Page  1 ï~~2005 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST DISTRIBUTIONAL NOTES FOR THE FLORA OF WISCONSIN Michael A. Vincent1 and Thomas G. Lammers2 1W.S. Turrell Herbarium Department of Botany Miami University Oxford, OH 45056 vincenma@muohio.edu 2Department of Biology and Microbiology University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Oshkosh, WI 54901 lammers @uwosh.edu The flora of Wisconsin is very well studied, and documentation available on the plant species found in the state is extensive (Judziewicz 2003; Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Wetter et al. (2001) stated that 3243 vascular plant species were known for Wisconsin, 2366 of which are native. Distributional maps are provided for many of the state's plant species on the Wisconsin vascular plant species web site (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003) and in Cochrane & Iltis (2000), as well as at the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point web site (Judziewicz 2003). Two other Wisconsin county records were recently reported in a paper on the flora of the Chicago region (Lammers 2003): Carex muskingumensis Schwein. (Cyperaceae) and Samolus parviflorus Raf. (Primulaceae). Species given below as state records for Wisconsin are not listed in any of the following sources as occurring in the state: Cochrane and Iltis (2000), Gleason and Cronquist (1991), Judziewicz (2003), USDA (2002), Wetter et al. (2001), Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003), or in the appropriate volume of the Flora of North America, if published. Six species are designated as state records in this note. New county record designation is given if the species was not mapped for a particular county on the Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003) web site or the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point web site (Judziewicz 2003). New county records are given for 17 species. An additional species, Cymbalaria muralis, is listed as a recent collection of a species excluded by Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003) from the state flora. Several species included in the list are greenhouse weeds. These are as follow: Cardamine flexuosa, Cymbalaria muralis, Fatoua villosa, Gypsophila muralis, Parietaria floridana. Two of these, Cardamine flexuosa and Gypsophila muralis are also represented by collections from outdoor populations, and are likely established or on their way to becoming established in the flora. Of the remainder, Fatoua villosa is also likely to become established in the state; it is known from many sites throughout North America (Wunderlin 1997), and was recently reported from Michigan by Reznicek (2001). The rest are included as

Page  2 ï~~THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Vol. 44 novelties, though they may or may not spread from the greenhouse settings in which they were found. Greenhouses and other horticultural settings often serve as conduits through which weedy species are spread. Beckmannia syzigachne (Steud.) Fern. American slough grass (Poaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co.: Aurora Twp. T18N R13E S8 SWY4, at jct. of State Hwy 21 and State Hwy 49, 1 mi SE of Auroraville, abundant in wet open roadside ditch, 17 Jul 2003, T G. Lammers 11625 & N. A. Harriman (ISC, MU, NY, OSH). American slough grass is native to marshes and ditches throughout much of the western United States, east through Wisconsin to Michigan, Ohio, and New York (Hitchcock 1950). In Wisconsin, the species was previously reported from 15 counties scattered across the state (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Blephilia hirsuta (Pursh) Benth. Hairy wood mint (Lamiaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Brown Co., Holland Twp., Holland State Wildlife Area, 1 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10777, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (MU); ibid, T G. Lammers 11558, M. A.Vincent & N. A. Harriman (BHO, BRIT, OSH). Hairy wood mint is reported for nine other counties in the state by Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003); this population represents the northeastern-most site discovered to date in Wisconsin. Cardamine flexuosa With. Bending bitter cress (Brassicaceae; state record) WISCONSIN: Dane Co., University of Wisconsin campus, Madison, weedy in flower beds, 5 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10820 (MU), common weed in Botany Department greenhouse, Birge Hall, 7 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10821 (MU, OSH); Dodge Co., Beaver Dam Twp., weedy on nursery grounds outside and in greenhouses, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10819 (MU, OSH); Waushara Co., Wautoma, weedy on nursery grounds, 30 Jul 2003, M. A. Vincent 10683, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (MU, OSH); Winnebago Co., Oshkosh, weedy in gravel beds and pots outdoors in a nursery, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10802 & T G. Lammers (MU, OSH), weedy in greenhouse, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10804 & T G. Lammers (MU, OSH). This introduced small bitter cress species was listed by Rollins (1993) as occurring only sporadically, but is much more widespread. It is being distributed rapidly across the continent through the horticultural industry (current research of the senior author). Carex cumulata (L. H. Bailey) Mack. Clustered sedge (Cyperaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co., Warren Twp., east edge of Redgranite, 30 Jul 2002, M. A. Vincent 10759, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (DOV, MU). According to the distribution map given by Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003), this new record is the eastern-most in the state. The species is described as infrequent and seldom abundant by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2002), though it is distributed widely in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada.

Page  3 ï~~2005 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Chamaesyce hirta (L.) Millsp. (=Euphorbia hirta L.) Pillpod sandmat (Euphorbiaceae, state record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co., Wautoma, weedy on nursery grounds, 30 Jul 2003, M. A. Vincent 10684, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (MU, OSH). This species is generally found in more southern areas, and is considered a tropical to subtropical species. It has been reported for Michigan (USDA 2002), and is known from stations in other states in the midwest (Vincent, unpublished). Coronilla varia L. Crown-vetch (Fabaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Dodge Co., Beaver Dam, roadside weed, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10814 (MU, OSH). Coronilla varia is wide-spread in Wisconsin. The oldest record for it in WIS is 1946, according to the Wisconsin State Herbarium website, and therefore it is not mentioned in Fassett (1939). It is commonly used in seed mixes for road-side soil stabilization (Isely 1998). The species is becoming quite invasive in some areas, and is now considered a noxious weed in some states (e.g., Ohio, Gardner & Hillmer 2002). This collection documents a population in a new county in the east-central part of the state. Cucurbita pepo L. Pumpkin (Cucurbitaceae; state record) WISCONSIN: Dodge Co., Beaver Dam, roadside weed, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10816 (MU, OSH). The name C. pepo in restricted to pumpkin and allied cultivars, while C. maxima should be restricted to winter squashes, such as hubbard and acorn squash (USDA 2002, Whitaker and Davis 1962). Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003) records for C. maxima may be of both species, and should be further investigated. Cymbalaria muralis Gaertn., G. Mey. & Scherb. Kennilworth ivy (Scrophulariaceae) WISCONSIN: Winnebago Co., Oshkosh, weed in greenhouse, not cultivated, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10806, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (MU, OSH). Kennilworth ivy is listed as excluded from the Wisconsin flora (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). This collection is of the species as a weed in a greenhouse, and may indicate that the species could be more widespread than records indicate. It is known as a weed from the adjacent states of Illinois and Michigan (USDA 2002). Eupatorium altissimum L. Upland boneset (Asteraceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Outagamie Co.: Dale Twp. T21N R15E section 27, along RR tracks southeast of Dale, between Industrial Dr. and Hunters Rd., rocky railway bed, 29 Aug 2003, T G. Lammers 11780 & N. A. Harriman (OSH). Eupatorium altissimum has previously been reported mostly from southern counties; this collection extends the northern limit of its range in Wisconsin.

Page  4 ï~~THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Vol. 44 Fatoua villosa (Thunb.) Nakai Mulberry-weed (Moraceae; state record) WISCONSIN: Winnebago Co., Oshkosh, weedy in greenhouse, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10805 & T G. Lammers (MU, OSH). Mulberry-weed is spreading rapidly across North America through the horticultural industry (senior author's present research). It is likely to be found in outdoor settings in Wisconsin, especially since it is known from many sites throughout North America (Wunderlin 1997), and a population was recently reported from Michigan by Reznicek (2001). Gaura biennis L. var. biennis Biennial bee-blossom (Onagraceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Racine Co.: Caledonia Twp. T4N R22E section 3 N%, along RR tracks north of the Root River bridge and 7% Mile Rd., just S of the Milwaukee Co. line, brushy right-of-way, 27 Aug 1999, T G. Lammers 10813 & N. A. Harriman (MU, OSH). This species is widely distributed in eastern North America (USDA 2002). This collection is a new county for Wisconsin (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003), and is also an addition to the flora of the Chicago region of Swink and Wilhelm (1994). Gypsophila muralis L. Cushion baby's breath (Caryophyllaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Dodge Co., Beaver Dam Twp., weedy on nursery grounds outside and in greenhouses, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10818 (MU, OSH). Cushion baby's breath had previously been known from nine scattered counties in the state (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). The species is sometimes cultivated as a bedding plant and escapes readily, as was the case at this site. Iris pseudacorus L. Yellow flag (Iridaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Manitowoc Co., along St. Rt. 42 6 miles north of St. Rt. 310, 10 Jun 1994, M. A. Vincent 6505 & T G. Lammers (MU, OSH). Yellow flag has previously been reported for 12 counties in Wisconsin (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). It has been widely introduced in North America and easily escapes into wet areas (Henderson 2002). In addition to the normal, yellow-flowered plants, a single white-flowered plant was found at this site (M. A. Vincent 6506 & T G. Lammers, MU). Lotus corniculatus L. Bird's-foot trefoil (Fabaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Dodge Co., Beaver Dam, roadside weed, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10817 (MU, OSH). Bird's-foot trefoil is a common weedy species in much of the United States (USDA 2002), where is has been used in roadside seeding mixes and as a forage crop (Isely 1998). It seems a relatively recent introduction to Wisconsin, and was not listed for the state by Fassett (1939); the oldest collection in WIS is 1958; it is now widespread (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Lycopodiella margueritae J. G. Bruce, W. H. Wagner & Beitel Northern prostrate club-moss (Lycopodiaceae; state record)

Page  5 ï~~2005 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST WISCONSIN: Wood Co., Cranmoor Twp., cranberry bog west of Nekoosa, 30 Jul 2002, M.A. Vincent 10727, TG. Lammers & N.A. Harriman (MU). This diminutive species is not listed for Wisconsin by the Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003). Wagner and Beitel (1993) list this species only for Michigan. It was reported for Ohio by Cooperrider et al. (2001). Identification of the specimen was confirmed by R.J. Hickey and A.W. Cusick. Matricaria recutita L. Chamomile (Asteraceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Fond du Lac Co., Lamartine Twp., weedy roadside, 3 Aug 2002, M. A. Vincent 10812 (MU, OSH). This is the common chamomile of "chamomile tea." It is a widespread species in North America, having been introduced from Europe (USDA 2002). In Wisconsin, the species has previously been known from 10 counties (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Odontites serotina (Lam.) Dumort. Odontites (Scrophulariaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Winnebago Co.: Winchester Twp. T20N R15E section 1 SE4, along County Hwy M, 0.5 mi N of its jct. with North Loop Rd., in the Rat River State Wildlife Area, ca. 2.6 mi S of Medina, abundant on grassy roadside, 29 Aug 2003, T G. Lammers 11775 & N. A. Harriman (BRIT, MO, MU, NY, OSH, WU). Odontites was first reported for Wisconsin by Harriman (1970), and is now known from Brown, Door, Kewaunee, Manitowoc, Marinette, Oconto, Outagamie, and Shawano counties (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Parietaria floridana Nutt. Florida pellitory (Urticaceae; state record) WISCONSIN: Winnebago Co., Oshkosh, weedy in greenhouse, 3 Aug 2002, M.A. Vincent 10807 & TG. Lammers (MU, OSH). Not listed for the state by Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003), this greenhouse weed is native to the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains (Boufford 1997). Platanthera obtusata (Banks ex Pursh) Lindl. Blunt bog orchid (Orchidaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Wood Co., Cranmoor Twp., cranberry bog west of Nekoosa, 30 Jul 2002, M.A. Vincent 10730, T G. Lammers & N. A. Harriman (MU); ibid, T G. Lammers 11528, M. A. Vincent & N. A. Harriman (NY, OSH). Platanthera obtusata is a widespread species in Canada; in the United States, it is found only in the northernmost states, and further south in the Rocky Mountains (Sheviak 2002). This record represents a southwestern range extension for blunt bog orchid in Wisconsin. It should be noted that additional county records beyond those given by Wisconsin State Herbarium (2003) for the species are given by Case (1987), for Dunn, Shawano, and Taylor counties. Polygonum careyi Olney Carey's smartweed (Polygonaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co., Warren Twp., east edge of Redgranite, 30 Jul 2002, M. A. Vincent 10752, T G. Lammers & N.A. Harriman (MU); ibid, T G. Lammers 11549, M. A. Vincent & N. A. Harriman (NY, OSH).

Page  6 ï~~THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Vol. 44 Polygonum careyi is known from the northeastern quarter of the United States, and, interestingly, Florida (USDA 2002). In Wisconsin, it has previously been known from 13 counties (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Puccinellia distans (Jacq.) Parl. European alkali grass (Poaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co.: Aurora Twp. T18N R13E S8 SWY4, at jct. of State Hwy 21 and State Hwy 49, 1 mi SE of Auroraville, wet open roadside ditch, 17 Jul 2003, TG.Lammers 11626 & N.A.Harriman (ISC, MU, NY, OSH). European alkali grass is found throughout the western US and in the northern half of the eastern part of the country (USDA 2002). It is found in widely scattered areas throughout eastern Wisconsin (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Silene cserei Baumg. Balkan catchfly (Caryophyllaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Waushara Co., Warren Twp., east edge of Redgranite, 30 Jul 2002, M.A. Vincent 10755, T.G. Lammers & N.A. Harriman (MU). Balkan catchfly is found in many of the north-central and northeastern states in the US. It has been reported from many counties in the state (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Spergula arvensis L. Corn spurry (Caryophyllaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Wood Co., Cranmoor Twp., cranberry bog west of Nekoosa, 30 Jul 2002, M.A. Vincent 10713, T.G. Lammers & N.A. Harriman (MU). Corn spurry is found as a weed in much of the United States (USDA 2002), and in widely scattered populations in Wisconsin (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). Zizia aurea (L.) W.D.J.Koch Common golden alexanders (Apiaceae; county record) WISCONSIN: Marinette Co., Marinette, along RR tracks parallelling US Hwy 41, 2.2 mi S of its jct. with County Hwy T, grassy open right-of-way, 10 Jun 1994, M.A. Vincent 6547 & T.G. Lammers (MU, OSH); ibid, iT.G. Lammers 9023 & M.A. Vincent (F, UC). This collection represents the northeasternmost county in the state for this widely distributed species (Wisconsin State Herbarium 2003). LITERATURE CITED Boufford, D. E. 1997. Urticaceae Jussieu-Nettle Family. Pp. 400-413. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 3: Magnoliophyta: Magnoliidae and Hamamelidae. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. Case, F. W. 1987. Orchids of the Western Great Lakes Region (revised edition). Cranbrook Institute of Science, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Bulletin No. 48. Cochrane, T. S. and H. H. Iltis. 2000. Atlas of the Wisconsin Prairie and Savanna Flora. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison. Technical Bulletin 191. Cooperrider, T. S., A. W. Cusick, and J. T. Kartesz. 2001. Seventh Catalog of the Vascular Plants of Ohio. Ohio State University Press, Columbus, OH. Fassett, N. C. 1939. The Leguminous Plants of Wisconsin. The Taxonomy, Ecology, and Distribution of the Leguminosae Growing in the State without Cultivation. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison. 157 pp. (Verbatim reprint, without corrections or updating, 1961).

Page  7 ï~~2005 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Gardner, R. and J. Hillmer. 2002. Ohio's Invasive Plant Range Report. The Nature Conservancy, Ohio Chapter. http://nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/ohio/science/art6279.html (accessed 5 Nov 2003). Gillett, J. M. and T. S. Cochrane. 1973. Preliminary reports on the flora of Wisconsin. No. 63. The genus Trifolium-the clovers. Wisconsin Academy of Science, Arts and Letters 61: 59-74. Gleason, H. A. and A. Cronquist. 1991. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and adjacent Canada (ed. 2). New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY Harriman, N. A. 1970. A range extension for Odontites serotina (Lam.) Dum. (Scrophulariaceae). Rhodora 72: 286. Henderson, N. C. 2002. Iris Linnaeus (Iridaceae). Pp. 371-395. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 26: Magnoliophyta: Liliidae: Liliales and Orchidales. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. Hitchcock, A. S. 1950. Manual of the Grasses of the United States (ed. 2, revised by A. Chase). USDA Miscellaneous Publ. 200. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC. Isely, D. 1998. Native and Naturalized Leguminosae (Fabaceae) of the United States. Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, Provo, UT. Judziewicz, E. J. 2003. Plants of Wisconsin. http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/ (accessed 10 Nov 2003). Lammers, T. G. 2003. New county records for Plants of the Chicago Region. Michigan Botanist 42: 85-89. Mastrogiuseppe, J., P. E. Rothrock, A. C. Dibble, and A. A. Reznicek. 2002. Carex Linnaeus sect. Ovales Kunth. Pp. 332-378. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 23: Magnoliophyta: Commelinidae (in part): Cyperaceae. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. Reznicek, A. A. 2001. Mulberry weed (Fatoua villosa) spread as far north as Michigan. Michigan Botanist 40: 73-74. Rollins, R. C. 1993. The Cruciferae of Continental North America. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA. Sheviak, C. J. 2002. Platanthera Richard (Orchidaceae). Pp. 551-571. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 26: Magnoliophyta: Liliidae: Liliales and Orchidales. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. Swink, F. and G. Wilhelm. 1994. Plants of the Chicago Region (ed. 4). Indiana Academy of Science, Indianapolis, IN. USDA, NRCS. 2002. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA. Wagner, W. H. and J. M. Beitel. 1993. Lycopodiaceae Mirbel-Club-moss Family. Pp. 18-37. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 2: Pteridophytes and Gymnosperms. Oxford University Press, New York, NY. Wetter, M. A., T. S. Cochrane, M. R. Black, H. H. Iltis, and P. E. Berry. 2001. Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Wisconsin. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison. Technical Bulletin 192. Whitaker, T. W. and G. N. Davis. 1962. Cucurbits. World Crop Books, Leonard Hill [Books] Ltd., London. Wisconsin State Herbarium. 2003. Wisconsin Vascular Plant Species. http://www.botany.wisc.edu /herbarium/. (accessed 31 Oct 2003 and 7 February 2005) Wunderlin, R. P. 1997. Moraceae Link - Mulberry Family. Pp. 388-399. In: Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.). Flora of North America north of Mexico. Volume 3: Magnoliophyta: Magnoliidae and Hamamelidae. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.