Page  13 ï~~2002 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST 13 THE BIG TREES OF MICHIGAN 27. Prunus pensylvanica L.f. Pin Cherry Kenneth M. Hiser & Elwood B. Ehrle Department of Biological Sciences Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, MI 49008 The largest known Pin Cherry in Michigan is located in Fischer's Woods, 2.5 miles north of the city of Kalamazoo (Kalamazoo County) in the southwestern portion of the Lower Peninsula. Description of the Species: The Pin Cherry is a member of the rose family, Rosaceae, and is characterized by having showy, insect-pollinated, perfect flowers. Within this family, five tree genera are native to Michigan. The genus Prunus, with seven species native to Michigan, is distinguished by having drupes ("stone" fruits) and often paired glands at the base of the leaf blade (Voss 1985). The drupes of the Pin Cherry are bright red and borne in umbels. The leaves are alternate with oblong-lanceolate blades having finely serrate margins (with incurved teeth), tapering to a sharp tip (see Fig. 1). The bark of its twigs is light reddish-brown, thin, smooth (often peeling), with prominent, widely-spaced orange lenticels. Flowers generally appear in late spring, and are distinctly perigynous, with five white petals. The Pin Cherry is characteristically a fast-growing, short-lived "nurse tree" found in open, upland areas. It is usually associated with Populus species and pines and gives way to other hardwoods. Location of Michigan's Big Tree: The tree can be located by taking Kalamazoo Avenue west from downtown Kalamazoo to its end at Douglas Avenue. Take Douglas Avenue north 2.5 miles to the Hi-Lo Bar on the right side of the road. Just beyond the Hi-Lo is a paved private drive on the left side of the road. If you have obtained permission, follow the drive to the Fischer residence. There is a trail from the house through the woods past the tennis court. Near the top of a rise, the tree can be seen about twenty feet into the woods off the right side of the trail. Description of Michigan's Big Tree: The tree is healthy, with a solid single trunk, measured at 48" (122 cm) in circumference four and a half feet above the ground [Diameter=15" (38 cm)]. Its crown spread was measured at 22' (6.75 m), which is relatively small, probably due to the competition of many nearby trees. The tree is 95' (29 m) tall. INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE If you would like to join us in extending this series of articles by visiting and describing one or more of Michigan's Big Trees, please contact Elwood B. Ehrle for help with locations, specifications for taking measurements, and assistance

Page  14 ï~~14 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Vol. 41 FIGURE 1. Documented distribution in Michigan and characteristics of the Pin Cherry. Map is from Voss (1985). Illustrations are from Barnes & Wagner (1991). 1. Winter twig xl; 2. Portion of twig, enlarged; 3. Leaf x%. 4. Margin of leaf, enlarged; 5. Flowering twig, xV; 6. Flower, enlarged; 7. Fruit, drupes, xl. with the manuscript. The Michigan Botanical Club encourages your involvement in this activity. Please remember to ask permission before entering private property. LITERATURE CITED Barnes, B.V., & W.H. Wagner, Jr. 1991. Michigan Trees. A Guide to the Trees of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. viii +383 pp. Voss, E.G. 1985. Michigan Flora. Part II. Dicots (Saururaceae-Cornaceae) Bulletin of the Cranbrook Institute of Science 59 and University of Michigan Herbarium. xix +724 pp. 2 7 3 6.ON FIGURE 1. Documented distribution in Michigan and characteristics of the Pin Cherry. Map is from Voss (1985). Illustrations are from Barnes & Wagner (1991). 1. Winter twig xl; 2. Portion of twig, enlarged; 3. Leaf x3/4. 4. Margin of leaf, enlarged; 5. Flowering twig, x%; 6. Flower, enlarged; 7. Fruit, drupes, xl. with the manuscript. The Michigan Botanical Club encourages your involvement in this activity. Please remember to ask permission before entering private property. LITERATURE CITED Barnes, B.V., & W.H. Wagner, Jr. 1991. Michigan Trees. A Guide to the Trees of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. viii +383 pp. Voss, E.G. 1985. Michigan Flora. Part II. Dicots (Saururaceae-Cornaceae) Bulletin of the Cranbrook Institute of Science 59 and University of Michigan Herbarium. xix +724 pp.