537. For all Officers-a waist-belt not less than one and one-half lnch nor more than two inches wide; to be worn over the sash; the 468

Page  469 FOR HE ARMY. 46 Uniform.- Sword and Scabbard. sword to be suspended from it by slings of the same material as the belt, with a hook attached to the belt upon which the sword may be hung. 1538 S. For Geperal Officers - Russia leather, with three stripes of gold embroidery; the slings embroidered on both sides. 1539. For all other Officers-black leather, plain. 1540. For all.Noncommissioned Officers-black leather, plain. SWORD-BELT PLATE. 1541. For all Officers and Enlisted Men-gilt, rectangular, two inches wide, with a raised bright rim; a silver wreath of laurel encircling the "Arms of the United States;" eagle, shield, scroll, edge of cloud and rays bright. The motto, "E PLURIBUS UNUM," in silver letters, upon the scroll; stars also of silver; according to pattern. SWORD AND SCABBARD. 1542. Fot General Officers-straight sword, gilt hilt, silver grip, brass or steel scabbard. 1543. F1r Officers of the Adjutant-General's, Inspector- General's, Quartermaster's, and Subsistence Departments, Corps of Engineers, Topographical Engineers, Ordnance, the Judge Advocate of the Army, Aides-de- Camp, Field Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Foot Rfltemen, and for the Light Artillery-the sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department, April 9, 1850; or the one described in General Orders No. 21, of August 28, 1860, for officers therein designated. 1544. For the Medical and Pay Departments-small sword and scabbard, according to pattern in the Surgeon-General's office. 1545. For Medical Cadets, the sword and belt and plate will be the same as for non-commissioned officers. 1546. For Officers of Cavalry-sabre and scabbard now in use, acording to pattern in the Ordnance Department. 1547. For the Artillery, Infantr,, and Foot RiJGemen, except the field officers-the sword of the pattern adopted by the War Department, April 9, 1850. 1548. The sword an&d sword-belt will be worn upon all occasions of duty, without exception. 1549. When on foot, the sabre will be suspended from the hook attached to the belt. 1550. When not on military duty, officers may wear swords of honor, or the prescribed sword, with a scabbard, gilt, or of leather with gilt mountings.' 469 FOR THE ARMY.

Page  470 REVISED BEGULATIONS Uniform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. SWORD-KNOT. 1551. For General (fficers-gold cord with acorn end. 1552. For all other officers-gold lace strap with gold bullion tassel. BADGES TO DISTINGUISH RANK. Epaulettes. 1553. For the Major-General Commanding the Army-gold, with solid crescent; device, three silver-embroidered stars, one, one and a half inches in diameter, one, one and one-fourth inches in diameter, and one, one and one-eighth inches in diameter, placed on the strap in a row, longitudinally, and equidistant, the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the top; dead and bright gold bullion, one-half inch in diameter and three and one-half inches long. 1554. For all other Major-Generals-the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except that there will be two stars on the strap instead of three, omitting the smallest. 1555. For a Brigadier-Genera-the same as for a Major-General, except that, instead of two, there shall be one star (omitting the smallest) placed upon the strap, and not within the crescent. 1556. For a Cblonel-the same as for a Brigadier-General, substituting a silver-embroidered spread eagle for the star upon the strap; and within the crescent for the Medical JDepartnent-a laurel wreath embroidered in gold, and the letters H [., in old English characters, in silver, within the wreath; Pay Department-,same as the Medical Department, with the letters ~.. in old English characters; Corps of Engineers-a turreted castle of silver; Corps of Topographical Engineers-a shield embroidered in gold, and below it the letters IC 3[., in old English characters, in silver; Ordnance Departmentshell and flame in silver embroidery; Regimental Officers-the number of the regiment embroidered in gold, within a circlet of embroidered silver, one and three-fourths inches in diameter, upon cloth of the following colors: for Artillery-scarlet; Infantrylight or sky blue; Cavalry-yellow. 1557. For a Lieutenant-Colonelthe same as for a Colonel, according to corps, but substituting for the eagle a silver-einbroidered leaf. 1558. For a Major-the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle. 1559. For a Captain-the same as for a Colonel, according to c)rps, except that the bullion will be only one-fourth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle two silver-embroidered bars. 1560. For a First Lieutenant-the same as for a Colonel, according to 470

Page  471 FOE THE ARMY. 471 Uniform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. corps, except that the bullion will be only one-eighth of an inch in diameter, and two and one-half inches long, and substituting for the eagle one silver-embroidered bar. 1561. For a Second Iieutenant-the same as for a First Lieutenants omitting the bar. 1562. For a Brevet Second Leutenanthe same as for a Second Lieu. tenant. 1563. All officers having military rank will wear an epaulette on each shoulder. 1564. The epaulette may be dispensed with when not on duty, and on certain duties off parade, to wit: at drills, at inspections of barracks and hospitals, on Courts of Inquiry and Boards, at inspections of articles and necessaries, on working parties and fatigue duties, and upon the march, except when,in war, there is immediate expectation of meeting the enemy, and also when the overcoat is worn. Shoulder-Straps. 1565. For the Major- General Commanding the Army-dark blue cloth, one and three-eighths inches wide by four inches long; bordered with an embroidery of gold one-fourth of an inch wide; three silver-embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side equidistant between the centre and the outer edge of the strap; the centre star to be the largest. 1566. For all other Major-Generals-the same as for the Major-General Commanding the Army, except, that there will be two stars instead of three; the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both stars of the same size. 1567. For a Brigadier-General-the same as for a Major-General, except that there will be one star instead of two; the centre of the star to be equidistant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of the strap. 1568. For a Colonel-the same size as for a Major-General, and bordered in like manner with an embroidery of gold; a silver-embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap, two inches between the tips of the wings, having in the right talon an olive-branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast, as represented in the arms of the United States; cloth of the strap as follows: for the General Staff and Staff Corps-dark blue; Artillery-scarlet; Iqfantry-light or sky blue; Cavalry-yellow. 1569. For a Lieutenant-Coanel —the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, an I introducing a silver-embroidered leaf at 471 FOR THE ARMY.

Page  472 l72 REVISED REOTIONS- I Uniform.-Badges to distinguish Rank. each end, each leaf extending seven-eigl ths of an inch from the end border of the strap. 1570. For a Majo-the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing a gold-embroidered leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap. 1571. For a Captain-the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end two gold-embroidered bars of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap; the distance between them and from the border equal to the width of the border. 1572. For a First l'eutenant-the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle, and introducing at each end one gold-embroidered bar of the same width as the border, placed parallel to the ends of the strap, at a distance from the border equal to its width. 1573. For a Second Lieutenant-the same as for a Colonel, according to corps, omitting the eagle. 1574. For a Brevet Second Lieutenant-the same as for a Second Lieu tenant. 1575. For a Miedical Cadet-a strip of gold lace three inches long, half an inch wide, placed in the middle of a strap of green cloth three gad three-quarter inches long by one and one-quarter inches wide. 1576. The shoulder-strap will be worn whenever the epaulette is not Chevrons. 1577. The rank of non-commissioned officers will be marked by chevrons upon both sleeves of the uniform coat and overcoat, above the elbow, of silk or worsted binding one-half an inch wide, same color as the edging on the coat, points down, as follows: 1578. For a Sergeant Majorthree bars and an arc, in silk. 1579. For a Quartermaster Sergeant-three bars and a tie, in silk. 1580. For an Ordnance Sergeant-three bars and a star, in silk. 1581. For a Hospital Steward-a half chevron of the following description,-viz.: of emerald green cloth, one and three-fourths inches wide, running obliquely downward from the outer to the inner seam of the sleeve, and at an angle of about thirty degrees with a horizontal, parallel to, and one-eighth of an inch distant from, both the upper and lower edge, an embroidery of yellow silk one-eighth of an inch wide, and in the centre a "caduceus" two inches long, embroidered also with yellow silk, the head toward the outer seam of the sleeve. 1582. For a First Sergeant —three bars and a lozenge, in worsted. 1583. For a Sergeant-three bars, in worsted. 472 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  473 FOR TH ARMY. 473 Uniform. Overcoat. 1584. For a Corporal-two bars, in worsted. 1585. For a Pioneer-two crossed hatchets of cloth, same color and material as the edging of the collar, to be sewed on each arm above the elbow in the place indicated for a chevron (those of a corporal to be just above and resting on the chevron), the head of the hatchet upward, its edge outward, of the following dimensions, viz.: Handle —-four and onehalf inches long, one-fourth to one-third of an inch wide. Hatchettwo inches long, one inch wide at the edge. 1586. To indicate serviceall non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, who have served faithfully for the term of five years, will wear, as a mark of distinction, upon both sleeves of the uniform coat, below the elbow, a diagonal half chevron, one-half an inch wide, extending from seam to seam, the front end nearest the cuff, and one-half an inch above the point of the cuff, to be of the same color as the edging on the coat. In like manner, an additional half chevron, above and parallel to the first, for every subsequent five years of faithful service; distance between each chevron one-fourth of an inch. Service in war will be indicated by a light or sky blue stripe on each side of the chevron for Artillery, and a red stripe for all other corps the stripe to be one-eighth of an inch wide. OVERCOAT. For Commissioned Offcers. 1587. A "cloak coat' of dark blue cloth, closing by means of four frog buttons of black silk and loops of black silk cord down the breast, and at the throat by a long loop d gchelle, without tassel or plate, on the left side, and a black silk frog button on the right; cord for the loops fifteen-hundredths of an inch in diameter; back, a single piece, slit up from the bottom, from fifteen to seventeen inches, according to the height of the wearer, and closing at will, by buttons, and button-holes cut in a concealed flap; collar of the same color and material as the coat, rounded at the edges, and to stand or fall; when standing, to be about five inches high; sleeves loose, of a single piece, and round at the bottom, without cuff or slit; lining, woolen; around the front and lower border, the edges of the pockets, the edges of the sleeves, collar, and slit in the back, a flat braid of black silk one-half an inch wide; and around each frog button on the breast, a knot two and one-quarter inches in diameter of black silk cord, seven-hundredths of an inch in diameter, arranged according to drawing; cape of the same color and material as the coat, removable at the pleasure of the wearer, and reaching to the cuff of the coat-sleeve when the arm is extended; coat to extend down the leg from six to eight inches below the knee, according to height. To indicate rank, there will be on both 20 FOR THE ARMY. 473

Page  474 REVISED REGULATIONS Uniform.-Shirts, Blankets, &c. sleeves, near the lower edge, a knot of flat black silk braid not exceeding one-eighth of an inch in width, arranged according to drawing, and composed as follows: 1588. For a General-of five braids, double knot. 1589. For a Colonel-of five braids, single knot. 1590. For a Lieutenant-Colone-of four braids, single knot. 1591. For a Major-of three braids, single knot. 1592. For a Captain-of two braids, single knot. 1593. For a First Lieutenant-of one braid, single knot. 1594. For a Second Lieutenant and Brevet Second Lieutenant-a plain sleeve, without knot or ornament. For Enlisted len. 1595. Of all Mounted Corps-of sky-blue cloth; stand-and-fall collar; double-breasted; cape to reach down to the cuff of the coat when the arm is extended, and to button all the way up; buttons (1467). 1596. All other E,tlisted Men-of sky-blue cloth; stand-up collar; single-breasted; cape to reach down to the elbows when the arm is extended, and to button all the way up; buttons (1467). 1597. For Cavalry-a gutta-percha talinma, or cloak extending to the knee, with long sleeves. OTHER ARTICLES OF CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT. 1598. Flannel shirt, drawers, stockings, and stable-frock-the same as now furnished. 1599. Blanket-woolen, gray, with letters U. S. in black, four inches long, in the centre; to be seven feet long, and five and a half feet wide, and to weigh five pounds. 1600. Canvas overalls for Engineer soldiers-of white cotton; one garment to cover the whole of the body below the waist, the breast, the shoulders, and the arms; sleeves loose, to allow a free play of the arms, with narrow wristband "buttoning with one button; overalls to fasten at the neck behind with two buttons, and at the waist behind with buckle and tongue. 1601. Belts of all Enlisted Mfen-black leather. 1602. Uartridge-box-according to pattern in the Ordnance Department. 1603. Drum-sling-white webbing; to be provided with a brass drumstick carriage, according to pattern. 1604. Knapsack-of painted canvas, according to pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department; the great-coat, when carried, to be neatly folded, not rolled, and covered by the outer flaD of the knapsack 474

Page  475 w~ ~~~O TH ARM' 75 Horse Equipments. 1605. Haversack-of painted canvas, with an inside sack unpainted according to the pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department. 1606. Canteen-of tin, covered with woolen cloth, of the pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department. TENTS. 1607. For all Commissioned Officers-wall tent, with a fly, pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department. 1608. For Hospital purposes-pattern described in "General Orders" No. 1, of January 19, 1860. 1609. For all EEnlisted Men-Sibley's patent, according to the pattern now issued by the Quartermaster's Department, at the rate of one tent to 17 mounted or 20 foot men. Sheet-iron stoves will be issued with the tents in cold climates, or when specially ordered. 1610. For Officers' Servants and Laundresses-small common tent, old pattern. HORSE FURNITURE. For General Officers and the General Staff. 1611. Housing for General Officers-to be worn over the saddle; of dark blue cloth, trimmed with two rows of gold lace, the outer row one inch and five-eighths wide, the inner row two inches and one-fourth; to be made full, so as to cover the horse's haunches and forehands, and to bear on each flank corner the following ornaments, distinctive of rank, to wit: for the Major- General Commanding the Army-a gold-embroidered spread eagle and three stars; for other Major-Generals-a gold-embroidered spread eagle and two stars; for a Brigadier-General-a gold-em broidered spread eagle and one star. 1612. Saddle-cloth for General Staff Officers-dark blue cloth, of sufficient length to cover the saddle and holsters, and one foot ten inches in depth, with an edging of gold lace one inch wide. 1613. Surcingle-blue web. 1614. Bridle-black leather; bent branch bit, with gilt bosses; the tfront and roses yellow. 1615. Collar-yellow. 1616. Holsters-black leather, with gilt mountings. 1617. Stirrups-gilt or yellow metal. For Officers of the Corps of Engineers and Topographical Engineers. 1618. The same as for General Staff Officers. 1619. In time of actual field service, General Officers and Officers of the General Staff and Staff Corps are permitted to use the horse equip. ments described for mounted service. FOI& THE ARMY. 475 I

Page  476 476 RkVlSED REGULAT1O Horse Equipments. HORSE EQUIPMENTS FOR THE MOUNTED SERVICE. 1620. A complete set of horse equipments for mounted troops consists of 1 bridle, 1 watering bridle, 1 halter, 1 saddle, 1 pair saddle bags, 1 addle blanket, 1 surcingle, 1 pair spurs, 1 currycomb, 1 horse brush, 1 picket pin, and 1 lariat; 1 link and 1 nose bag when specially required. HEAD GEAR. 1621. All the leather is black bridle leather, and the buckles are malleable iron, fiat, bar buckles, blued. 1622. BRIDLE-It is composed of 1 headstall, 1 bit, 1 pair of reins. 1623. HEADSTALL-1 crown piece, the ends split, forming 1 cheek strap and 1 throat lash billet on one side, and on the other, 1 cheek strap and I throat lash, with 1 buckle,.625 inch, 2 chapes and 2 buckles,.75 inch, sewed to the ends of cheek piece to attach the bit; 1 brow band, the ends doubled and sewed form 2 loops on each end through which the cheek straps and throat lash and throat lash billet pass. 1624. BIT (shear steel, blued)-2 branches, S shaped, pierced at top with an eye for the cheek strap billet, and with a small hole near the eye for the curb chain, terminated at the bottom by 2 buttons, into which are welded 2 rings, 1 inch, for the reins; 1 mouth piece, curved in the middle, its ends pass through the branches and are riveted to them; 1 cross bar, riveted to the branches near the lower ends; 2 bosses (cast brass), bearing the number and letter of the regiment and the letter of the company, riveted to the branches with 4 rivets; 1 curb-chain hook, steel wire, No. 10, fastened to the near branch; 1 curb chain, steel wire, No. 11, curb-chain links 0.7 inch wide, with 1 loose ring in the middle, fastened to the off branch by a S hook, coldshut; 1 curb strap (leather), fastened to the curb chain by 2 standing loops. 1625. 1 curb ring for bit No. 1 replaces the curb chain and curb strap. They are of two sizes: No. 1 has an interior diameter of 4 inches; No. 2, of 3.75 inches. The number is marked on the outside of the swell. No. 1 is the larger size. 1626. There are four bits, differing from each other in the arch of the mouth piece, and in the distance from the mouth piece to the eye for the cheek strap. The branches are alike below the mouth piece. No. I is a Spanish bit, No. 2 is the next severest, and No. 4 is the mildest. Height of arch is 2i inches in No. 1, 2 inches in No. 2, 1~ inch in No. 3, and i inch in No. 4. The distance between the branches is 4.5 inches in all the bits. 1627. REINs-2 reins sewed together at one end, the other ends sewed to the rings of the bit. 476 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  477 FOR THE ARMY. 477 - Hsrse Equipments. WATERING BRIDLE. 1628. The watering bridle is composed of 1 but and 1 pair of reins. 1629. BIT (wrought iron, blued)-2 mouth-piece sides united in the middle by a loo} hinge; their ends are pierced with 2 holes to receive 2 rings 1.7 inches diameter for the reins. 2 chains and toggles, 3 links, each 1 inch X 0.55 inch, welded into the rein rings. 1630. REINS-2 reins sewed together at one end, the other end sewed to rings of the bit. HALTER. 1631. 2 cheek pieces, sewed at one end to 2 square loops 1.6 inches diameter, and the other to 2 cheek rings 1.6 inches diameter; 2 standing loops for the toggles of the watering bridle sewed to the cheek piece near to the square loops; 1 crown piece sewed to the off cheek ring, 1 buckle 1.12 inches, and chape sewed to the near cheek ring; 1 nose band, the ends sewed to the square loops; 1 chin strap, the ends sewed to the square loops and passing loose through the hitching-strap ring; 1 throat strap, folded on itself making two thicknesses, and forming at top a loop for the throat band to pass through, and embracing in the fold at the other end 1 bolt which holds 1 hitching-strap ring; 1 throat band passes loose through the loop in the throat strap, and is sewed to the cheek rings; 1 hitching strap 6~ feet long, 1 buckle 1.25 inches, and 1 standing loop, 1 billet sewed to the buckle end by the same seam which holds the buckle. SADDLE. 1632. All the leather is black bridle or harness leather, and the buckles are blued malleable iron. 1633. The saddle is composed of 1 tree, 2 saddle skirts, 2 stirrups, 1 girth and girth strap, 1 surcingle, 1 crupper. SADDLE TREE. 1634. WOOD (beech)-1 pommel made of 2 pieces framed together at top and glued; 1 cantle formed of 2 pieces like the pommel; 2 side bars (poplar), each made of 3 pieces glued together; they are glued to the pommel and cantle, and fastened by 2 rivets, 2 burrs, and 4 nails, the burrs let in on the under side; 1 strap mortise in the pommel, 3 strap mortises in the cantle. 1635. There are three sizes of trees, varying in the length of the seat The number is marked on the pommel ornament. 202 FOR THE ARMY. 477 i

Page  478 478 REVISED REGULATIONS Horse Equipments. No. 1. 11 inches length of seat 15 per cent. No.2. 11I " 50 " No. 3. 12 " 35 1636. IRON.-1 pommel arc 0.1 inch thick, with three small holes on top, fastened to the side bars by 4 ri ets; 1 pommel plate 0.1 inch thick, semi-circular, fastened to the front of the pommel by 4 rivets; 1 cantle arc 0.1 inch thick, with three small holes on top, fastened to the side bars by 4 rivets; 1 cantle plate 0.1 inch thick, fastened to the rear of the cantle by 4 rivets; 2 stirrup loops hinged in 2 holdfasts which are fastened to the side bars by 6 rivets. 1637. The tree is painted with one coat of white lead. It is covered with the best quality kip skin raw hide, put on wet, sewed with thongs of the same and held in place by stitches through the wood along the junction of the pommel and cantle with the side bars. The seams are made on the edges of the side bars, where they will not chafe the horse or rider. 1638. 2 crupper rings, held by staples driven into the front ends of side bars; 2 foot staples for coat straps, fastened to the front of the pommel by 4 brass screws, i inch; 2 crupper rings (japanned black), fastened by staples driven into the rear ends of side bars; 2 foot staples, fastened to the rear of cantle by 4 brass screws, i inch; 1 guard plate, 1 pommel ornament, shield-shaped (sheet brass), fastened to the pommel, each, by 3 brass screw pins; 6 guard plates, fastened to the cantle by 12 screw pins; 2 foot staples, fastened on the back strap by 4 brass screws, inch; 1 saddle-bag stud, fastened on the back strap to the cantle arc by 2 copper rivets. 1639. Two SADDLE SKIRTS (thick harness leather), fastened to the side bars by 38 brass screws, i inch; 2 stay loops for the saddle-bag straps, sewed to the rear edge of the skirts. 1640. Two STIRRUPS (hickory or oak), made of one piece bent, the ends separated by 1 transom and fastened by 2 iron rivets, each, 4 burrs; 2 leather hoods, fastened to the stirrups by 12 copper rivets and burrs distance of hood from rear of stirrup, 6 inches; 2 stirrup straps, 2 brass buckles, 1.375 inches, 2 sliding loops, pass through the stirrup loops and through a hole cut in the skirts; 2 sweat leathers, each has 2 standing loops. 1641. GIRTH-2 girth straps pass over the pommel and cantle arcs, to which they are fastened by 4 copper rivets and 4 burrs; they arc fastened to the side bars by 4 brass screws, 4 inch; the ends are sewed into 2 D rings, 1.85 inches; 2 girth billets, sewed to the straight side of the D rings; I girth, 4.5 inches, blue woolen webbing; 1 chape, 1 buckle, 2 inches, I standing laop, and 1 safe on the off end; and 1 chape, 1 buckle, 1.5 478 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  479 -~~FRTE RY 7 Horse Equipments. inches, 1 D ring, 1.85 inches, 1 standing loop, 1 safe on the near side; 1 standing loop on the middle. 1642. SIx COAT STRAPS, 6 buckles, 0.625 inch, and stops. They pass through the mortises in the pommel and cantle and the foot staples. 1643. ONE CARBINE SOCKET, 1 strap, 1 buckle, 0.75 inch, sewed to the socket. The socket is buckled to the D ring on the off side of the saddle. 1644. ONE SPRCINGLE, 3.25 inches, blue woolen webbing; 1 chape, 1 buckle, 1.5 inches, 1 standing loop on one end, and 1 billet on the othter; 1 billet lining sewed over the end of webbing to the billet; 2 standing loops near the buckle end. 1645. CRUPPER-1 dock, made of a single piece and stuffed with hair, the ends sewed to the body of the crupper; 1 body, split at one end, has sewed to it 1 chape, 1 ring, 1.25 inches, 2 back straps-each has one buckle, 0.75 inch, and 2 sliding loops-they pass through the rings of the side bars and the ring on the body of the crupper. 1646. SADDLE BAGS (bag leather).-They are composed of 2 pouches and I seat; the ends of the seat are sewed to the pouches. Each pouch has 1 back, sewed to the gusset and upper part of inner front with a welt; 1 gusset, sewed to the back and to 1 outer and 1 inner front with a welt; 1 flap, sewed to the top of the back and to the seat by 2 seams; 1 flap billet, sewed to the point of the flap; 1 chape and 1 buckle, 0.625 inch, sewed to the outer front; 1 billet, 1 buckle, 0.625 inch, sewed to the chape. The scat is sewed to the pouch by the same seams which join the flap to the back of the pouch. It has 2 holes for the foot staples and 1 hole for the saddle-bag stud; 2 key straps, sewed to the seat near its ends; 4 lacing thongs for the pouches. 1647. SADDLE BLANKET.-To be of pure wool, close woven, of stout yarns of an indigo-blue color, with an orange border 3 inches wide, 3 inches from the edge. The letters U.S., 6 inches high, of orange color, in the centre of the blanket. Dimensions: 75 inches long, 67 inches wide; weight, 3.1875 pounds; variation allowed in weight, 0.1875 pounds. 1648. SPURS (brass).-2 spurs, 2 rowels, 2 rivets, 2 spur straps, 19 inches long, 2 roller buckles, 0.625 inch, 2 standing loops. Length of heel for No. 1, 3~ inches; for No. 2, 31 inches-inside meas. Width of heel " 3i " " 3 "' Length of shank to centre of rowel, 1 inch. Diameter of rowel, 0.85 inch. 1649. ONE HORSE BRUSH-1 body (maple), Russia bristles; 1 cover, glued and fastened to the body by 8 brass screws; 1 hand strap, fair leather, fastened to the sides of the body by 6 screws; 2 leather washers under the heads of screws. Dimensions: Body, 9.25 inches long, 4 FOR THE ARMY. 479

Page  480 REVISED REGUJLATIONS Uniform.- Miscellaneous. inches wide, 0.5 inch thick; cover, 0.1 inch thick; bristles project 0.9 inch; hand strap, 2 inches wide. 1650. ONE CURRY COMB-iron, japanned black. The pattern of "Carpenter's, No. 333?" 1 body (sheet iron, 0.4), the top and bottom edges turned at right angles, forming two rows of teeth; 3 double rows of teeth, riveted to the body by six rivets; 1 cross bar, riveted across the top by 2 rivets; 1 handle shank, riveted to the body by 3 rivets; 1 handle (wood), turned and painted, passes over the shank and is held by the riveted end of the shank; 1 ferrule, sheet iron. Dimensions: Length, 4 inches; width, 4.75 inches; thickness, 0.75 inch; length of handle, 4 inches; weight, 0.84 pound. 1651. ONE PICKET PIN (iron, painted black).-The parts are: the body, the neck, the head, the swell, the point; 1 lariat ring around the neck, 8-shaped, the larger opening for the lariat. Dimensions: Length, 14 inches; diameter at swell, 4 inches from point, 0.75 inch; at neck, 0.5 inch; at head, 1 inch; lariat ring, 0.2 inch wire, welded, interior diameter, 1 inch; weight of pin, 1.29 pounds. 1652. ONE LARIAT.-Best hemp 1i-inch rope, 30 feet long, of 4 strands; an eye spliced in one end, the other end whipped with small twine; weight, 2.38 pounds. 1653. ONE LINK-1 strap2 embracing in the fold at one end 1 spring hook, and at the other 1 buckle, 0.75 inch, and 1 billet. 1654. ONE NOSE BAG-same as for Light Artillery. MILITARY STORE-KEEPERS. 1655. A citizen's frock-coat of blue cloth, with buttons of the department to which they are attached; round black hat; pantaloons and vest, plain, white or dark blue; cravat or stock, black. MISCELLANEOUS. 1656. General Officers, and Colonels having the brevet rank of General Officers, may, on occasions of ceremony, and when not serving with troops, wear the "dress" and "undress" prescribed by existing regulations. 1657. Officers below the grade of Colonel having brevet rank, will wear the epaulettes and shoulder-straps distinctive of their army rank. In all other respects, their uniform and dress will be that of their respective regiments, corps, or departments, and according to their commissions in the same. Officers above the grade of Lieutenant-Colonel by ordinary commission, having brevet rank, may wear the uniform of their respective regiments or corps, or that of General Officers, according to their brevet rank. 48.0

Page  481 FOR THE ARMY. Volunteers and Miitia. 1658. The uniform and dress of the Signal Officer will be that of a Major of the General Staff. 1659. Officers are permitted to wear a plain dark blue body-coat, with the button designating their respective corps, regiments, or departments, without any other mark or ornament upon it. Such a coat, however, is not to be considered as a dress for any military purpose. 1660. In like manner, officers are permitted to wear a buff, white, or blue vest, with the small button of their corps, regiment, or department. 1661. Officers serving with mounted troops are allowed to wear, for stable duty, a plain dark blue cloth jacket, with one or two rows of buttons down the front, according to rank; stand-up collar, sloped in front as that of the uniform coat; shoulder-straps according to rank, but no other ornament. 1662. The hair to be short; the beard to be worn at the pleasure of the individual; but, when worn, to be kept short and neatly trimmed. 1663. A Band will wear the uniform of the regiment or corps to which it belongs. The commanding officer may, at the expense of the corps, sanctioned by the Council of Administration, make such additions in ornaments as he may judge proper. ARTICLE LII. VOLUNTEERS AND MILITIA IN THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATBS. 1664. Whenever volunteer or drafted militia are called into the service of the United States, by any officer authorized to make such call, the requisition must be made on the Governor of the State or Territory in which the militia are to be raised, and the number of officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates will be stated in the requisition, according to the organization prescribed by the law of the United States. 1665. Before militia are received in the service of the United States, they shall be mustered by an Inspector-General, or some other officer of the regular army, specially designated to muster them. 1666. When volunteers are to be mustered into the service of the United States, they will, at the same time, be minutely examined by the surgeon and- assistant surgeon of the regiment, to ascertain whether they have the physical qualifications necessary for the military service. And in case any individual shall be discharged within three months after entering the service, for a disability which existed at that time, he shall receive neither pay nor allowances except subsistence and transportation to his home. The certificate given by the surgeon will, in all cases. state whether the disability existed prior to the date of muster, or was contracted after it. 0 481.

Page  482 REVISED REGULATIONS Volunteers and Militia. 1667. It shall be the duty of the officer designated to muster and inspect militia, to forward muster-rolls of each company, and of the field and staff of each regiment, direct to the Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington; and he will also immediately forward a consolidated return, by regiments and corps, of the force received into service, for the in formation of the War Department. 1668. Mustering in.-Reference will be made to the particular act ox acts of Congress under which the militia are called into service. If there be no such act, then to the act May 8, 1792, amended by the acts April 18, 1814, and April 20, 1816. Mustering officers will not muster into service a greater number of officers, or of higher rank, than the law prescribes. No officers of the general staff will be mustered or received into service, except such general officers, with their aides-de-camp, as may be required to complete the organization of brigades or divisions. 1669. Mustering out.-The rolls for this purpose will be compared with those of the first muster. All persons on the first rolls, and absent at the final muster, must be accounted for-whether dead, captured, discharged, or otherwise absent; and if the mustering officer, in any particular case, shall have cause to doubt the report made to be entered on the rolls, he shall demand the oath of one or more persons to prove the fact to his satisfaction; further, he shall take care that not more persons of the several ranks be mustered out of service than were mustered in, if there be an excess over the requisition or beyond the law, nor recognize additions or substitutes, without full satisfaction that the additions or substitutions were regularly made, and at the time reported on the rolls. 1670. Officers mustering in troops will be careful that men from one company or detachment are not borrowed for the occasion, to swell the ranks of others about to be mustered. No volunteer will be mustered into the service who is unable to speak the English language. 1671. Officers charged with the duty of mustering militia will take care that the muster-rolls contain all the information that may in any way affect their pay; the distance from the places of residence to the place of rendezvous or organization, and the date of arrival, must be stated in each case; the date and place of discharge, and the distance thence to the place of residence; all stoppages for articles furnished by the Government must be noted on the rolls; and in cases of absence at the time of discharge of the company, the cause of absence must be stated. When the necessary information cannot be obtained, the mustering officer will state the reason. 1672. If, as has sometimes happened, militia, at the end of a term of service, shall, from the want of a mustering officer, disperse or return home without being regularly mustered out; and if, with a view to a paymnent, a muster shall afterward be ordered by competent authority, the 0 4,8-2

Page  483 FOR THE ARMY. 483 Volunteers and Militia. officer sent for the purpose shall carefully verify all the facts affecting pay, by the oath of one or more of the officers belonging to such militia, in order that full justice may be done. 1673. In all cases of muster for payktent, whether final or otherwise, the mustering officer will give his particular attention to the state and condition of the public property: such as quarters, camp-equipage, means of transportation, arms, accoutrements, ammunition, &c., which have been in the use or possession of the militia to be paid; and if any such public property shall appear to be damaged, or lost, beyond ordinarywear or unavoidable accident, such loss or damage shall be noted on the muster-rolls, in order that the injury or loss sustained by the United States may be stopped from the pay that would otherwise be due to the individual or detachment mustered for payment. See regulations of the Ordnance Department. This provision shall be read to all detachments of militia on being mustered into service, and as much oftener as may be deemed necessary. 1674. Payments will, in all cases, be made by the paymasters of the regular army. 1675. Officers of the volunteer service tendering their resignations, will forward them through the intermediate commanders to the officer commanding the department or corps,'armde in which they may be serving, who is authorized to grant them honorable discharges. This commander will immediately report his action to the Adjutant-General of the Army, who will communicate the same to the Governor of the State to which the officer belongs. A clear statement of the cause will accompany every resignation. 1676. Vacancies occurring among the commissioned officers in volunteer regiments will be filled by the Governors of the respective States by which the regiments were furnished. Information of such appointments will, in all cases, be furnished to the Adjutant-General of the Army. FOR THE ARMY. 483 I

Page  484 I

Page  485 APPENDIX. ARTICLES OF WAR. AN ACT FOR ESTABLISHING RULES AND ARTICLES FOR THE GOVERN MENT OF THE ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES.* SECTION 1. Be it enacted, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That, from and after the passing of this act, the following shall be the rules and articles by which the armies of the United States shall be governed: ARTICLE 1. Every officer now in the army of the United States shall, in six months from the passing of this act, and every officer who shall hereafter be appointed shall, before he enters on the duties of his office, subscribe these rules and regulations. ART. 2. It is earnestly recommended to all officers and soldiers diligently to attend divine service; and all officers who shall behave indecently or irreverently at any place of divine worship shall, if commissioned officers, be brought before a general court-martial, there to be publicly and severely reprimanded by the president; if non-commissioned officers or soldiers, every person so offending shall, for his first offense, forfeit one-sixth of a dollar, to be deducted out of his next pay; for the second offense, he shall not only forfeit a like sum, but be confined twenty-four hours; and for every like offense, shall suffer and pay in like manner; which money, so forfeited, shall be applied, by the captain or senior officer of the troop or company, to the use of the sick soldiers of the company or troop to which the offender belongs. ART. 3. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall use any profane oath or execration, shall incur the penalties expressed in the foregoing article; and a commissioned officer shall forfeit and pay, for each and every such offense, one dollar, to be applied as in the preceding article. ART. 4. Every chaplain commissioned in the army or armies of the United States, who shall absent himself from the duties assigned him (excepting in cases of sickness or leave of absence), shall, on conviction thereof before a court-martial, be fined not exceeding one month's pay, * These rules and articles, with the exceptions indicated by the notes annexed to articles 10, 20, 65, and 87, remain unaltered and in force at present. 2 P 485

Page  486 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. besides the loss of his pay during his absence; or be discharged, as the said court-martial shall judge proper. ART. 5. Any officer or soldier who shall use contemptuous or disrespectful words against the President of the United States, against the Vice-President thereof, against the Congress of the United States, or against the Chief Magistrate or Legislature of any of the United States, in which he may be quartered, if a commissioned officer, shall be cashiered, or otherwise punished, as a court-martial shall direct; if a nn-commissioned officer or soldier, he shall suffer such punishment as shall be inflicted on him by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 6. Any officer or soldier who shall behave himself with contempt or disrespect toward his commanding officer, shall be punished, according to the nature of his offense, by the judgment of a court-martial. ART. 7. Any officer or soldier who shall begin, excite, cause, or join in, any mutiny or sedition, in any troop or company in the service of the United States, or in any party, post, detachment, or guard, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as by a court-martial shall be inflicted. ART. 8. Any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, who, being present at any mutiny or sedition, does not use his utmost endeavor to suppress the same, or, coming to the knowledge of any intended mutiny, does not, without delay, give information thereof to his commanding officer, shall be punished by the sentence of a court-martial with death, or otherwise, according to the nature of his offense. ART. 9. Any officer or soldier who shall strike his superior officer, or draw or lift up any weapon, or offer any violence against him, being in the execution of his office, on any pretense whatsoever, or shall disobey any lawful command of his superior officer, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall, according to the nature of his offense, be inflicted upon him by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 10. Every non-commissioned officer or soldier, who shall enlist himself in the service of the United States, shall, at the time of his so enlisting, or within six days afterward, have the Articles for the government of the armies of the United States read to him, and shall, by the officer who enlisted him, or by the commanding officer of the troop or company into which he was enlisted, be taken before the next justice of the peace, or chief magistrate of any city or town corporate, not being an officer of the army,* or where recourse cannot be had to the civil mragis. trate, before the judge advocate, and in his presence shall take the followin8 oath or affirmation: "I, A. B., do solemnly swear, or affirm (as *By Sect. 11 of Chap. 42 August 3, 1861, the oath of enlistment and re-enlsgtment may be administered by any commissioned officeer of the army. 486

Page  487 FOR THE ARMY Articles of War. the case may be), that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against alr their enemies or opposers whatsoever; and observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the Rules and Articles for the government of the armies of the United States." Which justice, magistrate, or judge advoeate is to give to the officer a certificate, signifying that the man enlisted did take the said oath or affirmation. ART. 11. After a non-commissioned officer or soldier shall have been duly enlisted and sworn, he shall not be dismissed the service without a discharge in writing; and no discharge granted to him shall be sufficient which is not signed by a field officer of the regiment to which he belongs, or commanding officer, where no field officer of the regiment is present; and no discharge shall be given to a non-commissioned officer or soldier before his term of service has expired,;but by order of the President, the Secretary of War, the commanding officer of a department, or the sentence of a general court-martial; nor shall a commissioned officer be discharged the service but by order of the President of the United States, or by sentence of a general court-martial ART. 12. Every colonel, or other officer commanding a regiment, troop, or company, and actually quartered with it, may give furloughs to non-commissioned officers or soldiers, in such numbers, and for so long a time, as he shall judge to be most consistent with the good of the service; and a captain, or other inferior officer, commanding a troop or company, or in any garrison, fort, or barrack of the United States (his field'officer being absent), may give furloughs to non-commissioned officers or soldiers, for a time not exceeding twenty days in six months, but not to more than two persons to be absent at the same time, excepting some extraordinary occasion should require it. ART. 13. At every muster, the commanding officer of each regiment, troop, or company, there present, shall give to the commissary of musters, or other officer who musters the said regiment, troop, or company, certificates signed by himself, signifying how long such officers, as shall not appear at the said muster, have been absent, and the reason of their absence. In like manner, the commanding officer of every troop or company shall give certificates, signifying the reasons of the absence of the non-commissioned officers and private soldiers; which reasons anc time of absence shall be inserted in the muster-rolls, opposite the names of the respective absent officers and soldiers. The certificates shall, together with the muster-rolls, be remitted by the commissary of musters, or other officer mustering, to the Department of War, as speedily as the listance of the place will admit. 487

Page  488 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. ART. 14. Every officer who shall be convicted before a general court martial of having signed a false certificate relating to the absence of either officer or private soldier, or relative to his or their pay, shall be cashiered. ART. 15. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false muster of man or horse, and every officer or commissary of musters who shall willingly sign, direct, or allow the signing of muster-rolls wherein such false muster is contained, shall, upon proof made thereof, by two wif nesses, before a general court-martial, be cashiered, and shall be thereby utterly disabled to have or hold any office or employment in the service of the United States. ART. 16. Any commissary of musters, or other officer, who shall be convicted of having taken money, or other thing, by way of gratification, on mustering any regiment, troop, or company, or on signing muster-rolls, shall be displaced from his office, and shall be thereby utterly disabled to have or hold any office or employment in the. service of the United States. ART. 17. Any officer who shall presume to muster a person as a soldier who is not a soldier, shall be deemed guilty of having made a false muster, and shall suffer accordingly. ART. 18. Every officer who shall knowingly make a false return to the Department of War, or to any of his superior officers, authorized to call for such returns, of the state of the regiment, troop, or company, or garrison, under his command; or of the arms, ammunition, clothing, or other stores thereunto belonging, shall, on conviction thereof before a court-martial, be cashiered. ART. 19. The commanding officer of every regiment, troop, or inde. pendent company, or garrison, of the United States, shall, in the begin ning of every month, remit, through the proper channels, to the Depart. ment of War, an exact return of the regiment, troop, independent company, or garrison, under his command, specifying the names of the officers then absent from their posts, with the reasons for and the time of their absence. And any officer who shall be convicted of having, through neglect or design, omitted sending such returns, shall be punished, according to the nature of his crime, by the judgment of a general court-martial. ART. 20. All officers and soldiers who have received pay, or have been duly enlisted in the service of the United States, and shall be convicted of having deserted the same, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as, by sentence of a court-martial, shall be inflicted.* * No officer or soldier in the army of the United States shall be subject to the punishment of death, for desertion in time of reace.-Act 29th Bfay, 1830. 488

Page  489 ~~~~FO TH ARY 48 Articles of War. ART. 21. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall, without leave from his commanding officer, absent himself from his troop, company, or detachment, shall, upon being convicted thereof, be punished according to the nature of his offense, at the discretion of a court-martial. ART. 22. No non-commissioned officer or soldier shall enlist himself in any other regiment, troop, or company, without a regular discharge from the regiment, troop, or company in which he last served, on the penalty f being reputed a deserter, and suffering accordingly. And in case any officer shall knowingly receive and entertain such non-commissioned officer or soldier, or shall not, after his being discovered to be a deserter, immediately confine him, and give notice thereof to the corps in which he last served, the said officer shall, by a court-martial, be cashiered. ART. 23. Any officer or soldier who shall be convicted of having advised or persuaded any other officer or soldier to desert the service of the United States, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be inflicted upon him by the sentence of a court-martial.* ART. 24. No officer or soldier shall use any reproachful or provoking speeches or gestures to another, upon pain, if an officer, of being put in arrest; if a soldier, confined, and of asking pardon of the party offended, in the presence of his commanding officer. ART. 25. No officer or soldier shall send a challenge to another officer or soldier, to fight a duel, or accept a challenge if sent, upon pain, if a commissioned officer, of being cashiered; if a non-commissioned officer or soldier, of suffering corporeal punishment, at the discretion of a courtmartial. ART. 26. If any commissioned or non-commissioned officer command" ing a guard shall knowingly or willingly suffer any person whatsoever to go forth to fight a duel, he shall be punished as a challenger; and all seconds, promoters, and carriers of challenges, in order to duels, shall be deemed principals, and be punished accordingly. And it shall be tha duty of every officer commanding an army, regiment, company, post, or detachment, who is knowing to a challenge being given or accepted by any officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, under his command, or has reason to believe the same to be the case, immediately to arrest and bring to trial such offenders. ART. 27. All officers, of what condition soever, have power to part and quell all quarrels, frays, and disorders, though the persons concerned should belong to another regiment, troop, or company; and either to order officers into arrest, or non-commissioned officers or soldiers into confinement, until thfieir proper superior officers shall be acquainted there. * See note on page 502. 2P2 FOR THIR ARMY. 489

Page  490 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. with; and whosoever shall refuse to obey such officer (though of an inferior rank), or shall draw his sword upon him, shall be punished at the discretion of a general court-martial. ART. 28. Any officer or soldier who shall upbraid another for refusing a challenge, shall himself be punished as a challenger; and all officers and soldiers are hereby discharged from any disgrace or opinion of disadvantage which might arise from their having refused to accept of challenges, as they will only have acted in obedience to the laws, and done their duty as good soldiers who subject themselves to discipline. ART. 29. No sutler shall be permitted to sell any kind of liquors or victuals, or to keep their houses or shops open for the entertainment of soldiers, after nine at night, or before the beating of the reveille, or upon Sundays, during divine service or sermon, on the penalty of being dismissed from all future sutling. ART. 30. All officers commanding in the field, forts, barracks, or garrisons of the United States, are hereby required to see that the persons permitted to suttle shall supply the soldiers with good and wholesome provisions, or other articles, at a reasonable price, as they shall be answerable for their neglect. ART. 31. No officer commanding in any of the garrisons, forts, or barracks of the United States, shall exact exorbitant prices for houses or stalls, let out to sutlers, or connive at the like exactions in others; nor by his own authority, and for his private advantage, lay any duty or imposition upon, or be interested in, the sale of any victuals, liquors, or other necessaries of life brought into the garrison, fort, or barracks, for the use of the soldiers, on the penalty of being discharged from the service. ART. 32. Every officer commanding in quarters, garrisons or on the march, shall keep good order, and, to the utmost of his power, redress all abuses or disorders which may be committed by any officer or soldier under his command; if, upon complaint made to him of officers or soldiers beating or otherwise ill-treating any person, or disturbing fairs or markets, or of committing any kind of riots, to the disquieting of the citizens of the United States, he, the said commander, who shall refuse or omit to see justice done to the offender or offenders, and reparation made to the party or parties injured, as far as part of the offender's pay shall enable him or them, shall, upon proof thereof, be cashiered, or otherwise punished, as a general court-martial shall direct. ART. 83. When any commissioned officer or soldier shall be accused of a capital crime, or of having used violence, or committed any offense against the person or property of any citizen of any of the United States, such as is punishable by the known laws of the land, the commanding 490

Page  491 as~~~~RTH RY 9 Articles of War. officer and officers of every regiment, troop, or company, to which the person or persons so accused shall belong, are hereby required, upon application duly made by, or in behalf of, the party or parties injured, to use their utmost endeavors to deliver over such accused person or persons to the civil magistrate, and likewise to be aiding and assisting to the officers of justice in apprehending and securing the person or persons,so accused, in order to bring him or them to trial. If any commanding officer or officers shall wilfully neglect, or shall refuse, upon the application aforesaid, to deliver over such accused person or persons to the civil magistrates, or to be aiding and assisting to the officers of justice in apprehending such person or persons, the officer or officers so offending shall be cashiered. ART. 34. If any officer shall think himself wronged by his Colonel, or the commanding officer of the regiment, and shall, upon due application being made to him, be refused redress, he may complain to the General commanding in the State or Territory where such regiment shall be stationed, in order to obtain justice; who is hereby required'o examine into said complaint, and take proper measures for redressing the wrong complained of, and transmit, as soon as possible, to the Department of War, a true state of such complaint, with the proceedings had thereon. ART. 35. If any inferior officer or soldier shall think himself wronged by his Captain or other officer, he is to complain thereof to the commanding officer of the regiment, who is hereby required to summon a regimental court-martial, for the doing justice to the complainant; from which regimental court-martial either party may, if he thinks himself still aggrieved, appeal to a general court-martial. But if, upon a second hearing, the appeal shall appear vexatious and groundless, the person so appealing shall be punished at the discretion of the said court-martial. ART. 36. Any commissioned officer, store-keeper, or commissary, who shall be convicted at a general court-martial of having sold, without a proper order for that purpose, embezzled, misapplied, or wilfully, or through neglect, suffered any of the provisions, forage, arms, clothing, ammunition, or other military stores belonging to the United States to be spoiled or damaged, shall, at his own expense, make good the loss or damage, and shall, moreover, forfeit all his pay, and be dismissed from the service. ART. 37. Any non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall be con victed at a regimental court-martial of having sold, or designedly, or through neglect, wasted the ammunition delivered out to him, to be employed in the service of the United States, shall be punished at the discretion of such court. FOR THE ARMY. 491

Page  492 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. ART. 38. Every non-commissioned officer or soldier who shall be convicted before a coulrt-martial of having sold, lost, or spoiled, througk neglect, his horse, arms, clothes, or accoutrements, shall undergo such weekly stoppages (not exceeding the half of his pay) as such courtmartial shall judge sufficient, for repairing the loss or damage; and shall uffer confinement, or such other corporeal punishment as his crime shall deserve. ART. 39. Every officer who shall be convicted before a court-martial of having embezzled or misapplied any money with which he may have been intrusted, for the payment of the men under his command, or for enlisting men into the service, or for other purposes, if a commissioned officer, shall be cashiered, and compelled to refund the money; if a noncommissioned officer, shall be reduced to the ranks, be put under stoppages until the money be made good, and suffer such corporeal punishment as such court-martial shall direct. ART. 40. Every captain of a troop or company is charged with the arms, accoutrements, ammunition) clothing, or other warlike-stores belonging to the troop or company under his command, which he is to be accountable for to his Colonel in case of their being lost, spoiled, or damaged, not by unavoidable accidents, or on actual service. ART. 41. All non-commissioned officers and soldiers who shall be found one mile from the camp without leave, in writing, from their commanding officer, shall suffer such punishment as shall be inflicted upon them by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 42. No officer or soldier shall lie out of his quarters, garrison, or camp without leave from his superior officer, upon penalty of being punished according to the nature of his offense, by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 43. Every non-commissioned officer and soldier shall retire to his quarters or tent at the beating of the retreat; in default of which he shall be punished according to the nature of his offense. ART. 44. No officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier shall fail in repairing, at the time fixed, to the place of parade, of exercise, or other rendezvous appointed by his commanding officer, if not prevented by sickness or some other evident necessity, or shall go from the said place of rendezvous without leave from his commanding officer, before he shall be regularly dismissed or relieved, on the penalty of being punished, according to the nature of his offense, by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 45. Any commissioned officer who shall be found drunk on his guard, party, or other duty, shall be cashiered. Any non-commissioned officer br soldier so offending shall suffer such corporeal punishment as shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court-martial. 402

Page  493 VO B THB ARMY. Articles of War. ART. 46. Any sentinel who shall be found sleeping upon his post, or shall leave it before he shall be regularly relieved, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be inflicted by the sentence of a court. martial. ART. 47. No soldier belonging to any regiment, troop, or company shall hire anotherto do his duty for him, or be excused from duty but in cases of sickness, disability, or leave of absence; and every such soldier found guilty of hiring his duty, as also the party so hired to do anothej's duty, shall be punished at the discretion of a regimental court-martial. ART. 48. And every non-commissioned officer conniving at such hiring of duty aforesaid, shall be reduced; and every commissioned officer knowing and allowing such ill practices in the service, shall be punished by the judgment of a general court-martial. ART. 49. Any 6fficer belonging to the service of the United States, who, by discharging of firearms, drawing of swords, beating of drums, or by any other means whatsoever, shall occasion false alarms in camp, garrison, or quarters, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial. ART. 50. Any officer or soldier who shall, without urgent necessity, or without the leave of his superior officer, quit his guard, platoon, or division, shall be punished, according to the nature of his offense, by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 51. No officer or soldier shall do violence to any person who brings provisions or other necessaries to the camp, garrison, or quarters of the forces of the United States, employed in any parts out of the said States, upon pain of death, or such other punishment as a court-martial shall direct. ART. 52. Any officer or soldier who shall misbehave himself before the enemy, run away, or shamefully abandon any fort, post, or guard which he or they may be commanded to defend, or speak words inducing others to do the like, or shall cast away his arms and ammunition, or who shall quit his post or colors to plunder and pillage, every such offender, being duly convicted thereof, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a general court-martial. ART. 53. Any person belonging to the armies of the United States who shall make known the watchword to any person who is not entitled to receive it according to the rules and discipline of war, or shall presume to give a parole or watchword different from what he received, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a generaleourt-martial. -ART. 54. All officers and soldiers are to behave themselves orderly in quarters and on their march; and whoever shall commit any waste or 493

Page  494 RE VIS-ED REGIULATIONB Articles of War. spoil, either in walks of trees, parks, warrens, fish-ponds, houses, or gar dens, corn-fields, inclosures of meadows, or shall maliciously destroy any property whatsoever belonging to the inhabitants of the United States, unless by order of the then commander-in-chief of the armies of the said States, shall (besides such penalties as they are liable to by law) be punished according to the nature and degree of the offense, by the judg ment of a regimental or general court-martial. ART. 55. Whosoever, belonging to the armies of the United States in foreign parts, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death. ART. 56. Whosoever shall relieve the enemy with money, victuals, or ammunition, or shall knowingly harbor or protect an enemy, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 57. Whosoever shall be convicted of holding correspondence with, or giving intelligence to, the enemy, either directly or indirectly, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be ordered by lhe scntence of a court-martial. ART. 58. All public stores taken in the enemy's camp, towns, forts, or magazines, whether of artillery, ammunition, clothing, forage or provisions shall be secured for the service of the United States; fo- the neglect of which the commanding officer is to be answerable. ART. 59. If any commander of any garrison, fortress, or post shall be compelled, by the officers and soldiers under his command, to give up to the enemy, or to abandon it, the commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers, or soldiers who shall be convicted of having so offended, shall' suffer death, or such other punishment as shall be inflicted upon them by the sentence of a court martial. ART. 60. All sutlers and retainers to the camp, and all persons whatsoever, serving with the armies of the United States in the field, though not enlisted soldiers, are'to be subject to orders, according to the rules and discipline of war. ART. 61. Officers having brevets or commissions of a prior date to those of the regiment in which they serve, may take place in courtsmartial and on detachments, when composed of different corps, according to the ranks given them in their brevets or dates of their former com I missions; but in the regiment, troop, or company to which such officerb belong, they shall do duty and take rank both in courts-martial and on detachments which shall be composed of their own corps, according to the commissions by which they are mustered in the said corps. ART. 62. If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of the army shall happen to join, or do duty together, the officer highest in rank of the line of the army, marine corps, or militia, by commission;: 494

Page  495 .~ ~~~~O TH ARY 406 Articles of War. there on duty or in quarters, shall command the whole, and give orders for what is needful to the service, unless otherwise specially directed by the President of the United States, according to the nature of the case. ART. 63. The functions of the engineers being generally confined to the most elevated branch of military science, they are not to assume, nor are they subject to be ordereL on any duty beyond the line of their im. mediate profession, except by the special order of the President of the United States; but they are to receive every mark of respect to which their rank in the army may entitle them respectively, and are liable to be transferred, at the discretion of the President, from one corps to another, regard being paid to rank. ART. 64. General courts-martial may consist of any number of commissioned officers, from five to thirteen, inclusively; but they shall not consist of less than thirteen where that number can be convened without manifest injury to the service. ART. 65.* Any general officer commanding an army, or Colonel corn.m manding a separate department, may appoint general courts-martial when. ever necessary, But no sentence of a court-martial shall be carried into execution until after the whole proceedings shall have been laid before the officer ordering the same, or the officer commanding the troops for the time being; neither shall any sentence of a general courtmartial, in the time of peace, extending to the loss of life, or the dismission of a commissioned officer, or which shall, either in time of peace or war, respect a general officer, be carried into execution, until after the whole proceedings shall have been transmitted to the Secretary of War, to be laid before the President of the United States for his confirmation or disapproval, and orders in the case. All other sentences may be confirmed and executed by the officer ordering the court to assemble, or the cornm. manding officer for the time being as the case may be. ART. 66. Every officer commanding a regiment or corps may appoint, for his own regiment or corps, courts-martial, to consist of three commissioned officers, for the trial and - punishment of offenses not] capital, and * Whenever a general officer commanding an army, or a colonel commanding a sepa rate department, shall be the accuser or prosecutor of any officer in the army of the United States, under his command, the general court-martial for the trial of such officer shall be appointed by the President of the United States. The proceedings and sentence of the said court shall be sent directly to the Secretary of War, to be by him laid before the President, for his confirmation or approval, or orders in the case. So much of the sixty-fifth article of the first section of "An act for establishing rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United States," passed on the tenth of April, eighteen hundred and six, as is repugnant hereto, shall be, and the same is hereby, repealed. —iAt 29th May, 15830, *est. 1, 2,. FOR THEARM.Y. w

Page  496 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. decide upon their sentences. For the same purpose, all officers commanding any of the garrisons, forts, barracks, or other places where the troops consist of different corps, may assemble courts-martial, to consis+ of three commissioned officers, and decide upon their sentences. ART. 67. No garrison or regimental court-martial shall have the power to try capital cases or commissioned officers; neither shall they inflict a fine exceeding one month's pay, nor imprison, nor put to hard labor, any non-commissioned officer or soldier for a longer time than one month. ART. 68. Whenever it may be found convenient and necessary to the public service, the officers of the marines shall be associated with the officers of the land forces, for the purpose of holding courts-martial, and trying offenders belonging to either; and, in such cases, the orders of the senior officer of either corps who may be present and duly authorized, shall be received and obeyed. ART 69. The judge advocate, or some person deputed by him, or by the general, or officer commanding the army, detachment, or garrison, shall prosecute in the name of the United States, but shall so far consider himself as counsel for the prisoner, after the said prisoner shall have made his plea, as to object to any leading question to any of the witnesses or any question to the prisoner, the answer to which might tend to criminate himself; and administer to each member of the court, before they proceed upon any trial, the following oath, which shall also be taken by all members of the regimental and garrison courts-martial: "You, A. B., do swear that you will well and truly try and determine, according to evidence, the matter now before you, between the United States of America and the prisoner to be tried, and that you will duly administer justice, according to the provisions of'An act establishing Rules and Articles for the government of the armies of the United States,' without partiality, favor, or affection; and if any doubt should arise, not explained by said Articles, according to your conscience, the best of your under standing, and the custom of war in like cases; and you do further sweat that you will not divulge the sentence of the court until it shall be published by the proper authority; neither will you disclose or discover the vote or opinion of any particular member of the court-martial, unless required to give evidence thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in a due course of law. So help you God." And as soon as the said oath shall have been administered to the respective members, the president Df the court shall administer to the judge advocate, or person officiatir g as such, an oath in the following words: "You, A. B., do swear, that you will not disclose or discover the vote or opinion of any particular member of the court-martial, unless required 4M

Page  497 ~~~~~O'H RY 9 Articles of War. to give evidence thereof, as a witness, by a court of justice, in due course of law; nor divulge the sentence of the court to any but the proper authority, until it shall be duly disclosed by the same. So help you God." ART. 70. When a prisoner, arraigned before a general court-martialshall, from obstinacy and deliberate design, stand mute, or answer foreign to the purpose, the court may proceed to trial and judgment as if the prisoner had regularly pleaded not guilty. ART. 71. When a member shall be challenged by a prisoner, he must state his cause of challenge, of which the court shall, after due deliberation, determine the relevancy or validity, and decide accordingly; and no challenge to more than one member at a time shall be received by the court ART. 72. All the members of a court-martial are to behave with decency and calmness; and in giving their votes are to begin with the youngest in commission. ART. 73. All persons who give evidence before a court-martial are to be examined on oath or affirmation, in the following form: "You swear, or affirm (as the case may be), the evidence you shall give in the cause now in hearing shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. So help you God." ART. 74. On the trials of cases not capital, before courts-martial, the deposition of witnesses, not in the line or staff of the army, may be taken before some justice of the peace, and read in evidence; provided the prosecutor and person accused are present at the taking the same, or are duly notified thereof. ART. 75. No officer shall be tried but by a general court-marti aor by officers of an inferior rank, if it can be avoided. Nor shall any pro ceedings of trials be carried on, excepting between the hours of eight in the morning and three in the afternoon, excepting in cases which, in the opinion of the officer appointing the court-martial, require immediate example. ART. 76. No person whatsoever shall use any menacing words, signs, or gestures, in presence of a court-martial, or shall cause any disorder or riot, or disturb their proceedings, on the penalty of being punished at the discretion of the said court-martial. ART. 77. Whenever any officer shall be charged with a crime, he shall be arrested and confined in his barracks, quarters, or tent, and deprived of his sword by the commanding officer. And any officer who shall leave his confinement before he shall be set at liberty by his commanding officer, or by a superior officer, shall be cashiered. ART. 78. Non-commissioned officers and soldiers, charged with crimes, shall be confined until tried by a co-rt-martial, or released by proper authority. 2Q FOR THE ARALY. 497

Page  498 498 REVISED BEGULATION Articles of War. ART. 79. No officer or soldier who shall be put in arrest shall continue in confinement more than eight days, or until such time as a court-martial can be assembled. ART. 80. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall refuse to receive or keep any prisoner committed to his charge by an officer belonging to the forces of the United States; provided the officer committing shall, at the same time, deliver an account in writing, signed by himself, of the crime with which the said prisoner is charged. ART. 81. No officer commanding a guard, or provost marshal, shall presume to release any person committed to-his charge without proper authority for so doing, nor shall he suffer any person to escape, on the penalty of being punished for it by the sentence of a court-martial. ART. 82. Every officer or provost marshal, to whose charge prisoners shall be committed, shall, within twenty-four hours after such commitment, or as soon as he shall be relieved from his guard, make report in writing, to the commanding officer, of their names, their crimes, and the names of the officers who committed them, on the penalty of being punished for disobedience or neglect, at the discretion of a court-martial. ART. 83. Any commissioned officer convicted before a general courtmartial of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, shall be dismissed the service, ART. 84. In cases where a court-martial may think it proper to sentence a commissioned officer to be suspended from command, they shall have power also to suspend his pay and emoluments for the same time, according to the nature and heinousness of the offense. ART. 85. In all cases where a commissioned officer is cashiered for cowardice or fraud, it shall be added in the sentence, that the crime, name, and place of abode, and punishment of the delinquent, be published in the newspapers in and about the camp, and of the particular State from which the offender came, or where he usually resides; after which it shall be deemed scandalous for an officer to associate with him. ART. 86. The commanding officer of any post or detachment, in which there shall not be a number of officers adequate to form a general courtmartial, shall, in cases which require the cognizance of such a court, report to the commanding officer of the department, who shall order a court to be assembled at the nearest post or department, and the party accused, with necessary witnesses, to be transported to the place where the said court shall be assembled. ART. 87.* No person shall be sentenced to suffer death but by the * So much of these rules and articles as authorizes the infliction of corporeal punishment by stripes or lashes, was specially repealed by Act of 16th May, 1812. By Act of 2d 49:8 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  499 I )R TtIR AR.A.Y. Articles of War. concurrence of two-thirds of the members of a general court-martial, nor except in the cases herein expressly mentioned; nor shall more than fifty lashes be inflicted on any offender, at the discretion of a courtmartial; and no officer, non-commissioned officer, soldier, or follower of the army, shat be tried a second time for the same offense. ART. 88. No person shall be liable to be tried and punished by a general court-martial for any offense which shall appear to have been committed more than two years before the issuing of the order for such trial, unless the person, by reason of having absented himself, or some other manifest impediment, shall not have been amenable to justice within that period. ART. 89. Every officer authorized to order a general court-martial shall have power to pardon or mitigate any punishment ordered by such court, except the sentence of death, or of cashiering an officer; which, in the cases where he has authority (by Article 65) to carry them into execution, he may suspend, until the pleasure of the President of the United States can be known; which suspension, together with copies of the proceedings of the court-martial, the said officer shall immediately transmit to the President for his determination; And the colonel or commanding officer of the regiment or garrison where any regimental or garrison court-martial shall be held, may pardon or mitigate any punishment ordered by such court to be inflicted. ART. 90. Every judge advocate, or person officiating as such, at any general court-martial, shall transmit, with as much expedition as the opportunity of time and distance of place can admnit, the original proceedings and sentence of such court-martial to the Secretary of War; which said original proceedings and sentence shall be carefully kept and preserved in the office of said Secretary, to the end that the persons entitled thereto may be enabled, upon application to the said office, to obtain copies thereof. The party tried by any general court-martial shall, upon demand thereof, made by himself, or by any person or persons in his behalf, be entitled to a copy ofthe sentence and proceedings of such court-martial. ART. 91. In cases where the general, or commanding officer may order a court of inquiry to examine into the nature of any transaction, accusation, or imputation against any officer or soldier, the said court shall consist of one or more officers, not exceeding three, and a judge advocate, or other suitable person, as a recorder, to reduce the proceedings and March, 1833, the repealing act was repealed, so far as it applied to the crime of desertion, Which, of course, revived the punishment by lashes for that offense. Flogging was toll abolished by qw. 3 of Chap. 54, 5 August, 1861. 499

Page  500 REVISED REGULATIONS Article8 of War. evidence to writing; all of whom shall be sworn to the faithful perform ance of their duty. This court shall have the same power to summon witnesses as a court-martial, and to examine, them on oath. But they shall not give their opinion on the merits of the, case, excepting they shall be thereto specially required. The parties accused shall also be permitted to cross-examine and interrogate the witnesses, so as to investi gate fully the circumstances in the question. ART. 92. The proceedings of a court of inquiry must be authenticated by the signature of the recorder and the president, and delivered to the commanding officer, and the said proceedings may be admitted as evidence by a court-martial, in cases not capital, or extending to the dismission of ian officer, provided that the circumstances are such that oral testimony cannot be obtained. But as courts of inquiry may be perverted to dis. honorable purposes, and may be considered as engines of destruction to military merit, in the hands of weak and envious commandants, they are hereby prohibited, unless directed by the President of the United States, or demanded by the accused. ART. 93. The judge advocate or recorder shall administer to the mem bers the following oath:. "You shall well and truly examine and inquire, according to your evidence, into the matter now before you, without partiality favor, affection, prejudice, or hope of reward. So help you God." After which the president shall administer to the judge advocate or recorder the following oath: "You, A. B., do swear that you will, according to your best abilities accurately and impartially record the proceedings of the court, and the evidence to be given in the case in hearing. So help you God." The witnesses shall take the same oath as witnesses sworn before a uoart-martial. ART. 94. When any commissioned officer shall die or be killed in the service of the United States, the major of the regiment, or the officer doing the major's duty in his absence, or in any post or garrison, the second officer in command, or the assistant military agent, shall immediately secure all his effects or equipage, then in camp or quarters, and shall make an inventory thereof, and forthwith transmit the same to the office of the Department of War, to the end that his executors or administrators may receive the same. ART. 95. When any non-commissioned officer or soldier shall die, qr be killed in the service of the United States, the then commanding officer of the troop or company shall, in the presence of two other commissioned officers, take an account of what effects he died possessed of, above his arms and accoutrements, and transmit the same to the office of the De 500

Page  501 FOR TilE ARMY. 501 Articles of War. partment of War, which said effects are to be accounted for, and paid to the representatives of such deceased non-commissioned officer or soldier. And in case any of the officers, so authorized to take care of the effects of deceased officers and soldiers, should, before they have accounted to their representatives foi the same, have occasion to leave the regiment or post, by preferment or otherwise, they shall, before they be permitted to quit the same, deposit in the hands of the commanding officer, or of the assistant military agent, all the effects of such deceased non-commissioned officers and soldiers, in order that the same may be secured for, and paid to, their respective representatives. ART. 96. All officers, conductors, gunners, matrosses, drivers, or other persons whatsoever, receiving pay or hire in the service of the artillery, or corps of engineers of the United States, shall be governed by the aforesaid Rules and Articles, and shall be subject to be tried by courtsmartial, in like manner with the officers and soldiers of the other troops in the service of the United States. ART. 97. The officers and soldiers of any troops; whether mnilitia or others, being mustered and in pay of the United States, shall, at all times and in all places, when joined, or acting in conjunction with the regular forces of the United States, be governed by these rules and articles of war, and shall be subject to be tried by courts-martial, in like manner with the officers and soldiers in the regular forces; save only that such courts-martial shall be composed entirely of militia of!icers. ART. 98. All officers serving by commission fromn tle authority of any particular State, shall, on all detachments, courts-martial, or ohlier duty, wherein they may be employed in conjunction with the regular forces of the United States, take rank next after all officers of the like grade in said regular forces, notwithstanding the commissions of such militia or State officers may be elder than the commissions of the officers of the regular forces of the United States. ART. 99. All crimes not capital, and all disorders and neglects which officers and soldiers may be guilty of, to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, though not mentioned in the foregoing articles of war, are to be taken cognizance of by a general or regimental courtmartial, according to the nature and degree of the offense, and be punished at their discretion. ART. 100. The President of the United States shall have power to prescribe the uniform of the army. ART. 101. The foregoing articles are to be read and published, once in every six months, to every garrison, regiment, troop, or company, mustered, or to be mustered, in tl e service of the United States, and 2Q2 FOR, THEIARMY. 601

Page  502 REVISED REGULATIONS Articles of War. are to be duly observed and obeyed by all officers and soldiers who axe, or shall be, in said service. SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That in time of war, all persons not citizens of, or owing allegiance to, the United States of America, who shall be found lurking as spies in or about the fortifications or encampments of the armies of the United States, or any of them, shall suffer death, according to the law and usage of nations, by sentence of a general court-martial. SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That the rules and regulations by which the armies of the United States have heretofore been governed, and the resolves of Congress thereunto annexed, and respecting the same, shall henceforth be void and of no effect, except so far as may relate to any transactions under them prior to the promulgation of this act, at the several posts and garrisons respectively, occupied by any part of the army of the United States. [APPROYED, April 10, 1806.] 502

Page  503 FOR THE ARMY. 50 Extracts from Acts of Congress. -EXTRACTS FROM ACTS OF CONGRESS. 1. IF any non-commissioned officer, musician, or private shall desert the service of the United States, he shall, in addition to the penalties mentioned in the Rules and Articles of War, be liable to serve for and during such a period as shall, with the time he may have served previous to his desertion, amount to the full term of his enlistment; and such soldier shall and may be tried by a court-martial, and punished, although the term of his enlistment may have elapsed previous to his being apprehended or tried.-Act 16th March, 1802, Sec. 18. 2. "That if any person shall sell, exchange, or give, barter or dispose of; any spirituous liquor or wine to an Indian (in the Indian country), such person shall forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars; and if any person shall introduce, or attempt to introduce, any spirituous liquor or wine into the Indian country, except such supplies as shall be . necessary for the officers of the United States and troops of the service, under the direction of the War Department, such person shall forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding three hundred dollars; and if any superintendent of Indian affairs, Indian agent, or sub-agent, or commanding officer of a military post, has reason to suspect, or is informed, that any white person or Indian is about to introduce, or has introduced, any spirituous liquor or wine into the Indian country, in violation of the provisions of this section, it shall be lawful for such superintendent, Indian agent, or sub-agent, or military officer, agreeably to such regulations as may be established by the President of the United States, to cause the boats, stores, packages, and places of deposit of such person to be searched, and if any such spirituous liquor or wine is found, the goods, boats, packages, and peltries of such persons shall be seized and delivered to the proper officer, and shall be proceeded against by libel, in the proper court, and forfeited, one half to the use of the informer, and the other half to the use of the United States; and if such person is a trader, his license shall be revoked and his bond put in suit. And it shall moreover be lawful for any person in the service of the United States, or for any Indian, to take and destroy any ardent spirits or wine found in the Indian country, excepting military supplies as mentioned in this section." -Act 30th June, 1834, Sec. 20. FOR THE ARMY. 503

Page  504 504 REVISED REGULATIONS Extracts from Acts of Coagrcss. 3. "That if any person whatever shall, within the limits of the IndianD country, set up or continue any distillery for manufacturing ardent spirits, he shall forfeit and pay a penalty of one thousand dollars, and it shall be the duty of the superintendent of Indian affairs, Indian agent, or subagent, within the limits of whose agency the same shall be set up or con. tinued, forthwith to destroy and break up the same; and it shall be lawful to employ the military force of the United States in executing that duty."-Act 30th June, 1834, Sec. 21. 4. "That the twentieth section of the'Act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and To preserve peace on the frontiers,' approved June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, be and the same is hereby so amended, that, in addition to the fines thereby imposed, any person whio shall sell, exchange, or barter, give, or dispose of, any spirituous liquor or wine to an Indian, in the Indian country, or who shall introduce, or attempt to introduce, any spirituous liquor or wine into the Indian country, except such supplies as may be necessary for the officers of the United States and the troops of the service, under the direction of the War Department, such person, on conviction thereof, before the proper district court of the United States, shall in the former case be subject to imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years, and in the latter case not exceeding one year, as shall be prescribed by the court, according to the extent and criminality of the offense. And in all prosecutions arising under this section, and under the twentieth section of the act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and preserve peace on the frontiers, approved June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and thirty-four, to which this is an amendment, Indians shall be competent witnesses."-Act 3d March, 1847, Sec. 2. 5. "That no annuities, or moneys, or goods shall be paid or distributed to the Indians while they are under the influence of any description of intoxicating liquor; nor while there are good and sufficient reasons for the officers or agents, whose duty it may be to make such payments or distributions, for believing that there is any species of intoxicating liquor within convenient reach of the Indians; nor until the chiefs and head men of the tribe shall have pledged themselves to use all their influence, and to make all proper exertions to prevent the introduction and sale of such liquor in their country."-Act 3d March, 1847, Sec. 3. AN ACT to authorize the employment of volunteers to aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public property. WHEREAS, certain of the forts, arsenals, custom-houses, navy yards, and other property of the UTJnit(d States have seen seized, and other viola. 504 REVISED REGULATIONS

Page  505 FOR TIlE ARMY. Extracts from Acts of Congress. tions of law have been committed and are threatened by organized bodies of men in several of the States, and a conspiracy has been entered into to overthrow the government of the United States: Therefore, Be it enacted by the Senate and House of?Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President be and he is hereby authorized to accept the services of volunteers, either as cavalry, infantry, or artillery, in such numbers,* not exceeding five hundred thousand, as he may deem necessary, for the purpose of repelling invasion, suppressing insurrection, enforcing the laws, and preserving and protecting the public property: Provided, That the services of the volunteers shall be for such time as the President may direct, not exceeding three years nor less than six months, and they shall be disbanded at the end of the war. And all provisions of law applicable to three years' volunteers shall apply to two years' volunteers, and to all volunteers who have been, or may be, accepted into the service of the United States for -a period not less than six months, in the same manner as if such volunteers were specially named. Before receiving into service any number of volunteers exceeding those now called for and accepted, the President shall, from time to time, issue his proclamation, stating the number desired, either as cavalry, infantry, or artillery, and the States from which they are to be furnished, having reference, in any such requisition, to the number then in service from the several States, and to the exigencies of the service at the time, and equalizing, as far as practicable, the number furnished by the several States, according to Federal population. SEc. 2. And be i,t further enacted, That the said volunteers shall be subject to the rules and regulations governing the army of the United States, and that they shall be formed, by the President, into regiments of infantry, with the-exception of such numbers for cavalry and artillery, as he may direct, not to exceed the proportion of one company of each of those arms to every regiment of infantry, and to be organized as in the regular service. Each regiment of infantry shall have one colonel, one lieutenant-colonel, one major, one adjutant (a lieutenant), one quartermaster (a lieutenant), one surgeon and one assistant surgeon, one sergeant major, one regimental quartermaster sergeant, one regimental commissary sergeant, one hospital steward, two principal musicians, and twenty four musicians for a band; and shall be composed of ten companies, each company to consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, one first sergeant, four sergeants, eight corporals, two musicians, one wagoner, and from sixty-four to eighty-two privates. * As the exigencies of the service may, in his opinion, demand, not exceeding 500,000, by Seeo. 1 of Chp. 17, July 25, 1i61. 505

Page  506 REVISED BEGULATION8 Extracts from Acts of Congress. SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That these forces, when accepted as herein authorized, shall be organized into divisions of three or more brigades each; and each division shall have a major-general, three idesde-camp, and one assistant adjutant-general with the rank of major. Each brigade shall be composed of four or more regiments, and shall have one brigadier-general, two aides-de-camp, one assistant adjutant-general with the rank of captain, one surgeon, one assistant quartermaster, and one commissary of subsistence. SEc. 4. And be itfurther enacted, That the President shall be authorized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for the command of the forces provided for in this act, a number of majorgenerals, not exceeding six, and a number of brigadier-generals, not exceeding eighteen,* and the other division and brigade officers required for the organization of these forces, except the aides-de-camp, who shall be selected by their respective generals from the officers of the army or volunteer corps: Provided, That the President may select the major generals and brigadier-generals provided for in this act from the line or staff of the regular army, and the officers so selected shall be permitted to retain their rank therein. The Governors of the States furnishing volunteers under this act, shall commission the field, staff, and company officers requisite for the said volunteers; but in cases where the State authorities refuse or omit to furnish volunteers at the call or on the proclamation of the President, and volunteers from such States offer their services under such call or proclamation, the President shall have power to accept such services, and to commission the proper field, staff and company officers. SEc. 5. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates, organized as above set forth, shall, in all respects, be placed on the footing, as to pay and allowances, of similar corps of the regular army: Provided, That the allowances of non-commissioned officers and privates for clothing, when not furnished in kind, shall be three dollars and fifty cents per month, and that each company officer, non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer of cavalry shall furnish his own horse and horse equipments, and shall receive forty cents per day for their use and risk, except that in case the horse shall become disabled, or shall die, the allowance shall cease until the disability be removed or another horse be supplied. Every volunteer non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer, who enters the service of the United States under this act, shall be paid at the rate of fifty cents in lieu of subsistence, and if a cavalry volunteer, twenty-five cents additional, in "Such number of major-generals and of brigadier-generals as may, in his judgme,t be required for their erganization."-Aet July 25, 1861. 5m

Page  507 t~~~~~O TH ARY 0 Extracts from Acts of Congress. lieu of forage, for every twenty miles of travel from his place of enrol ment to the place of muster-the distance to be measured by the shortest usually traveled route; and when honorably discharged, an allowance at the same rate, from the place of his discharge to his place of enrolment, and, in addition thereto, if he shall have served for a period of two years, or during the war, if sooner ended, the sum of one hundred dollars: Pro vided, That such of the companies of cavalry herein provided for, as may require it, may be furnished with horses and horse equipments in the same manner as in the United States Army. Sec. 6. And be itfurther enacted, That any volunteer who may be re oeived into the service of the United States under this act, and who may be wounded or otherwise disabled in the service, shall be entitled to the benefits which have been or may be conferred on persons disabled in the regular service; and the widow, if there be one, and if not, the legal heirs of such as die, or may be killed in service, in addition to all arrears of pay and allowances, shall receive the sum of one hundred dollars. SEc. 7. And be it further enacted, That the bands of the regiments of infantry and of the regiments of cavalry shall be paid as follows: one fourth of each shall receive the pay and allowances of sergeants of engineer soldiers; one-fourth, those of corporals of engineer soldiers; and the remaining half, those of privates of engineer soldiers of the first class; and the leaders of the band shall receive the same pay and emoluments as second lieutenants of infantry. SEc. 8. And be it further enacted, That the wagoners and saddlers shall receive the pay and allowances of corporals of cavalry. The regimental commissary sergeant shall receive the pay and allowances of regimental sergeant major, and the regimental* quartermaster sergeant shall receive the pay and allowances of a sergeant of cavalry. SEc. 9. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to each regiment one chaplain, who shall be appointed by the regimental commander on the vote of the field officers and company commanders on duty with the regiment at the time the appointment shall be made. The chaplain so appointed must be a regular ordained minister of a Christian denomination, and shall receive the pay and allowances of a captain of cavalry, and shall be required to report to the colonel commanding the regiment to which he is attached, at the end of each quarter, the moral and religious condition of the regiment, and such suggestions as may conduce to the social happiness and moral improvement of the troops. SEc. 10. And be it further enacted, That the general commanding a separate department or a detached army is hereby authorized to appoint a military board or commission of not less than three nor more than five officers, whose duty it shall be to examine the capacity, qualific'ations, * The word "regimental" is erroneously inserted. FORTHE LR,MY. 607

Page  508 508 ILEVIS!D REGULATIOS Extracts from Acts of Congress. propriety of conduct, and efficiency of any commissioned officer of volunteers within his department or army, who may be reported to the board or commission, and upon such report, if adverse to such officer, and if approved by the President of the United States, the commission of such officer shall be vacated: Provided always, That no officer shall be eligible to sit on such board or commission whose rank or promotion would in any way be affected by its proceedings, and two members at least, if practicable, shall be of equal rank of the officer being examined. And when vacancies occur in any of the companies of volunteers, an election shall be called by the colonel of the regiment tofill such vacancies, and the men of each company shall vote in their respective companies for all officers as high as captain, and vacancies above captain shall be filled by the votes of the commissioned officers of the regiment, and all officers so elected shall be commissioned by the respective Governors of the States, or by the President of the United States.* SEC. 11. And be it further enacted, That all letters written by soldiers in the service of the United States may be transmitted through the mails without pre-payment of postage, under such regulations as the Post-Office Department may prescribe, the postage thereon to be paid by the recipients. SEC. 12. And be itjftrther enacted, That the Secretary of War be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to introduce among the volunteer forces in the service of the United States, the system of allotment tickets now used in the navy, or some equivalent system, by which the family of the volunteer may draw such portions of his pay as he may request. [APPROVED July 22, 1861.] AN ACT in addition to the " Act to authorize the employment of volunteers to aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public property," approved July twenty-second, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to accept the services of volunteers, either as cavalry, infantry, or artillery, in such numbers as the exigencies of the public service may, in his opinion, demand, to be organized as authorized by the act of the twenty-second of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-one: Provided, That the number of troops hereby authorized shall not exceed five hundred thousand. * All in italics repealed by Sect. 3 of Chapter 52, August 6, 1861. 508 REVISBD REGULATIONS,

Page  509 FOR T HE ARMY. Extracts from Acts of Congress. SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That the volunteers authorized by this act shall be armed as the President may direct; they shall be subject to the rules and articles of war, and shall be upon the footing, in all respects, with similar corps of the United States Army, and shall be mustered into the service for " during the war.', SEc. 3. And be it fiurther enacted, That the President shall be author. ized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for the command of the volunteer forces, such number of major-generals and of brigadier-generals as may, in his judgment, be required for their organization. [APPROVED July 25, 1861.] 2 R so w,

Page  510 APPENDIX B, CHANGES AND ADDITIONS TO ARMY REGULATIONS, UP TO JUNE 25, 1863. GENERAL REGULATIONS. 1. All correspondence and communication, verbally or by writing, printing, or telegraphing, respecting operations of the army or military movements on land or water, or respecting the troops, camps, arsenals, intrenchments, or military affairs, within the several military districts, by which intelligence shall be, directly or indirectly, given to the enemy, without the authority and sanction of the General in command, be and the same are absolutely prohibited, and persons violating this Regulation will be proceeded against under the 57th Article of War. 2. Paragraph 1292 having been inadvertently introduced into the Revised Regulations of the Army, is hereby revoked; and paragraph 895, with which it was in partial conflict, will wholly supersede it.d 3. When certificates of disability, in the case of a volumnr, are forwarded to the Commander having authority to grant his discharge, they will be accompanied by the blank referred to in paragraph 165, Revised Regulations, on which the discharge from service is finally made. And the said Commander will tndorse thereon the same orders that he gives upon the certificate of disability. By this means the discharge, when complete, will carry with it the evidence of its authenticity, and the necessity for investigation on the part of the Pay Department will be removed. A. When soldiers are discharged within two years from the date of enlistment by reason of wounds received in battle, the medical officer granting the certificate of disability will endorse such fact upon both the final statements and the discharge. 5. The insane of the military service are entitled to treatment in the Government Hospital established in Washington. To protect, however, their own interests, as well as those of the Government, it is prescribed by the Secretary of War; that to procure admission into the Hospital, application must be made to the Adjutant General, setting forth the name, rank, company, and regiment of the patient, with a certificate from the surgeon of the regiment as to the duration of the insanity, and whether insane before enlistment. It will likewise be accompanied by the descriptive list of the soldier, containing his pay and clothing accounts. The application should precede the arrival of the soldier in Washington by at least one day. 6. On the departure of the patient from his station, the Commanding Officer will give such orders to the person in charge as will provide for the transportation of the necessary attendants, to the institution and back again to their post, and for their subsistence, either in kind, or by commutation, during their absence. 7. To procure the release of a patient, when cured, or for delivery to his friends, application must again be made to the Adjutant General, who will procure the necessary authorization, and also cause a statement of his accounts to be made and delivered to him. 8. Guidons and camp colors for the army will be made like the United State - flag, with stars and stripes. 510 OONTAINING

Page  511 FOB Tsk A?RrT. General Regulations. 9. Paragraph 211, Revised General Regulations, is modified to read as follows: Every military post may have one Sutler, to be appointed by the Secretary of War on the recommendation of the Council of Administration, approved by the Commanding Officer. 10. Chapel tents, when purchased by Regiments, will be transported by public conveyahce in the same manner as tents furnished for the use of the soldiers by the Government. Shelter tents only are allowed to company officers and men, and are transported in the latter case by the men themselves. 11. There shall be inscribed upon the colors or guidons of all regiments and batteries in the service of the United States the names of the battles in which they have borne a meritorious part. These names will also be placed on the Army Register at the head of the list of the officers of each regiment. 12. The following addition is made to paragraph 9, page 10, Revised Regulations for the Army: Except commissions issued by the President to officers of Volunteer Regiments, which will be considered the same as if issued by the governors of States. 13. All property captured by the Army, or seized by any Provost Marshal, or taken up estray, or taken from soldiers marching in the enemy's country, will be turned over to the Chiefs of the Staff Departments to which such property would appertain, on duty with the troops, and will be accounted for by them as captured property, and used for the public service, unless claimed by owners and ordered by the commanding officer to be returned. In such case, the receipts of the owners to whom the property is delivered will be taken therefor. Provost Marshals will make returns to the Adjutant General of all such property and of the disposition made of it, accounting on separate returns for ordnance, quartermaster, subsistence, medical stores, &c., furnishing and procuring the usual invoices and receipts, and charging the officers to whom the property has been delivered, with the same, on the returns. 14. In time of war leaves of absence will only be granted by the Secretary of War, except when the certificate of a medical officer shall show, beyond doubt, that a change of location "is necessary to save life, or prevent permanent disability."(Paragraph 186, General Regulations.) In such case the Commander of an Army, a Department, or District, may grant not exceeding twenty days. At the expiration of that time, if the officer be not able to travel, he must send a report to the Adjutant General of the Army, accompanied by the certificate of a medical officer of the army, in the usual form, and that he is not able to travel. If it be not practicable to procure such a certificate, in consequence of there being no army physician in the place where the officer resides, the certificate of a citizen physician, attested by a civil magistrate, may be substituted. 15. Whenever soldiers are discharged while absent from their companies, the officers granting the discharge will furnish them with finat statenents for pay, and certificates of discharge, and take up their descriptive lists. - The same officers, including Medical Inspectors, will, in atl cases, notify the Adjtant General and the commanding officer of the company to which the soldier belongs, of the date, place, and cause of such dis:harge. Certificates of disability are never to be given into the hands of the soldier, but are to be forwarded to the Adjutant General, after being completed.-(See paragraphs 167 and 168, General Regulations.) 16. The act of February 13, 1862, section 2, although prohibiting the discharge of minors from the service, does not authorize their enlistment or muster into service, except with the written consent of their parents, masters, or guardians. Such consent must be taken in triplicate, and filed with triplicate copies of the muster-in rolls. 17. Officers detached from their regiments for Signal duty will report immediately for orders to the Signal Officer of the Army; after which they will not be relieved from such duty, except by orders from the Adjutant General of the Army. — fill

Page  512 REBYISD REGULATIONS General Regulations. 18. All contracts, which by the present regulations are prescribed to be tade in writing, shall hereafter be made in quintuplicate, of which four shall be disposed of according to such regulations, and one shall be sent by the officer making and signing the same to the Returns Office of the Department of the Inerior, within thirty days after the contract is made, together with all proposals, and a copy of any advertisement published by him touching the same, attached and verified in the manner required by the act approved June 2, 1862. 19. When an officer returns to his command after having overstaid his leave of absence, he may be tried by a court-martial for this as a military offence, or a commission may be appointed by the commanding officer of his division, army corps, or army, as the case may be, to investigate his case, and to determine whether or not he was absent from proper cause; and if there should be found to be such proper cause, he will be entitled to pay during such absence. The proceedings of such commission will be sent to the Adjutant General of the Army for the approval of the Secretary of War. Such commissions will consist of not less than three nor over five commissioned officers. 20. Where officers are not serving in a division, army corps, or separate army, applications for leaves may be made to the Adjutant General of the Army; but. except in very extraordinary cases, no leave of absence will be granted unless the application be accompanied by a certificate of the same character as that prescribed in paragraph 14. 21. The laws of the United States and the general laws of war authorize, in certain cases, the seizure and conversion of private property for the subsistence, transportation, and other uses of the army; but this must be distinguished from pillage; and the taking of property for public purposes is very different from its conversion to private uses. All property lawfully taken from the enemy, or from the inhabitants of an enemy's country, instantly becomes public property, and must be used and accounted for as such. The 52d Article of War authorizes the penalty of death for pillage or plundering, and other articles authorize severe punishments for any officer or soldier who shall sell, embezzle, misapply, or waste military stores, or who shall permit the waste or misapplication of any such public property. The penalty is the same whether the offence be committed in our own or in an enemy's territory. 22. All property, public or private, taken from alleged enemies, must be inventoried and duly accounted for. If the property taken be claimed as private, receipts must be given to such claimants or their agents. Officers will be held strictly responsible for all property taken by them or by their authority, and it must be accounted for, the same as any other public property. 23. Where foraging parties are sent out for provisions or other stores, the commanding officer of such party will be held accountable for the conduct of his command, and will make a true report of all property taken. \ 24. No officer or soldier will, without authority, leave his colors or ranks, to take private property, or to enter a private house for that purpose. All such acts are punishable with death, and an officer who permits them is equally as guilty as the actual pillager. 25. When forage in kind cannot be furnished by the proper department, officers entitled to forage may commute it for the number of horses specified in section 2 of the act approved July 17, 1862, upon the certificate of the quartermaster, when there is one, or of the commanding officer, when there is no quartermaster, that forage in kind cannot be furnished. When the officer is on detached duty, his own certificate to the fact, with the additionarstatement that there is no commanding officer or quartermaster serving with him, will entitle him to the commutation. 26. Officers on leave of absence are not entitled to forage, or to commutation herefor. 27. Officers of the Army and of Volunteers detailed for duty in the Engineers or other branches of the staff, are not, as a matter of course, entitled to the pay, I " ., - 11 -— I 512

Page  513 FOR THE ARMY. General Regulationu emoluments, and allowances of cavalry officers. But, when ordered by the proper authority to be mounted, and when so mounted at their own expense, they are entitled to such pay, emoluments, and allowances. 28. No officer will hereafter be relieved from his command and sent to report in Washington without the authority of the War Department. Where subordinate officers are guilty of military offences, or are negligent, or incompetent, it is the duty of the Commander to have them tried for their offences, or examined in regard to their incompetency, by a proper court or commission; and this duty cannot be evaded by sending them to Washington. 29. In settling the accounts of the commanding officer of a company for clothing and other military supplies, the affidavit of any such officer may be received to show the loss of vouchers, or company books, or any matter or circumstance tending to prove that any apparent deficiency was occasioned by unavoidable accident, or lost in service, without any fault on his part, or that the whole or any part of such clothing and supplies had been properly and legally used and appropriated; and such affidavit may be considered as evidence to establish the facts set forth, with or without other evidence, as may seem to the Secretary of War just and proper under the circumstances of the case.-(Act of February 7, 1863.) 30. Members and Judge Advocates of Military Commissions will be entitled to the same extra pay and travelling allowances as in the case of General CourtsMartial. 31. Paragraph 1416, Army Regulations, is so amended as to authorize issues, without payment, of equipments and arms necessary to the performance of such duty to officers detailed for special duty requiring them to be mounted; and for which service they receive no additional compensation. Officers shall receipt and account for all equipments or arms so issued to them. 32. All quartermasters and commissaries will personally attend to the reception and issue of supplies for their commands, and will keep themselves informed of the condition of the depots, roads, and other communications. 33. All quartermasters and commissaries will report, by letter, on the first of every month, to the chiefs of their respective departments, at Washington, D. C., their station, and generally the duty on which they have been engaged during the preceding month. 34. After every battle, skirmish, or other engagement, the Commanding Officer of each Regiment, Battery, or other detached portion of a Regiment, there present, will, in addition to the lists transmitted through intermediate Commanders, promptly forward, direct to the Adjutant General, a correct return of the killed, wounded, and missing of his command. 35. One copy of the monthly returns of Regiments will be forwarded direct to the Adjutant General's Office. 36. The chiefs of the respective Bureaus in the War Department will designate the officers to be assigned as Adjutant General, Quartermaster, Commissary of Subsistence, and Inspector General for each Army Corps, in accordance with section 10 of the act approved July 17, 1862. These officers will, when once assigned, remain permanently attached to their respective Corps without regard to the movements of Corps Commanders, unless otherwise assigned by the President. 37. The Aides-de-Camp authorized for Corps Commanders by the act quoted above, will be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, on the recommendation of the Corps Commanders. They may accompany the General for whom they were appointed in his change of duties or station; but when he is assigned to a command inferior to an Army Corps, their appointments as Aides-de-Camp for a Corps Commander will be revoked, and they will fall back upon the commission previously held. 38. The only members of their Staff whom General Officers are authorized to 2 R 2 513

Page  514 tREVISED REGULATIONS General Regulations.-Army Trains and Baggage. take with them, when detached from, or otherwise leaving their commands, are their ordinary Aides-de-Camp-those selected in accordance with the acts of July 22 and 29, 1861, sections 3 and 4, respectively, and of July'17, 1862, section 10. 39. No officer or agent under the control of the War Department, disbursing public money, will pay any claim or account presented through agents or collectors, except on regular power of attorney, executed after the account or claim is due and payable, and unless such agent or collector is considered by the disbursing officer amply able to reimburse the United States, or the disbursing officer, in case such claim or account shall, subsequent to payment, prove to be unjust or fraudulent; and when an account is presented in person by an individual who is not known to the disbursing officer, the latter will require such evidence of identity as will secure the Government against fraud. 40. Paragraph 1372, General Regulations, and "General Orders," No. 86, of July 23, 1862, paragraph IV, are hereby modified so as to require that applications for payment in cases where certificates of discharge or final statements are lost or destroyed, shall be made to the Second Auditor of the Treasury instead of the Second Comptroller. ARMY TRAINS AND BAGGAGE. 41. There will be allowed for headquarters train of an Army Corps, four wagons; of a Division or Brigade, three; a full Infantry Regiment, six; and a Light Artillery Battery or Squadron of Cavalry, three. In no ease will this allowance be exceeded, but always proportionably reduced according to the number of officers and men actually present. All surplus wagons will be turned over to the Chief Quartermaster to be organized, under direction of the Commanding Generals, into supply trains, or sent to the nearest depot. The requisite supply trains, their size depending upon the state of the roads and character of the campaign, will be organized by the Chief Quartermaster, with the approval of the Commanding Generals, subject to the control of the War Department. 42. The wagons allowed to a regiment, battery, or squadron, must carry nothing but forage for the teams, cooking utensils, and rations for the troops, hospital stores, and officers' baggage. One wagon to each regiment will transport exclusively hospital supplies, under the direction of the Regimental Surgeon; the one for regimental headquarters will carry the grain for the officers' horses; and the three allowed for each battery or squadron will be at least half loaded with grain for their own teams. Stores in bulk and ammunition will be carried in the regular or special supply trains. 43. In active campaign, troops must be prepared to bivouac on the march, the allowance of tents being limited, as follows: For the headquarters of an Army Corps, Division, or Brigade, one wall tent to the Commanding General, -and one to every two officers of his staff. For the Colonel, Field, and Staff of a full regiment, three wall tents; and for every other commissioned officer, one shelter tent each. For every two non-commissioned officers, soldiers, officersservants, and authorized camp followers, one shelter tent. One hospital tent will be allowed for office purposes at Corps headquarters, and one wall tent at those of a Division or a Brigade. All tents beyond this allowance will be left in depot. 44. Officers' baggage will be limited to blankets, one small valise or carpet-bag, and a moderate mess-kit. The men will carry their own blankets and shelter tents, and reduce the contentsof their knapsacks as much as possible. 45. The Depot Quartermaster will provide storage for a reasonable amount of officers' surplus baggage, and the extra clothing and knapsacks of the men. 46. Hospital tents are for the sick and wounded, and, except those allowed for Army Corps headquarters, must not be diverted from their proper use. 47. On all marches, quartermasters, under the orders of their commanding officers, will accompany and conduct their trains in a way not to obstruct the movement of troops. 614

Page  515 FOR THE ARMY. Quartermuter'8 Departmnent QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 48. Paragraph 156 is amended so that in addition to the reward of five dollars for the apprehension and delivery of a deserter to an officer of the army at the nearest military post or depot, the transportation and reasonable expenses f the duty will be paid in the case of each deserter arrested and delivered since the 31st day of July, 1862. 49. For the purpose of preserving accurate and permanent records of deceased soldiers, and their place of burial, the Quartermaster General of the United States Army shall cause to be printed, and to be placed in every General and Post Hospital of the Army, blank books and forms corresponding with the accompanying duplicate forms, for preserving said records. The Quartermaster will also provide proper means for a registered head-board, to be secured at the head of each soldier's grave, as follows: Whenever any soldier or officer of the United States Army dies, it shall be the duty of the commanding officer of the military corps or department in which such person dies, to cause the regulation and forms provided in the foregoing directions to the Quartermaster General to be properly executed. Any Adjutant, or Acting Adjutant (or commander) of a military post or company, immediately upon the reception of a copy of any mortuary record from a military company, shall transmit the same to the Adjutant General at Washington. 50. Transportation by express agency being liable to abuse, and very expensive, is prohibited by the Secretary of War, on public account, except in cases of great emergency, for which the officer ordering or sending the stores shall be responsible. 51. Paragraph 1068.-Military storekeepers are entitled to the same allowance of fuel as first lieutenants of the army. 52. Medical cadets and hospital stewards will be entitled each to one room as quarters, and fuel therefor. 53. Paragraph 1121, of the Revised Regulations for the Army, of 1861, is amended by adding as follows: In special cases of hard service or exposure, the Quartermaster General may authorize the ration of grain to be increased not more than three pounds, upon a report rec6mmending it by the Chief Quartermaster serving in a Military Department, or with an Army in the field. 54. Officers serving in the Quartermaster's Department will issue to signal parties of the Army serving in their vicinity, such supplies as may be necessary for their proper equipment, on the requisition of the officer in charge of such parties. The Quartermaster's Department will issue, upon the requisition of the Medicl Officer in charge of any hospital or depot of sick and wounded soldiers, such regulation clothing necessary to their health and comfort, as may be requisite to replace that lost by them from the casualties of war. The necessity of the issue to be certified by the Surgeon, and the requisition to be approved by the Medical Director or Medical Inspector of the station. Such issue to be gratuitous and not charged to the soldier. The Quartermaster General will cause blank requisitions to be furnished to the officers of the various hospitals upon their application. 55. With the exception of issues to patients in hospital as provided for in the-preceding paragraph, no gratuitous issues of clothing will be made without special order of the Secretary of War based upon official report of boards of survey in each case, setting forth the facts, with copies of the orders under which the clothing was lost, showing that it was lost, not by the fault of the men, but in obedience to orders given by sufficient authority; and the issues should in no case exceed the actual necessities of the soldiers. No superfluities will be replaced at the expense of the United States. Issues thus made will be of clothing in kind, not payments of money. I - - . ; - - 11 : -,.,., -1 - 1, I 5.15 F —

Page  516 REVISED REGULATIONS. Quartermaster's Department. 56. All officers of, or acting in, the Quartermaster's Department, and Regimental Quartermasters, who receive public money which they are not authorized to retain as salary, pay, or emolument, shall render their money accounts monthly, mailing or forwarding them addressed direct to the Third Auditor of the Treasury, at Washington, within ten days after the expiration of each successive month. The accounts and vouchers to be thus rendered are: Forms Nos. 10 to 22 inclusive, and Nos. 48 to 50, of the Revised Regulations of the Army. These accounts and vouchers will be made up in duplicate; one copy of each to be retained by the officer for his own protection, the other copy to be forwarded, as above required, direct to the Third Auditor, and not to the Quartermaster General. 57. Whenever an officer ceases, from any reason, to be a disbursing officer, he will immediately render his final accounts, with vouchers, to the Third Auditor. The following Regulations will take the place of paragraphs 1169, 1170, 1171, 1172, and 1173 58 Property Returns, Forms Nos. 23 to 46, and Nos. 51 to 52, will be rendered monthly (not quarterly) to the Quartermaster General direct, and not to the Auditors of the Treasury. They will be mailed, or otherwise forwarded, within ten days after the expiration of each successive month. Monthly Statements, Returns, &c., Forms Nos. 1 to 9, are for the Quartermaster General's Office only, and will be mailed within five to ten days after the expiration of each month. The Roll No. 3, and the Returns Nos. 23 and 51, will be made in triplicate all other papers in duplicate. One copy of Roll No. 3 will be sent with the money accounts to the Treasury. Two Returns, Forms 23 and 51, will be sent to the Quartermaster General-one with abstract and vouchers and one without them. One complete set of accounts, returns, vouchers, and of all papers pertaining thereto, should be retained by the officer for his own protection. 59. Paragraph 1142, page 168, General Regulations for the Army, is revised so that the last sentence shall read as follows: Copies of the telegrams must accompany vouchers for their payment where they can be procured. If the copies cannot be procured, the account may be aid by a Quartermaster upon the certificate of the Commanding General of the Department, or the Commanding Officer of the post, showing that the telegrams were on public business, and that the maer demaanded this mode of communication. 60. The monthly papers, Forms 1 to 9; the returns of Quartermasters' stores, Forms 23 to 51; and the returns of clothing, camp, and garrison equipage, will each be accompanied by a letter of advice enumerating the papers therein enclosed. 61. Officers who are not doing duty as Quarteimasters, who are not disbursing money, but who are responsible for public property received from the Quarter master's Department, such as horses, clothing, camp and garrison equipage, &c., will only forward to the Quartermaster General the monthly returns of the prop erty for which they are accountable, accompanied by vouchers. This includes company commanders, who should hereafter transmit their returns of clothing and other Quartermasters' property to the Quartermaster General monthly, instead of quart rly. 62. All officers doing duty in the Quartermaster's Department are also required to make out and forward to the Quartermaster General, on the first day of each month a personal report, giving their post office address and a statement of the duty upon which they have been employed since their last report. 63. The allowances granted to witnesses examined before General Courts Martial and Courts of Inquiry, will also be made to those summoned before Military Commissions. 64. The assistant commissary generals of subsistence, assistant surgeons general, medical inspectors general, and medical inspectors are entitled to the same num ber of rooms as offices, and fuel and furniture therefor, as are allowed to officers of the Quartermaster's Department who have the same rank, I I. I- -.,, - ,. - 616

Page  517 FOR THE ABMY. Quartermaster's Department. 65. The table in paragraph 1148 is replaced by the following: Allowance of camp and garrison egui'age. In permanent camp. In camp, garrison, or in In the the field. field. A general officer................... 3.................... 1.... 1............... Field or staff officer above the rank of captain...................... 2...... Otlher staff officers or captains..... 1....................... 1........... Subalterns ofcompany, to every two. I.................1.... 1........... To every 15 foot or 13 mounted men................... 12 2.2 2 2 5........ To every 20 foot or 17 mounted men....... 1...... To every 6 foot or 4 mounted men.............1..................... To general commanding corps, divi sion, or brigade....................................................................I To every 2 officers of his staff............................................. I Colonel~ field and staffofa regiment'........... 3 To each company offic-er............................................ To every two enlisted men.................. I..................................... 66. The table in paragraph 1150 is replaced by the following: Allowance of clot]ting. Cap, with trimmings cornplete light artillery....... I... 1 1 1 1 5 PIue r e orse hair................................ I........ 2' 'Cover for artillery cap.................................. "I" 5 Ila", with trimmings complete................... I.......1 1 1 I I 5 Forage cap............................................. 1- I 1 1 1 5 Coat or jacket.................................2.. 1 2 1 2 8 Trowsets..................................... 3 2 3 2 3 13 ,Shirt,::.........................:...................... 3 3 3 3 3 15 Dra s.................................... 2 - 2 2 11 *Bootees, pairs of........... 4........... 4 4 4 4'20 Stockings, pairs of.......... 4............. 4 4 4 4 20 Leather stock........................................... I...... I............ 2 Greatcoat.............................................. 1.... 1. Stable ro ck (for mounted men).......................................... 2 Fatigue overalls (for engineers and ordnance).............. 1ll "'I 1 1. 5 Blanket, woollen...to........wo..................... 1....... 1..... Blanket, water -prooyl f, (foor tr oops).................1 1 2 2 2 5 PonThoes, e r-proot o mounte d troops).............1 Gaiters (for foot troops)................................. 1 1 1 1 1 5 Flannel sack coat........................................ 2 2 2 2 10 * Mounted men may receive one pair of "boots" and two pairs of" bootees" instead of four pairs of bootees. 517

Page  518 REYISMBD REGULATION Subsistence Department.-Medical Department. 67. Paragraph l1156 is modified to read as follows: Water-proof ponchoes will be issued to mounted troops as articles of clothing, and charged to them in their respective clothing accounts. Water-proof blankets will, in like manner, be issued to foot troops, and charged to the soldiers who receive them. 68. Paragraph 1158 is modified to read as follows: Officers receiving clothing, or camp and garrison equipage, will render monthly returns of it to the Quartermaster General. SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. (A revised edition of the Subsistence Regulations will be found in the body of this volume.) MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 69. Surgeons from civil life who tender their services for the sick and wounded in the field, under the invitation of the Secretary of War, will each be allowed, while so employed, the use of a public horse, a tent, the necessary servants, and the privilege of purchasing stores from the Subsistence Department. 70. The following are the regulations which will govern the appointment of medical storekeepers: 1. A board of not less than three medical officers will be assembled by the Secretary of War to examine such applicants as may by him be authorized to appear before it. 2. Candidates, to be eligible to examination, shall not be less than 25 years or more than 40 years of age; shall possess sufficient physical ability to perform their duties satisfactorily; and shall present with their applications satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 3. Candidates will be required to pass a satisfactory examination in the ordinary branches of a good English education, in pharmacy and materia medica, and to give proof that they possess the requisite business qualifications for the position. 4. The board will report to the Secretary of War the relative merit of the candidates examined, and they will receive appointments accordingly. 5. When appointed, each medical storekeeper will be required to give a bond before he shall be allowed to enter on the performance of his duties. 71. Paragraph 1305 Army Regulations is hereby so modified that private physicians, employed as medical officers with an army in the field in time of war, may be allowed a sum not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars per month, besides transportation in kind. 72. The exercise of the powers given the Medical Inspectors of the Army to discharge soldiers for disability, is suspended until their duties in this respect are definedby Regulations to be published hereafter. 73. Medical Purveyors will be required to give bond in the same amount as Quartermasters. 74. Transportation for sanitary supplies will be furnished only on the requisition of a Medical Director, and, when sent to another Department, the supplies must be assigned to the Medical Director of that Department. 75. All medical officers will make to the Surgeon General on the first of each month a personal report, giving their post office address and a statement of the duty upon which they have been employed since their last report. 76. The statement of the hospital fund required by Paragraph 1300, General Regulations, must be a true copy of the monthly statement embraced in the commissary's abstract of provisions. Vide Form 5, Subsistence Regulations. 77. Medical disbursing officers will render direct to the Second Auditor of the Treasury, within ten days after the expiration of each month, a duly certified monthly statement of all public money, on hand from last return, received, dis 518

Page  519 .~~~~O XH At 5 r19 LA Pay Department.-Ordnance Departnent. —Recruiting Service. bursed, or transferred during the month, the balance on hand, and where deposited; a duplicate will be sent to the Surgeon General at the same time, with an estimate of funds required for ensuing month. 78. They will also send direct to the Second Auditor within one month after the expiration of each quarter a quarterly account current of moneys received, expended, &c., during the quarter, with an abstract of disbursements and proper vouchers. Duplicates of the account current and abstract only will be at the same time forwarded to the Surgeon General. 79. Whenever medical disbursing officers are relieved, they will render their summary statements, accounts, abstracts, and vouchers, as above directed. 80. The general hospitals are under the direction of the Surgeon General. When it is expedient and advisable, sick and wounded soldiers may, under the direction of the Surgeon General, be transferred in parties, but not in individual cases, to other hospitals. 81. Medicines, instruments, and hospital stores and supplies will be issued in conformity with instructions issued from time to time by the Surgeon General, under the direction of the Secretary of War. PAY DEPARTMENT. 82. The Paymaster General is authorized to change the stations of Paymasters within the limits of the pay districts which have been or may be arranged by him, whenever he may deem it necessary for the interests of the service. ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 83. Paragraph 905, General Regulations, is amended by inserting after the word "Companies," in the third line, the following: " and armorers for repairing arms of regiments serving as Infantry or Cavalry." 84. The fourth line of paragraph 1023, General Regulations, is modified to read as foillows: "may require-the sale of ordnance and ordnance stores excepted,"&c. 85. All Captains of Companies are hereby: required to report quarterly to the Chief of Ordnance the kind of arms in use by their companies, their opinion of the suitableness of the arm, the general extent of service, and the number requiring repairs since the previous report. (Additional instructions are published by the Ordnance Department, and may be obtained by officers interested by application to the chief of ordnance.) RECRUITING SERVICE. 86. Paragraphs 924, 931, 933, 934, 1211, and 1212, Revised Regulations for the Army, of 1861, are modified to read as follows: 87. Tours of inspection by superintendents will be made only on instructions from the Adjutant General's Office; but superintendents may order officers to visit branch or auxiliary rendezvous under their charge, not oftener than once a week. The branch rendezvous to be established only by orders from superintendents, and not to be more than fifteen miles distant from the main rendezvous. 88. No person under the age of eighteen years is to be enlisted or re-enlisted without the written consent of his parent, guardian, or master. Recruiting officers must be very particular in ascertaining the true age of the recruit. 89. If the recruit be a minor under eighteen years of age, his parent, guardian, cr master must sign a consent to his enlisting, which will be added to the preceding declaration in the following form, &c. 90. The forms of declaration, and of consent, in case of a minor under eighteen, havg been signed and witness,d, the recruit will then be duJy ezwined) &c. FOR THE ARMY. 519

Page  520 R REI SED) REG ULATIONS Recruiting Service. 91. Issues of provisions will be made on the usual ration returns, and -board will be furnished on a return showing the number of the party, the days, and dates. A ration in kind may be allowed to one laundress at each principal rendezvous. 92. Lodging will be furnished on a return showing the number of men, days, and dates for each. From these returns the abstract is made up. 93. The volunteer recruiting service will be conducted according to the Regulations of the Recruiting Service," for the United States Army, as far as they are applicable, except where special directions have been given by the War Department. The existing directions are given in this appendix, and such others as may be necessary, from time to time, will be published in General Orders from the Adjutant General's Office.' 94. The recruiting service in the various States for the volunteer forces already in service, and for those that may be received, is placed under charge of general superintendents for those States, respectively, with general depots for the collection and instruction of recruits. 95. Both the superintendents and the location of the depots are announced in orders from the Adjutant General's Office. 90. The superintendentadetailed will take -charge of the recruiting service in the various States to which they are assigned; they will take posts at their general -depots, which will be under their immediate command. Upon the requisition of the superintendents, a suitable number of volunteer officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates, will be detailed for duty in the staff departments, and as drill masters at the respqctive depots. 97. A disbursing officer of the fund for "collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers," will be assigned to each depot, and will be under the direction of the superintendent. 98. Commanding officers of volunteer regiments, or independent companies, will take measures to keep the strength of their commands up to the maximum standard of organization. -- - 99. For-this purpose two commissioned officers, with one non-commissioned officer or private from each company, will be detailed, from time to timne, to report in person to the superintendents of the recruiting service for their respective States. The full number will not be detailed if a less number will suffice to fill up the regiment. 100- —. These officers and non.commissioned officers will be detailed for a tour of -six months, and will be assigned as recruiting parties to rendezvous by the superintendents; if found inefficient or incompetent, they will be relieved and replaced by others. -- 101. Nominations for these details will be made by the colonels, and the order for detail given by Commanders of Departments or Army Corps. 102. Parties so detailed will recruit for their respective regiments, and not for the General Volunteer Service. They will, however, be under the direction of the genera superintendent. 103. Immediately upon their arrival at their stations, or, if more convenient, upon their — way thither, the commissioned officers thus-detailed will report in person or by letter to the nearest United States mustering officer, who will give them instructions in the matters of recruiting, the expenses proper to be incurred there.for, and the rendition of their accounts with proper vouchers. 104. Mustering officers will muster into service and administer the oath of alle. giance to:such regiments or recruits brought to them as may present conclusive evidence of their acceptance by the War Department. 105. The superintendents will establish the rendezvous, and so arrange for the rent, subsistence of recruits, and other expenses, that the charges may be reasonable, and that the bills therefor may be certified to by the recruiting officers in charge, and presented for paymuent to the disbursing officers at the general depots. ,520

Page  521 FOPR THE ARMY. Recruiting Service. 106. Enlistments of volunteers will be made upon printed forms, to be furnished for the purpose, similar to those established for the regular service. They will in all cases be made in duplicate., 107. Recruits will be sent, as often as may be necessary, in small squads, to the general depots, with a descriptive list, and both copies of the enlistment of each man. The descriptive list will be examined, and, if correct, be filed with the records of the depot. One copy of each enlistment will be delivered to the disbursing officer to assist him in the examination and verification of accounts, and will be sent with those accounts, at the end of each month, to the Second Auditor, at Washington. The second copy will be sent by the superintendent to the Adjutant General of the Army, with a consolidated return of the recruiting parties for the month, on the first day of the succeeding month, or as soon thereafter as practicable. 108. Recruiting officers will send to the superintendents a return of their recruiting parties for each month on the first day of the succeeding month. They will also make tri-monthly reports of the state of the recruiting service to the superintendent, and the superintendent will forward a consolidated tri-monthly report to the Adjutant General of the Army. 109. Superintendents will keep their depots supplied with sufficient clothing for issues to recruits, and with the arms necessary for their instruction 110. Commanders of volunteer regiments, batteries, or independent companies requiring recruits, will make requisitions, approved by the commanding officers of their brigades, divisions, and departments, or corps d'armee, direct on the superintendents of the recruiting service for their respective States, who will furnish the necessary men, forwarding a descriptive list with them. Certified copies of this descriptive list will be forwarded at the same time to the Adjutant General of the Army, and to the Adjutant General of the State. 111. To facilitate the raising of volunteer regiments, officers recruiting therefor are authorized to muster their men into service as enrolled. As soon as mustered, these men will be sent, with descriptive lists, to the camps of rendezvous, at which places the oath of allegiance will be duily administered by a civil magistrate, or an officer of the regular army, preferably by the latter. The cost of transportation from place of muster-in to camps of rendezvous will be paid by the quartermaster at the latter station. 112. When the organization of regiments accepted to be raised within a specified time is not completed at the expiration of that period, the companies and detachments thereof, already mustered into service, will be assigned to other regiments, at the pleasure of the War Department. 113. United States mustering and disbursing officers are detailed as such by orders from the Adjutant General's Office. They will disburse the fund "for collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers." They will make requisitions for funds monthly upon the Adjutant General, United States Army. This fund is intended for the payment of all expenses that may be incurred therefor, as well as for the reimbursement to individuals of such amounts as have been already justly and actually expended by them in raising troops that have been, or may be, received into the service of the United States. Reimbursements of expenses for organizations raised, or attempted to be raised, but not actually mustered into the United States service, will not be made. Claims of States for expenditures heretofore made by them in raising volunteers are provided for by separate and distinct appropriations, and will not be paid from the one now referred to. 114. Bills must set forth theplace and time of expenditure, specifying each particular item and the amount, also the company and regiment for which the expense was incurred They must also be accompanied by the receipt of the party * In the case of new regiments organized under General Orders, No. 75, of 1862, enlistment paprs will be made in tnicate, and disposed of as directed in that order. 2 B 621

Page  522 REVISED REGULATI ONS Recruiting Sevice, to whom payment was made, and the certificate of the officer or person incurring the expense, that the amount charged is accurate and just, and that it was necessary for the public service, for troops raised for the United States. 115. Among expenses properly chargeable against the fund "for collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers" may be enumerated: 1. Rent of rendezvous or office for recruiting. 2. Commutation of fuel and quarters for officers already mustered into service, when detached on recruiting duty. 3:. In organizing new Regiments of Volunteers, the subsistence of the recruits, prior to the completion of the organization, will be chargeable against the appropriation "for collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers." After the organ. ization of the regiments is completed, and they have been inspected by the mustering officer for the State, subsistence will be provided by the Subsistence Department. Whenever facilities for cooking can be furnished to the troops whether in squads or larger bodies, subsistence will be issued in kind, as recognized in the regular service, (or if other articles are substituted, the cost of the whole must not exceed the regular supplies,) and will be paid for at rates not exceeding the current prices at the place of purchase. If the rations cannot be contracted for at a reasonable rate, subsistence will be procured in bulk, and used to the volunteers. In no case should the cost of the ration, uncooked, exceednineteen cents, and at most of the points in the Western States it should not, exceed fourteen cents. When cooking facilities cannot be furnished, contracts for the rations, cooked, may be made at reasonable rates, and the necessity for the same must be clearly stated on the accounts. When board and lodging are necessary, theprices for eachshouId be stated and the aggregate cost of both must not exceed forty cents per day. 4. Necessary transportation of volunteers prior to completion of company or-' ganization and muster into service as a company. Aftercompletion of such organization and muster, transportation will be paid by the Quartermaster's Depart ment, Transportation will be at the rate of two cents per mile for railroad travel, and at the current rates for stage and steamboat fare. 5. Rent of grounds and buildings for camping purposes, cost of erection of quarters, of cooking stoves when absolutely necessary, of clerk and office hire when authorized by the Adjutant General, and of all expenses incidental to camps of rendezvous. 6. Knives, forks, tin cups and tin plates for volunteers. 7. Necessary medicines and medical attendance prior to organization of regiments, or the mustering in of the regimental surgeons. 8. Actual railroad, stage, or steamboat fare necessarily incurred by authorized agents in raising or recruiting volunteers. 9. Advertising. The officers recruiting will be authorized to advertise for recruits in not more than two English and, where necessary, two German daily papers, by short notices, for each rendezvous under their charge, and likewise to have, in cities, not more than two hundred posters or handbills for each company, and one-fourth of.that number for the country. 10. Fuel and straw, previous to company organization, according to the allowance for the regular army. 11. All other expenses allowed for recruiting in the regular service not herein mentioned, and incurred for volunteers previous to their muster into the United States service. -116. Recruiting officers claiming reimbursement must specify in their bills the place and date of expenditure; the items and amount; the company and regiment for which the expense was incurred; the names of the recruits, accompanied by the receipt of the party to whom payment was made, and by a certificate of the officer or person incurring the expense that the amnount charged is accurate gjaml, and that it was necessary for the public service, and that the reoruits 62'9

Page  523 FO l- T f I A M 1T. Prisoners of War. were actually mustered into the United States service after the expenditure was incurred. (The revised edition of the Regulations for the Recruiting Service may be obtained on application to the Adjutant General.) PRISONERS OP WAR. 117. Officers and soldiers of the United States who are or may become prisoners of war shall, during their imprisonment, be entitled to and receive the samo pay as if they were doing active duty. 118. The rations of prisoners held in the rebel States shall be commuted for and during the period of their imprisonment; the commutation to be rated at cost price. To entitle a soldier to this commutation he must furnish to the Commissary General of Prisoners such evidence of the fact of capture and time of detention as he may consider necessary, to be laid before the Secretary of War, and if approved, a certificate will be issued by the Commissary General of Prisoners, on which payment will be made by the Subsistence Department. 119. A general commanding in the field, or a department, will make arrange ments for the safe-keeping and reasonable comfort of his prisoners. For this purpose he will place them under a guard already on duty, or detach a guard for the special service. The general will give no order exchanging prisoners, or releasing them, except under instructions from the Secretary of War. 120. In emergencies admitting of no delay the general will act upon his own authority, and give any order in relation to his prisoners the public interest might require, promptly reporting his proceedings to the War Department through the Adjutant General. 121. In time of war a Commissary General of Prisoners will be announced, whose general duties will be those of an inspector, and all communications relating to prisoners will pass through him. Depots for prisoners will be designated by the Secretary of War, to which suitable and permanent guards will be assigned, the whole to be under the orders of the Commissary General of Prisoners. He will establish regulations for issuing clothing to prisoners, and will direct the manner in which all funds arising from the saving of rations at prison hospitals or stations shall be accounted for and disbursed by the proper disbursing officer, in providing such articles as he may deem absolutely necessary for the welfare of the prisoners. He is authorized to grant paroles to prisoners on the recommendation of the medical officer attending the prison in cases of extreme illness, but under no other circumstances. 122. The Commissary General of Prisoners has authority to call for such reportsa from officers in command of g lards over prisoners as may be necessary for the proper discharge of his own duties, and he will be prepared to furnish such information in relation to prisoners as may be c.lled for by the Adjut,mt General. 123. A full record of all prisoners will be kept in the office of the Commissary General of Prisoners, in suitable books, giving the name, rank, regiment, and company of each military prisoner, the residence, county, and State of each civil prisoner, with the charges against him, and the time and place of capture or arrest. Any special information of importance will be added from time to time in the column of remarks. When disposed of by exchange or otherwise, the fact and the authority for it, with the time, should be noted on the record. 124. The Commissary General of Prisoners is empowered to visit places at which prisoners may be held, and will recommend to the general whose guards are responsible for them whatever modification in their treatment may seem to iim proper or necessary, and report the same to the War Department. 125. The Commissary General of Prisoners has charge of the United States officers and men on parole, and correspondence relating to them. All detaits,oncaning them will pass through him.

Page  524 RETIS]Dl) RE:ULATIONS Uniform.-Mustering Volunteers, &e.-Drafting. 126. Generals commanding departments, or in the field, may, at their discretion, send their prisoners to thu general depots, furnishing a proper roll with them, s.howing the rank, regiment, and company, and when and where captured; after which their -charge of them will cease. Immediately on the arrival of prisoners at a depot, the commanding officer will forward to the Commissary General of Prisoners a copy of the roll received with them, noting such changes as may have been made by escape or otherwise. 127. The principle being recognized that medical officers and chaplains should not be held as prisoners of war, all medical officers and chaplains so held by the United States will be immediately and unconditionally discharged. - 128. Whenever prisoners of war are released on parole and sent through the lines, the officers who release them will immediately send rolls to the CommissaryI General of Prisoners, containing an exact list of the prisoners' names, rank, regiment, and companly, date and place of capture, and date and place of parole. These rolls are indispensable in effecting exchanges of prisoners. / 129. Blanks for monthly returns an, al for rolls of federal and other prisoners of war will le furnished from the office of the Commissary General of Prisoners on their being called for by commanders who require them. UNIFORM., 130. In time of actual field service, officers of Cavalry, Artillery, and Infantry are permitted to wear the light blue overcoat prescribed for enlisted men of the mounted corps. -I31. The uniform for Chaplains of the Army will be plain black frock coat with standing collar, and one row of nine black buttons; plain black pantaloons; black felt hat, or army forage cap, without ornament. Oa occasions of ceremony, a plain chapeau de bras may be worn. 132. The following change is made in the uniform trowsers of regimental officers and enlisted men:The cloth to be sky-blue mixture. The welt for officers, and stripes for non-commissioned officers of Infantry, to be of dark blue. 133. The following uniform has been adopted for the Invalid Corps: Jacket-Of sky-blue kersey, with dark-blue trimmings, cut like the jacket for United States cavalry, to come well down on the loins and abdomen. .Towsera-Present regulation, sky-blue., Porage Cap-Present regulation. 134. The following uniform- has been adopted for officers of the Invalid Corps: Frock Coat-Of sky-blue cloth, with dark-blue velvet collar and cuffs-in all other respects, according to the present pattern for officers of Infantry. ShAouldr Strops-According to present regulations, butworkedon dark-bluevelvet. antalons- Of skly-blue cloth, with double stripe of dark-blue Cloth down the outer seam, each stripe one-half inch wide, with space between of three-eighths of an inch. MUSTERING VOLUNTEERS INTO AND OUT OF THE SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. 135. Theo regulations governing this branch of service are published in pamphlet form, and distributed to the Army by the Adjutant General. DRAFTING. 136. The regulations governing this branch of service are published in pamphlet - form, and distributed to those officers who may require them in the performance o their duties by the Prvo Marshal General. 524

Page  525 FOR TI I ARtMY. Extr from Acts of Ansa EXTRACTS FROM ACTS OF CONGIRESS Be it enaded by the Senate and fouse of Seetatices of th United of A'tic in Cbngre assembled, That whenever, by reason of unlawful obstructions, combinetions, or assemblages of persons, or rebellion against the authority of the government of the United States, it shall become impracticable, in the judgment of the President of the United States, to enforce, by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, the laws of the United States within any State or Territory of the United States, it shall be lawful for the President of the United States to call forth the militia of any or all the States of the Union, and to employ such parts of the land and naval forces of tbe United States as he may deem necessary, to enforce the faithful execution of the laws of the United States, or to suppress such rebellion in whatever State or Territory thereof the laws of the UInited States may be forcibly opposed, or the execution thereof forcibly obstructed. SEc. 2. And be ztfurther enacted, That whenever, in the judgmentof the President, it may be necessary to use the military force hereby directed to be employed and called forth by Lim, the President shall, forthwith, by proclamation, command such insurgents to disperse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes, within a limited time. SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That the militia so called into the service of the United States shall be subject to the same Rules and Articles of War as the troops of the United States, and be continued in the service of the United States until discharged by proclamation of the President: Provided, That such continuance inl service shall not extend beyond sixty days after the commencement of the next regular session of Congress. unless Congress shall expressly provide by law therefor: Andprovided, further, That the militia so called into the service of the United States shall, during their time of service, be entitled to the same pay, rations, and allowances for clothing as are or may be established by law for the army of the United States. Szc. 4. And be it further enacted, That every officer, non-commissioned officer, or private of the militia, who shall fail to obey the orders of the President of the United States in any of the cases before recited, shall forfeit a sum not exceeding one year's pay, and not less than one month's pay, to be determined and adjudged by a court-martial; and such officer shall be liable to be cashiered by a sentence of court-martial, and be incapacitated from holding a commission in the militia, for a term not exceeding twelve months, at the discretion of the court; and such non-commissioned officer and private shall be liable to imprisonment by a like sentence, on failure of payment of the fines adjudged against them for one'ealendar month, for every twenty-five dollars of such fine SEc. 5. And be it further enacted, That courts-martial for the trial of militia shall be composed of militia officers only. -.. - -- SEC. - 6. And be it furthern ated, That all fines to be assessed as. aforesaid:shall be certified by the presiding officer of the court-martial, and shall be collected and paid over according to the provisions and in the manner prescribed by the seventh and eighth sections of the act of February twenty-eight, seventeen hundred and ninety-five, to which this is an amendment. A roved July: We2i.. 1.1-.. 2 . 52i.,-,

Page  526 REYI1SED R9 GULATIONS E.xtrats from Acts of Congress. O 0 0 v 0 o e a Q SEc. 5. And be it further enacted, That there be added to the medical staff of the army a corps of medical cadets, whose duty it shall be to act as dressers ia the general hospitals and as ambulance attendants in the field, under the direction and control of the medical officers alone. They shall have the same rank and pay as the military cadets at West Point. Their number shall be regulated by the exigencies of service, at no time to exceed fifty. It shall be composed of young men of liberal education, students of medlcine, between the ages of eighteen and twenty-three, who have been reading medicine for two years, and have attended at least one course of lectures in a medical college. They shall enlist for one year, and be subject to the Rilles and Articles of W'.r. On the fifteenth day of the last month of their service the near approach of their discharge shall be reported to the surgeon general, ia order, if desired, that they may be relieved by another detail of applicants. SFA. 7. And. be it further enacted, That one chaplain shall be allowed to each regiment of the army, to be selected and appointed as the President'nay direct: P.rovided, That none but regularly ordained mi;.nisters of some Christian denomination shall be eligible to selection or appointment. a a C' G C 0 a Szc. 11. And be it further enacted, That in all cases of enlistment and re enlistment in the military service of the United States, the prescribed oath of allegiance may be administered by any commissioned officer of the army. Szc. 13. And be it further enacted, That the army ration shall be increased as follows, viz: Twenty-two ounces of bread or flour, or one pound of hard bread, instead of the present issue; fresh beef shall be issued as often as the con,manding officer of any detachment or regiment shall require it, when practicable, in place of salt meat; beans and rice or hominy shall be issued in the same ration in the proportions now provided in the regulation, and one pound of potatoes per man shall be issued at least three times a week, if practicable; and when' these articles cannot be issued in these proportions, an equivalent in value shall be issued ina some other proper food, and a ration of tea may be substituted for a ration of coffee upon the requisition of the proper officer: Provided, That after the present insurrection shall cease, the ration shall be as provided by law and regulations on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. SEC. 14. And be it further enqcted, That there may be allowed in hospitals, to be provided under such rules as the surgeon general of the army, with the approval of the Secretary of War, may prescribe, such quantities of fresh or preserved fruits, milk or butter, and of eggs, as may be necessary for the proper diet of the sick. SEC. 15. And be it further enacted, That any commissioned officer of the army, or of the marine corps, who shall have served as such for forty consecutive years, may, upon his own application to the President of the United States, be placed upon the list of retired officers, with the pay and emoluments allowed by this act. SEc. 16. And be it fiurther enacted, That if any commissioned officer of the army, or of the marine corfs, shall1 have become, or shall hereafter become, incapable of performing the duties of his office, he shall be placed upon the r'etired list and withdrawn from active service and command, and from the line of promotion, with the following pay and emoluments, namely: the pay proper of the highest rank held by him at the time of his retirement, whether by staff or regimental commission, and four rations pet day, and without any other pay, emoluments, or allowances; and the next officer in rank shall be promoted to the place of the retired officer, according to the established rules of the service. And the same rule of promotion shall; applied successively to the vaanodes consequent upon 526

Page  527 FOR THE -A RMT Extracts from Acts of gr the retirement of an officer: Provided, That should the brevet lieutenant general be retired under this act, it shall be without reduction in his current pay, subsistence, or allowances: And provided, further, That there shall not be on the retired list at any one time more than seven per centum of the whole number of officers of the army, as fixed by law. SEc. 17. And be it furth er enacted, That, in order to carry out the provisions of this act, the Secretary of War, or Secretary of the Navy, as the case may be, under the direction and approval of the President of the United States, shall, from time to time, as occasion may require, assemble a board of not more than nine nor less than five commissioned officers, two-fifths of whom shall be of the medical staff, the board, except those taken from the medical staff, to be Icomposed, as far as may be, of his seniors in rank, to determine the facts as to.the nature and occasion of the disability of such officers as appear disabled to perform such military service, such board being hereby invested with the powers of a court of inquiry and court-martial; and their decision Shall be subject to like revision as that of such courts by the President of the United States. The board, whenever it finds an officer incapacitated for active service, will report whether, in its jud - ment, the said incapacity result from long and faithful service, from wounds or injury received in the-line of duty, from sickness or exposure therein, or from any other incident of service If to, and the President approve such judgment, the disabled officer shall thereupon be placed upon the list of retired officers, according to the provisions of this act. If otherwise, and if the President concur in opinion with the board, the officer shall be retired, as above, either with his pay proper alone, or with his service rations alone, at the discretion of the President, or he shall be wholly retired from the service, with one year's pay and allowances; and in this last case the name shall be thenceforward omitted from the Army Register or Navy Register, as the case may be: Provided, always, That the members of the board shall in every case be sworn to an honest and impartial discharge of their duties, and that no officer of the army shall be retired, either partially or wholly, from the service without having had a fair and fui1 hearing before the board, if, upon due summons, he shall demand it. SEC. 18. And be it further enacted, That the officers partially retired shall be entitled to wvear the uniform of their respective grades, shall continue to be borne upon the Army Register or Navy Register, as the case may be, and shall be subject to the Rules and Articles of War, and to trial by general court-martial for any breach of the said articles. SEc. 19. And be it further enacted, That so much of the sixth section of the act of August twenty-three, eighteen hundred and forty-two, as allows additional or double rations to the commandant of each permanent or fixed post garrisoned withtroops, be, and the same is hereby, repealed. SEC. 20. And be it further enacted, That officers of the army, when absent from their appropriate duties for a period exceeding six months, either with or without leave, shall not receive the allowances authorized by the existing laws for servants' forage, transportation of baggage, fuel, and quarters, either in kind or in commutation. a. a a a, an SEc. 25. And be it further enacted, That retired officers of the army, navy, and marine corps, may be assigned to such duties as the President may deem them capable of performing, and such as the exigencies of the public service may require. Approved August 3, 1861. 0 a 0 0 SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That any commissioned officer of the army, navy, or marine corps, wle), having tendvrod his resignation, shall, prior to due 57 6

Page  528 RIEIS-) B REGULATIONS Extracts from Acts of Congr notice of the acceptance of the same by the proper authority, and without leave, quit his post or proper duties with the intent to remain permanently absent therefrom, shall be registered as a deserter, and punished as such. SEc. 3. And he it further enacted, That flogging as a punishment in the army is hereby abolished. Approved August 5, 1861. o ~ ~ ~ P to:. a>,a SEc. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of the first section of the act approved August fifth, eighteen hundred and fifty-four, as authorizes the appointment of civilians to superintend the national armories be, and the same is hereby, repealed, tand that the superintendents of these armories shall be appointed hereafter from officers of the ordnance department. Approved August 6, 1861. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Rcpresentatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the pay of the privates of the regular army and voluntee,rs, in the service of the United States, be thirteen dollars per month for three years from and after the passage of this act, and until otherwise fixed by lctw. Approved August 6, 1861. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Reresentalivei of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in time of war the commander of a division or separate brigade may appoint general courts-martial, and confirm, execute, pardon, and mitigate their sentences, as allowed and restrained in the sixty-fifth and eightyninth articles of war to commanders of armies and departments: Provided, That sentences of such courts, extending to loss of life, or dismission of a commissioned officer, shall require the confirmation of the general commanding the army in the field to which the division or brigade belongs: And provided, further, That when the division or brigade commander shall be the accuser or prosecutor, the court shall be appointed by the next higher commander. Approved December 24, 1861. a a a a a a * SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the fifth section of the act of twelfth June, eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, giving sutlers a lien upon the soldier's pay, be, and the same is hereby, repealed; and all regulations giving sutlers rights and, privileges beyond the Rules and Articles of War be, and the same are hereby,abrogated. Approved December 24, 1861. 0 e 4> 0 e 04 0 i 0 ~:0 SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That, in time of war or rebellion against the supreme authority of the United States, all persons who shall be found lurking as spies, or acting as such, in or about the fortifications, encampments, posts, quarters, or headquarters of the armies of the United States, or any of them, within any part of the United States which has been or may be declared to be in a state of insurrection by proclamation of the President of the United State, hall suffe(r death by sentence of a general court-martial. lyI MI 0

Page  529 FOR THE ARMY. Exacts' from Acts of Congress. -SE. 5. And be itfurther enacted, That the fifty-fifth article of the first section of act of tenth April, eighteen hundred and six, chapter twenty, be, and the same is hereby, Lo amended as to read as follows: (See 55th Article of War.) Article fifty-five. Whoever, belonging to the armies of the United States in foreign parts, or at any place within the United States or their Territories, during rebellion against the supreme authority of the United States, shall force a safeguard, shall suffer death. :Approved February 13, 1862. SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That the fifth section of the act of twventyeighth September, eighteen, hundred and fifty, providing for the discharge from the service of minors enlisted without the consent of their parents or guardians, be, and the same hereby is, repealed: Provide(d, That hereafter no person under the age of eighteen shall be mustered into the United States service, and the oath of enlistment taken by the recruit shall be conclusive as to his age. SWG. 4. And be itfurther enated, That the second section of the act of the tenth of April, eighteen hundred and six, shall be, and the same is hereby, so amended as to read as follows: (S&ep. 516, Army Regulations.) Approved February 13, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That hereafter the following shall be promulgated as an additional Artic!e of War for the government of the army of the United States, and shall be obeyed and observed as such ARTICLE -. All officers or persons in the military or naval service of the United States are prohibited from employing any of the forces under their respective commands for the purpose of returning fugitives from service or labor, who may have escaped from any persons to whom such labor or service is claimed to be due; and any officer who shall be found guilty by a court-martial of violating this article shall be dismissed from the service. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That this act shall take effect from and after its passage. Approved March 13, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and Hozse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembted, That the inspector generals of the army shall constitute a board of officers, whose duty it shall be to prepare, immediately after the passage of this act, a list or schedule of the following articles, which may be sold by sutlers to the officers and soldiers of the volunteer service, to wit: Apples, dried apples, oranges, figs, lemons, butter, cheese, milk, syrup, molasses, raisins, candles, crackers, wallets, brooms, comforters, boots, pocket looking-glasses, pins, gloves, leather, tin washbasins, shirt-buttons, horn and brass buttons, newspapers, books, tobacco, cigars, pipes, matches, blacking, blacking-brushes, clothesbrushes, tooth-brushes, hair-brushes, coarse and fine combs, emery, crocus, pockethandkerchiefs, stationery, armot oil, sweet oil, rotten-stone, razor-strops, razors, shaving-soap, soap, suspenders, scissors, shoe strings, needles, thread, knives, pencils, and Bristol brick. Saidl list or schedule shall be subject, from time to time, to such revision and change as, in the judgment of the said board, the good of the service may require: Provided, always, That no intoxicating liquors shall at any time be owntained therein, or the sate of such liquors be in any way author I

Page  530 REgiI- ED RIEGULATIONX Extracts from Acts of Congress. ized by said board. A copy of said list or schedule, and of any subsequent change therein, together with a copy of this act, shall be, without delay, furnished by said board to the commanding officer of each brigade and of each regiment not attached to any brigade in the volunteer service, and also to the adjutant general of the army. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That immediately upon the receipt from said board of said list or schedule and copy of this act by the commanding officer of any such brigalde, the acting brigadier general, surgeon, quartermaster, and commissary of said brigade shall constitute a board of officers whose duty it shall be to affix to each article in said list or schedule a price for said brigade, which shall be by them forthwith reported to the commanding officer'of the division, if any, to which said brigade is attached, for his approval, with or without modification, and who shall, after such'.approval, report the same to the inspector generals, and the same, if not disapproved by them, shall be the price not exceeding which said aiticles may be sold to the officers and soldiers in said brigade. Whenever any brigade shall not be attached to a division, said prices shall then be reported directly to the inspector generals, and if approved by them shall be the price fixed for such brigade as aforesaid; and whenever any regiment shall be unattached to any brigade, the acting colonel, lieutenant colonel, matjor, and captains thereof shall constitute the board of officers by whom the price of said articles shall be fixed for said regiment, in the same manner as is herein provided for an unattached brigade. The prices so fixed may be changed by said boards respectively from time to time, not oftener than once in thirty days; but all changes therein shall be reported in like manner and for the same purpose as when originally fixed. SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the commanding officer of each brigade, immediately upon receipt of a copy of said list or schedule and copy of this act, as herein provided, to cause one sutler for each regiment in his brigade to be selected by the commissioned officers of such regiment, which selection shall be by him reported to the adjutant general of the army; the person so selected shall be sole sutler of said regiment. And the commanding officer of each unattached regiment shall, in like manner, cause a selection of a sutler to be made for said regiment, who shall be sole sutler of said regiment. Any vacancy in the office of sutler from any cause shall be filled in the same way as an original appointment. SEC. 4. And be itfurther enacted, That the sutlers chosen in the manner provided in the preceding section shall be allowed a lien only upon the pay of the officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates of the regiment for which he has been chosen, or those stationed at the post to which he has been appointed, and for no greater sum than one-sixth of the monthly pay of each officer, non-commissioned officer, or private, for articles sold during each month; and the amount of onesixth or less than one sixth of the pay of such officer, non-commulissioned officer, or private so sold to him by the sutler, shall be charged on the )ay-rolls of such officer, non-commissioned officer, or private, and deducted from his pay, and paid over by the paymaster to the sutler of the regiment or military post, as the case may be: Provided, That if any paymaster in the service of the United States shall allow or pay any greater sum to any sutler than that hereby authorized to be retained from the pay of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, for artcles sold by any sutler during any one month, then the amount so allowed or paid by the paymaster shall be charged against the said paymaster an(t deducted from his pay and returned to the officer, non-commissioned officer, musician, or private against whom the amount was originally charged. And any cap ain or lieutenant commanding a company who may certify any pay-roll bearingi a charge in favor of the sutler against any officer, non-commissioned officer, musician, or private, larger or greater than one-sixth of the monthly pay of subch officer, non-commissioned officer, musician, or private, shall be punished'at the 51.4i,O

Page  531 FORl THE ARtMY. Extracts from Acts of Conagess. discretion of a courtmartial: Provided, however, That sutlers shall be allowed to sell only the articles designated in the list or schedule provided in this act, and none others, and at prices not exceeding those affixed to said articles, as herein provided: Andprovided, further, That the sutlers shall have no legal claim upon any officer, non-commissior ed officer, musician, or private to an amount exceeding one-sixth of his pay for articles sold during any month. He shall keep said list or schedule, together with a copy of this act, fairly written or printed, posted up in some conspicuous part of the place where he makes said sales, and where the same can be easily read by any person to whom he makes said sales. SEc 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the inspector generals to cause the place of sale and articles kept for that purpose, by said sttlers, to be inspected from time to time, once in fifteen days at least, by some competent officer, specially detailed for that duty, and such changes in said place, or in the quality and character of the articles mentioned in said list or schedule so kept, as shall be required by said officer, shall be conformed to by each sutler. And such officer shall report each inspection to the inspector generals. Seo. 6. And be it further enacted, That no person shall be permitted to act as sutler unless appointed accortding to the provisions of this act; nor shall any person be sutler for more than one regiment; n,r shall any sutler farm out or underlet the business of sutling or the privileges granted to him by his appointment; nor shall any officer of the army receive from any sutler any money or other presents, nor be interested in any way in the stock, trade, or business of any sutler; and any officer receiving such presents, or being thus interested, directly or indirectly, shall be punished at the discretion of a court-martial. No sutler shall sell t,) an enlisted man on credit to a sum exceeding one-fourth of his monthly pay within the same month; nor shall the regimental quartermasters allow the use of army wagons for sutlers' purposes; nor shall the quartermasters' conveyances be used for the transportation of sutlers' supplies. SEac. 7. And be it further enacted, That any sutler who shall violate any of the provisions of this act shall, by the colonel, with consent of the council of administration, be dismissed from the service, and be ineligible to a reappointment as sutler in the service of the United States. Approved March 19, 1862. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Cbgress assembled, That whenever military operations may require the presence of two or more officers of the same grade ia the same field or department, the President may assign the command of the forces in such field or department, without regard to seniority of rank. Approved April 4, 1862. Sr. 3. And be it further enacted, That there shall be eight medical inspectors, with the rank, pay, and emoluments each of a lieutenant colonel of cavalry, and who shall be charged with the duty of inspecting the sanitary cond:tion of transports, quarters, and camps, of field and general hospitals, and who shall report to the medical inspector general, under such regulations as may be hereafter established, all circumstances relating to the sanitary condition and wants of troops and of hospitals, and to the skill, efficiency, and good conduct of the officers and attendants connected with the medical department. Sc. 5. And be it further enacted, That medical purveyors shall be charged, under the direction of the surgeon general, with the selection and purchase of all medi 531

Page  532 1EBIS$1D REGULATION. Extracts from Acts of Congress. cal supplies, including new standard preparations, and of all books, instruments, hospital stores, furniture, and other articles required for the sick and wounded of the army. In all cases of emergency they may provide such additional accommodations for the sick and wounded of the army, and may transport such medical supplies as circumstances may render necessary, under'such regulations as may hereafter be established, and shall make prompt and immediate issues upon all special requisitions made upon them under such circumstances by medical officers; and the special requisitions shall consist simply of a list of the articles required, the qualities required, dated, and signed by the medical officers requiring them. Szc. 6. And be it.further enacted, That whenever the inspector general, or any one of the medical inspectors, shall report an officer of the medical corps as disqualified, by age or otherwise, for promotion to a higher grade, or unfitted for the performance of his professional duties, he shall be reported by the surgeon general, for examination, to a medical board, as provided by the seventeenth section of the act approved August third, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. SEc. 7 And be it further enacted, That the provisions of this act shall continue and be in force during the existence of the present rebellion, and no longer: Pro vided, however, That, when this act shall expire, all officers who shall have been promoted from the medical staff of the aimy under this act shall retain their re spective rank in the army, with such promotion as they would have been en titled to. Approved April 16, 1862. Be it enacted byj the Senate and House rf.Representatives of the United States of America in Conlres assembked, That the medical inspector general, or any medical inspector, is hereby authorized and empowered to discharge from the service of the United States any soldier or enlisted man, with the consent of such soldier or enlisted man, in the permanent hospitals, laboring under any physical disability which makes it disadvantageous to the service that he be retained therein,' and the certificate, in writing, of such inspector general or medical inspector, setting forth the existence and nature of such physical disability shall be sufficient evidence of such discharge: Provided, however, That every such certificate shall appear on its face to have been founded on personal inspection of the soldier so discharged, and shall specifically describe the nature and origin of such disability; and that such discharge shall be without prejudice to the right of such soldier or enlisted man to the pay due him at the date thereof, and report the same to the adjutant general and the surgeon general. Approved May 14, 1862. Be it enacted by the &Snate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of War be authorized to add to the medical department of the army medical storekeepers, not exceeding six in number, who shall have the pay and emoluments of military storekeepers in the quartermaster's department, wlio shall be skilled apothecaries or druggists, who shall give the bond and security required by existing laws for military storekeepers in the quartermaster's department, and who shall be stationed at such points as the necessities of the army may require: Provided, That the provisions of this act shall remain in force only during the continuance of the present rebellion. SEc. 2. And he it further enacted, That the President of the United States is hereby authorized to appoint, if he shall deem it necessary, X chaplain for each permanent hospital, whose pay, with that of chaplains of hospitals heretofore appointed by him, shall be the same as that of regimental chaplains in the volun

Page  533 FOR THI ARMY. Extracts from Acts of ConFress. teer force; and who shall be subject to such rules in relation to leave of absence from duty as are prescribed for commissioned officers of the army. Approved May 20, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of tFpresentatives of the United States of America in Congress assemqbled, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of War, of the Secretary of the Navy, and of the Secretary of the Interior, immediately after the passage of this act, to cause and require every contract made by them, severally, on behalf of the government, or by their officers under them appointed to make such contracts, to be reduced to writing, and to be signed by the contracting parties with their names at the end thereof, a copy of which shall be filed by the officer making and signing the said contract in the "Returns Office" of the Department of the Interior (hereinafter established for that purpose) as soon after the contract is made as possible, and within thirty days, together with all bids, offers, and proposals to him made by persons to obtain the same., as also a copy of any advertisement he may have published inviting bids, offers, or propoposals for the same; all the said copies and papers in relation to each contract to be attache d together by a ribbon and seal, and numbered in regular order numer. ically, according to the number of papers composing the whole return. Sac. 2. And be it J.Urther enacted, That it shall be the further duty of the said officer, before making his return according to the first section of this act, to affix to the same his affidavit in the following form, sworn td before some magistrate having authority to administer oaths: - I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that the copy of contract hereto annexed is an exact copy of a contract made by me personally with -;I that I made the same fairly, without any benefit or advantage corruptly to the said, or any other person; and that the papers accompanying include all those relating to the said contract, as required by the statute in such case made and provided." And any officer convicted of falsely and corruptly swearing to such affidavit shall be subject to all the pains and penalties now by law inflicted for wilful and corrupt perjury. SEc. 3. And be it further enacted, That any officer making contracts, as aforesaid, and failing or neglecting to make returns of the same, according to the provisions of this act, unless from unavoidable accident and not within his control, shall be deemed, in every case of such failure or neglect, to be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred dollars, nor more than five hundred dollars, and be imprisoned for not more than six months, at the discretion of the court trying the same. a ~ ~~~ c. 0s 0ug 0 0. a SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of War, of the Secretary of the Navy, and of the Secretary of the Interior, immediately after the passage of this act, to furnish each and every officer severally appointed by them with authority to make contracts on behalf of the government, with a printed letter of instructions, setting forth the duties of such officer under this act, and also to furnish therewith forms, printed in blank, of contracts to be made, and the affidavit of returns required to be affixed thereto, so that all the instruments may be as nearly uniform as possible. Approved June 2, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and IHouse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That company officers of volunteers shall be paid on the muster and pay rolls of their company, party, or detachment, and not otherwise, except when such officer may be on detached service without troops, or on leave of absence. Approved June 18, 1862. 2T M-3

Page  534 nR %IS$BD RRBGUlATIOIS Extracts from Acts of Congress. Resolved by the Senate and ifouse of Representatives of the U;-ited States of America in Jongress assembled, That so much of the ninth section of the act approved Auguist third, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled "An act for the better orgalization of the military establishment," as abolishes the premium paid for bringing accepted recruits to the rendezvous, be, and the same is hereby, repealed and hereafter a premium of two dollars shall be paid to any citizen, non-commissioned officer, or soldier, for such accepted recruit for the regular army [as] he mray bring to the rendezvous. And every soldier who hereafter enlists, either in the regular army or the volunteers, for three years, or during the war, may receive his first month's pay in advance, upon the mustering of his company into the service of the United States, or after he shall have been mustered into and joined a regiment already in the service. Approved June 21, 1862. a5 a 0. a5 a a a Szc. 2. And be it further enacted, That from and after the passage of this act brigade surgeons shall be known and designated as surgeons of volunteers, and shall be attached to the general medical staff under the direction of the sui geon general; and hereafter such appointments for the medical service of the army shall be appointed surgeons of volunteers. Szc. 3. And be it further enacted, That instead of "one assistant surgeon," as provided by the second section of the act of July twenty-two, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, each regiment of volunteers in the service of the United States shall have two assistant surgeons. Approved July 2, 1862. SEc 2. And be it further enacted, That so much of the seventh section of the act approved third March, eighteen hundred and fifty- one, entitled "An act to found a military asylum for the relief and support of invalid and disabled soldiers of the army of the United States," as requires that "all moneys, not exceeding twothirds of the balance on hand, of the hospital fund and of the post fund of each military station, after deducting the necessary expenses," shall be set apart for the support of the military asylum, be, and the same is hereby, repealed. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the enlisted men of the ordnance department now designated as master workmen shall hereafter be designated and mustered as sergeants; those now designated as armorers, carriage-makers, and blacksmiths shall be designated and mustered as corporals; those now designated as artificers shall be designated and mustered as privates of the first class, and those now designated as laborers shall be designated and mustered as privates of the second class: Provided, That the pay, rations, and clothing now authorized by law to the respective grades of enlisted ordnance men shall not be changed. Approved July 5, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative.q of the United States of Amer4ca in Congress assembled, That hereafter every person elected or appointed to any office of honor or profit under the government of the United States, either in the civil, military, or naval departments of the public service, excepting the Pres'dent of the United States, shall, before entering upon the duties of such office, and before being entitled to any of the salary or other emoluments thereof, take and subscribe to the following oath or affirmation: "I, A. B., do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have never voluntarily borne arms against the United States since I have been a citizen thereof; that I have voluntarily given no aid, countenance, counsel, or encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility thereto; that I 584~

Page  535 rFQt T HE ARXT. Extracts from Acts of Congress have neither sought nor accepted nor attempted to exercise the functions of any office whatever under any authority or pretended authority in hostility to the United States; that I have not yielded a voluntary support to any pretended government, authority, power, or constitution within the United States hostile or inimical thereto. And I do further swear (or affirm) that, to the best of my knowledge aced ability, I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter, so help me God;" which said oath, so taken and signed, shall be preserved among the files of the court, house of Congress, or department to which the said office may appertain. And any person who shall falsely take the said oath shall be guilty of perjury, and on conviction, in addition to the penalties now prescribed for that offence, shall be deprived of his office, and rendered incapable forever after of holding any office or place under the United States. Approved July 2, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That any officer of the government of the United States who shall, directly or indirectly, take, receive, or agree to receive, any money, property, or other valuable consideration whatsoever, from any person or persons for procuring, or aiding to procure, any contract, office, or place from the government of the United States or any department thereof, or from any officer of the United States, for any person or persons whatsoever, or for giving such contract office, or place to any person whomsoever, and the person or persons who shall, directly or indirectly, offer or agree to give, or give or bestow any money, property, or other valuable consideration whatsoever, for the procuring or aiding to procure any contract, office, or place, as aforesaid, shall, for every such offence, be liable to indictment as for a misdemeanor in any court of the United States having jurisdiction thereof, and on conviction thereof shall pay a fine of not exceeding ten thousand dollars, and suffer imprisonment in the penitentiary not exceeding two years, at the discretion of the court trying the same; and any such contract or agreement, as aforesaid, may, at the option of the President of the United States, be declared absolutely null and void; and any officer of the Uni{cd States convicted, as aforesaid, shall, moreover, be disqualified from holding any office of honor, profit, or trust under the government of the United States. Approved July 16, 1862. 0 e 0 a a a a a O SEc. 13. And be it further enacted, That the relative rank between officers of the navy and the army shall be as follows, lineal rank only to be considered: Rear admirals with major generals. Commodores with brigadier generals. Captains with colonels. Commanders with lieutenant colonels. Lieutenant commanders with majors. Lieutenantits with captains Masters with first lieutenants. Ensigns with second lieutenants. Approved July 16, 1862. Approved July 16, 1862. .53

Page  536 RlR~VISBJ RIEOVLATIO,NI Extracts from Acts of Congress. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represent(atives of the United States (f Amica in Congress assembled, That hereafter no person in the military service of the United States convicted and sentenced by a court-martial shall be punished by confinement iu the penitentiary of the District of Columbia unless the offence of which such person may be convicted would by some statute of the United States or at common law, as the same exists in the said District, subject such convict to said punishment. Approved July 16, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the passage of this act any officer or agent of the United States who shall receive public money which he is not authorized to retain as salary, pay, or emolument, shall render his accounts monthly, instead of quarterly, as heretofore; and such accounts, with the vouchers necessary to the correct and prompt settlement thereof, shall be rendered direct to the proper accounting officer of the Tl easury, and be mailed or otherwise forwarded to its proper address within ten days after the expiration of each successive month. And in case of the non-receipt at the Treasury of any accounts within a reasonable and proper time thereafter, the officer whose accounts are ia default shall be required to furnish satisfactory evidence of having complied with the provisions of this act; and for any default on his part the delinquent officer shall be deemed a defaulter, and be subject to all the penalties prescribed by the sixteenth section of the act of August sixth, eighteen hundred and forty-six, "to provide for the better organization of the Treasury, and for the collection, safe-ieeping, transfer, and disbursement of tbe public revenue:" Provided, That the secretary of the Treasury may, if in his opinion the circumstances of the case justify and require it, extend the time hereinbetore prescribed for the rendi tion of accounts: And provided, further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to restrain the heads of any of the departments from requiring such other returns or reports from the officer or agent subject to the control of such heads of departments as the public interest may require. Approved July 17, 1862. Be it enacted by the Senate and ilouse of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assenibled, That officers of the army entitled to forage for horses shall not be allowed to commute it but may draw forage in kind for each hoire actually kept by them when, and at the place where, they are on duty, not exceeding the number authorized by law: Provided, however, That when forage in kind cannot be fn:.nished by the proper department, then, and in all such cases, officers entitled to forage may commute the same according to existing regulations: And provided, further, That officers of the army and of volunteers assigned to duty which requires them to be mounted shall, during the time they are employed on such duty, receive the pay, emoluments, and allowances of cavalry officers of the same grade, respectively. SEc. 2. And be it further enacted, That major generals shall be entitled to draw forage in kind for five horses; brigadier generals for four horses; colonels, lieutenanrt colonels, and majors, for two horses each; captains and lieutenants of cavalry and artillery, or having the cavalry allowance, for two horses each; and chaplains, for one horse only. SEC 3. Ard be it further enacted, That whenever an officer in the army shall employ a soldier as his servant, he shall, for each and every month during which soldier ahall be so enmployed, dedut from his own monthly pay the full >7. A& -' * | jK, 0.-. 4. 1.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. 7.7.., ~~.!I, — w

Page  537 FOR TIE ARMY. EXacts from Acts of Congress. amount paid to or expended by the government per month on account of said soldier; and every officer of the army who shall fail to make such deduction shall, on conviction thereof before a general court-martial, be cashiered. SEc. 6. And be it further enacted, That each brigade in the volunteer service may have sixteen musicians as a band, who shall receive the pay and allowances now provided by law for regimental bands, except the leader of the band, who shall receive forty-five dollars per month, with the emoluments and allowances of a quartermaster's sergeant. SEC. 7. And be it further enacted, That in lieu of the present rate of mileage allowed to officers of the army when travelling on public duty, where transportation in kind is not furnished to them by the government, not more than six cents per mile shall hereafter be allowed, unless where an officer is ordered from a station east of the Rocky mountains to one west of the same mountains, or vce versa, when ten cents per mile shall be allowed to him; and no officer of the army or navy of the United States shall be paid mileage except for travel actually performed at his own expense, and in obedience to orders. SEC. 8. And be itfurther enacted, That so much of section nine of the aforesaid act, approved July twenty-second, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, and of section seven of the "Act providing for the better organization of the military estab]ishment," approved August third, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, as defines the qualifications of chaplains in the army and volunteers, shall hereafter be construed to read as follows: That no person shall be appointed a chaplain in the United States army who is not a regularly ordained minister of some religious denomination, and who does not present testimonials of his present good standing as such minister, with a recommendation for his appointment as an army chaplain from some authorized ecclesiastical body, or not less than five accredited ministers belonging to said religious denomination. S-c 9. And be it further enacted, That hereafter the compensation of all chaplaints in the regular or volunteer service or army hospitals shall be one hundred dollars per month and two rations a day when on duty; and the chaplains of the permanent hospitals, appointed under the authority of the second section of the act approved Mlay twenty, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, shall be nominated to the Senate for its advice andi consent, and( they shall, in all respects, fill the requirements of the preceding section of this act relative to the appointment of chaplains in the army and volunteers; and the appointments of chaplains to army hospitals heretofore made by the President are hereby confirmed. a a o 4 I Chaplains employed at the military posts, called "chaplain posts," shlall be required to reside at the posts; and all chaplains in the United States service shall be subject to such rules in relation to leave of absence from duty as are prescribed for commissioned officers of the United States army stationed at such po.ts SEac. 10. And be it further enacted, That so much of the tenth section of the aforesaid act, approved August three, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, be, and the same are hereby, repealed. SEC. 11. And be it further enacted, That whenever an officer shall be put under arrest, except at remote military posts or stations, it shall be the duty of the officer by whose orders he is arrested to see that a copy of the charges on which he has been arrested and is to be tried shall be served upon him within eight days thereafter, and that he shall be brought to trial within ten days thereafter, unless the necessities of the service prevent such trial; and then he shall be brought to trial within thirty days after the expiration of the said ten days or the arrest shall cease: Provided, That if the copy of the charges be not served upon the arrested officer, as herein provided, the arrest shall cease; but officers released from arrest under the provisions of this section may be tried whenever the exlgencies of the service will permit, within twelve months after such release from 2 T2 ," 7

Page  538 RrE~VISED RtEGULATIONS Extracts from Acts of Congress. arrest: And provided, further, That the provisions of this section shall apply to all persons now under arrest and awaiting trial. SEc. 12. And be it further enacted, That whenever the name of any officer of the army or marine corps now in the service, or who may hereafter be in the service, of the United States, shall have been borne on the army register or naval register, as the case may be, forty-five years, or he shall be of the age of sixty-two years, it shall be in the discretion of the President to retire him from active service and direct his name to be entered on the retired list of officers of the grade to which he belonged at the time of such retirement; and the President is hereby authorized to assign any officer retired under this section, or the act of August third, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, to any appropriate duty; and such officer thus assigned sh-ll receive the full pay and emoluments of his grade while so assigned and employed. SEc. 16. And be itfurther enacted, That whenever any contractor for subsistence, clothing, arms, ammunition, munitions of war, and tbr eve y description of supplies for the army or navy of the United States, shall be found guilty by courtmartial of fraud or wilful ne,glect of duty, he shall be punished by fine, imprisonment, or such other punishment as the court-martial shall adjudge; and any person who shall contract to furnish supplies of any kind or description for the army or navy he shall be deemed and taken as a part of the land or naval f1orces of the United States, for which he shall contract to furnish said supplies, and be subject to the rules and regulations for the government of the land and naval forces of the United States. SEc. 17. And be it further enacted, That the President of the United States be, and hereby is, authorized and requested to dismiss and discharge from the military service, either in the army, navy, marine corps, or volunteer force, in the United States service, any officer for any cause which, in his judgment, either renders such officer unsuitable for, or whose dismission woulj promote, the public service. Approved July 17, 1862. G Q- G ~ Q e G 0 G Sesc. 5. And be it further enacted, That the President shall appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, at judge advocate general, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of a colonel of cavalry, to whose office shall be returned, for revision, the records and proceedings of all courts-martial and military commissions and where a recoid bhall be kept of all proceedings had thereupon. And no sentence of death or imprisonment iu the penitentiary shall be carried into execution until the same shall have been approved by the President. SFc. 6. And be itfurther enacted, That there may be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, for each armv in the field, a judge advocate, with the rank, pay, and emoluments, each, of a major of cavalry, who shall perform the duties of judge advocate for the army to which they respectively belong, under the direction of the judge advocate general. SE.c. 7. And be itfturther enwttd, That hereafter all offenders in the army charged with offences now punishable by a regimental or garrison court-martial shall be brought before a field officer of his regiment, who shall be detailed for that purpose, and who shall hear and determine the offcnce, and order the punishment that shall be inflicted; and b-hall also make a record of his proceedings, and submit the same to the brigade commander, who, upon the approval of the proceedings of such field officer, shall order the same to be executed: Provided, That the punishment in such cases be limited to that authorized to) be inflicted by a regimental or garrison court-martial. And provided, further, That, in the event of 5818;

Page  539 FOR THE ABXY. Extracts fom Acto of Congress. there being no brigade commander, the proceedings, as aforesaid, shall be submitted lbr approval to the commanding officer of the post. ia a a a a v a a 0 SEc, 9. And be t further enacted, That the President be, and he is hereby, authorized3. to establish and organize army corps according to his discretion. Sac. 10. And be tfurther enacted, That each army corps shall have the following officers, and no more, attached thereto, who shall constitute the staff of the commander thereof: one assistant adjutant general, one quartermaster, one commissary of subsistence, and one assistant inspector general, who shall bear, respectively, the rank of lieutenant colonel, and who shall be assigned from the army or volunteer force by the President. Also three aides-de-camp, one to bear the rank of major, and two to bear the rank of captain, to be appointed by the President, by, and with the advice and consent of the Senate, upon the recommendation of the commander of the army corps. The senior officer of artillery in each army corps shall, in addition to his other duties, act as chief of artillery and ordnance at the headquarters of the corps. a 0 a a,. a O O O Ssc. 16. And be it further enaced, That medical purveyors and storekeepers shall give bonds in such sums as the Secretary of War may require, with security to be approved by him. Approved July 17, 1862. a O a a a a a a O Ssc. 2. And be itfurthtr enacted, That the officers of the medical inspector's department shall be charged, in addition to the duties now assigned to them by existing laws, with the duty of making regular and frequent inspections of all military general hospitals and convalescent camps, and shall, upon each such inspection, designate to the surgeon in charge of such hospitals or camps all soldiers who may be, in their opinion, fit subjects for discharge from the service, on surgeon's certificate of disability, or sufficiently recovered to be returned to their regiments for duty, and shall see that such soldiers are discharged or so returned. And the medical inspecting officers are hereby empowered, under such regulations as may be hereafter established, to direct the return to duty, or the discharge from service, as the case may be, of all soldiers designated by them. Approved December 27, 1862. O *. X a a a a * * Swo. 2. And be it further enacted, That in settling the accounts of the commanding officer of a company for clothing and other military supplies, the affidavit of any such officer may be received to show the loss of vouchers, or company books, or any matter or circumstance tending to prove that any apparent deficiency was occasioned by unavoidable accident, or lost in actual service, without any fault on his part, or that the whole or any part of such clothing and supplies had been properly and legally used and appropriated; and such affidavit may be considered as evidence to establish the factsset forth, with or without 6ther evidence, as may seem to the Secretary of Warjust and proper under the circumstances of the case. Approved February 7, 1863. Be it enacted by the' Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That any person in the land or naval forces of the United States, or in the militia in actual service of the United States, in time of war, who shall make or cause to be made, or present, or cause to be presented for payment ar approval to or by any peron or officer hin the civil or military service of the 6ft

Page  540 RET~IBIDI) REGULATI ON8 Extracts from Acts of Congress. United States, any claim upon or against the government of the United States, or any department or officer thereof, knowing such claim to lbe false, ficticious, or fraudulent; any person, in, such forces or service, who shall, for the purpose of obtaining, or aiding in obtaining, the approval or payment of such claim; make, use, or cause to be made or used, any false bill, receipt, voucher, entry, roll, account, claim, statement, certificate, affidavit, or deposition, knowing the same to contain any false or fraudulent statement or entry; any person in said forces or service who shall make or procure to be made, or knowingly advise the making of any false oath to any fact, statement, or certificate, voucher or entry, for-the purpose of obtaining, or of aiding to obtain, any approval or payment of any claim against the United States, or any department or officer thereof; any person in said forces or service who, for the purpose of obtaining, or enabling any other person to obtain from the government of the United States, or any department or officer thereof, any payment or allowance, or the approval or signature of any person in the military, naval, or civil service of the United States, of or to any false, fraudulent, or fictitious claim, shall forge or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be forged or counterfeited, any signature upon any bill, receipt, voucher, account, claim, roll, statement, affidavit, or deposition; and any person in said forces or service who shall utter or use the same as true or genuine, knowing the same to have been forged or counterfeited; any person in said forces or service who shall enter into any agreement, combination, or conspiracy to cheat or defraud the government of the United States, or any department or officer thereof, by obtaining, or aiding and assisting to obtain, the payment or allowance of any false or fraudulent claim; any person in said forces or service who shall steal, embezzle, or knowingly and wilfully misappropriate or apply to his own use or benefit, or who shall wrongfully and knowingly sell, convey, or dispose of any ordnance, arms, ammunition, clothing, subsistence stores, money, or other property of the United States, furnished, or to be used for the military or naval service of the United States; any contractor, agent, paymaster, quartermaster, or other person whatsoever, in slid forces or service, having charge, possession, custody, or control of any money or other public property, used or to be used in the military or naval service of the United States, who shall, with intent to defraud the United States, or wilfully to conceal such money or other property, deliver or cause to be delivered to any other person having authority to receive the same any amount of such money or other public property less than that for which he shall receive certificate or receipt; any person in said forces or service who is or shall be authorized to make or deliver any certificate, voucher, or receipt, or other paper certifying the receipt of arms, ammunition, provisions, clothing, or other public property so used or to be used, who shall make or deliver the same to any person without having full knowledge of the truth of the fLcts stated therein, and with intent to cheat, defraud, or injure the United States; any person in said forces or service who shall knowingly purchase or receive, in pledge for any obligation or indebtedness, from any soldier, officer, or other person called into or employed in said forces or service, any arms, equipments, ammunition, clothes, or military stores, or other public property, such soldier, officer, or other person not having the lawful right to pledge or sell the same, shall be deemed guilty of a criminal offence, and shall besubject to the rules and regular tions made for the government of the military and naval forces of the United States, and of the militia when called into and employed in the actual service of the United States in time of war, and to the provisions of this act. And every person so offending may be arrested and held for trial by a court-martial, and if found guilty shall be punished by fine and imprisonment, or such other punish. ment as the court-martial may adjudge, save the punishment of death. SEc. 2. And be itfurther enacted, That any person heretofore called or hereafter to be called into or employed in such forces or service, who shall commit any -ivado of this act ad Shall ditrwards rev his discharge; or be dismissed 540

Page  541 FOR TIE ARX. rT. Extracts from Acts of Congress. from the service, shall, notwithstanding such discharge or dismissal, continue to be liable to be arrested and held for trial and sentence by a court-martial, in the same manner and to the same extent as if he hal not received such discharge or been dismissed. Approved March 2, 1862. e r 0 v * 0 * 0 * SEc. 21. And be it further enacted, That so much of the fifth section of the act approved seventeenth July, eighteen hundred and sixty.two, entitled "An act to amend an act calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union," and so forth, as requires the approval of the President to carry into execution the sentence of a court-martial, be, and the same is hereby, repealed, as far as relates to carrying into execution the sentence of any court-martial against any person convicted as a spy or deserter, or of mutiny or murder; and hereafter sentences in punishment of these offences mnay be carried into execution upon the approval of the commanding general in the field. Szc 22. And be itfurther enacted, That courts-martial shall have power to sentence officers who shall absent themselves from their commands without leave, to be reduced to the ranks to serve three years or during the war. SEc. 23. And be it further enacted, That the clothes, arms, military outfits, and accoutrements furnished by the United States to any soldier, 3hall not be sold, bartered, exchanged, pledged, loaned, or given away; and no person not a soldier, or duly authorized officer of the United States, who has possession of any such clothes, arms, military outfits, or accoutrements, furnished as aforesaid, and which have been the subject of any such sale, barter, exchange, pledge, loan, or gift, shall have any right, title, or interest therein; but the same may be seized and taken wherever found by any officer of the United States, civil or military, and shall thereupon be delivered to any quartermaster, or other officer authorized to receive the same; and the possession of any such clothes, arms, military outfits, or accoutrements, by any person not a soldier or officer of the United States, shall be prima facia evidence of such a sale, barter, exchange, pledge, loan, or gift, as aforesaid. SEc. 27. And be it further enacted, That depositions of witnesses residing beyond the limits of the State, Territory, or district in which military courts shall be ordered to sit, may be taken in cases tlot capital by either party, and read in evidence: Provided, The same shall be taken upon reasonable notice to the opposite party, and duly authenticated. SEc. 28. And be zt further enacted, That the judge advocate shall have power to appoint a reporter, whose duty it shall be to record the proceedings of, and testimony taken before, military courts, instead of the judge advocate; and such reporter may take down such proceedings and testimony in the first instance in shorthand. The reporter shall be sworn or affirmed faithfully to perform his duty before entering upon it. Sxc. 29. And be it further enacted, That the court shall, for reasonable cause, grant a continuance to either party for such time and as often as shall appear to be just: Provided, That if the prisoner be in close confinement, the trial shall not be delayed for a period longer than sixty days. Szc 30. And be itfurth