Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln. Volume 8.
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Vol. 8



THE HISTORY BOOK CLUB EDITION

Page  1

To Isaac M. Schermerhorn [1]

Isaac M. Schemerhorn Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir. Washington, Sept. 12. 1864.

Yours inviting me to attend a Union Mass Meeting at Buffalo is received. Much is being said about peace; and no man desires peace more ardently than I. Still I am yet unprepared to give up the Union for a peace which, so achieved, could not be of much duration. The preservation of our Union was not the sole avowed object for which the war was commenced. It was commenced for precisely the reverse object---to destroy our Union. The insurgents commenced it by firing upon the Star of the West, and on Fort Sumpter, and by other similar acts. It is true, however, that the administration accepted the war thus commenced, for the sole avowed object of preserving our Union; and it is not true that it has since been, or will be, prossecuted by this administration, for any other object. In declaring this, I only declare what I can know, and do know to be true, and what no other man can know to be false.

In taking the various steps which have led to my present position in relation to the war, the public interest and my private interest, have been perfectly paralel, because in no other way could I serve myself so well, as by truly serving the Union. The whole field has been open to me, where to choose. No place-hunting necessity has been upon me urging me to seek a position of antagonism to some other man, irrespective of whether such position might be favorable or unfavorable to the Union.

Of course I may err in judgment, but my present position in reference to the rebellion is the result of my best judgment, and according to that best judgment, it is the only position upon which any Executive can or could save the Union. Any substantial departure from it insures the success of the rebellion. An armistice---a cessation of hostilities---is the end of the struggle, and the insurgentsPage  2 would be in peaceable possession of all that has been struggled for. Any different policy in regard to the colored man, deprives us of his help, and this is more than we can bear. We can not spare the hundred and forty or fifty thousand now serving us as soldiers, seamen, and laborers. This is not a question of sentiment or taste, but one of physical force which may be measured and estimated as horse-power and Steam-power are measured and estimated. Keep it and you can save the Union. Throw it away, and the Union goes with it. Nor is it possible for any Administration to retain the service of these people with the express or implied understanding that upon the first convenient occasion, they are to be re-inslaved. It can not be; and it ought not to be.

Annotation

[1]   ADf, DLC-RTL. The draft is in pencil and unfinished. See Lincoln's telegram to Schermerhorn, September 9, supra, and letter, infra.

To Isaac M. Schermerhorn [2]

Private. Executive Mansion,
Isaac M. Schemerhorn, Pres't &c. Washington,
Buffalo, N.Y. September 12th. 1864.

My dear Sir: Your letter, mentioned in your two telegrams, has not reached me; so that I am without knowledge of its particulars. I beg you to pardon me for having concluded that it is not best for me now to write a general letter to a political meeting. First, I believe it is not customary for one holding the office, and being a candidate for re-election, to do so; and secondly, a public letter must be written with some care, and at some expense of time, so that having begun with your meeting, I could not well refuse others, and yet could not get through with all having equal claims. Please tender to those you represent my sincere thanks for the invitation, and my appeal to their indulgence for having declined their request. Yours very truly. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's unfinished letter to Schermerhorn, supra.

To James G. Blaine [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. J. G. Blaine War Department,
Augusta, Maine Washington, D.C., Sep. 13. 1864.

On behalf of the Union, thanks to Maine. Thanks to you personally for sending the news. A LINCOLN

Page  3Send same to L. B. Smith and M. A. Blanchard, Portland, Maine.

A.L.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 164. James G. Blaine, chairman of the Republican State Central Committee, sent two telegrams on September 12. The first was received at 8:40 P.M.: ``The State Election today has resulted in a great victory for the Union Cause Governor Cony re-elected by a large majority with the entire Cong ticket'' (DLC-RTL). The second was received at 11 P.M.: ``The Union majority in Maine will reach 20,000 We will give you thirty thousand (30,000) in November'' (ibid.).

A telegram from Lewis B. Smith, chairman of the Union Committee of Cumberland County and M. A. Blanchard, secretary of the Union District Committee of Cumberland County, was received at 12 P.M.: ``The First Congressional District of Maine endorses your administration. . . . The Star of the East fights it out on this line'' (ibid.).

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Butler War Department,
Bermuda Hundred, Va. Washington, D.C., Sept. 13. 1864.

The Ames guns I am under promise to pay, or rather to advise paying, a very high price for, provided they bear the test, and they are not yet tested, though I believe in process of being tested. I could not be justified to pay the extraordinary price without the testing. I shall be happy to let you have some of them so soon as I can. How comes on your canal. [2] A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 167. See Lincoln's order of August 21, 1864. Butler telegraphed on September 13, 1864: ``I am informed that Mr Ames of Falls Village Conn has some wrought iron rifle guns of great strength & penetration which have commended themselves to your notes [notice] & that you have ordered some to be made. We need one (1) or two (2) guns of great power & penetration to use against the enemys iron clad on the James. Please permit me to order one (1) or two (2) to be rifled & forwarded here. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   Lincoln probably refers to the Dutch Gap Canal being built on the James River. No reply to the question has been found.

Memorandum of Pre-election Poll [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, [c. September 13], 1864.

On train from Pittsburg to Harrisburg Sep. 13. 1864.

Lincoln McClellan Fremont

172. 66. 7.

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-Nicolay Papers.

Page  4

Pass [1]

Let the Old Soldier pass according to his R.R. passes without hindrance.

A. LINCOLN.

Sept. 13, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 1206, March 6, 1916, No. 388.

Pass for John Ehler [1]

September 13, 1864

Let this boy, John Ehler, have transportation, food, and whatever is necessary, to get him to his Uncle Dr. Ehler, at Cavalry Corps Hospital at City-Point, Va. A. LINCOLN

Sep. 13. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DeWI. See Lincoln's endorsement of April 11, supra. Dr. Ehler has not been identified.

Response to Serenade [1]

September 13, 1864

Mr. Lincoln made a brief response, to the effect that he was not prepared to acknowledge the honor done him in a set speech. We had heard the right sort of speeches from Vermont and Maine lately, and previously from Mobile and Atlanta, and he was much in favor of hearing more of the same sort from the South.

He then thanked the assemblage and bade them farewell, upon which they took up the line of march for Mr. Seward's residence.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily National Republican, September 14, 1864. Following a Republican celebration at the Mount Vernon Hotel, where a banner forty feet long and twenty-six feet wide, bearing the names of Lincoln and Johnson, was run out from the hotel across Pennsylvania Avenue, the crowd paraded to the Executive Mansion and serenaded the president.

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Major General Rosecrans Executive Mansion,
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, Sept 13, 1864.

Postpone the execution of S. H. Anderson for two weeks. Hear what his friends can say in mitigation and report to me.

A. LINCOLN

Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram. JNO. G. NICOLAY PRIV. Sec.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 165. The telegram, including Lincoln's signature, is in Nicolay's handwriting. Although the White HousePage  5

ledger of court-martial cases lists the case of S. H. Anderson, citizen of Missouri, sentenced to death for being a guerrilla, as respited on February 9, 1865, to hard labor for the duration of the war, no record of the case has been found in the Judge Advocate General's files. (DNA WR RG 153).

To William S. Rosecrans [2]

Major General Rosecrans; Executive Mansion,
St Louis Washington, September 13th, 1864.

Postpone the execution of Joseph Johnson, for two weeks. Examine the case and report. A. LINCOLN

Major Eckert:

Please send the above telegram. JNO. G. NICOLAY PRIV: Sec

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 166. The telegram is in Edward D. Neill's handwriting, except the signatures which are in Nicolay's hand. The last entry on the case of Joseph Johnson, citizen of Missouri, sentenced to death for being a guerrilla, notes the respite of two weeks granted by Lincoln on September 13, 1864 (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2126).

To Edward Bates [1]

Attorney General please make out a pardon in this case.

Sep. 14. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 549. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter of Samuel S. Woods, Lewistown, Maine, September 12, 1864, introducing Mrs. Ellen Contner, who wished to ask a pardon for her son, Albert Contner, ``convicted of manslaughter nearly three years since. . . . The young man volunteered among the first in the defence of Washington . . . & the offence was committed . . . under the influence of liquor. . . .''

Endorsements Concerning William Elmore [1]

September 14, 1864

If this man's Colonel will say in writing on this sheet that he is willing to receive him back into his regiment I will pardon and send him. A LINCOLN

Sep. 14. 1864

According to the foregoing, this man is pardoned and ordered to his regiment. A LINCOLN

Oct. 10. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Herman Smith, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Lincoln's endorsements are written on the back of a certificate signed by Justice of the Peace Frederick A. Boswell, Washington, D.C., September 14, 1864: ``This is to certify that I know William Elmore, a private Soldier in Company D, Second DistrictPage  6

of Columbia, who was convicted by Court Marshall and sentenced to be confined at fort-Delaware. he has a wife and one child who is perfectly destitute and any thing that can be done for her relief would be a charitable act.''

Apparently William Elmore's wife could not get action from the commander of the regiment. Following Lincoln's first endorsement, she wrote, ``Col will you Be so kind as to take William Elmore Back in the Regiment he is in prisen at fort Delaware Col the presdent sa if you would be willing to take him back in the Regiment he wold pardon him i have got a little Child an no one to help me look on this sheet you will see the president writing Col you must ancer me on this note and send it back as soon as you can to me

``Col will you be so kind to me as to take him back as I have no frends in Washinton no one to help me Mrs Frances C Elmore''

On October 11, Elmore was ordered to be released and returned to his regiment (AGO Special Orders No. 342).

To Herman H. Heath [1]

Major H. H. Heath Executive Mansion
Baltimore, Md. Washington, Sep. 15. 1864

You are hereby authorized to visit Washington.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 169. Major Herman H. Heath, Seventh Iowa Cavalry, was detailed to visit Baltimore and Washington on special business for Major General Samuel R. Curtis, commanding at Fort Leavenworth (Headquarters Department of Kansas, Special Orders No. 191, September 6, 1864, MS., RPB).

Memorandum:
Appointment of Wilbur R. Bacon [1]

[September 15, 1864]

Wilbur R. Bacon, born March 25. 1844, applies for West-Point---has two brothers in the Army, and is excellently well recommended. Resides in Conn.

Annotation

[1]   AE, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1863, No. 185. Lincoln's endorsement is written on an envelope with recommendations of Wilbur R. Bacon of New Haven, Connecticut. No record of his appointment has been found.

Reply to Eustorjio Salgar [1]

September 15, 1864

GEN. SALGAR: It is with very sincere satisfaction that I learn that peace and tranquillity have returned to the United States of Colombia. I fervently desire that your country may long continue to enjoy these great blessings, which are so essential to public happiness and to the progress of civilization, which is the great interest of all American States.

Page  7We have had the pleasure of knowing your respected President intimately at this capital, and thus we have been very well assured that whomsoever he should accredit as his representative here would be found not only a true patriot, but also a liberal friend to the United States and a firm supporter of republican institutions throughout the American Continent.

Your public character has preceded you here, sir, and I am happy in recognizing you, on this occasion, as such a Minister as this Government has so confidently expected. Be assured, sir, that no effort on my part will be spared to render your mission successful and satisfactory to yourself and to your enlightened countrymen.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily National Republican, September 16, 1864. Substantially the same text appeared in other Washington papers. Lincoln replied to a brief speech made by General Eustorjio Salgar upon presenting his credentials as minister from Colombia.

To James B. Steedman [1]

Major General Steadman Executive Mansion
Chattanooga, Tenn. Washington, Sept 15. 1864

Mrs. McElrath, of East Tennessee is here saying she has been sent away by your order, and appealing to me to allow her to return to her home. I have told her I will if you say so. What say you? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 168. No reply from General James B. Steedman has been discovered, and Mrs. McElrath has not been identified.

On October 27, however, Nathaniel G. Taylor wrote Lincoln of Mrs. McElrath's return to Knoxville: ``Mrs McElrath (widow of Major McE. late of the rebel army) who recently had an interview with you at Washington, waited on . . . Brig Gen. S[amuel] P. Carter at Knoxville E.T. to take the oath of Amnesty, and speaking of yourself stated `When Gen. Carters name was mentioned President Lincoln remarked ``that he did not think Genl. C. was any better friend of his than she Mrs McE. was''. . . .' '' (DLC-RTL).

To William P. Fessenden [1]

September 16, 1864

If it is compatable for William M. [W.] Orme, to be appointed to the Vicksburg agency under the new rules, in addition to the appointment you have already given him, I shall be obliged to have it done.

Annotation

[1]   Parke-Bernet Catalog 905, December 1-2, 1947, No. 278. According to the catalog description the text is from an autograph letter signed. The Treasury regulations referred to were those approved by Lincoln on July 30, supra. On September 6, 1864, Leonard Swett and others wrote:Page  8

``We . . . hereby recommend William W. Orme of Bloomington Illinois as a suitable man to be appointed an agent of the Government to get out cotton for the United States.

``We know him to be a man of strict integrity and honor.

``We would recommend that he be stationed at or near Vicksburgh Miss. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Orme is listed in the U.S. Official Register, 1865, as ``Supervising Special Agent'' of the Treasury, at Memphis, Tennessee.

To James B. Fry [1]

Provost-Marshal-General: September 16, 1864

Please see and hear these gentlemen, who say that by an adjustment---settlement, so to speak---the aggregate quota for Illinois is 16, 184 men, while by some result of sub-districting the draft is about to be enforced for 29,797.

Please look into this and correct the error if it exists, or make for me an intelligible statement; show no error to exist.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, III, IV, 702. Lincoln's endorsement was written on a petition presented by the Union State Central Committee of Illinois and the Grand Council of the Union League of Illinois, September 8, 1864, complaining of the draft quotas for the state. The petition is endorsed by Thomas J. Turner, chairman of the Central Committee, and Samuel H. Melvin, commissioner of the Union League: ``If the Provost-Marshal-General will make a reduction of 50 per cent. upon the quotas of every sub-district where a draft has been ordered in Illinois, it will be satisfactory to the people of that State and settle difficulty in regard to the apportionment.''

To Joseph Holt [1]

Judge Advocate General please examine & report on this case.

Sep. 16. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2393. Lincoln's endorsement is written on papers in the case of N. C. Trowbridge, convicted on charges of violating laws and customs of war and furnishing aid to the enemy, and sentenced to ten years' imprisonment. Holt opposed any mitigation of the sentence.

To Franz Sigel [1]

Major General Sigel Executive Mansion,
Bethlehem, Pa. Washington, Sep. 16, 1864.

You are authorized to visit Washington, on receipt of this.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 172. Sigel replied on the same day: ``I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Telegram, saying that I am authorized to visit Washington. As I have made no applicationPage  9

to this effect I respectfully request you to inform me by letter or Telegraph, whether you wish or direct that I should come . . . in which case I would of course proceed there immediately. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On September 19, Sigel telegraphed Nicolay: ``Your dispatch recd today. I will leave for Washington tomorrow morning the twentieth. . . .'' (Ibid.).

To John P. Slough [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gen. Slough, War Department,
Alexandria, Va Washington, D.C., Sep. 16, 1864.

On the 14th. I commuted the sentence of Conly, but fearing you may not have received notice I send this. Do not execute him.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 170. See Lincoln to Smith, September 8, supra. General Slough's telegram, dated September 15 and marked as received on September 15, 9:35 A.M., reads: ``I recd in due time the notification that Conleys sentence had been commuted by you & will act accordingly'' (DLC-RTL).

To William Sprague [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. William Sprague War Department,
Providence, R.I. Washington, D.C., Sep. 16. 1864.

I commuted the sentence of Conley two days ago.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 171. See Lincoln to Smith, September 8, supra. Sprague's telegram, received at 9:55 A.M., reads: ``Circumstances indicate the innocence of Sergt Conley of R I sentenced to be shot today Will you stay his sentence'' (DLC-RTL).

To William T. Sherman [1]

Major General Sherman Executive Mansion
Atlanta, Ga. Washington, D.C. Sep. 17. 1864

I feel great interest in the subjects of your despatch mentioning corn and Sorghum, & a contemplated visit to you.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 173. On September 15, 1864, Sherman had telegraphed Halleck: ``My report is done, and will be forwarded as soon as I get a few more of the subordinate reports. I am awaiting a courier from General Grant. . . . Governor Brown has disbanded his militia, to gather the corn and sorghum of the State. I have reason to believe that he and Stephens want to visit me, and I have sent them a hearty invitation. I will exchange 2,000 prisoners with Hood, but no more.'' (OR, I, XXXIX, II 381).

At 6 P.M. on September 17, he replied to Lincoln:

``I will keep the Department fully advised of all developements as connectedPage  10 with the subject in which you feel so interested. A Mr. [Augustus R.] Wright, former member of Congress from Rome Ga and a Mr. [William] King of Marietta are now going between Gov Brown and myself. I have said that some of the people of Georgia are now engaged in rebellion begun in error and perpetuated in pride; but that Georgia can now save herself from the devastation of war preparing for her, only by withdrawing her quota out of the confederate army, and aiding me to repel Hood from the border of the State; in which event instead of desolating the land, as we progress I will keep our men to the high roads and commons, and pay for the corn and meat we need and take. I am fully conscious of the delicate nature of such assertions, but it would be a magnificent stroke of policy, if I could without wasting a foot of ground or of principle arouse the latent enmity to Jeff Davis, of Georgia.

``The people do not hesitate to say, that Mr. Stevens was, and is, a Union man at heart, and they feel that Jeff Davis will not trust him, or let him have a share in his government.'' (DLC-RTL).

The visit of Governor Joseph E. Brown and Alexander H. Stephens did not materialize.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

September 19, 1864.

The writer of this, who appeals for his brother, is our minister to Ecuador, and whom, if at all compatible, I would like to have obliged by a special exchange of his brother. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, II, VIII, 30. Lincoln's endorsement is on a letter from Frederick Hassaurek, September 17, 1864, enclosing a letter from his half-brother, Lieutenant Leopold Markbreit, originally of the Twenty-eighth Ohio Volunteers and acting assistant adjutant general on General William W. Averell's staff when captured. Markbreit wrote from Libby Prison, July 10, 1864: ``My situation could not be worse. I have become so weak and broken down from close confinement and want of food that I can hardly walk. Our daily ration consists of one-half pound of corn bread, one-half pound of boiled beans, and about two or three ounces of bacon. . . . I cannot say how long we shall be able to live on such rations. . . .'' This same letter from Markbreit is printed elsewhere in the Official Records with the following endorsement by Charles A. Dana, October 10, 1864: ``Respectfully referred to the Commissary-General of Prisoners, with directions to subject the officer held as hostage for the within-named prisoner to the same treatment.'' (OR, II, VII, 457). Not until January 5 was an exchange effected, on which date General Grant telegraphed Stanton, ``Will you please say to the President that Lieutenant Markbreit has been released from prison and is now on his way North.'' (OR, II, VIII, 811).

To Joseph Holt [1]

This application being for the present denied I have allowed the applicant to withdraw the papers filed by him. A. LINCOLN

Sept. 19, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 2292. The record in the case of First Lieutenant Edward P. McCreary, One Hundred Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, dismissed from service, who had appealed for reinstatement, quotes the above endorsement as appearing on the application.

Page  11

Memorandum [1]

[c. September 19, 1864]

A despatch of Gen. Sherman, dated Sep. 17, 1864 among other things, says

``The Secretary of War tells me the draft will be made on Monday next. If the President modifies it to the extent of one man, or waivers in it's execution he is gone ever. The Army would vote against him''

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-RTL. The telegram from which Lincoln inaccurately quotes is printed in OR, I, XXXIX, II, 396. See Stanton's correct quotation in the note to Lincoln's letter to Sherman, infra.

To William T. Sherman [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.
Major General Sherman, September 19th, 1864.

The State election of Indiana occurs on the 11th. of October, and the loss of it to the friends of the Government would go far towards losing the whole Union cause. The bad effect upon the November election, and especially the giving the State Government to those who will oppose the war in every possible way, are too much to risk, if it can possibly be avoided. The draft proceeds, notwithstanding its strong tendency to lose us the State. Indiana is the only important State, voting in October, whose soldiers cannot vote in the field. Any thing you can safely do to let her soldiers, or any part of them, go home and vote at the State election, will be greatly in point. They need not remain for the Presidential election, but may return to you at once. This is, in no sense, an order, but is merely intended to impress you with the importance, to the army itself, of your doing all you safely can, yourself being the judge of what you can safely do. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, InFtwL; LS copy, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's memorandum, supra. On September 12, 1864, Governor Morton, Indiana Republicans in congress, and others wrote Stanton:

`` . . . we express it as our profound conviction that upon the issue of the election that occurs within a month from this date may depend the question as to whether the secession element shall be effectually crushed or whether it shall acquire strength enough, we do not say to take the state out of the Union, but practically to sever her from the general government, so far as future military aid is concerned.

``We further express the gravest doubts as to whether it will be possible for us to secure success at the polls on the 11th of October unless we can receive aid---

``1. By delay of the draft until the election has passed.

``2. By the return, before election day, of fifteen thousand Indiana soldiers. . . .'' (William Dudley Foulke, Life of Oliver P. Morton, I, 367).

Page  12On September 18 Stanton replied:

``It appears from a dispatch received from General Sherman last night that his army is jealously watching whether the draft will be suspended or enforced. The general says:

`` `If the President modifies it to the extent of one man, or wavers in its execution, he is gone. Even the army would vote against him.'

``You can judge from this what effect the recall of troops and delaying the draft is likely to have on your election.'' (OR, III, IV, 732).

See further Lincoln to Morton, October 13, infra.

To John C. Ten Eyck [1]

Hon J. C. Ten Eyck Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir. Washington, Sep. 19, 1864.

Dr. J. R. Freese, now editor of a leading Union Journal in New-Jersey, resided, for a time, in Illinois, when & where I made his acquaintance, and since when I have enjoyed much of his friendship. He is somewhat wounded with me now, that I do not recognize him as he thinks I ought. I wish to appoint him a Provost-Marshal in your State. May I have your approval? Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln to James B. Fry, September 27, infra.

To Isachar Zacharie [1]

Dr. Zacharie Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir Washington, Sep. 19, 1864.

I thank you again for the deep interest you have constantly taken in the Union cause. The personal matter on behalf of your friend, which you mention, shall be fully and fairly considered when presented. Yours truly A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, RPB. ADfS, DLC-RTL. Zacharie wrote Lincoln on September 21, 1864:

``Yours of the 19th came duly to hand. It has had the desiered effect, with the friends of the parties.

``I leave tomorrow for the interior of Pennsylvania. May go as far as Ohio. One thing is to be done. And that is for you to impress on the minds of your friends for them not to be so sure.'' (DLC-RTL). No satisfactory clues have been discovered to this cryptic letter.

To George G. Meade [1]

Majr Gen Meade Executive Mansion
Hd Qurs Army Potomac. Sept. 20th. 1864

If you have not executed the sentence in the case of private Peter Gilner Co. F. 62. Penn vols, let it be suspended until further orders.

Report to me. A. LINCOLN.

Page  13

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 175. See Lincoln to Meade, April 27, supra. Meade replied the same day: ``Your dispatch relative to Peter Gelner [sic] . . . received. He is not now in this Army. His sentence was commuted by me to confinement at Dry Tortugas under your order. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln to Moorhead, October 16, infra.

To Philip H. Sheridan [1]

``Cypher'' Executive Mansion,
Major General Sheridan Washington,
Winchester, Va Sep. 20. 1864.

Have just heard of your great victory. God bless you all, officers and men. Strongly inclined to come up and see you. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC (on deposit). The original manuscript of this telegram was removed from the file of presidential telegrams and presented to General Sheridan on January 20, 1877, a certified copy replacing it (DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 174). Now on deposit in the Library of Congress, the autograph telegram is owned by the Sheridan heirs. On September 19 Sheridan had telegraphed Grant: ``I have the honor to report that I attacked the forces of Genl Early over the Berryville Pike at the crossing of Opequan Creek, and after a most stubborn and sanguinary engagement . . . completely defeated him . . . driving him through Winchester, capturing about twenty five hundred (2500) prisoners---five (5) of artillery, nine (9) Army flags and most of their wounded. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir Washington, Sep. 20, 1864.

Let Mallison, the bogus proclamation man, be discharged. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 94, Adjutant General, Letters Received, P 1064. Stanton endorsed on the bottom of the page ``Adjt Genl will issue the order immediately to Gen Dix as directed by the Prest.'' Also endorsed on the bottom of the page is the telegram of Edward D. Townsend, September 22, directing General Dix to discharge Francis A. Mallison, who had collaborated with Joseph Howard, Jr., in producing the ``bogus proclamation'' of May 17, 1864 (see Lincoln to Dix, May 18, supra).

Among several letters in the Lincoln Papers suggesting the propriety of releasing Mallison is the following from Joseph Howard, Jr.:

``I have once intruded upon your cares to thank you for your kindness in granting an order for my release from . . . Fort Lafayette & to assure you of my sincere regret at my folly & its consequences; permit me to call your attention to the case once more in behalf of the young man who was placed there at the same time as myself, but who was not include in the order for release. . . .

``I regret to say that certain `Democratic' stumpers are making a handle of his continued confinement, taking the absurd ground that he is held on account of his Democratic affiliations.

``Mr. Mallison has an aged Mother dependent upon him, was no deeper (norPage  14 so deep) in the foolishness . . . than I, and has felt very keenly his position & its consequences. May I . . . urge you to direct his immediate discharge . . . ?'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

September 20, 1864

The bearer will present the list of names contemplated within. The Provost Marshal General will please take the proper steps to have them examined, mustered in and discharged from prison, so as to be properly credited all according to the within.

Sept 20. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, IHi; OR, III, IV, 68o. This endorsement was written on Lincoln's order to Huidekoper, September 1, supra. The date September 20, 1864, is given on the official copy, but the Official Records print it without date. On September 10, S. Newton Pettis had written Lincoln from Rock Island, Illinois, where he had gone with Lincoln's order of September 1. Colonel Huidekoper not being able to be there ``for a day or two,'' Pettis had shown the order to the commandant:

``The first remark he made was, that he had often wondered why the Government had not allowed recruiting for the army before, as well as for the Navy. The second remark was that there would be a difficulty . . . for this reason. When the first body of men were recruited for the Navy, about a hundred who had volunteered and taken the oath of allegiance were rejected by the surgeon as unfit, and were at once discharged. The next party recruited for the Navy in the same way, about the same number rejected & the order for their discharge was revoked, consequently they were thrown back into prison and have been abused by the rabid and malicious secesh so that many are afraid to come out for . . . volunteering, lest they are rejected. . . .

``I read your order over again . . . and gave it as my opinion that you never intended to have a man remanded after he had volunteered and taken the oath even if he was rejected. . . . I also told him to say to those who feared that result if they took the oath and volunteered & were rejected by the Surgeon that they would be discharged. I have no doubt the letter & spirit of your order warranted such a request. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On September 22, Captain Henry R. Rathbone of the Twelfth U.S. Infantry was ordered to Rock Island to make a ``special inspection, under instructions to be given him by the Provost Marshal General'' of the prisoners to be enlisted (AGO Special Orders No. 315), and on the same date Lincoln wrote Grant in explanation of his action (vide infra).

To Edward R. S. Canby [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Canby Sep. 21. 1864.

Gen. Baily, of Rapides Parish, Louisiana, is vouched to me as entirely trustworthy, and appeals to me in behalf of the people in his region, who he says are mostly Union people, and are in great destitution---almost absolute starvation. He says their condition is greatly aggravated by Gen. Banks' expedition up Red-River, last

Page  15Spring, in reliance upon which they mostly took the oath of allegiance. Of course what Gen. Baily asks is permission to carry provisions to them. This I will not give without your consent; but I will thank you to hear and consider their case, and do for them the best you can, consistently with the interests of the public service. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. A letter of Crafts J. Wright, Willard's Hotel, to Thomas Corwin, September 20, 1864, explains Lincoln's letter:

``Gen Baily has explained to me his application to the President to allow him to collect in New Orleans and send to his empoverished friends in the Parish of Rapides La. food & raiment. Will you allow me to say to the President through you in regard to this mission.

``From many years intercourse in Louisiana I have a large acquaintance & this has been renewed the last nine months of being in N O. I have seen hundreds, who have been in the Red River country, since the withdrawal of Gen Banks and the vials of confederate wrath have been poured upon those who were seduced into open & manifest efforts of co operation, believing they would be protected. Hundreds & hundreds of the friends of the President . . . have been reduced to beggary. . . . The enemy have no supplies to give---and these people must starve if their friends in N O will not be allowed to send them food. You cannot I know carry on this . . . through officers of Government. . . . They will allow a responsible citizen . . . to go on such a mission & protect in the delivery to them it is designed for . . . but it cannot be done officially. . . .

``I know Gen B. he is entirely reliable & knows the wants of his neighbours. . . . Why not then allow him to collect gratuitously & take the donations of food & raiment. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

General Canby did not reply to Lincoln's letter until December 19:

``Genl Baily has just handed me your note of Sept. 24 [sic] in relation to the destitute union people in the neighborhood of Alexandria La. I would long since have sent supplies to them . . . if I could have had even a doubtful assurance that they would have reached their destination, or that they could have been applied to the benefit of those for whom they were intended, but my own convictions have been confirmed by the assurances of loyal persons living within the rebel lines, that any attempt of this kind would not be to their benefit and would only compromize them with the rebel authorities, and that any general system of supplying the inhabitants beyond the lines would have no other result than to prolong the war and their own suffering.

``The policy of the rebels in this respect is unrelenting. . . . I am satisfied that until we can break the armed power of the rebels we can do nothing that will not aid our enemies and injure our friends.

``My own sympathies have run strongly counter to my judgment and it has been with great pain that I have felt myself constrained to pursue a different course, not only as a question of policy, but (in the end) one of humanity. . . .'' (Ibid.).

General Baily has not been further identified.

To Charles A. Dana [1]

Will Mr. Dana please see this young lady, and let her know the grounds on which her friends are detained at Fort-Warren.

Sep. 21. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC-RTL. Dana endorsed, ``These men are confined as bushwhackers, guerrillas, and persons who cannot be at large consistently with the publicPage  16

safety. They were 50 committed on the recommendation of Gen. [John H.] Martindale.'' The young lady was Maggie K. Ryan, who wrote Lincoln on September 28, 1864:

``According to your orders I have atlass succeeded in getting the charges of my friends and have also had them disputed, as you will see which is all that I could posibly do and now my onely hopes is with you who I am in hopes will faivour thair release---in regard to my intercesion in thair behalf you will allow me to state that it is an intimacy from childhood and knowing them inocint of any crimes subjecting them to the misiries and sufferings they have undergone for the last twelve mounths

``Again I am bitroth of Geo. W Jamison the last act of my dieing Mother was to join our hand with a pray for our union which was to have been the thirtieth of Sept 1863 I am an orphand of poor but I am happy to say honerable ancestors I cam to this city a perfect stranger the 31 of March with the hope of affecting the release of my friend it was by the persuation of their Mother and sisters that I ever undertook sutch a task I am here now without . . . homer friends or money and I trust that you having the power you have to make One happy for life would not see them sink to misery and shame.

``With the hopes that you may condesend to think your humble applicant worthy of your consideration I am with respect you most Obedient'' (DLC-RTL).

George W. Jameson and David Jameson, imprisoned in Fort Warren, were citizens of Culpeper, Virginia.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Gen. Hitchcock Sep. 21, 1864

Please see the bearer Mr. Broadwell, on a question about a mutual supplying of clothes to prisoners Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. On September 12, 1864, M. M. Broadwell of New York City wrote to Colonel William Hoffman, commissary general of prisoners: ``I propose to effect an arrangement by which both the Federal and rebel prisoners shall be furnished with blankets and clothing. . . . My personal relations with most of the rebel officials, and my family connections with some, enable me to negotiate this matter with the rebel authorities. I propose, therefore, . . . to go to Richmond and get the consent of the rebel authorities to receive and distribute such blankets and clothing as the United States Government will furnish to the prisoners now held at the South . . .'' (OR, II, VII, 814-15).

On October 3, Charles A. Dana sent Broadwell a pass permitting him to go through the lines on his mission (ibid., p. 920).

To Joseph Holt [1]

September 21, 1864

Judge Advocate General please procure record and report on this case. A. LINCOLN

Sep. 21. 1864

Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence A. LINCOLN

Sept. 29. 1864

Page  17

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2094, Lincoln's endorsements are written on papers in the case of Private John (Jonas) Steed, Fifteenth West Virginia Volunteers, sentenced on charges of disobedience of orders and conduct prejudicial to good order, to serve the remainder of his enlistment at hard labor, forfeit all pay, etc. Holt recommended remitting remainder of punishment.

To Gustavus V. Fox [1]

Will Capt. Fox please see the bearer & examine the model he will present? A. LINCOLN

Sep. 22. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. The bearer has not been identified.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lieut. General Grant Sep. 22, 1864.

I send this as an explanation to you, and to do justice to the Secretary of War. I was induced, upon pressing application, to authorize agents of one of the Districts of Pennsylvania to recruit in one of the prisoner depots in Illinois; and the thing went so far before it came to the knowledge of the Secretary of War that in my judgment it could not be abandoned without greater evil than would follow it's going through. I did not know, at the time, that you had protested against that class of thing being done; and I now say that while this particular job must be completed, no other of the sort, will be authorized, without an understanding with you, if at all. The Secretary of War is wholly free of any part in this blunder. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA; ADfS, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's order to Huidekoper, September 1, and to Stanton, September 20, supra. On September 25 Stanton telegraphed Grant substantially the same information contained in Lincoln's letter of September 22, and Grant replied on the same day: ``Your dispatch in relation to the organization of troops from prisoners of war is just received. I would advise that they be placed all in one regiment, and be put on duty either with Pope, or sent to New Mexico.'' (OR, III, IV, 744).

On September 26, S. Newton Pettis wrote Lincoln from Meadville, Pennsylvania:

``Nothing ever helped our cause here as your order, and the manner which you have so justly sustained it when assailed has quickened their efforts and renewed their energies. . . .

``I go to Rock Island by next train. I fear the War Department has sent a man out to embarrass our action, and if so shall telegraph you directly. . . . I asked when I left that nothing be said but there was no such thing as bridleing the tongues or pens of our people. Their gratitude will be mannifested at the Polls. . . .

Page  18``I pray you for the sake of our cause which is the cause of the country, allow no embarrassment to the execution of the order.'' (DLC-RTL).

See further Lincoln's order to Fry, October 8, infra.

To Joseph Holt [1]

September 22, 1864

Judge Advocate General please report on this case.

Sep. 22. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence upon party returning to his regiment and faithfully serving out his term.

Sep. 24. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 1844. Lincoln's endorsements are written on papers in the case of Private Peter King, Company F, Ninth Veteran Reserve Corps, sentenced to two years at hard labor. Holt reported that King had served six months and had a previous good record.

To Montgomery Blair [1]

Hon. Montgomery Blair Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir. Washington, Sep. 23. 1864.

You have generously said to me more than once, that whenever your resignation could be a relief to me, it was at my disposal. The time has come. You very well know that this proceeds from no dissatisfaction of mine with you personally or officially. Your uniform kindness has been unsurpassed by that of any friend; and, while it is true that the war does not so greatly add to the difficulties of your Department, as to those of some others, it is yet much to say, as I most truly can, that in the three years and a half during which you have administered the General Post-Office, I remember no single complaint against you in connection therewith. Yours

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. Blair replied on the same day:

``I have received your note of this date, referring to my offers to resign when ever you should deem it advisable for the public interests that I should do so and stating that in your judgment that time has now come.

``I now, therefore, formally tender my resignation of the Office of Postmaster General.

``I can not take leave of you without renewing the expressions of my gratitude for the uniform kindness which has marked your course towards, Yours very truly, M. BLAIR'' (DLC-RTL).

Montgomery Blair's unpopularity with the radical Republicans, Frémont's supporters in particular, is borne out by numerous letters in the Lincoln Papers which recommend his removal. Undoubtedly Lincoln's action was prompted by his desire to consolidate Republican support in the forthcoming election. A letter of Francis P. Blair, Jr., to his father, September 30, 1864, reads: ``I receivedPage  19 yours and my sisters letter yesterday giving an account of late transactions in Washington. I feel in regard to the matter precisely as you do. Indeed before I received your letter my instincts told me that my brother had acted his part for the good of the country and for the re-election of Mr. Lincoln in which the safety of the country is involved I believe that a failure to re-elect Mr. Lincoln would be the greatest disaster that could befall the country and the sacrifice made by the Judge to avert this is so incomparably small that I felt it would not cost him a penny to make. Indeed the only sacrifice involved in it appears to be the triumph which it gives to our enemies & the enemies of the Presidents. It is somewhat mortifying to reflect that this triumph has been given to those who are equally the enemies of the President & `the Blairs' but at the same time the Judge leaves the cabinet with an untarnished name and the reputation of having administered the Dept with the greatest ability & success and that as far as worldly considerations go, it is far better for him to go out than to remain in the cabinet. This is rather a contrast to the position of Chase, Fremont & all the rest of the enemies & persecutors of the `Blairs'. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Memorandum Concerning Alfred G. Lawrence [1]

September 23, 1864

I have said that if satisfactory evidence is brought to me, with this paper, that A. G. Lawrence, named within, is non compos mentis, I will discharge him A. LINCOLN

Sep. 23. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of a telegram of Provost Marshal Alonzo D. Pratt, Harpers Ferry, September 22, to Provost Marshal Timothy Ingraham: ``Private Alfred G. Lawrence alias Wright was forwarded to B Gen [Marsena R.] Patrick PM Gen A of P on the 19th Aug. I have forwarded papers containing endorsement &c concerning him this day.'' On October 12 John Hay telegraphed Major General Meade: ``The President directs suspension of execution in case of Albert [sic] G. Lawrence 16th Mass. Vols until his further order.''

To Frank W. Ballard [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Frank W. Bollard War Department,
New-York Washington, D.C., Sep. 24 1864.

I shall be happy to receive the deputation you mention.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 177. A copy marked ``repeated,'' received at New York on September 26, 4:55 P.M. is in the Lincoln Papers (DLC). Frank W. Ballard, whose name Lincoln misspelled because of an incorrect signature on the telegram received, was corresponding secretary of the Young Men's Republican Union of New York. His telegram of September 24 reads: ``A deputation from the New York Young Mens republican union desires a brief interview on tuesday next will it be convenient & agreeable to you to grant it. Please reply by telegraph'' (DLC-RTL).

Page  20

To William Dennison [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. William Dennison War Department,
Columbus, Ohio Washington, D.C., Sep. 24 1864.

Mr. Blair has resigned, and I appoint you Post-Master General. Come on immediately. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 176. Noah H. Swayne replied on the same day: ``Mrs Dennison requests me to say that the Governor is filling appointments in south eastern ohio away from any telegraph line & that he will return on monday or tuesday He has been absent a week'' (DLC-RTL). William Dennison telegraphed on September 27: ``I expect to leave for Washington Thursday so as to reach there Friday to enter upon the duties of the office with which you have honored me.'' (Ibid.).

Executive Order Relative to the Purchase of Products of Insurrectionary States [1]

Executive Mansion, September 24, 1864.

I. Congress having authorized the purchase for the United States of the Products of States declared in insurrection, and the Secretary of the Treasury having designated New Orleans, Memphis, Nash-ville, Pensacola, Port Royal, Beaufort, North Carolina, and Norfolk, as places of purchase, and, with my approval, appointed agents and made regulations under which said products may be purchased: Therefore,

II. All persons, except such as may be in the civil, military, or naval service of the government, having in their possession any products of States declared in insurrection, which said agents are authorized to purchase, and all persons owning or controlling such products therein, are authorized to convey such products to either of the places which have been hereby, or may hereafter be, designated, as places of purchase, and such products, so destined, shall not be liable to detention, seizure, or forfeiture, while in transituor in store waiting transportation.

III. Any person having the certificate of a purchasing agent, as prescribed by Treasury Regulation VIII, is authorized to pass, with the necessary means of transportation to the points named in said certificate, and to return therefrom with the products required for the fulfilment of the stipulations set forth in said certificate.

IV. Any person having sold and delivered to a purchasing agent any products of an insurrectionary State, in accordance with the regulations in relation thereto, and having in his possession a certificate setting forth the fact of such purchase and sale, the characterPage  21 and quantity of products, and the aggregate amount paid therefor, as prescribed by Regulation IX, shall be permitted by the military authority commanding at the place of sale to purchase from any authorized dealer at such place, or any other place in a loyal State, merchandise, and other articles not contraband of war, nor prohibited by order of the War Department, nor coin, bullion, or foreign exchange, to an amount not exceeding in value one third of the aggregate value of the products sold by him as certified by the agent purchasing; and the merchandise and other articles so purchased may be transported by the same route, and to the same place, from and by which the products sold and delivered reached the purchasing agent, as set forth in the certificate, and such merchandise and other articles shall have safe conduct, and shall not be subject to detention, seizure, or forfeiture while being transported to the places and by the routes set forth in the said certificate.

V. Generals commanding military districts, and commandants of military posts and detachments, and officers commanding fleets, flotillas, and gunboats, will give safe conduct to persons and products, merchandise, and other articles duly authorized as aforesaid, and not contraband of war, or prohibited by order of the War Department, or the orders of such generals commanding, or other duly authorized military or naval officer, made in pursuance hereof, and all persons hindering or preventing such safe conduct of persons or property will be deemed guilty of a military offense and punished accordingly.

VI. Any person transporting, or attempting to transport, any merchandise or other articles except in pursuance of regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, dated July 29, 1864, or in pursuance of this order, or transporting or attempting to transport any merchandise or other articles contraband of war or forbidden by any order of the War Department, will be deemed guilty of a military offence and punished accordingly; and all products of insurrectionary States found in transitu to any other person or place, than a purchasing agent, and a designated place of purchase shall be seized and forfeited to the United States, except such as may be moving to a loyal State under duly authorized permits of a proper officer of the Treasury Department, as prescribed by Regulation XXXVIII, concerning ``commercial intercourse,'' dated July 29, 1864, or such as may have been found abandoned, or have been captured, and are moving in pursuance of the act of March 12, 1864.

VII. No military or naval officer of the United States, or person in the military or naval service, nor any civil officer, except suchPage  22 as are appointed for that purpose, shall engage in trade or traffic in the products of insurrectionary States, or furnish transportation therefor under pain of being deemed guilty of unlawful trading with the enemy and punished accordingly.

VIII. The Secretary of War will make such general orders or regulations as will insure the proper observance and execution of this order, and the Secretary of the Navy will give instructions to officers commanding fleets, flotillas, and gunboats in conformity therewith. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House of Representatives Executive Document No. 3, Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, pp. 348-49.

To William P. Fessenden [1]

Executive Mansion, September 24, 1864.

The foregoing rules and regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, having been seen and considered by me, are hereby approved.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House of Representatives Executive Document No. 3, p. 347. Lincoln's endorsement approved the Treasury's General Regulations for the Purchase of Products of the Insurrectionary States on Government Account, September 24, 1864.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Judge Advocate General. Sep. 24, 1864.

It is said that Simon Ready has recently been tried by one of our Military courts in this city. I can tell no more of the case; but his poor wife is bothering me & I will thank you, if practicable, to procure the record & report on the case. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, James Ruddy, CA. Simon Ready has not been identified, and no reply from Holt has been found.

To George H. Bragonier [1]

Geo. H. Bragonier, Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Commanding at War Department,
Cumberland, Md. Washington, D.C. Sep. 25. 1864.

Postpone the execution of Private Joseph Provost until Friday the 30th. Instant. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 178. Captain George H. Bragonier had telegraphed on September 23, 1864: ``Gen [George] Crook byPage  23

order has fixed next Sabbath day twenty fifth (25) inst at twelve (12) o'clock in Cumberland for the execution of Joseph Provost private First (1) N York Cavy. Shall the order be carried into effect on Sunday?'' (DLC-RTL).

To Henry W. Hoffman [1]

H. W. Hoffman. Executive Mansion,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, Sep. 25. 1864.

Please come over and see me to-morrow, or as soon as convenient.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 179. See Lincoln to Hoffman, October 10, infra.

To Edward Bates [1]

I think this has been acted upon. Please file.

Sep. 26. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments, Kentucky, Box 479. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Joshua Tevis, January 14, 1864, recommending appointment of William A. Merriwether as U.S. marshal for Kentucky. See Lincoln to Bates, January 23, supra.

To Edward Bates [2]

Let pardon issue in this case. A. LINCOLN

Sep. 26. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 553. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition of members of the jury, Washington, September 3, 1863, asking executive clemency for a Negro boy Nicholas Warner, whom they had sentenced at the May term of court to imprisonment for two years on charges of assault and battery. Marshal Ward H. Lamon endorsed the petition in concurrence on January 18, 1864.

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Major General Burbridge Executive Mansion,
Lexington, Ky. Washington, Sep 26. 1864.

Terrible complaints are being made as to the discharge of Meade at Louisville. Please report the particulars of the case, including grounds of discharge. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 180. J. Bates Dickson, Burbridge's assistant adjutant general, telegraphed on September 27: ``Gen Burbridge is absent with his command & cannot be communicated with at present No one here knows any thing in regard to the discharge of Mead. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

No further reference to Meade (or Mead) has been found.

Page  24

To Joseph Holt [1]

Judge Advocate General please report.

Sep. 26. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2273. Lincoln's endorsement is written on papers in the case of George W. Brown, citizen of Washington, fined $500 for running Negroes away to Baltimore to make them enlist. Holt reported in favor of clemency and Lincoln remitted the sentence on October 8, 1864.

Pass for Mrs. Defoe [1]

Allow this lady, Mrs. Defoe, to pass and have transportation from Washington to New-York. A. LINCOLN

Sep. 26, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, RPB. Mrs. Defoe has not been identified.

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Executive Mansion,
Major General Rosecrans, Washington, Sep. 26, 1864

One can not always safely disregard a report, even which one may not believe. I have a report that you incline to deny the soldiers the right of attending the election in Missouri, on the assumed ground that they will get drunk and make disturbance. Last year I sent Gen. Schofield a letter of instruction, dated October 1st, 1863, which I suppose you will find on the files of the Department, and which contains, among other things, the following:

``At elections see that those and only those, are allowed to vote, who are entitled to do so by the laws of Missouri, including as of those laws, the restrictions laid by the Missouri Convention upon those who may have participated in the rebellion.''

This I thought right then, and think right now; and I may add I do not remember that either party complained after the election, of Gen. Schofield's action under it. Wherever the law allows soldiers to vote, their officers must also allow it. Please write me on this subject. Yours truly, A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL; copy, DNA WR RG 94, Adjutant General, Letters Received, P 1575. On October 3, 1864, Rosecrans wrote:

``In reply to your favor of the 26th ult. notwithstanding the reports you have received to the contrary, I have the honor to inform you that I have not nor ever had the slightest idea of preventing soldiers in my Department from attending the elections whenever and wherever they may have a legal right to vote, without neglecting paramount military duties. On the contrary I shall take such measures as . . . will most effectually secure to them and to every legal voter the right of voting according to the laws of the state. . . .

Page  25``I have have [sic] before me the orders and instructions to which you refer They seem good in principle and I shall prepare and publish one that will give satisfaction to all honest union men.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir Washington, Sep. 26. 1864.

Have you, as yet definitely concluded whether the order prohibiting the exportation of arms shall be recinded?

Please answer by bearer. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NHi. No reply has been found.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major General Butler Executive Mansion,
Bermuda Hd. Va. Washington, Sep. 27, 1864.

Assistant Surgeon Wm. Crouse in here complaining that you have dismissed him and ordered him out of the Department. Please telegraph me briefly the reasons. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 183. Butler replied the same day: ``Asst Surg William Crouse has deceived the President. He has not been dismissed. He received an appointment as Asst Surge from me in writing he refused to accept the appointment which was thereupon revoked because of his refusal to accept it. Then finding that he was drinking & worthless & as some thought crazy I ordered him out of the Department. I will forward official copies of the papers tomorrow.'' (DLC-RTL).

To William Dennison [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Wm. Dennison War Department,
Columbus, O. Washington, D.C., Sep. 27 1864.

Yours received. Come so soon as you can. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 182. See Lincoln to Dennison, September 24, supra. Dennison telegraphed from Steubenville, Ohio, on September 29: ``Failed make railroad connection here will delay my arrival at Washington'' (DLC-RTL).

To James B. Fry [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Provost-Marshal General Sep. 27, 1864.

Please let the appointment of Jacob R. Freese, as Commissioner of Board of Enrollment for 2nd. Dist. of New-Jersey, in place of

Page  26Mr. Wilson resigned, be made at once. Senator Ten Eyck is agreed to it. I have his letter to that effect, though I can not at this moment lay my hands on it. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. See Lincoln to Ten Eyck, September 19, supra. James Wilson resigned as commissioner of enrollment for the Second District of New Jersey on September 2, and Freese, appointed on September 27, served until honorably discharged on April 30, 1865.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion September 27. 1864

Respectfully referred to Lieutenant General Grant for his consideration and decision. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the following letter from William H. Kent, September 27, 1864: ``In July last, my Pass as Army Correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune was revoked by order of Lt. Gen. Grant, at the request, I believe of Maj. Gen. Meade. I am not conscious of and certainly did not intend to write aught but what was true and proper for publication. Since that time the order relating to Mr. Wm. Swinton of the N.Y. Times who was sent from the Army at the same time has been rescinded by Gen. Meade. In behalf of the Tribune and myself I have respectfully to ask that similar action be taken in my case.''

Endorsements by General George G. Meade and General Winfield S. Hancock (October 4 and 7) indicate that Kent had submitted false and injurious reports on Hancock's command, and Grant's endorsement of October 10 reads: ``The most liberal facilities are afforded to newspaper correspondents, but they cannot be permitted to misrepresent facts to the injury of the service. When they so offend their pass . . . is withdrawn. . . . In this case there appears to have been a deliberate attempt to injure one of the best Generals and Corps in the service. I cannot therefore consent to Mr. Kent's return to this army.''

To Andrew Johnson [1]

Gov. Johnson Executive Mansion
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, Sep. 27. 1864

I am appealed to in behalf of Robert Bridges, who it is said is to be executed next Friday. Please satisfy yourself, and give me your opinion as to what ought to be done. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 184. See Lincoln to Johnson, September 7, supra. Governor Johnson telegraphed on September 28: ``In reply to your despatch referring to Thos R Bridges who is to be executed on Friday the thirtieth inst I will say from all the information I have upon the subject that a commutation to confinement in the Penitentiary at hard labor during his natural life is the utmost extent that Executive Clemency should be extended at this time'' (DLC-RTL).

See further Lincoln's communications to Miller, September 29, and to McClelland, December 24, infra.

Page  27

Memorandum Concerning Edward Middleton [1]

September 27, 1864

When evidence shall be brought to me, with this paper, that the father has procured a substitute who shall have been duly mustered in, I will discharge the son. A. LINCOLN

Sep. 27. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, OSHi. Lincoln's endorsement was written on a request from E. C. Middleton for exchange and discharge of his son Edward Middleton, Company I, Fourth Ohio Volunteers, age sixteen, who had enlisted as a bugler but had been assigned duties as a private before being captured. The father offered to furnish a substitute.

To William T. Sherman [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Sherman War Department,
Atlanta, Ga. Washington, D.C., Sept. 27 1864.

You say Jeff. Davis is on a visit to Hood. I judge that Brown and Stephens are the objects of his visit. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 181. See Lincoln to Sherman, September 17, supra. Sherman had telegraphed Halleck on September 26: ``I have re-enforced my line back as far as Chattanooga; but in Middle Tennessee we are weak. . . . I would like to have any regiments in Indiana or Ohio sent to Nashville. . . . Jeff. Davis is on a visit to [John B.] Hood at Palmetto.'' (OR, I, XXXIX, II, 479). On September 28, he replied to Lincoln:

``I have positive knowledge that Jeff Davis made a speech at Macon on the 22nd. . . . It was bitter against [Joseph E.] Johnston & Govr Brown. The militia is now on furlough. Brown is at Milledgeville trying to get a legislature to meet next month but he is afraid to act unless in concert with other Governors.

``Judge Wright of Rome has been here and Messrs [Joshua] Hill and [Thomas A.R.] Nelson former members of our Congress are also here now and will go to meet Wright at Rome and then go back to Madison and Milledgeville. Great efforts are being made to re-enforce Hood's army and to break up my Railroads, and I should have at once a good reserve force at Nashville. It would have a bad effect if I were to be forced to send back any material part of my army to guard roads so as to weaken me to an extent that I could not act offensively if the occasion calls for it.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major General Butler Executive Mansion,
Bermuda Hd. Va. Washington, Sep. 28. 1864.

For what offence was the money of John H. Lester, confiscated. Please answer & if practicable send me the record of confiscation.

A. LINCOLN

Page  28

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 187. Butler replied on September 29: ``John H. Lesters property was confiscated to the use of the U.S. & is in the hands of the Pro Mar at Fortress Monroe. The record of Confiscation will be found in General Orders No. 50 published May 8th 1864 I will send for a copy & forward it as early as possible We did not confiscate 300,000 worth of cotton which Lester had at Wilmington & 60,000 in Gold which he had in Canada. The original record is in the Judge Advocates Office'' (DLC-RTL).

To John R. Cannon [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
J. R. Cannon War Department,
New-Albany, Ia. Washington, D.C., Sept 28th. 1864.

It will be impossible for me to attend your ratification meeting.

Thank you for the invitation A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 186. ``Sept 28th.'' in the date line is in Nicolay's handwriting. John R. Cannon telegraphed from New Albany, Indiana, on September 27, 1864: ``We have announced your expected presence here at our grand ratification meeting on saturday next can you come answer by telegraph at length if you please'' (DLC-RTL).

To Charles A. Dana [1]

Will Assistant Sec. of War, Dana please see & hear this lady?

Sep. 28. 1864 A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-F, ISLA. The lady has not been identified.

To John F. Miller [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Officer in Command at War Department,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, D.C., Sept. 28. 1864.

Execution of Jesse A. Broadway is hereby respited to Friday the 14th. day of October next. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 185. See Lincoln to Johnson, September 7, supra. On September 27, Jordan Stokes and T. A. Keicherd telegraphed Lincoln from Nashville: ``We as the counsel for Jesse A Broadway who is sentenced to be hung at this city on next Friday the thirtieth inst would state that owing to the distance which the witnesses & friends live we have been unavoidably delayed in procuring the testimony which we desired to forward to you in his behalf. As the time is now too short for the papers in the case to reach you we therefore would most Respectfully ask . . . to extend the time for five or ten (10) days until the papers shall have reached you. We prove unconditionally that the said Jesse A Broadway was not present or in any way concerned with the crimes for which he stands charged. All of which your Excellency will see upon the arrival of the papers. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).Page  29

On October 13 John Hay telegraphed Miller: ``The sentence of Jesse Broad way has been commuted by the President to imprisonment at hard labor for three years.'' (DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 203).

To John Cessna [1]

Hon. J. Cessna, War Department
Harrisburg, Pa. Washington City, Sep. 29. 1864

Your received. See McClure on the subject you speak of.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 189. John Cessna, representative in the Pennsylvania legislature, wrote Lincoln on September 28, 1864: ``The death of my father prevents my visiting you. If possible it would be just and fair & greatly to our advantage as well as your own could you construe the conscription law as to exempt for one (1) year all who paid commutation. Many of these are drawn & it operates very severely'' (DLC-RTL).

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Gen. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va Washington, D.C., Sep. 29 1864.

I hope it will lay no constraint on you, nor do harm any way, for me to say I am a little afraid lest Lee sends re-enforcements to Early, and thus enables him to turn upon Sheridan.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 188. Grant replied on the same day: ``Your despatch just received. I am taking steps to prevent Lee sending reenforcements to Early by attacking him here. Our advance is now within six miles of Richmond and have captured some very strong enclosed forts, some fifteen or more pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. Although I have been at the front I can give no estimate of our losses, about 600 wounded men however have been brought in'' (DLC-RTL).

To John F. Miller [1]

Officer in Command at Executive Mansion
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, Sept. 29. 1864

Let the execution of Robert T. Bridges be suspended until further order from me. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 190. See Lincoln's communications to Johnson, September 7 and 27, supra, and to McClelland, December 24, infra.

Page  30

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major General Butler Executive Mansion,
Bermuda Hd. Va Washington, Sep. 30, 1864.

Is there a man in your Department by the name of James Hallion, under sentence, and if so, what is the sentence,? and what for?

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 191. Major Joseph L. Stackpole replied for Butler on October 1:

``There is no man named James Hallian [sic] under sentence in this Department.

``Private Jas Hallion Co `K' 20th N.Y. Cavy was sentenced by Gen Court martial to be shot for rape & other offenses. Genl Butler has commuted this sentence to dishonorable discharge . . . & to three (3) years . . . at Hard Labor with ball & chain. The sentence will be published in a few days. I think this is the same man.'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln's telegram to Joseph Roberts, October 1, infra.

To William Hoffman [1]

Executive Mansion
Col. Hoffman, Washington, Sep. 30. 1864

Let John S. Conn, now a prisoner of war at Camp Douglas, Illinois, take the oath of Dec. 8. 1864 [sic], and be discharged. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. No further reference has been found, and John S. Conn has not been further identified.

Order Concerning Lessees and Owners of Plantations Worked by Freedmen [1]

Executive Order}
concerning Lessees and Owners of} Executive Mansion,
Plantations worked by Freedmen.} September [30?], 1864.

For the purpose of encouraging persons, formerly held as slaves, to labor as freedmen in insurrectionary States that they may become self-supporting, and that the products of their labor may benefit the country, and for the purpose of protecting all persons employing such labor under rules relating thereto, established under proper authority, it is hereby ordered:

I. All officers, commanding military Departments, Districts, Posts, Naval fleets and vessels, will at once suspend [2] all orders made by them or in force within their respective commands, so far as they [3] prohibit or in any manner interfere with the transportation of supplies to, or products from, any plantation worked byPage  31 free labor under rules relating thereto, prescribed or approved by the Secretary of the Treasury: Provided such transportation is being made in pursuance of permits granted by duly authorized officers of the Treasury Department, and all persons hindering or interfering with transportation to or from such plantations so worked, which has been so permitted, will be deemed guilty of a military offence and punished accordingly.

II. Agreements have been made with owners of lands who have recognized the freedom of their former slaves, and leases have been made of abandoned plantations under authority of the Government, and good faith to such owners and lessees requires due observance of the terms of all such agreements and leases on the part of all civil and military officers of the Government; therefore all military and naval officers will aid in securing such observance by every means at their command which can be used for that purpose without interfering with active military or naval operations.

III. Such orders will be made by general and local military and naval commanders as will insure the fulfilment of the purposes of this order, and as will afford the greatest possible protection to the laborers and employers above named, consistent with the safety of their commands and the success of any military or naval movement being made by them.

Annotation

[1]   Df, DNA WR RG 94, Adjutant General, Letters Received, P 1589. Although corrected in Lincoln's autograph as indicated, this order was not signed or issued. See Lincoln to Stanton, infra.

[2]   ``Revoke'' emended by Lincoln to ``suspend.''

[3]   ``Which'' emended by Lincoln to ``so far as they.''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion
Dear Sir Washington, Sep. 30. 1864

The accompanying is the draft of an order drawn up at the Treasury Department for me to sign. Please look over it, and say whether you perceive any objection. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NHi. See Order, supra. Stanton replied on the same day: ``Having examined the draft of the Treasury Order in relation to Freedmen and Plantations, referred to me by your note of this date, I cannot recommend its execution by you. It seems to me subject to very grave objections, which ought to be removed by satisfactory explanation, before the President would give such sweeping sanction and approval to the acts of Treasury Agents, in respect to which neither he nor this Department has any sufficient information. The specific objections will be stated to you at your convenience.'' (DLC-RTL).

Page  32

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]
September 30, 1864.

I think the bearer of this, Second Lieutenant Albee, deserves a hearing. Will the Secretary of War please accord it to him?

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, I, XLII, III, 494. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a statement of Second Lieutenant George E. Albee, Thirty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, September 30, 1864, protesting against an order which disgraced his regiment and forbade it to carry colors as a result of the capture of the regimental colors at Ream's Station, Virginia, on August 25.

To Lorenzo Thomas [1]
September 30, 1864

I have seen this man, who seems to be an intelligent & manly man, and whose story I believe to be true. If it does not invol[v]e much inconvenience, let the transfer he asks, be made.

Sep. 30. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES-P, ISLA. Lincoln's endorsement is on a letter of David G. Lindsay, Company G, Ninetieth Pennsylvania Infantry, to Lorenzo Thomas, September 29, 1864: ``I inlisted in the 17th. Regt Pa. Cavalry and through some missunderstanding I was Sent to the 90th. Pa Infantry. My reason for my inlisting in the 17th. Pa Cavalry was that I had a Brother in that Regiment, and wished to be along with Him. . . . I most respectfully & earnestly request you Sir to transfer me to my proper Regiment the one in which I inlisted. . . .'' Private David Lindsay was ordered to be transferred to the Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry on October 6, 1864 (AGO Special Orders No. 336).

To Edward Bates [1]

[October, 1864]

Attorney General please make out a pardon in this case.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 554. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition signed by Robert M. Beale and others, Washington, October, 1864, asking pardon for Alfred More, convicted of larceny.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Executive Mansion October 1, 1864

Will the Judge Advocate General please examine and report upon this case as soon as convenient. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Captain William Borrowe, Company H, Second Pennsylvania Artillery, October 1, 1864, sentenced by court-martial to loss of two months' pay, on charges of forgery andPage  33

making a false muster. Borrowe asked a ``final decision . . . and that redress be granted me.'' Holt left the decision to the president, and on October 26, Lincoln endorsed the court-martial record ``I decline to make any further order in this case. A. LINCOLN'' (copy, DNA RG 130, U.S. Army Court-Martial Cases, White House Office). Borrowe was dismissed from service on March 8, 1865, but reinstated as first lieutenant in the Second Artillery, July 26, 1865.

Order for Pardon of John S. Ward [1]

Let this man, John S. Ward take the oath of Dec. 8 1863, be exchanged & report to Gov. Johnson at Nashville Tenn.

Oct 1 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Arthur Hansen, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a telegram of Andrew Johnson to W. C. Ward, September 28, 1864: ``You will show this dispatch to the President. I should have no hesitancy in releasing your brother and permitting him to return home if I had the pardoning power providing he would take the oath of allegiance willingly and in good faith & report to the Executive of the State and enter into such bonds as may be required for the faithful observance of the same.''

Order of Thanks to One Hundred Day Troops [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, October 1, 1864.

The term of 100 days, for which volunteers from the States of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin volunteered, under the call of their respective Governors, in the months of May and June, to aid in the recent campaign of General Sherman, having expired, the President directs an official acknowledgment to be made of their patriotic service. It was their good fortune to render effective service in the brilliant operations in the Southwest, and to contribute to the victories of the national arms over the rebel forces in Georgia under command of Johnston and Hood. On all occasions, and in every service to which they were assigned, their duty as patriotic volunteers was performed with alacrity and courage, for which they are entitled to and are hereby tendered the national thanks through the Governors of their respective States.

The Secretary of War is directed to transmit a copy of this order to the Governors of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin, and to cause a certificate [2] of their honorable services to be delivered to the officers and soldiers of the States above named, who recently served in the military force of the United States as volunteers for 100 days.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Page  34

Annotation

[1]   OR, III, IV, 755-56. See Lincoln to Stanton, April 23, supra.

[2]   These printed certificates ``of thanks'' and ``of honorable service,'' dated December 15, 1864, and signed by Lincoln and Stanton, incorporated Lincoln's order of October 1, 1864, in the body of their text.

To William T. Otto [1]

October 1, 1864

Understanding that persons giving credit in this case will have no strictly legal claim upon the government, yet the necessity for it is so great and urgent, that I shall most cheerfully urge upon Congress that such credit and claims fairly given and made, shall be recognized and paid. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 1. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA NR RG 48, Indian Division, Letters Received. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of Acting Secretary of the Interior William T. Otto enclosing a letter of William P. Dole, October 1, 1864, suggesting that Cherokee Agent Justin Harlan be instructed to buy on credit in New York $30,000 worth of clothing and that Superintendent William G. Coffin at Leavenworth, Kansas, be instructed to buy $170,000 worth of food for relieving the refugee Indians in Kansas.

To Joseph Roberts [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Officer in Command at War Department,
Fort-Monroe, Va. Washington, D.C., Oct. 1 1864.

Is there a man by the name of James Hallion (I think) under sentence? and what is his offence? what the sentence? and when to be executed? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 192. See Lincoln to Butler, September 30, supra. Colonel Joseph Roberts replied on the same day: ``Your telegram just received. The Provost Marshal of Dept . . . informs me that James Hallion twentieth (20th) N.Y. Cavalry was received at this office from Norfolk, sent here by order of Brig Genl Sheply [George F. Shepley] August ninth . . . as awaiting sentence of General Court Martial and is now at the Military Prison Camp Hamilton. I do not know what his offence is. Brig Genl Shepley at Norfolk can inform you no doubt as he was probably tried by a Court Martial convened by his orders. This man is not in my charge'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edward Bates [1]

Let a pardon be made out in this case.

Oct. 3, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 563. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter signed by Thomas D. Larner and others, Washington, October, 1864, asking pardon for William Trunnell, convicted of assault and battery.

Page  35

To William P. Fessenden [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Hon. Secretary of the Treasury: Oct. 3, 1864.

My dear Sir, Mr. Hallowell who brings this, has a very meritorious cotton-case & I hope it may be found that the same sort of thing can be done for him that was for Judge Johnson [2] of Cincinnati. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Carnegie Book Shop Catalog 167, No. 266; Tracy, p. 245. On September 30, 1864, John W. Forney wrote Lincoln:

``I will have the honor to call upon you on Monday morning between ten and eleven o'clock in company with Morris L. Hallowell. He is one of the most upright and influential members of the Society of Friends in this city. . . . He was ruined by the Rebellion---all his trade South was cut off---his debtors refused to pay---and he was thus left almost bankrupt. He is a man of earnestness & integrity & to enable him to live he will lay before you the following. . . .

``One of his debtors in Arkansas who owes him . . . an immense sum has 3600 bales of cotton. If he could get these out of the State under the authority of the Government, it would be a source of great advantage to the common cause, & would also enable his party in Arkansas to pay him. Gen's Steele & Dana need only your permission to give protection to this cotton to get it out. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   This case has not been identified, but Johnson was probably William Johnson an outstanding lawyer and jurist of Cincinnati.

Recommendation for Mrs. Charlotte Hough [1]

Executive Mansion
Washington, Oct. 3, 1864

I have but slight personal acquaintance with the bearer of this Mrs. Lotty Hough; but I have known something of her by reputation for several years and never heard aught against her. She is now struggling to support herself and her little boy, and I hope she may be afforded fair opportunities to succeed. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS, RPB. Concerning Mrs. Charlotte Hough, see Lincoln's order of March 7, 1865, infra, permitting her to bring products through the lines.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

If the service can be made useful, let Capt. Dewey be appointed an Assistant Quarter-Master A. LINCOLN

Oct. 3. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter of Captain Lucien Eaton, district judge advocate at St. Louis, Missouri, to Captain William F. Dewey, Fifty-third Illinois Volunteers, January 27, 1864, commending him for his prior services as judge advocate at St. Louis. The letter is endorsed in concurrence by several other officers, including General John M. Schofield. Stanton endorsed ``Applicant from Illinois to be filed and appointment [sic].'' No further reference has been found.

Page  36

Order for Discharge [1]

Let this boy be discharged, on refunding any bounty received.

Oct. 4. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, InFtwL. Lincoln's letter is written on a letter of William D. Kelley, Philadelphia, October 3, 1864, to an unidentified person:

``My dear friend Will you look over the enclosed papers and get the subject fairly before the President soon as possible I know the parties, Miss Porters father & two uncles were lunatics, and from this trouble will send her to the asylum. Dr. Gardner is an eminent physician. I know all the parties & hope the President will grant the prayer if possible I am nearly worn out.''

The papers are not with the letter and the case has not been identified.

Order for Pardon of Roswell McIntyre [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Oct. 4. 1864.

Upon condition that Roswell McIntyre of Co. E. 6th. Regt. of New-York Cavalry returns to his Regiment and faithfully serves out his term, making up for lost time, or until otherwise lawfully discharged, he is fully pardoned for any supposed desertion heretofore committed; and this paper is his pass to go to his regiment.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS-F, ISLA. An endorsement at the bottom of the page reads: ``Taken from the body of R. McIntyre at the battle of Five Forks Va 1865.'' An endorsement across the face of the order indicates transportation furnished by the quartermaster's office from New York on October 22, 1864.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion Washington
Lieut Gen Grant, Oct. 5th. 1864.

I enclose you copy of a correspondence [2] in regard to a contemplated exchange of Naval prisoners through your lines and not very distant from your Head Quarters. It only came to the knowledge of the War Department and of myself yesterday, and it gives us some uneasiness. I therefore send it to you with the statement that as the numbers to be exchanged under it are small, and so much has already been done to effect the exchange, I hope you may find it consistent to let it go forward under the general supervision of Gen Butler, and particularly in reference to the points he holds vital in exchanges. Still you are at liberty to arrest the whole operation, if in your judgment the public good requires it. Yours Truly A. LINCOLN

Page  37

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 108, HQA, Letters Received, P 459, Box 73. On October 11, 1864, Grant forwarded Lincoln's letter with the enclosures to General Benjamin F. Butler, turning ``the whole matter over to you to conduct.'' (OR, II, VII, 965). Welles' Diary under dates of October 4 and 5 records at length the difficulty between the Navy and War departments, concluding as follows: ``The President came to see me pretty early this morning in relation to the exchange of prisoners. It had troubled him through the night. . . . The President said he wanted the subject to be got along with harmoniously, that they were greatly ruffled at the War Department, and if I had no objection he would go and see Seward, tell him the facts, get him to come over, and bring the Secretary of War . . . to a consultation. . . .

``In less than an hour the President returned with Seward. We went briefly over the question. . . . After discussing the subject, went, by request of the President, with him to the War Department. General Hitchcock and General Halleck came in soon. Stanton was ill-mannered, as usual, where things did not please him. . . . The President said that the correspondence was a past transaction,---that we need not disturb that matter; the Navy arrangement must go forward, and the Navy have its men. He wrote and read a brief letter to General Grant proposing to turn over the prisoners we had sent to him. . . . Hitchcock . . . began a speech . . . intimating that the War Department should have exclusive control of the cartel. . . . I told him I was perfectly willing . . . if they would not obstruct the exchange but get back our men. All assented to the President's letter. Stanton and Seward preferred it should be addressed to General Butler. . . . But the President preferred addressing the General-in-Chief, and I commended his preference. We telegraphed Capt. Melancthon Smith, to turn the prisoners over to General Grant to be disposed of. . . .''

[2]   See OR, II, VII, 661, for letter of Stephen R. Mallory to Gideon Welles, August 20, 1864, and Welles' reply, September 9, 1864 (ibid., p. 790).

To William Hoffman [1]

Col. Hoffman please see & hear this lady & oblige her if it can be consistently done. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 5, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ISLA. Lincoln's endorsement is on a letter from Anne Sweatman, Washington, October 5, 1864, asking release of her husband, First Lieutenant Robert Sweatman of Company E, Fifth U.S. Cavalry, taken prisoner at Beaver Dam Depot, Virginia, on May 10, 1864. Presumably Sweatman had been exchanged but was not yet returned to service.

To Joseph Holt [1]

October 5, 1864

Judge Advocate General please procure record & report on this case.

Oct. 5. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 1187. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter asking clemency for Private Linden B. Esher, Company A, Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, sentenced to be shot for desertion. Holt reported on December 12, 1864, that sentence had already been commuted to imprisonment on Dry Tortugas.

Page  38

To John F. Miller [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Officer in command at War Department,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, D.C., Oct. 5 1864.

Suspend execution of Thomas K. Miller until further order from me. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 193. On October 1, 1864, Andrew Johnson telegraphed Lincoln: ``Thomas K Miller & Y[oung] C Edmondson are sentenced to be hanged on the seventh inst The friends of the Parties who are respectable & intelligent allege that they can present reasons & facts which will go a great way towards mitigating the sentence & desire an extension of time to enable them to do so. I hope that their request will be granted & the execution postponed a reasonable time'' (DLC-RTL).

On October 4, Andrew Johnson's son Robert, acting as his secretary, telegraphed: ``I would most respectfully call your attention to a telegraph of Gov Johnson of Oct first (1) in regard to Thos K Miller & Y C Edmondson sentenced to be hanged on the seventh inst & hope you will consider the case favorably Father is absent in Indiana.'' (Ibid.).

Lincoln endorsed the second telegram ``Suspended till further order. Oct. 5, 1864. A.L.'' See Lincoln to Miller, October 25, infra.

To William P. Fessenden [1]

The bearer, Judge Peck, is my good friend, whom I hope the Sec. of Treasury will see & hear. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 6. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, N. Ebenezer Peck was associate justice of the U.S. Court of Claims.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

October 6, 1864

Hon. Sec. of War please see Mr. Wood, one of the Penn. agents, who has some fears that a misdescription of the functions of himself & colleagues in their passes, may create difficulty.

Oct. 6. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. Mr. Wood has not been further identified, but may have been one of the agents named by the State Committee to obtain votes of Pennsylvania soldiers in the field.

Appointment of Directors of Union Pacific Railroad [1]

Executive Mansion, October 7th 1864.

By virtue of the authority conferred upon the President of the United States, by the thirteenth section of the act of Congress approved

Page  39July 2, 1864, amending the act to aid in the construction of a Railroad and Telegraph line from the Missouri river to the Pacific Ocean &c.

Jesse L. Williams of Indiana

George Ashmun of Massachusetts

Charles T. Sherman of Ohio

Springer Harbaugh of Pennsylvania, and

Timothy J. Carter of Illinois

are hereby appointed directors on the part of the Government of the United States, for the Union Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Company, to serve until the next ensuing regular election of directors for said Company, and until their successors are qualified.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA NR RG 48, Department of Interior, Union Pacific Railroad, Package 239. John A. Dix, president of the Union Pacific, wrote Lincoln on October 4, 1864: ``I desire respectfully to call your attention to the fact that the term of service of the government Directors of this company expires tomorrow. As there will be a meeting of the Board of Directors at an early day, it is very desirable that the appointment of the five government Directors for the ensuing year should be made as soon as practicable.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Joseph Holt [1]

October 7, 1864

Believing there was technichal wrong in these cases, on a point which the government can not safely disregard, and yet having great doubt whether there was moral guilt in these particular cases, it is ordered that the fine in each case is reduced to one thousand dollars, the excess being remitted. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 7. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2089. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the court-martial record of J. Paul Jones and William A. Jones. See Lincoln to Holt, September 9, supra.

To Henry J. Raymond [1]

October 7, 1864

I well remember the meetings herein narrated. See nothing for me to object to in the narrative as being made by General McDoWell, except the phrase attributed to me ``of the Jacobinism of Congress,'' which phrase I do not remember using literally or in substance, and which I wish not to be published in any event.

October 7, 1864. A. LINCOLN.

Page  40

Annotation

[1]   Henry J. Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln (1865), p. 772. According to the source, Lincoln wrote this endorsement on a memorandum prepared by General Irvin McDowell of an interview with Lincoln on January 10, 1862. McDowell's lengthy memorandum may be consulted in the source. The passage to which Lincoln alludes is as follows: ``The President was greatly disturbed at the state of affairs. Spoke of the exhausted condition of the Treasury; of the loss of public credit; of the Jacobinism in Congress; of the delicate condition of our foreign relations; of the bad news he had received from the West, particularly as contained in a letter from General Halleck on the state of affairs in Missouri; of the want of co-operation between General Halleck and General Buell; but, more than all, the sickness of General McClellan.'' (Ibid., p. 773).

To James B. Fry [1]

War Department,
Washington, D.C., October 8, 1864.

It is now said that under present instructions in recruiting from prisoners at Rock Island the names of those willing to enlist have to be first ascertained and sent here, and then an order from here for their examination and muster of such as are found suitable.

It is proposed to change this so that the ascertainment of names, examination, and muster can all be gone through with there, under the supervision of Colonel Johnson and Captain Rathbone [2], thus saving much time and trouble.

It is also proposed that the restriction in the President's order limiting the recruits to persons of foreign and Northern birth be removed, and that the question of good faith on the part of those offering to enlist be left to the judgment and discretion of Colonel Johnson and Colonel Caraher [3]. The limit of the whole not to exceed 1,750 men.

Annotation

[1]   OR, III, IV, 756-57. A footnote in the source identifies this memorandum as follows: ``Unsigned memorandum made by President Lincoln and given to the Provost-Marshal-General with verbal instructions to conform thereto.'' See Lincoln's orders to Huidekoper, September 1, to Stanton, September 20, and letter to Grant, September 22, supra.

[2]   Andrew J. Johnson, commanding at Rock Island, and Henry R. Rathbone.

[3]   Andrew P. Caraher.

To Simon Cameron [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gen. Simon Cameron War Department,
Philadelphia Washington, D.C., Oct. 9. 1864.

There is absolutely no news here from the Army of the Potomac not published in Stantons bulletins of yesterday and before. ThePage  41 line is open, and mere business despatches are passing over it. Have no alarm, on bogus despatches. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 195. No telegram from Cameron in regard to news from the Army of the Potomac has been found.

To Andrew G. Curtin [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Curtin War Department, Washington, D.C.,
Harrisburg Pa. Oct. 10. 5. PM. 1864.

Yours of to-day just this moment received; & the Secretary having left it is impossible for me to answer to-day. I have not received your letter from Erie. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 194. Curtin's telegram or letter of October 10 has not been found. His letter from Erie, Pennsylvania, October 6, reads in part:

``Having . . . passed through the counties from Clinton west to Erie I fulfil my promise to write you.

``Whilst I anticipate our success on next Tuesday in this State our most reliable friends do not promise an increased vote in the counties mentioned. . . .''

``P.S. Will you not order the muster of Colonel [John H.] Stover of the 184th Reg P.V It is important and if he [Stanton] has any objections about him he can be disposed of after the election. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

See Lincoln's telegram to Curtin, October 11, infra.

To Henry W. Hoffman [1]

Hon. Henry W Hoffman Executive Mansion, Washington,
My dear Sir: October 10, 1864.

A convention of Maryland has framed a new constitution for the State; a public meeting is called for this evening, at Baltimore, to aid in securing its ratification by the people; and you ask a word from me, for the occasion. I presume the only feature of the instrument, about which there is serious controversy, is that which provides for the extinction of slavery. It needs not to be a secret, and I presume it is no secret, that I wish success to this provision. I desire it on every consideration. I wish all men to be free. I wish the material prosperity of the already free which I feel sure the extinction of slavery would bring. I wish to see, in process of disappearing, that only thing which ever could bring this nation to civil war. I attempt no argument. Argument upon the question is already exhausted by the abler, better informed [2], and more immediately interested sons of Maryland herself. I only add that I shall be gratified exceedingly if the good people of the State shall, by their votes, ratify the new constitution. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Page  42

Annotation

[1]   ALS, MdHi. This letter is incorrectly dated October 18, 1864, in Hertz (II, 952-53). Henry W. Hoffman, chairman of the Maryland Unconditional Union Central Committee, wrote Lincoln on October 3, 1864:

``Our grand Mass Meeting in favor of the `Free Constitution' will be held in Monument Square on Monday evening October 10th.

``In consequence of local dissensions and with a view to general harmony and cordial fraternization upon the new Constitution, the Committee have resolved to rely exclusively upon speakers from other States at this meeting.

``We are convinced that your presence on the occasion would insure its success both as to harmony and point of numbers and that its influence upon the vote to be taken on the Following Wednesday would be to add hundreds and perhaps thousands of votes to the free State column. We therefore most cordially and earnestly invite your attendance. If however you should feel disinclined to comply with the urgent request of the Committee . . . we are well assured that a letter from you expressive of the deep interest which we know you feel in regard to its success would be productive of the greatest good. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On October 12 Hoffman wrote: ``Many thanks for your letter of Monday It was recd with the unbounded applause of the many thousands assembled The meeting was a great success in point of numbers Harmony & enthusiasm The new constitution will be adopted The majority in this city will not fall short of ten thousand from present indications. The voting is proceeding quietly. . . .''(Ibid.).

The new constitution was ratified by a vote of 30, 174 to 29, 799.

[2]   Lincoln wrote ``better posted,'' but John Hay erased ``posted'' and wrote ``informed,'' as shown on the manuscript and recorded in Hay's Diary under date of October 9, 1864.

Recommendation for Josiah Shaw [1]

I shall be glad if Capt. Shaw, recently in our service, can get suitable employment in any of the Departments.

Oct. 10, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Anderson Galleries Catalog 3854, October 20, 1930, No. 159. According to the catalog description, this is the text of an autograph endorsement signed on the back of discharge papers of Captain Josiah Shaw, Company A, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, mustered out on September 3, 1864.

Testimony Concerning Shelling of Houses Near Fort Stevens [1]

A. Executive Mansion
Washington Oct. 10. 1864

I was present at Fort Stevens (I think) on the afternoon of July 12th. 1864, when some houses in front were shelled by our guns, and understanding that the Military officers in command thought the shelling of the houses proper and necessary, I certainly gave my approbation to its being done A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 233, Forty-eighth Congress, House of Representatives Collection, Box 162. The copy of this communication is preserved in the record ofPage  43

the proceedings of a board of officers convened by Special Orders No. 228, Headquarters, Department of Washington, September 13, 1864, upon the claim of Catharine Carberry for loss and damage to her property sustained during the raid of the Confederates on Washington in July, 1864. The proceedings refer to the communication as exhibit ``A.'' These proceedings are filed in the Forty-eighth Congress collection presumably because the Committee on the Judiciary had under consideration the bill for claims of Catharine Carberry and Richard Lay (H.R. 5407). The committee reported the bill adversely:

``The claimants insist that these facts make a case of the taking of private property for public use, and entitle them to payment for their losses. Similar claims have been before Congress repeatedly since the close of the war of the rebellion, and have been discussed in many reports of committees, and on the floor of both houses.

``The committee think the law of this subject has become settled that such claims are for losses and damage by war, and not a taking of private property for public use. The subject was most exhaustively examined in a report of the Committee on War Claims in the Forty-seventh Congress. . . . We think their conclusions are sound, but they are fatal to this bill.'' (Forty-eighth Congress, First Session, House of Representatives Report No. 1856).

To Gideon Welles [1]

Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir Oct. 10, 1864.

The bearer, Mr. Jones, calls on you to obtain facilities for taking the votes of Seamen & Sailors. Please do all for him in this respect which you consistently can. Mr. Jones is Chairman of the Union State Central Committee for the State of New York. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog 1342, January 4, 1924, No. 35. According to the catalog description this communication is an autograph letter signed. Welles' Diary under date of October 11 records the following: ``The President and Seward called on me this forenoon relative to New York voters in the Navy. Wanted one of our boats to be placed at the disposal of the New York commission to gather votes in the Mississippi Squadron. A Mr. [Charles] Jones was referred to, who subsequently came to me with a line from the President, and wanted also to send to the blockading squadrons. Gave permission to go by the Circassian, and directed commanders to extend facilities to all voters. . . .''

To Simon Cameron [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gen. S. Cameron War Department, Washington, D.C.,
Philadelphia Pa & Harrisburgh [2]Oct. 11. 1864.

Am leaving office to go home. How does it stand now?

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 198. No reply was received from Cameron until his telegram from Philadelphia was received at 9:05 P.M. on October 12: ``Returns came in slowly but I still think we will have fourPage  44

(4) additional Members of Congress & a large majority in the Legislature On the aggregate vote in thirty four counties we have last . . . 6500 compared with Eighteen hundred Sixty three. . . . At the same ratio we will have more than three thousand majority on the home vote.'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   ``& Harrisburgh'' is not in Lincoln's autograph.

To Andrew G. Curtin [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Curtin War Department, Washington, D.C.,
Harrisburg, Pa. Oct. 11 1864.

On looking up the Col. Stover case this morning I find we could not, without further information, be at all justified in ordering him to be mustered. I hope it can be made straight; but the record as it stands is too bad. A copy will be immediately sent you by mail.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 196. See Lincoln to Curtin, October 10, supra. Curtin wrote Lincoln again on November 2, asking action on Stover's case: ``If the charges are true he is unfit for honorable position. . . . If they are not true he should command his regiment. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). The roster of the One Hundred Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers lists Colonel John H. Stover as mustered out with his regiment on July 14, 1865.

To Robert T. Lincoln [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Robert T. Lincoln War Department,
Cambridge, Mass. Washington, D.C., Oct. 11 1864.

Your letter makes us a little uneasy about your health. Telegraph us how you are. If you think it would help you make us a visit.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 197. No letter or telegram from Robert Lincoln has been found.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

October 11, 1864

I wish to appoint Ebenezer J. Bennett of St. Louis, Mo., an Assistant Quarter Master, or Commissary of Subsistence. If service can be found for him, let him be appointed.

Annotation

[1]   The Collector, April-May, 1945, No. 2003. According to the catalog description this text is from an autograph letter signed. Captain Ebenezer J. Bennett, formerly of the Second Missouri Cavalry, was appointed commissary of subsistence on October 12, 1864.

Page  45

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va Washington, D.C., Oct. 12. 1864.

Sec. of War not being in, I answer yours about election. Pennsylvania very close, and still in doubt on home vote. Ohio largely for us, with all the members of congress but two or three. Indiana largely for us. Governor, it is said by 15,000, and 8. of the eleven members of congress. Send us what you may know of your army vote. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 199½. No communication from Grant in this connection has been found.

Order Concerning the Fusigama [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, 12th October, 1864.

The Japanese Government having caused the construction at New York of a vessel of war called the `Fusigama,' and application having been made for the clearance of the same in order that it may proceed to Japan, it is ordered, in view of the state of affairs in that country and of its relations with the United States, that a compliance with the application be, for the present, suspended.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 56, General Records of the Treasury Department, AB Series, 1864, Letters from Executive Officers, State Department, Part 2, Volume II. This order was enclosed with a letter of Secretary Seward to William P. Fessenden, October 12, 1864: ``I have the honor to enclose an order of the President of this date, suspending the granting of a clearance to the gunboat Fusigama, which has been built at New York for the Japanese, and which is represented to be ready to start for her destination.''

Japan was in a state of semi-revolution led by the ``Ronins,'' as a result of antiforeign sentiment aroused by the efforts of England, France, and the Netherlands to get favorable commercial concessions similar to those granted by Japan to the United States. The Fusigama and the Funayma Solace (see Lincoln's order of December 3, infra) had been built under contracts arranged by Thurlow Weed and Charles B. Lansing (see Lincoln's communication to the Senate, February 6, 1863, supra).

To Edward Bates [1]

Attorney General please make out a pardon in this case.

Oct. 13, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 561. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from William P. Fessenden, October 3, 1864, asking pardon for Franklin B. Furlong, convicted of stealing letters from the post office at Portland, Maine.

Page  46

Estimated Electoral Vote [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
War Department,
Washington, D.C., October 13th. 1864.

Supposed Copperhead Vote. Union Vote, for President

New-York 33 New England States 39

Penn 26 Michigan 8

New Jersey 7 Wisconsin 8

Delaware 3 Minnesota 4

Maryland 7 Iowa 8

Missouri 11 Oregon 3

Kentucky 11 California 5

Illinois 16 Kansas 3

--- Indiana 13

114 Ohio 21

W. Virginia 5

---

117

Nevada 3

---

120

Annotation

[1]   AD, CSmH. Written on a printed telegraph blank, this document is in Lincoln's autograph except for the date, column headings, and ``Nevada 3/120.''

To Oliver P. Morton [1]

Cypher Office U.S. Military Telegraph, Gov. O. P. Morton War Department, Washington, D.C.,
Indianapolis, Ind. Oct. 13 1864.

In my letter borne by Mr. Mitchell to Gen. Sherman, I said that any soldiers he could spare for October need not to remain for November. I therefore can not press the General on this point. All that the Sec. of War and Gen. Sherman feel they can safely do, I however, shall be glad of.

Bravo, for Indiana, and for yourself personally.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 200. William Mitchell, former representative from Indiana (1861-1863), who had carried Lincoln's letter of September 19 (supra), telegraphed Lincoln from Louisville, Kentucky, on October 7: ``I have succeeded very well.'' (DLC-RTL).

Re-elected on October 11, Governor Morton telegraphed Lincoln and Stanton on October 12: ``In consideration of the fact that nearly all of the Indiana sick & wounded soldiers furloughed from Hospitals under your late order did not reach their homes until within a few days past & many not until yesterday &Page  47 the day before leaving them little or no time to see their friends & families & secure the rest & recuperation they so much need on account of long & arduous Journey they have performed I most earnestly ask that their furloughs be extended by a special order until after the Presidential Election say Nov (10) tenth. If this is done I feel confident hundreds of them will return to the front able for active duty If sent on the fifteenth inst they will be worse off than ever For the best interests of the service and the sake of humanity I earnestly hope this request will be granted & the order telegraphed to me as soon as possible'' (DLC-RTL).

Morton's reply to Lincoln's telegram was received October 13 at 1 P.M.: ``I fear you misapprehend my dispatch of yesterday I only asked that the sick & wounded who are furloughed under Mr Stantons order to the Surgeon Genl be allowed to remain Genl Sherman had nothing to do with sending them home & would not be strengthened any by their return now as they would all have to go into Hospitals again It seems to me the order of extension asked for yesterday can be granted without consulting the Genl & without the least detriment, but rather benefit to the service Please let Mr Stanton see this & for God's sake let the order be made at once'' (ibid.).

At 5 P.M. Morton telegraphed Lincoln and Stanton again: ``It is my opinion that the vote of every soldiers in Indiana will be required to carry this state for Mr Lincoln in November. The most of them are sick and wounded and in no condition to render service and it is better to let them remain while they are here.

``It is important that this be answered immediately.'' (Ibid.).

To Godlove S. Orth [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. G. S. Orth War Department, Washington, D.C.,
LaFayette, Ind. Oct. 13 1864.

I now incline to defer the appointment of Judge until the meeting of Congress. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 201. Godlove S. Orth telegraphed Lincoln on October 12: ``Have you determined the question of Judge Whites successor If not will you defer appointment until meeting of congress Please answer by telegraph'' (DLC-RTL). U.S. District Judge Albert S. White died on September 24, 1864. David McDonald of Indianapolis, his successor, took office on December 13, 1864.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major Gen. Butler Executive Mansion,
Butlers Hd Qrs. Va. Washington, Oct. 14, 1864.

It is said that Captain Joseph R. Findley of Co. F. 76. Penn. Vols. has been summarily dismissed the service for supposed skulking. Such representations are made to me of his good character, long service, and good behavior in many battles as to induce the wish that you would re-examine his case. At all events send me a statement of it as you have A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 204. Butler replied the same day: ``My order and a Report on the case of Capt Jos P Findley will bePage  48

sent by Mail. It has never been my misfortune to get so disgraceful a case of skulking'' (DLC-RTL). The roster of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers lists Captain Joseph R. Findley as discharged on October 4, 1864.

To James B. Fry [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Provost-Marshal-General. Oct. 14, 1864

Hon. Charles O'Neill states that the 1st. Ward, in the 2nd. Congressional District in Philadelphia, is entitled to an additional credit on the draft of about 95 men, of Naval enlistments, which are only refused on a question of time---or, in other words, that they may have the credit on the next, but not on the present draft. If there be no mistake in this statement, let them have the credit now. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   John Heise Catalog 2487, No. 20. Charles O'Neill of Philadelphia was U.S. representative 1863-1871, 1873-1893.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Please send the papers of Major Gansler, by the bearer, Mr. Longnecker. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 14. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by John D. Lippy, Jr., Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Longnecker was probably Henry C. Longnecker of Allentown, Pennsylvania. Major W. H. Gansler, Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers had been dismissed for cowardice at Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill on April 8 and 9, 1864. (AGO Special Orders No. 169, May 6, 1864). On October 17, ``By direction of the President, so much of Special Orders, No. 169 . . . as relates to Major W. H. Gansler, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers, is hereby revoked, and he is honorably discharged, on tender of resignation. . . .'' (AGO Special Orders No. 350). Although the name appears as ``Gansler'' in Special Orders, it is ``Gausler'' on the roster of the regiment.

To Henry W. Hoffman [1]

Cypher Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. H. W. Hoffman War Department,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, D.C., Oct 15. 1864.

Come over to-night and see me. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 205. Hoffman's telegram received at 11:20 A.M. on October 15 is as follows: ``Returns from State come in slowly Probable maj. against the Constitution on the home vote of about one thousand It is believed that the soldiers vote may overcome this & give a small majority for the Constitution It is reported that in some of the rebel strongholds the oath was not administered & the Govr will consequently reject the returns'' (DLC-RTL).

On October 17 Hoffman telegraphed again: ``Allagheny official majority eight hundred and eighty five (885) for the Constitution Dorchester one thousandPage  49 and forty (1040) against. Worcester eleven hundred and ninety (1190) against Soldiers vote actually returned fourteen hundred and eighty (1480) majority for. Its estimated that at least one thousand further majority will be obtained from the soldiers. Our friends are still confident that the constitution will have a small majority on the total official vote'' (ibid.).

On the back of the telegram appears the following tabulation in Lincoln's autograph:

``885 1092

100

650

[1]   650

[54]   1040

120

488

------

958

[87]   940

1237

1404

1650

[94]   978

590

1190

-----

[71]   13087

-----

12894

-----

193''

Endorsement [1]

More likely to abstain from stopping once they get at it, until they shall have voted several times each. A.L.

Oct. 16. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, NAuE. Lincoln's endorsement (misdated October 16, 1863, in Lapsley, VI, 450) appears on a letter to Seward dated at New York on October 15, 1864, and signed with the unidentified initials ``P.J.J.'': ``On the point of leaving I am told by a gentleman to whose statements I attach Credit, that the opposition Policy for the Presidential Campaign will be to `abstain from voting.' ''

To James K. Moorhead [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. J. K. Moorehead War Department,
Pittsburgh, Pa. Washington, D.C., Oct. 16 1864.

I do not rem[em]ber about the Peter Gilner case, and must look it up before I can answer. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 206. See Lincoln to Meade, September 20, supra. James K. Moorhead telegraphed Lincoln on October 12: ``Please stay the execution of Peter Gilner sixty second (62) Pa Letter by mail'' (DLC-RTL). Moorhead's letter has not been found, but a second telegram on October 15 read: ``Have you respited or pardoned Peter Gilner ans'' (ibid.). AGO Special Orders No. 355, October 19, 1864, ordered that the unexecuted portion of Private Peter Gilner's sentence be remitted and that he be released from imprisonment and discharged the service.

Page  50

Appointment of George Harrington [1]

Washington, October 17th. 1864.

George Harrington, is hereby appointed to discharge the duties of Secretary of the Treasury, during the absence of Wm. P. Fessenden, the Secretary. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, owned by J. G. Heyn, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

To Joseph K. Barnes [1]

Surgeon General please say in writing on this whether there is, & where, a vacant Hospital chaplaincy. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 17. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, OFH. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Thaddeus Stevens, October 15, 1864, recommending ``the Revd. Mr. Bishop'' for appointment as hospital chaplain. Acting Surgeon General Charles H. Crane endorsed, ``Very respectfully returned to His Excellency the President. There is no vacancy at present in any hospital.'' The Reverend Mr. Bishop has not been further identified.

To Andrew G. Curtin [1]

Cypher Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. A. G. Curtin War Department,
Harrisburg, Pa. Washington, D.C., Oct. 17 1864.

Your information is erroneous. No part of Sheridan's force has left him, except by expiration of terms of service. I think there is not much danger of a raid into Pennsylvania. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 207. On October 17, Governor Curtin telegraphed Lincoln: ``I have information . . . that the enemy has arranged for a raid into Pennsylvania about the end of this month. Part of my information is, that Sheridan's force has been reduced to 25,000, and that the Sixth and Nineteenth Corps are under orders to join General Grant. . . . I have little doubt a serious threat, much more a raid into Pennsylvania in this month, would be followed by serious disaster. . . . Will you please to telegraph me to-day on the subject. . . . In the meantime, if my information is at all correct, vigorous measures should at once be taken. . . .'' (OR, I, XLIII, II, 392-93).

To Charles A. Dana [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Oct. 17, 1864.

Will Mr. Dana please report to me on the case of Constantine Bowling? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Dale Carnegie, New York City. Constantine Bowling has not been identified, and no report from Dana has been found.

Page  51

To Alfred B. Justice and Others [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Mr A. B. Justice & others; October 17th, 1864.

I have received at the hands of Hon. Wm. D. Kelley, a very beautiful and ingeniously constructed Pocket Knife, accompanied by your kind letter of presentation.

The gift is gratefully accepted and will be highly valued, not only as an extremely creditable specimen of American workmanship, but as a manifestation of your regard and esteem which I most cordially appreciate. Your ob't serv't A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, owned by Mrs. Alfred R. Justice, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. See the similar letter to Justice, September, supra.

To Horatio G. Wright [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Oct. 17, 1864.

S. S. Bradford, whose residence is in Culpeper Co. Va, and who is a brother-in-law, of Gen. H. G. Wright, is now on parole not to go South of Philadelphia. If Gen. Wright will request it in writing on this sheet, I will allow Mr. Bradford to go home to Culpeper.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, RPB. Major General Horatio G. Wright answered on the verso, from Headquarters, Sixth Army Corps, October 24, 1864:

``If my brother-in-law, Mr. S[laughter]. S. Bradford, shall give his parole of honor, in form satisfactory to the government, that he will remain entirely neutral, in word and act, as between the United States and the rebels, till regularly exchanged, I would ask that he be permitted to return to his home near Culpeper C. H. Va---otherwise not.

``Mr Bradford has never, as I believe, taken any active part in the present contest; and more over, I have such confidence in his integrity and sense of honor that I should unhesitatingly rely on his observing, strictly, any obligations he may take upon himself. Hence the above request.''

See Lincoln's pass for Bradford, December 21, infra.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Will Gen. Hitchcock, please see & hear the bearer, Mr. Leech.

Oct. 19. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the envelope of a letter from Richard Yates, October 3, 1864, introducing ``Mr. W. Leach, a loyal and praiseworthy citizen . . . who visits Washington to procure . . . the exchange of his Brother-in-Law Lt. A[braham]. Allee, of Co `K' 16th Ills Cavly. . . . whose health has been impaired by exposure in the field and confinement in prison . . . at Savannah Ga. . . .'' General Hitchcock wrote beneath Lincoln's endorsement, ``The undersigned feels that it would be unjust to prisoners left in the South, to recommend a special exchange except upon grounds of a public character, and such grounds do not appear in this case.'' The address of W. Leech (or Leach) is noted on the envelope as ``Lincoln, Ill.''Page  52

AGO Special Orders, No. 474, December 30, 1864, ordered Second Lieutenant Allee and other officers ``recently escaped Prisoners of War . . . to join their regiments in the field. Permission to delay reporting for thirty days, is hereby granted them.''

Response to a Serenade [1]

Friends and Fellow-citizens: [2]October 19, 1864

I am notified that this is a compliment paid me by the loyal Marylanders, resident in this District. I infer that the adoption of the new constitution for the State, furnishes the occasion; and that, in your view, the extirpation of slavery constitutes the chief merit of the new constitution. Most heartily do I congratulate you, and Maryland, and the nation, and the world, upon the event. I regret that it did not occur two years sooner, which I am sure would have saved to the nation more money than would have met all the private loss incident to the measure. But it has come at last, and I sincerely hope it's friends may fully realize all their anticipations of good from it; and that it's opponents may, by it's effects, be agreeably and profitably, disappointed.

A word upon another subject.

Something said by the Secretary of State in his recent speech at Auburn, has been construed by some into a threat that, if I shall be beaten at the election, I will, between then and the end of my constitutional term, do what I may be able, to ruin the government.

Others regard the fact that the Chicago Convention adjourned, not sine die, but to meet again, if called to do so by a particular individual, as the intimation of a purpose that if their nominee shall be elected, he will at once seize control of the government. I hope the good people will permit themselves to suffer no uneasiness on either point. I am struggling to maintain government, not to overthrow it. I am struggling especially to prevent others from overthrowing it. I therefore say, that if I shall live, I shall remain President until the fourth of next March; and that whoever shall be constitutionally elected therefor in November, shall be duly installed as President on the fourth of March; and that in the interval I shall do my utmost that whoever is to hold the helm for the next voyage, shall start with the best possible chance to save the ship.

This is due to the people both on principle, and under the constitution. Their will, constitutionally expressed, is the ultimate law for all. If they should deliberately resolve to have immediate peace even at the loss of their country, and their liberty, I know not the power or the right to resist them. It is their own business, and they must do as they please with their own. I believe, however, they arePage  53 still resolved to preserve their country and their liberty; and in this, in office or out of it, I am resolved to stand by them.

I may add that in this purpose to save the country and it's liberties, no classes of people seem so nearly unanamous as the soldiers in the field and the seamen afloat. Do they not have the hardest of it? Who should quail while they do not?

God bless the soldiers and seamen, with all their brave commanders.

Annotation

[1]   AD, MH; New York Tribune, October 20, 1864. Henry Willis, chairman of the loyal citizens of Maryland resident in the District of Columbia, wrote Lincoln on October 19, that it was the intention of the group to ``Serenade your Excellency this evening at 8 o'clock.'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   The salutation does not appear in the manuscript.

To Christopher C. Augur [1]

October 20, 1864

If not inconsistent with the service, will Gen. Augur please allow the furlough requested. The father of the boy is a domestic in my service. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 20, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NSh. The persons are unidentified.

To Isabel II [1]

October 20, 1864

Abraham Lincoln:

President of the United States of America.

To Her Majesty Doña Isabel II.

By the Grace of God and the Constitution of the Spanish Monarchy, Queen of Spain, &c. &c.

Great and Good Friend:---I have received the letter which Your Majesty was pleased to address to me on the 30th. of June last, announcing the marriage of your niece, Her Royal Highness, the Infante Doña Maria Isabel Francisca de Asis, to His Royal Highness the Count of Paris, Louis Phillippe of Orleans.

I participate in the satisfaction afforded by this happy event, and offer to Your Majesty my sincere congratulations on the occasion, and so recommend Your Majesty, and Your Majesty's Royal Family to the protection of the Almighty. Your Good Friend,

Washington, October 20th. 1864 ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA FS RG 59, Communications to Foreign Sovereigns and States, III, 242.

Page  54

To Isabel II [2]

October 20, 1864

Abraham Lincoln:

President of the United States of America.

To Her Majesty Doña Isabel II.

By the Grace of God and the Constitution of the Spanish Monarchy, Queen of Spain, &c. &c.

Great and Good Friend: I have received the letter which Your Majesty was pleased to address to me on the 12th. of March last, conveying the melancholy tidings of the decease of His Royal Highness the Infante Don Felipe Ramon Marie, Your Majesty's beloved nephew.

I participate in the grief occasioned by this sad event and offer to Your Majesty and to Your Royal household my sincere condolence.

May God have Your Majesty always in His safe and holy keeping. Your Good Friend, ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington, October 20th. 1864.

By the President,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA FS RG 59, Communications to Foreign Sovereigns and States, III, 243.

Memorandum Concerning James Hughes [1]

October 20, 1864

I am willing that any case, that of Judge Hughes as well as another, if coming within the precedent of what I call the Johnson case, may go as the Johnson case did. I really desire that Judge Hughes shall be obliged. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 20, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   ADS, owned by Richard F. Lufkin, Boston, Massachusetts. See Lincoln's recommendation for Hughes, October 22, infra, and Lincoln to Fessenden, October 3, supra.

Order Concerning Mrs. Annie Wittenmyer [1]

October 20, 1864

Let this Lady have transportation to any of the Armies, and any previleges while there, not objected to by the commanders of the armies respectively. A. LINCOLN.

Oct. 20. 1864

Page  55

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Don Knaur, Pottstown, PennsylvaniA. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of a permit signed by Edwin M. Stanton, July 25, 1862:

``Permission is hereby given to Mrs. Annie Wittenmeyer, Special Agent of the Iowa Sanitary Association, to pass with such goods as she may have in charge, to and within the lines of any of the Armies of the Departments of Kansas and of the Mississippi, for the purpose of visiting the sick and wounded soldiers of the Iowa Regiments in either of those Armies.

``Quartermasters will furnish transportation for herself and stores, and Commissaries will provide her with subsistence. It is also specially enjoined upon all officers to afford her every facility in carrying out her charitable purpose, it being shown that she is worthy of great respect.'' Surgeon General Joseph K. Barnes also endorsed the document on October 20, 1864: ``Mrs. A. Wittenmyer is specially commended to the attention and courtesy of all medical officers.'' Mrs. Wittenmyer inaugurated ``diet kitchens'' for the hospitals and organized aid for the widows and orphans of Union soldiers.

Proclamation of Thanksgiving [1]

October 20, 1864

By the President of the United States of America:

A Proclamation.

It has pleased Almighty God to prolong our national life another year, defending us with his guardian care against unfriendly designs from abroad, and vouchsafing to us in His mercy many and signal victories over the enemy, who is of our own household. It has also pleased our Heavenly Father to favor as well our citizens in their homes as our soldiers in their camps and our sailors on the rivers and seas with unusual health. He has largely augmented our free population by emancipation and by immigration, while he has opened to us new sources of wealth, and has crowned the labor of our working men in every department of industry with abundant rewards. Moreover, He has been pleased to animate and inspire our minds and hearts with fortitude, courage and resolution sufficient for the great trial of civil war into which we have been brought by our adherence as a nation to the cause of Freedom and Humanity, and to afford to us reasonable hopes of an ultimate and happy deliverance from all our dangers and afflictions.

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do, hereby, appoint and set apart the last Thursday in November next as a day, which I desire to be observed by all my fellow-citizens wherever they may then be as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to Almighty God the beneficent Creator and Ruler of the Universe. And I do farther recommend to my fellow-citizens aforesaid that on that occasion they do reverently humble themselvesPage  56 in the dust and from thence offer up penitent and fervent prayers and supplications to the Great Disposer of events for a return of the inestimable blessings of Peace, Union and Harmony throughout the land, which it has pleased him to assign as a dwelling place for ourselves and for our posterity throughout all generations.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L.S.]

Done at the city of Washington this twentieth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty four, and, of the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

By the President:

WILLIAM H SEWARD Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Proclamations. On October 9, 1864, Sarah Josepha Hale wrote Seward to remind him of the approach of Thanksgiving:

``Enclosed is an article (or proof) on the National Thanksgiving. As you were, last year, kindly interested in this subject, I venture to request your good offices again.

``My article will appear in the November number of the ``Lady's Book''; but before its publication I trust that President Lincoln will have issued his proclamation appointing the last Thursday in November as the Day.

``I send a copy of the proof for the President. You will greatly oblige me by handing this to him and acquainting him with the contents of this letter. I do not like to trouble him with a note. Should the president see fit to issue his proclamation at once, the important paper would have time to reach the knowledge of American citizens in Europe and Asia, as well as throughout our wide land. If the President should recommend that all American ministers and consuls etc---should observe the Day in their respective offices in Foreign countries would it not have a good effect on our citizens abroad? And if, on land and sea, wherever the American Flag floats over an American citizen all should be invited and unite in this National Thanksgiving, would it not be a glorious Festival?'' (DLC-RTL).

To William I [1]

October 20, 1864

Abraham Lincoln:

President of the United States of America.

To His Majesty William I.

King of Prussia, &c. &c.

Great and Good Friend: I have received the letter which Your Majesty was pleased to address to me on the 16th. ultimo, announcing the birth of a Prince to your well beloved daughter-in-law, the wife of the Prince Royal of Prussia, the Princess Victoria Adelaide Maria Louisa Princess Royal of Great Britain and Ireland and Duchess of Saxony.

Page  57I participate in the satisfaction which this happy event has afforded to Your Majesty, and to Your Majesty's Royal Family, and offer my sincere congratulations upon the occasion.

May God have Your Majesty, always in His safe and holy keeping. Your Good Friend, ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington, October 20th. 1864.

By the President,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA FS RG 59, Communications to Foreign Sovereigns and States, III, 244.

To John G. Nicolay [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
J. G. Nicolay War Department, Washington, D.C.,
St. Louis, Mo. Oct. 21. 9/45 PM 1864.

While Curtis is fighting Price have you any idea where the force under Rosecrans is? or what it is doing? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 208. No reply from Nicolay has been found. General Curtis telegraphed Halleck from ``Near Independence, Mo.'' on October 21: ``I have been fighting Price three hours on the Little Blue with my cavalry. We have a strong position fifteen miles in the rear, where I intend to make a stand. . . .'' (OR, I, XLI, IV, 163). On the same day Rosecrans was on the road to Lexington, Missouri, ``Camp near Davis' Creek'' (ibid., p. 158). Nicolay had written Lincoln an eleven-page letter reporting on Missouri affairs, from Springfield, Illinois, October 18, which would indicate that he had already left St. Louis and hence probably never received Lincoln's telegram (DLC-RTL).

Pass for Mrs. J. R. Reid [1]

October 21, 1864

Allow Mrs. J. R. Reid, with her little daughter, to pass our lines at any convenient point on or near the James River, and come to Washington. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 21. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   ADS-P, ISLA. Mrs. Reid has not been identified.

Response to a Serenade [1]

October 21, 1864

FELLOW-CITIZENS: I was promised not to be called upon for a speech to-night, nor do I propose to make one. But, as we have beenPage  58 hearing some very good news for a day or two, I propose that you give three hearty cheers for Sheridan.

While we are at it we may as well consider how fortunate it was for the Secesh that Sheridan was a very little man. If he had been a large man, there is no knowing what he would have done with them.

I propose three cheers for General Grant, who knew to what use to put Sheridan; three cheers for all our noble commanders and the soldiers and sailors; three cheers for all people everywhere who cheer the soldiers and sailors of the Union---and now, good night.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily Morning Chronicle, October 22, 1864. A torchlight parade ``passed through the grounds in front of the Presidential Mansion, where a large crowd had gathered, and kept up a continual blaze of light with rockets, bluelights, Roman-candles, &c., lighting up the upper windows under the portico, at which stood the President and `little Thad,' . . . After the procession had left the grounds, the crowd called loudly for the President, and he responded as follows: [text as above].''

To William B. Campbell and Others [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, D.C., Oct. 22, 1864.

Messrs. Wm. B. Campbell, Thos. A. R. Nelson, James T. P. Carter, John Williams, A. Blizzard, Henry Cooper, Bailie Peyton, John Lellyett, Em. Etheridge, John D. Perryman:

Gentlemen: On the 15th day of this month, as I remember, a printed paper, with a few manuscript interlineations, called a protest, with your names appended thereto, and accompanied by another printed paper purporting to be a proclamation by Andrew Johnson, Military Governor of Tennessee, and also a manuscriptPage  59Page  60Page  61Page  62 paper purporting to be extracts from the Code of Tennessee, was laid before me. The Protest, Proclamation and Extracts are respectively as follows:

To his Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States:

SIR: The undersigned, loyal citizens of the United States and of the State of Tennessee, on our own behalf and on behalf of the loyal people of our State, ask leave to submit this Protest against the Proclamation of his Excellency Andrew Johnson, Military Governor, ordering an election to be held for President and Vice President, under certain regulations and restrictions therein set forth. A printed copy of said proclamation is herewith enclosed.

The Constitution of the United States provides that ``Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors,'' &c. Under this provision of the Federal Constitution, the Legislature of Tennessee, years before the present rebellion, prescribed the mode of election to be observed, which will be found to differ essentially from the mode prescribed by the Military Governor. We herewith enclose a copy of the Law of Tennessee governing the holding of said election.

The Military Governor expressly assumes, by virtue of authority derived from the President, to so alter and amend the election law of Tennessee, (enacted under authority of the Constitution of the United States, as above set forth,) as to make the same conform to his own edict as set forth in the proclamation aforesaid.

He assumes so as to modify our law as to admit persons to vote at the said election who are not entitled to vote under the law and the Constitution of Tennessee. Instance this: our Constitution and Law require that each voter shall be ``a citizen of the county wherein he may offer his vote, for six months next preceding the day of election;'' while the Governor's order only requires that he shall (with other qualifications named) be a citizen of Tennessee for six months, &c. This provision would admit to vote many persons not entitled by law.

We will, for the sake of brevity, pass over some less important points of conflict between the proclamation and the law, but will instance in this place another. By our law it is provided that the polls shall be opened in every civil district in each county in the state; but the proclamation provides only for their being opened at one place in each county. This provision would put it out of the power of many legal voters to exercise the elective franchise.

We solemnly protest against these infringements of our law, conflicting as they do, with the very letter of the Federal Constitution, because they are without authority, and because they will prevent a free, fair, and true expression of the will of the loyal people of Tennessee.

But we protest still more emphatically against the most unusual and impracticable test oath which it is proposed to require of all citizen voters in Tennessee. A citizen qualified to vote, and whose loyalty cannot be ``disproved by other testimony,'' is to be required to swear, first, that he ``will henceforth support the Constitution of the United States, and defend it against all enemies.'' This obligation we are willing to renew daily; but this is not yet deemed a sufficient test of loyalty. He is required to make oath and subscribe to a mass of vain repetitionsPage  63 concerning his activity as a friend of the Union and the enemy of its enemies---concerning his desires his hopes and fears---and that he finds it in his heart to rejoice over the scenes of blood, and of wounds, of anguish and death, wherein his friends, his kindred, his loved ones are slain, or maimed, or made prisoners of war---whereby the land of his birth or adoption is made desolate, and lamentation and mourning are spread over the whole nation. While all the civilized world stands aghast in contemplation of the unequalled horrors of our tremendous strife, the citizen of Tennessee is called upon by her Military Governor, under your authority, to swear that in these things he finds occasion to rejoice! As if this were still not enough, the citizen is further required to swear to the indefinite prolongation of this war, as follows: ``That I will cordially oppose all armistices or negotiations for peace with rebels in arms, until the Constitution of the United States and all laws and proclamations made in pursuance thereof shall be established over all the people of every State and Territory embraced within the National Union;'' until (in brief) the war shall be at an end. Now, we freely avow to your Excellency, and to the world, that we earnestly desire the return of peace and good-will to our now unhappy country---that we seek neither pleasure, profit, nor honor in the perpetuation of war---that we should feel bound, as Christians, as patriots and as civilized men---that we are bound by the oaths we have taken---to countenance and encourage any negotiations which may be entered into by the proper authorities with the intent to restore peace and union under the Constitution we have sworn to support and defend. We should be traitors to our country, false to our oaths---false, indeed, to the primary clause of the oath we are now discussing, to oppose such negotiations. We cannot consent to swear at the ballot-box a war of extermination against our countrymen and kindred, or to prolong by our opposition, for a single day after it can be brought to an honorable and lawful conclusion, a contest the most sanguinary and ruinous that has scourged mankind.

You will not have forgotten, that in the month of July last, you issued the following proclamation:

``Executive Mansion,

``To whom it may concern: Washington, July 8 [18], 1864.

``Any proposition which embraces the restoration of peace, the integrity of the whole Union, and the abandonment of slavery, and which comes by and with an authority that can control the armies now at war against the United States, will be received and considered by the Executive Government of the United States, and will be met by liberal terms on other substantial and collateral points; and the bearer or bearers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways.

``ABRAHAM LINCOLN.''

This is certainly a proposition to treat with rebels in arms---with their chiefs. Are we now to understand by this proclamation of one acting under your authority, and himself a candidate with you for the second office, that even the above proposition is withdrawn---that you will henceforth have no negotiations upon any terms, but unrelenting war to the bitter end? Or, are we to understand, that while you hold this proposition open, or yourself free to act as your judgment may dictate,Page  64 we, the citizens of Tennessee, shall swear to OPPOSE your negotiations?

In the next breath, the voter who has been thus qualified, is required to swear that he will ``heartily aid and assist the loyal people in whatever measures may be adopted for the attainment of these ends.'' Adopted by whom? The oath does not say. We cannot tell what measures may be adopted. We cannot comment upon the absurdity of the obligation here imposed, without danger of departing from that respectful propriety of language which we desire to preserve in addressing the Chief Magistrate of the American people. But this is a clause of an oath which the candidate for the Vice Presidency requires at the lips of the loyal and qualified voters of Tennessee, before these citizens shall be allowed to vote for or against you and himself at the coming election!

For these reasons, and others, which, for the sake of brevity, we omit, we solemnly protest against the interference of the Military Governor with the freedom of the elective franchise in Tennessee. We deny his authority and yours, to alter, amend, or annul any law of Tennessee. We demand that Tennessee be allowed to appoint her Electors as expressly provided by the Federal Constitution, which you have sworn to support, protect, and defend, in the manner which the Legislature thereof has prescribed. And to that end we respectfully demand of you, as the principal under whose authority this order has been issued, that the same shall be revoked. We ask that all military interference shall be withdrawn so far as to allow the loyal men of Tennessee a full and free election. By the loyal men of Tennessee we mean those who have not participated in the rebellion, or given it aid and comfort; or who may have complied with such terms of amnesty as have been offered them under your authority.

On the 8th day of December, 1863, you, as President, issued a Proclamation, declaring that ``a full pardon is hereby granted, with restoration of all rights of property,'' &c., to each of our citizens having participated, directly or by implication, in the existing rebellion, (with certain exceptions,) ``upon the condition that every such person shall take and subscribe an oath, and thenceforward keep and maintain said oath inviolate.'' And it is further provided in the Proclamation aforesaid, that in the contingency of the reorganization of a State Government in Tennessee, or certain other States named, the persons having taken the oath referred to, being otherwise qualified by the election law of the State, shall be entitled to vote. The undersigned would state, that many of our citizens have complied in good faith with the terms of amnesty proposed in your Proclamation aforesaid; and are, therefore, by reason of the full pardon granted them, fully entitled to vote and exercise all other rights belonging to loyal citizens, without let or hindrance; and we respectfully appeal to you, as President of the United States, to make good your promise of pardon to these citizens, by the removal of all other and further hindrance to their exercise of the elective franchise.

But if it be claimed upon the plea of military necessity, that guards and restrictions shall be thrown around the ballot-box in Tennessee, we still ask the withdrawal of the Proclamation of the Military Governor, because the conditions thereby imposed upon the loyal men of Tennessee as a qualification for voting, are irrelevant, unreasonable,Page  65 and not in any sense a test of loyalty. But they pledge the citizen to oppose the lawful authorities in the discharge of their duty. The oath required is only calculated to keep legal and rightful voters from the polls. We suggest that no oath be required but such as is prescribed by law. Our people will not hesitate, however, to take the usual oath of loyalty---for example, in the language of the primary clause of the oath in question: ``That I will henceforth support the Constitution of the United States, and defend it against the assaults of its enemies.'' Denying your right to make any departure from the law in the case, we shall, however, feel no hardship in this.

The convention to which Governor Johnson refers was a mere partisan meeting, having no authority, and not representing the loyal men of Tennessee, in any sense.

The names of the signers of this protest have been placed before the people of Tennessee as candidates for Electors, who, if chosen, are expected to cast the electoral vote of Tennessee for George B. McClellan for President, and George H. Pendleton for Vice President. By virtue of such position, it becomes our province especially to appear before you in the attitude we do. We are aware that grave questions may arise, in any event, with regard to the regularity of the vote in Tennessee, in consequence of the partially disorganized condition of the State. The friends of your re-election, however, announced an electoral ticket; and the public became aware that preparations were being made for the holding of the election, leaving that matter no longer a question. Some time thereafter, our electoral ticket was placed before the public, and within a few days followed the proclamation complained of. We, for ourselves and those we represent, are willing to leave all questions involving the right of Tennessee to participate in the election to the decision of competent authority.

For the State at Large.

WM. B. CAMPBELL, of Wilson County.

THOS. A. R. NELSON, of Washington county.

For the Districts.

JAMES T. P. CARTER, of Carter county.

JOHN WILLIAMS, of Knox county.

A. BLIZARD, of McMinn county.

HENRY COOPER, of Bedford county.

BAILIE PEYTON, of Sumner county.

JOHN LELLYETT, of Davidson county.

EM. ETHERIDGE, of Weakley county.

JOHN D. PERRYMAN, of Shelby county.

PROCLAMATION.

BY THE GOVERNOR.

State of Tennessee,

Nashville, Tenn. Sept 30th, 1864. Executive Department,

Whereas, a respectable portion of the loyal people of Tennessee, representing a large number of the counties of the State, and supposed toPage  66 reflect the will of the Union men in their respective counties, recently held a convention in the city of Nashville, in which, among other things touching the re-organization of the State, they with great unanimity adopted the following resolutions:

2. Resolved, That the people of Tennessee who are now and have been attached to the National Union, do hold an election for President and Vice President in the ensuing election in November.

3. That the electors shall be the following and no others; the same being free white men, twenty-one years of age, citizens of the United States, and for six months previous to the election, citizens of the State of Tennessee---

1st. All who have voluntarily borne arms in the service of the United States during the present war, and who are either in the service or have been honorably discharged.

2d. All the known active friends of the Government of the United States in each county.

4. Resolved, That the citizen electors designated in the foregoing resolutions shall, at least fifteen days before the election, register their names with an agent to be appointed for that purpose, and no citizen not thus registered shall be allowed to vote. Such registration shall be open to the public for inspection, and to be executed according to such regulations as may hereafter be prescribed: Provided that the officers of the election, in the discharge of their duty, may reject any party so registered on proof of disloyalty.

5. Resolved, That, as means for ascertaining the qualification of the voters, the registers and officers holding the election may examine the parties on oath touching any matter of fact. And each voter, before depositing his vote, shall be required to take and subscribe the following oath, viz:

I solemnly swear that I will henceforth support the Constitution of the United States, and defend it against the assaults of all enemies; that I am an active friend of the Government of the United States, and the enemy of the so-called Confederate States; that I ardently desire the suppression of the present rebellion against the Government of the United States; that I sincerely rejoice in the triumph of the armies and navies of the United States, and in the defeat and overthrow of the armies, navies, and of all armed combinations in the interest of the socalled Confederate States; that I will cordially oppose all armistices or negotiations for peace with rebels in arms, until the Constituion of the United States and all laws and proclamations made in pursuance thereof, shall be established over all the people of every State and Territory embraced within the National Union, and that I will heartily aid and assist the loyal people in whatever measures may be adopted for the attainment of these ends; and further, that I take this oath freely and voluntarily, and without mental reservation. So help me God.

Said oath being prima facie evidence, subject to be disapproved by other testimony.

6. Resolved, That the polls be opened at the county seat, or some other suitable place in each county, and the ballot-box be so guarded and protected as to secure to electors a free, fair, and impartial election, and that polls also be opened for the convenience of the soldiers, at such places as may be accessible to them.

Page  67And whereas, it further appears from the proceedings of said Convention, ``That the Military Governor of the State of Tennessee is requested to execute the foregoing resolutions in such manner as he may think best subserves the interests of the Government.''

And whereas I, Andrew Johnson, Military Governor of the State of Tennessee, being anxious to co-operate with the loyal people of the State, and to encourage them in all laudable efforts to restore the State to law and order again, and to secure the ballot-box against the contamination of treason by every reasonable restraint that can be thrown around it, I do therefore order and direct that an election for President and Vice President of the United States of America be opened and held at the county seat, or other suitable place in every county in the State of Tennessee, upon the first Tuesday after the first Monday in the month of November next, at which all citizens and soldiers, being free white men, twenty-one years of age, citizens of the United States, and for six months prior to the election citizens of the State of Tennessee, who have qualified themselves by registration, and who take the oath prescribed in the foregoing resolutions, shall be entitled to vote, unless said oath shall be disproved by other testimony, for the candidates for President and Vice President of the United States.

And to the end that the foregoing resolutions, which are made part of this proclamation, may be faithfully executed, and the local citizens of the State, and none others, be permitted to exercise the right of suffrage I do hereby appoint the several gentlemen whose names are affixed to this proclamation, to aid in said election, and superintend the registration of the loyal voters in their respective counties, as provided by the fourth resolution above quoted.

But as the day of election is near at hand, and there may be a difficulty in completing the registration within the time limited, it is not intended that the registration be an indispensable prerequisite to the qualification of the voter; and in such cases, where it is impracticable, and where the voter is of known and established loyalty, he shall be entitled to vote, notwithstanding he may not have registered his name as required by the foregoing resolution.

The election shall be opened, conducted, returns made, &c., in all respects as provided by the 4th chapter of the ``Code of Tennessee,'' except so far as the same is modified by this proclamation.

But in cases where the County Court fail or neglect to appoint inspectors or judges of election, and there is no sheriff or other civil officer in the county qualified by law to open and hold said election, the registrating agents, hereto appended, may act in his stead, and in all respects discharge the duties imposed in such cases upon sheriffs.

In like manner it is declared the duty of the military officers commanding Tennessee regiments, battalions, or detached squads, and surgeons in charge of the hospitals of Tennessee soldiers, to open and hold elections on the day aforesaid, under the same rules and regulations hereinbefore prescribed, and at such suitable places as will be convenient to the soldiers, who are hereby declared entitled to vote without oath or registration.

In testimony whereof, I, Andrew Johnson, Military Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereunto set my hand, and have caused the Great

Page  68Seal of the State to be affixed at this Department, on the 30th day of September, A.D. 1864.

By the Governor: ANDREW JOHNSON. [L. S.]

Attest: EDWARD H. EAST, Secretary of State.

EAST TENNESSEE COUNTIES.

Anderson---John Leinart, Henry Hollaway, John Baker.

Bledsoe---William Foster, Frank Bridgeman.

Blount---Horace Foster, Stephen Mathis, James Henry, Jr.

Bradley---K. Clingam, W. R. Davis, John McPherson, A. J. McCaullie.

Campbell---John Preston, Reuben Rogers, Pryor Perkins.

Carter---Pleasant Williams, (of Stony Creek,) Elijah Simerly, Jones Smith.

Claiborne---Cannady Rodgers, Wm. D. Eppes, Ferney Jones.

Cocke---Jacob Reagan, Andrew Huff, Lt. Worthington, Sheriff Smith.

Cumberland---James Hamby, Thomas B. Swan, James H. Hamby.

Fentress---Henry Williams, Dr. J. D. Hale, David Baty, Rufus Dowdy.

Granger---John F. Nov, Anderson Acuff, M. Goldman.

Greene---R. C. Carter, Calvin Smith, Anderson W. Walker, James H. Reeves.

Hancock---Wm. Gilbert, Elbert Campbell, Isaac Campbell, Capt. Lewis Jarvis.

Hamilton---Col. C. C. McCaleb, Abe Pearson, Wash Evans.

Hawkins---Wm. D. Kanner, R. G. Wetherland, W. W. Willis.

Jefferson---J. Duffell Rankin, Press Swan, Wm. Harris, Duff G. Thornburgh.

Johnson---Col. R. R. Butler, Col. Sam Howard, Col. James Grayson.

Knox---Capt. Thos. Stephens, Andrew L. Knott, Wm. Hofner, Samuel McCammon.

Marion---Alexander Kelley, Robert Ralston, Pleasant Pryor, Wm. Pryor, Esq.

McMinn---James M. Henderson, John Mc---, G. W. Ross, F. B. McElwee.

Meigs---Wm. Adams, F. J. Mathis, Col. A. Cox, Robert Allen, James Gettys.

Monroe---Joseph Divine, Henry Duggan, Daniel Heiskell.

Morgan---James Langley, Sr., James Langley, Jr., S. C. Hunnycutt.

Overton---Rob't Smith, Anderson Winham, Geo. W. Bowman, Ellison Gussett.

Polk---Gen. James Gamble, Col. John Elliot, Charles McClary.

Rhea---Capt. J. B. Walker, Wm. H. Lowe, Samuel Lowe.

Roane---Joe D. Turner, Wm. Lowery, Wm. M. Alexander, J. Christopher Ables, Allen Robb, Sam. L. Childress.

Scott---Balie Putnam, Craven Duncan, James Lay.

Seviere---Col. Wm. Pickens, Reuben Hines, David McCroskey, Lemuel Dungan.

Sullivan---E. A. Millard, Wm. Mullenax, Esq., Enoch Shipley.

Union---James W. Turner, John Bayless, Calvin Monroe.

Washington---Calvin Hoes, John Mahoney, B. F. Swingle.

Sequatchie---Washington Hurd, Daniel McWilliams, B. F. Smith.

Page  69MIDDLE TENNESSEE COUNTIES,

Bedford---Joseph Thompson, Richard Phillips, Wm. T. Tune, Rob't T. Cannon.

Cannon---Hiram Morris, William Barten.

Cheatham---Warren Jordan.

Coffee---John F. Thomas.

Davidson---John Carper, Charles Sayers, Gen. J. Stubblefield, James Warren, T. J. Yarbrough, L. D. Wheeler, P. T. Phillips, J. B. Canfield, James Davis, W. W. Garrett.

DeKalb---William Hathaway, Wm. Blackburn, Andrew J. Garrison.

Dickson---Marsh Binkley.

Franklin---

Giles---J. C. Walker, Edward W. Rose, J. W. Alley, R. J. Gorden.

Grundy---William McCran, John Myers.

Hickman---

Humphreys---Wm. McKimmons, Wilkins Waggoner, David R. Owen, J. S. Spane, T. J. Winfrey, Mr. Thomas.

Jackson---James McKinney, John Gillem, Allen Davis.

Lawrence---

Lewis---

Lincoln---J. H. Fulgham, James T. Kirkpatrick.

Macon---Pleasant Chitwood, L. S. Clements, Geo. W. Clements.

Marshall---A. A. Steele

Maury---W. W. Jones, John D. Moore, John H. Campbell.

Montgomery---O. M. Blackman, Caleb Jones, D. S. Nye, Isaiah Barbee, Thomas F. Betters, Geo. Hampton.

Berry---W. O. Britt, F. M. Brasher, Jackson Taylor, J. S. Webb, A. H. Eathers.

Putnam---Joseph Rhea McColet.

Robertson---B. F. Aurt, Wiley Woodward, Jos. Starks.

Rutherford---Edward Jordan, Wm. Spence, Wm. C. Burt, James H. Carlton.

Smith---John W. Bowen, Asberry Griffin, Francis M. McKee.

Summer---

Stewart---

Van Buren---

Warren---Samuel Henderson, Dr. J. B. Armstrong, Sam L. Colville, Miles Bonner.

White---Edward D. Pennington, Alex. Payne, James Coety

Williamson---A. W. Moss, Wm. P. Campbell, Franklin Hardeman, Wm. S. Campbell.

Wilson---Wm. Waters, Wm. J. Waters.

Wayne---Theodore H. Gibbs, Jas. Dougherty, F. Hall, Jasper Lypert, John Stamps.

WEST TENNESSEE COUNTIES

Benton---David Brewer, Allen Bearsons, David Little, Abraham Gussett, Sam. Tippett.

Carroll---Young W. Allen, John Wood, John Norman, Lucian Hawkins, Isaac Bouch.

Dyer---William Wesson.

Page  70Decatur---John Stegall, Simon Bonman, G. Menzies, James Roberts, W. H. Johnson.

Fayette---

Gibson---

Haywood---

Henderson---Robert Kizer, James Hart, James Smith.

Hardeman---

Henry---Anderson---, Dr. J. W. Mathewson, Charles White, Temple Cowan.

Hardin---Thomas Maxwell, Michell Hood, Bailey Hinkell.

Lauderdale---

Madison---T. Skurlock.

McNairy---Wm. Scayne, John Barnes,---Gregg.

Obion---Dr. S. R. Chapin.

Shelby---J. B. Bingham, G. B. Ware, A. Gregg.

Tipton---

Weakley ---J. W. Hays, Wm. Bell

EXTRACTS FROM CODE OF TENNESSEE.---

CHAPTER 4.

Of the Electors of President and Vice President

913. Each congressional district shall be an electoral district, and one Elector shall reside in each of said districts.

914. There shall be two Electors for the State who may reside in any part of the State.

915. Any citizen qualified by law to vote for members of the General Assembly, may vote for the whole number of Electors.

916. Said qualified voters shall meet at the places appointed by law for holding elections in every county, on the first Tuesday next after the first Monday in the month of November, in the years in which the President and Vice President are to be elected, and vote for a number of Electors equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State is entitled in Congress.

917. The officer or person holding the election shall advertise at the court house in every county, and in every civil district of the county, the day on which said election shall take place, at least sixty days before the time of holding it.

918. The county court of every county shall appoint judges for every place of voting in the county, all of whom shall be sworn to conduct said election in the manner prescribed for electing members of the General Assembly.

919. If the county court neglect to appoint judges of the said elections, or those appointed refuse to act, the officer holding the election shall appoint judges out of the by-standers to hold the same.

920. [Of clerks and their qualifications.] [2]

921. The election shall be conducted in the manner prescribed for electing members of the General Assembly.

[The other sections of this chapter prescribe rules concerning thePage  71 comparison of polls, statements of same, returns, comparisons of returns, proceedings of Electors, vacancy, time of meeting to vote, certificate of voting, messenger, certificate by mail, lists of electors, and penalties on officers.] [3]

Qualification of Voters for Members of the General Assembly Referred to in Sec. 915 Above.

``Every free white man of the age of twenty-one years, being a citizen of the United States, and a citizen of the county where he may offer his vote, six months next preceding the day of election, shall be entitled to vote for members of the General Assembly.''---Code, Sec. 833, and Const. of Tenn., Art. 4, Sec. 1.

Plans of Holding Elections, Referred to in Sec. 916, Above.

``The places of holding elections shall be in each civil district, at some convenient locality, to be designated by the county court at least six months before the election, and entered on record.''---Code 837.

EXTRACTS FROM CODE.---ART. VI.

Officers of Popular Elections, Referred to in Sec. 917 Above.

839. The sheriff, or, if he is a candidate, the coroner, or if there be no coroner, some person appointed by the county court, shall hold all popular elections; and said officer or person shall appoint a sufficient number of deputies to hold said elections.

841. The county court, at the session next preceding the day of election, shall appoint three inspectors or judges for each voting place, to superintend the election.

842. If the county court fail to make the appointment, or any person appointed refuse to serve, the sheriff, with the advice of three justices, or, if none be present, three respectable freeholders, shall, before the beginning of the election, appoint said inspectors or judges.

843. If the sheriff, or other officer whose duty it is to attend at a particular place of voting under the foregoing provisions, fail to attend, any justice of the peace present, or, if no justice of the peace be present, any three freeholders may perform the duties prescribed by the preceding sections, or in case of necessity may act as officers or inspectors.

At the time these papers were presented as before stated, I had never seen either of them, nor heard of the subject to which they relate, except in a general way, only one day previously. Up to the present moment nothing whatever upon the subject has passed between Governor Johnson or anyone else connected with the proclamation and myself. Since receiving the papers as stated, I have given the subject such brief consideration as I have been able to do in the midst of so many pressing public duties. My conclusion is that I can have nothing to do with the matter, either to sustain the plan as the Convention and Governor Johnson have initiated it, or to revoke or modify it as you demand. By the Constitution andPage  72 laws the President is charged with no duty in the conduct of a presidential election in any State; nor do I, in this case, perceive any military reason for his interference in the matter. The movement set on foot by the Convention and Governor Johnson does not, as seems to be assumed by you, emanate from the National Executive. In no proper sense can it be considered other than as an independent movement of at least a portion of the loyal people of Tennessee. I do not perceive in the plan any menace of violence or coercion towards any one. Governor Johnson, like any other loyal citizen of Tennessee, has the right to favor any political plan he chooses, and, as Military Governor, it is his duty to keep the peace among and for the loyal people of the State. I cannot discern that by this plan he purposes any more. But you object to the plan. Leaving it alone will be your perfect security against it. It is not proposed to force you into it. Do as you please on your own account peacefully and loyally, and Governor Johnson will not molest you; but will protect you against violence so far as in his power.

I presume that the conducting of a Presidential election in Tennessee in strict accordance with the old code of the State is not now a possibility. It is scarcely necessary to add that if any election shall be held, and any votes shall be cast in the State of Tennessee for President and Vice President of the United States, it will belong, not to the military agents, nor yet to the Executive Department, but exclusively to another department of the Government, to determine whether they are entitled to be counted, in conformity with the Constitution and laws of the United States. Except it be to give protection against violence, I decline to interfere in any way with any presidential election. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Washington National Republican, October 22, 1864. John Lellyett's account of the presentation of the protest is given in a letter to the editor of the New York World, October 15, 1864, which appeared in the World on October 18:

``I called upon the President to-day and presented and read to him the subjoined protest. Having concluded, Mr. Lincoln responded:

`` `May I inquire how long it took you and the New-York politicians to concoct that paper?'

``I replied, `It was concocted in Nashville, without communication with any but Tennesseans. We communicated with citizens of Tennessee, outside of Nashville, but not with New-York politicians.'

`` `I will answer', said Mr. Lincoln emphatically, `that I expect to let the friends of George B. McClellan manage their side of this contest in their own way; and I will manage my side of it in MY way.'

`` `May we ask an answer in writing,' I suggested.

`` `Not now. Lay those papers down here. I will give no other answer now. I may or may not write something about this hereafter. I understand this. I know you intend to make a point of this. But go ahead, you have my answer.'

`` `Your answer then is that you expect to let General McClellan's friends manage their side of this contest in their own way, and you will manage your side of it in your way?'

`` `Yes.'

``I then thanked the President for his courtesy in giving us a hearing at all, and took my leave.

``Judge [Charles] Mason, of this city, was present at the interview, to whom I refer in regard to the correctness of this report. On stepping outside of the door of the executive mansion I immediately wrote down the President's emphatic response, and submitted it to Judge Mason and another gentleman who happened to be present, and they both pronounced it accurate.

``And now I have a word to say to the people of the United States, who are, or ought to be, the masters of Abraham Lincoln. The paper which I had the honor to present to the President is not the `concoction of New-York politicians,' however that might affect its merits. It is the solemn voice of a once free and proud people, protesting against their own disfranchisement by the agent of Abraham Lincoln. It is the voice of those loyal men in Tennessee who have borne the reproach of a people they still loved, supporting the President in all lawful efforts to preserve the Union. The reward of our loyalty is disfranchisement. The cup of perjury is commended to our lips, because it is known that we will not touch its contents. Judge ye between the people of Tennessee and Abraham Lincoln. It may be meet that our solemn and respectful appeal should be thrown aside with a contemptuous sneer. Look to it. If you, the people of the Northern states, shall sustain this act of tyranny, your own time will soon come. If the President of the United States may `manage his side of this contest' by setting aside the very letter of the Constitution, and altering the election laws of the state so as to disfranchise his opponents, liberty is already dead.''

The reply to Lincoln's communication, signed by Campbell, Peyton, and Lellyett, appeared in the World on election day, November 8:

``To Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States.

SIR: Your letter in reply to the Tennessee protest has reached us, and has, no doubt, been read by the people. The argument on this subject is nearly exhausted, but we have some additional and most important facts to submit to the people, in further elucidation of the subject. Our wonder is not excited to learn that you had not seen the proclamation of Governor Johnson, and scarcely heard of it until presented by us. It is an evil of no small magnitude, connected with your administration, that military subordinates assume despotic powers without asking the sanction of their superiors---even presuming to give law to the people by proclamation and to repeal and modify our laws at will. The idea that the President himself can make, or repeal, or modify a law of the land, state or national, constitutional or statutory, though freely practiced upon by yourself, is a doctrine of despotism in `irrepressible conflict' with the principles of public liberty. And when these things are done by subordinates, the evil becomes intolerably oppressive, and calls for the firmest and most active lawful resistance which a people deserving to be free can offer.

``You tell us that `the movement set on foot by the convention and Governor Johnson does not, as seems to be assumed by you, emanate from the national executive.' What we did assume is, that the plan was promulgated by proclamation of the military governor, who has no authority but that derived directly from you, and it was given the force of law by his edict. It thus became indirectly your act; and now that you decline to order the edict to be recalled or modified, it becomes your own as fully as if it had emanated from you. `In no proper sense,' you say, `can it be considered other than an independent movement of at least a portion of the loyal people of Tennessee.' Independent of what? Manifestly independent of all lawful authority---independent of and at war with the federal Constitution, which you have both sworn to support, protect, and defend.

What right has a citizen or officer to favor an `independent movement' at variance with the Constitution, and support the same by force of arms? What less is this than waging war against the Constitution of the United States, and the government established thereby? `An independent movement' against the Constitution, supported by a military governor by force of arms, recommended by an assembly calling itself a convention. Such in principle were the `independent movements' of governors and `portions of the people' which set at first in motion the great rebellion in the South with which we are contending. The `convention' calls upon a military governor to order an `independent movement' to help your re-election, and to support it by force of arms, placing `guards' around the ballot-box. And their recommendation is adopted by the military governor and `made' by him `part of his proclamation.' And yet you say, `I do not perceive in the plan any menace of coercion or violence toward any one.' Just so with the earlier `independent movement' of Governor [Isham G.] Harris in this state, which we opposed as we oppose this. There was no menace of coercion or violence toward any who should consent to see the Constitution violated and the `political plan' carried out without opposition. But the bayonet was kept in view, as it is in this case. Public meetings were menaced, and perhaps broken up by armed force. And so it is now. Those opposed to the `independent movement' were denounced as traitors, and so they are now. Troops from our own and from other states were used to overawe the people, and so they are now. We had vigilance committees and mob violence then. We have now secret leagues, and are liable at any time to arbitrary arrest, as well as to mob violence, which is now used in our midst.

``These are general facts, in support of which we add the following specifications: We have held a number of peaceable and loyal public meetings in this city, more than one of which has been `menaced' by your partisans. On the 21st instant such a meeting was held at the court-house in this city. It was held `peacefully' and conducted `loyally,' the assembly consisting chiefly of the `friends of George B. McClellan.' A number of provost guards were present, by request of those who conducted the meeting, to preserve order. The meeting had been addressed by a gentleman who is an exile from his home because of his loyalty, and who has spent much time in the military service of the government during the war. One of the undersigned, a McClellan elector (Hon. Balie Peyton), had taken the stand to address the meeting, when the hall was suddenly entered by a large party of soldiers, and the meeting violently broken up. These men rushed in with guns and drawn pistols, crying, `disperse you d---d rebels and traitors,' extinguishing the lights and driving the people from the hall.

``We specify further that on the 25th instant the rioters, thirty in number, published a card in the Nashville Times, the organ in this city of Governor Johnson, to which they append their names, as `all members of Company D, First Tennessee light artillery.' This company was raised and its officers appointed (as we understand) under the superintendence of Governor Johnson. The rioters speak thus in their card: `Neither Governor Johnson, nor any other individual outside of the men who were active participants, knew anything of our intention till the affair was over. Some colored men may have followed us, but we knew nothing of them.' `We do not fear a court-martial;' they defiantly add, `and therefore cheerfully give our names as loyal and Union-loving soldiers.'

``We specify further that on the evening of the 24th instant, only three days after the McClellan meeting was broken up, our streets were paraded by an immense procession of negroes, bearing torches and transparencies, with such inscriptions on the latter as `Lincoln and Johnson,' `Liberty or Death.' Some disorders occurred in connection with this demonstration, and shots were freely fired by the negroes---some at a window where white persons were standing, and some at persons on the streets. One of the latter (an employe of the government) was dangerously, if not mortally, wounded, and it was thought others were hit.

In the course of these orgies the procession waited on Governor Andrew Johnson, at the Capitol, and he delivered to the negro assembly an address. A report of his speech was published and republished in his organ, the Times, and from that report we take the following extract. Governor Johnson says:

`` `I speak to night as a citizen of Tennessee. I am here on my own soil, and mean to remain here, and fight this great battle of freedom through to the end. Loyal men, from this day forward, are to be the controllers of Tennessee's grand and sublime destiny, and rebels must be dumb. We will not listen to their counsels. Nashville is no longer the place for them to hold their meetings. Let them gather their treasonable conclaves elsewhere---among their friends in the confederacy. They shall not hold their conspiracies in Nashville.'

``The language of the rioters, `Disperse rebels and traitors,' and the common application of such terms of abuse and terror to the friends of General McClellan here, do not admit of our ignoring the meaning of Governor Johnson in the language quoted. The allusion is evidently to the riotous dispersion of our meeting three evenings previous. He also seems to adopt your idea that, as a citizen of Tennessee, he `has the right to favor any political plan he chooses.' And he unmistakably evinces his determination to `manage' his `side of this contest in his own way.'

`` `Governor Johnson,' you say, `like any other loyal citizen, has a right to favor any political plan he chooses.' We do not so read the duty of the citizen. Some of the political plans of our day are devised to overturn the Constitution and government of the United States---and this is one of them. The southern rebellion is another. Neither the citizens nor Governor Johnson has a right to favor such plans, unless it be upon the principle advanced by you as a member of Congress, that `any people, any where, being inclined, and having the power, have the right' to revolutionize, their government; that `this is a most valuable, a most sacred right.' We shall despair of the republic if these principles of anarchy, as embodied in you, shall be adopted by the people in your re-election.

``In the face of the reign of terror which has been established in Tennessee under the eyes of Governor Johnson, you say to us: `Do as you please, on your own account, peacefully and loyally, and Governor Johnson will not molest you, but will protect you against violence so far as is in his power.' If you mean that Governor Johnson will allow us to stay away from the polls without molestation, we trust there is some truth in your assurance. But if you mean to suggest that we hold separate elections `on our own account,' and to assure us that we shall not be molested but protected in such a `movement,' we know by experience, and by the facts above set forth, that your assurance is a cruel mockery. We will not advise our citizens to put in jeopardy their lives in going through the farce you propose, of holding an election under the laws at one ballot-box, while Governor Johnson holds an election under his `plan' at another. Too many unoffending citizens have already been murdered in our streets by negro soldiers---too many reputable women have been insulted by them. We do not wish to provoke further outrage. There will be no election for President in Tennessee in 1864. You and Governor Johnson may `manage your side of it in your own way,' but it will be no election.

``After consultation with our friends, therefore, in different parts of the state, and having communicated with nearly all of our colleagues, we respectfully announce to the people of Tennessee that in view of what is set forth above---in view of the fact that our people are overawed by military power, the laws set aside and violated with impunity---and in view of the fact that we have appealed in vain to the President whose duty it is to `see that the laws be faithfully executed,' and that those who act by his authority shall hold sacred the liberties of the people; in view of these things we announce that the McClellan electoral ticket in Tennessee is withdrawn. ``W. B. CAMPBELL, of Wilson county,

``Nashville, October 29.'' ``BAILIE PEYTON, of Sumner county,

``JOHN LELLYETT, of Davidson county.''

[2]   Brackets are in the source.

[3]   Brackets are in the source.

To James B. Fry [1]

Will the Provost-Marshal General, please see & hear. Capt. Muzzy, for whom it seems is sought a place in the Veteran Reserve Corps.

Oct. 22, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by R. E. Burdick, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter of Governor Oliver P. Morton to Fry, October 17, 1864, introducing ``L[eonard]. F. Muzzy, late Captain in the 114th Ohio Vols.'' No record has been found of Muzzy's appointment to the Veteran Reserve Corps.

Pass for Joseph J. Neave and William Norton [1]

October 22, 1864

These Friends, Joseph J. Neave and William Norton, reside in England and wish to visit the Friends in North Carolina. AllowPage  73 them to pass, with ordinary baggage, to Gen. Grant's Head Quarters, and by his consent through our lines. A. LINCOLN.

Oct. 22, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Catalog, December 3, 1923, No. 557. See Lincoln's pass for King, October 25, infra.

To William Price [1]

William Price Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
District Attorney War Department,
Baltimore, Md Washington, D.C., Oct. 22 1864.

Yours received. Will see you any time when you present yourself. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 209. William Price telegraphed Lincoln on October 22, 1864: ``Information has this moment come into my possession which I think ought to be communicated at once to the Govt. I will leave Baltimore in the three thirty (3 30) PM train for Washington & be accompanied by three (3) persons Can we have an interview with the Prest in the evening & what hour'' (DLC-RTL).

Recommendation for James Hughes [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Oct 22, 1864.

James Hughes of Indiana is a worthy gentleman and a friend, whom I wish to oblige.

He desires to trade in southern products, and all officers of the Army and Navy and other agents of the government will afford him such protection and such facilities of transportation, and otherwise in such business as can be consistently done with the regulations of trade and with the public service.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL. See also Lincoln's memorandum concerning Hughes, October 20, supra. Two drafts of orders to Treasury agents and to Army and Navy officers, dated October 21, 1864, which give substantially the same directions contained in this copy, were apparently never issued (ibid.), but were discarded in favor of the less peremptory recommendation.

To Philip H. Sheridan [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Major General Sheridan Oct. 22. 1864

With great pleasure I tender to you and your brave army, the thanks of the Nation, and my own personal admiration and gratitude,Page  74 for the month's operations in the Shenandoah Valley; and especially for the splendid work of October 19, 1864. Your Obt. Servt. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC; ADfS, DLC-RTL. On October 19, following Sheridan's famous ``ride'' from Winchester, Virginia, to rally his defeated army, the Union forces routed the Confederates at Cedar Creek to conclude the Shenandoah Valley campaign.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

October 22, 1864

Judge Hughes leaves these letters with me, requesting me to lay them before the Sec. of War, and to state that he Judge Hughes is opposed, in toto to the proposition contained in Davis letters.

Oct. 22, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of Edwin A. Davis of Indianapolis to Judge James Hughes, October 14, 1864, asking attention to an enclosed letter of Andrew Humphreys to Stanton: ``Humphreys has an idea that you would give the matter personal attention as a favor to him.'' Humphreys' letter is not present but probably referred to his arrest and trial by a military commission at Indianapolis in September, 1864, on charges of disloyalty and conspiracy against the government. Found guilty and sentenced to confinement at hard labor during the war, Humphreys' sentence was remitted by General Alvin P. Hovey: `` . . . as the evidence does not show that . . . Andrew Humphreys took any active part or committed any overt acts which were calculated to incite an insurrection or aid the conspiracy . . .'' (Headquarters District of Indiana, January 2, 1865, General Orders No. 1, OR, II, VIII, 11). See further Lincoln's telegram to Hooker, January 11, 1865, infra.

To George H. Thomas [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Thomas War Department,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, D.C., Oct. 23. 1864.

I received information to-day, having great appearance of authenticity, that there is to be rebel raid into Western Kentucky---that it is to consist of four thousand Infantry, and three thousand Cavalry, and is to start from Corinth, Mississippi on the fourth day of November. A. LINCOLN

Send copy to Gen. Washburne [2] at Memphis. A.L.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 210. General Thomas telegraphed Halleck at 9:30 P.M.: ``The dispatch of the President of to-day, concerning the threatened raid into Western Kentucky, has been received. I will gain all the information I can about the rumor, and prepare to prevent its being carried into execution. . . .'' (OR, I, XXXIX, III, 408).

[2]   Cadwallader C. Washburn was in command of the District of West Tennessee, Department of the Tennessee.

Page  75

Pass for Mr. Livingston [1]

Allow the bearer, Mr. Livingston, to have transportation, and pass to Gen. Grant's Head Quarters and return.

Oct. 24. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, CSmH. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of an envelope addressed to Brigadier General Daniel H. Rucker. Mr. Livingston was probably H.P. Livingston. See Lincoln to Seward, November 17, 1864.

Speech to One Hundred Eighty-Ninth New York Volunteers [1]

October 24, 1864

SOLDIERS: I am exceedingly obliged to you for this mark of respect. It is said that we have the best Government the world ever knew, and I am glad to meet you, the supporters of that Government. To you who render the hardest work in its support should be given the greatest credit. Others who are connected with it, and who occupy higher positions, their duties can be dispensed with, but we cannot get along without your aid. While others differ with the Administration, and, perhaps, honestly, the soldiers generally have sustained it; they have not only fought right, but, so far as could be judged from their actions, they have voted right, and I for one thank you for it. I know you are en route for the front, and therefore do not expect me to detain you long, and will therefore bid you good morning.

Annotation

[1]   New York Times, October 25, 1864. ``The One Hundred and Eighty-ninth Regiment New-York Volunteers, organized under the late call for 500,000 men . . . passed through this city [Washington] to-day, on their way to the front. Prior to their departure by transport, the regiment was paraded in front of the White House, and presented to the President. . . .'' (Ibid.).

To John F. Miller [1]

Executive Mansion
Officer in Command at Washington D.C.
Nashville, Tenn. Oct. 25, 1864.

Suspend execution of Young C. Edmonson, until further order from me. Answer if you receive this. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 211. See Lincoln to Miller, October 5, supra. Brigadier General John F. Miller replied the same day: ``Your order suspending execution of Young C. Edmonton [sic] received'' (DLC-RTL).

Page  76

Pass for Francis T. King [1]

Allow Francis T. King of Baltimore, to pass with the English Friends, through our lines to North Carolina. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 25. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, NcGu. See Lincoln's pass for Neave and Norton, October 22, supra.

To Gilbert P. Robinson [1]

Lieut. Col. Robinson Executive Mansion
of 3rd. Maryland Battallion Washington,
Near Petersburg, Va. Oct. 25. 1864

Please inform me what is the condition of, and what is being done with, Leut. Charles Saumenig, in your command.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 212. No reply from Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert P. Robinson has been found. The roster of Company A of the Third Maryland Infantry lists First Lieutenant Charles Saumenig as discharged on December 29, 1864.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

October 25, 1864

The bearer, Mr. Alderson, says he has good recommendations, among others, from Senator Henderson, on file at the War Department. If so, I shall be glad for him to get some suitable situation.

Oct. 25, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Miss Nellie W. Donley, Morgantown, West Virginia. Alderson has not been identified.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Judge Advocate General please examine and report

Oct. 26. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, MM 1421. Lincoln's endorsement is written on an envelope filed with the record of John Scally, citizen of Maryland, convicted on charges of recruiting for the rebel army and sentenced to imprisonment for two years. The record shows Holt's recommendation of rigid enforcement on April 24, and affirmation of his recommendation on October 31, 1864.

Order for Discharge of Big Eagle [1]

Let the Indian ``Big Eagle'' now confined at Davenport, Iowa, be discharged at once. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 26. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS-P, ISLA. See further Lincoln's telegram to Alfred Sully, November 19, infra.

Page  77

To Mrs. George W. Swift [1]

Mrs. George W. Swift Executive Mansion,
My dear Madam Washington, Oct. 26, 1864

Your complimentary little poem, asking for my autograph was duly received. I thank you for it, and cheerfully comply with your request Yours truly A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, CCamStJ; ADfS, DLC-RTL. The autograph draft is written on a letter from John Perkins, Jr., Quartermaster General's Office, October 4, 1864:

``The writer of the inclosed lines is a poetess of some reputation in Massachusetts and a lady who truly honors her President.

``Will you at a leisure moment deign to look at them, and comply with her request by presenting her your autograph.

``Mr Bates who hands you this will receive and forward it'' (DLC-RTL).

The poem by Mrs. Swift of Falmouth, Massachusetts, has not been found in the Lincoln Papers, but a copy is preserved with Lincoln's letter in St. John's Seminary.

To John R. Underwood and Henry Grider [1]

Hon. J.R Underwood, Executive Mansion
Hon. Henry Grider Washington, Oct. 26, 1864

Gentlemen A petition has been presented to me on behalf of certain citizens of Allen and Barren counties in the State of Kentucky assuming that certain sums of money have been assessed and collected from them by the United States Military authorities, to compensate certain Union citizens of the same vicinage, for losses by rebel depredations, and praying that I will order the money to be refunded. The petition is accompanied by a letter of yours, which so presents the case as to induce me to make a brief response. You distinctly admit that the petitioners ``sympathize with the Confederate States & regard them as warring to preserve their Constitutional & legal rights.'' This admitted, it is scarcely possible to believe that they do not help the cause they thus love whenever they conveniently can. Their sons and relatives go into the rebel, but we may not be able to distinctly prove that they out-fitted, and sent them. When armed rebels come among them, their houses and other property are spared; while Union men's houses are burned, and their property pillaged. Still we may not be able to specifically prove that the sympathizers, protected and supplied the raiders in turn, or designated their Union nei[g]hbors for plunder and devastation. Yet we know all this exists even better than we could know an isolated fact upon the sworn testimony of one or two witnesses, just as we better know there is fire whence we see much smoke rising than could know it by one or two witnesses swearing to it. The witnesses may commit perjury, but the smokePage  78 can not. Now, experience has already taught us in this war that holding these smoky localities responsible for the conflagrations within them has a very salutary effect. It was obviously so in and about St. Louis, and on Eastern Shore of Virginia.

Annotation

[1]   ADf, DLC-RTL. The draft is in pencil and appears to be incomplete. No further record of the letter has been found, and it seems probable that Lincoln abandoned the idea of writing Underwood and Grider, and wrote instead to Stephen G. Burbridge, October 27, infra. The petition and the letter from Underwood and Grider to which Lincoln refers, have not been found.

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Executive Mansion
Major General Burbridge Washington, Oct. 27, 1864

It is represented to me that an officer has, by your authority, assessed and collected considerable sums of money from citizens of Allen and Barren counties, Kentucky, to compensate Union men for depredations committed upon them in the vicinity by rebels; and I am petitioned to order the money to be refunded. At most I could not do this without hearing both sides, which, as yet, I have not. I write now to say, that, in my opinion, in some extreme cases, this class of proceedings becomes a necessity; but that it is liable to---almost inseparable from---great abuses, and therefore should only be sparingly resorted to, and be conducted with great caution; that you, in your department, must be the judge of the proper localities and occasions for applying it; and that it will be well for you to see that your subordinates be at all times ready to account for every dollar, as to why collected, of whom, and how applied. Without this, you will soon find some of them making assessments and collections merely to put money in their own pockets, and it will also be impossible to correct errors in future and better times.

In the case I have mentioned, such good men as Hon. J. R. Underwood & Hon. Henry Grider though not personally interested, have appealed to me in behalf of others. So soon as you can, consistently with your other duties, I will thank you to acquaint yourself with the particulars of this case, and make any correction which may seem to be proper. Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln to Underwood and Grider, October 26, supra. No reply from General Burbridge or further reference has been found.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

If the services of this applicant can be made useful, I shall be glad for him to be appointed. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 27. 1864

Page  [unnumbered]

Annotation

[1]   AES, Herman Blum, Blumhaven Library, Philadelphia, PennsylvaniA. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on a letter signed by twenty-six citizens of Columbus, Ohio, October, 1864, recommending ``George E. Hutchinson, late Captain in the 10th. Ohio Cavalry, for appointment of Commissary [of] Subsistan[ce] with the rank of Captain in the Army.'' No record of Hutchinson's appointment has been found.

To Albert G. Hodges [1]

Hon. A G. Hodges Executive Mansion
Frankfort, Ky. Washington, Oct. 28, 1864

Mrs. Margaret C. Price, is here asking that her son, Philemon B. Price, now a prisoner of war at Camp Chase, may be discharged, and I have told [her] I will do it if you say so. What say you?

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 213. Hodges telegraphed Lincoln in reply on October 29, but the telegram has not been found. In a post-script to his letter of November 1, however, Hodges commented: ``I do not know young Price, whom you telegraphed me about. He grew from childhood to manhood in this community without my having any recollection of him. I could not, from inquiries made of his antecedents, recommended him, unconditionally, to executive clemency, and hence the form of the dispatch sent you Oct. 29th.'' (DLC-RTL).

To John A. Prall [1]

J. A. Prall, Executive Mansion
Paris, Ky Washington, Oct. 28. 1864

Mrs. George W. Bowen, is here asking for the discharge of her husband, now a prisoner of war, at Camp Chase, and I have told her I will do it if you say so. What say you? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 214. No reply has been found. John A. Prall was a member of the Kentucky Senate and a delegate to the Baltimore Convention in 1864. George W. Bowen has not been further identified.

To S. Austin Allibone [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Dear Sir, October 29th, 1864.

Mr Everetts address of 19th. inst. which you so kindly sent, has been received, and you will please accept my thanks. Your ob't. serv't A. LINCOLN.

S. Austin Allibone Esq

Philadelphia, Pa

Page  80

Annotation

[1]   LS, CSmH. On October 26, 1864, S. Austin Allibone enclosed the Boston Advertiser of October 22, containing Edward Everett's speech of October 19 on ``The Duty of Supporting the Government in the Present Crisis of Affairs.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edward Bates [1]

Will the Attorney General please have a report made on this case.

Oct. 29. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a copy of the court record in the case of the U.S. vs. Charles Randall and Edward Scott, on trial for counterfeiting Treasury notes. On November 21, 1864, Bates wrote Lincoln:

``I have considered the Petition, herewith returned, addressed to you by H[ugh]. B. McCracken of Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

``It appears that Mr. McCracken became surety for the appearance at the May Sessions, 1864, of the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania of one Charles Randall, indicted in that Court for the offence of passing an altered United States Treasury Note; that the said defendant, Randall, having failed to appear, according to the condition of the obligation, the recognizance executed by Mr. McCracken was forfeited, and that an action . . . was . . . brought . . . in which judgment for $3000 was obtained by the United States against Mr. McCracken on the 15th of August 1864.

``Mr. McCracken, appealing `to the Executive Clemency' now prays, `that upon the payment of costs and the sum of thirty dollars . . . the said judgment may be remitted.' . . . The question, I presume, which you desire me to answer . . . is, whether you have any Constitutional or statutory power to grant the relief which is prayed? I am of opinion that you have none. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Endorsement Concerning Thomas Berington [1]

October 29, 1864

I do not think a man offering himself a volunteer when he could receive a bounty & being rejected for disability should afterwards be compelled to serve without bounty as a drafted man. Let this man be discharged. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 29, 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Robert B. Carnahan, U.S. attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, October 28, 1864:

``Mrs Berington, who will hand you this note, is about to visit Washington for the purpose of having an interview with you, and to request the discharge of her husband Thomas Berington, recently drafted and now in service in the Army of the Potomac

``The case of Berington is a hard one. In August last he offered himself as a volunteer, and could have then obtained about $550.00 as bounty, but was rejected by physical disability. In September he was drafted and was accepted. He wished to volunteer to avoid the draft, but could not get into the service, and now he is drafted and cannot receive any bounty. I am a near neighbor of the family. They are highly respectable people, and the family is entirely dependent upon the fathers exertions for support. A wife and three young children thePage  81 oldest not more than 13 years old are left at home without support. Mr Berington is an excellent man of good habits. If consistent with the public service I would be much pleased if your Excellency would either discharge Mr Berington from the army or permit him to enlist and receive bounty. I cannot but think the case a very hard one.''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

October 29, 1864

As the resignation of officers is not likely to become a great evil, let this resignation be accepted on the usual condition of settling accounts. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 29. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Captain Henry C. Holloway, October 28, 1864, tendering his resignation as commissary of subsistence of Volunteers. Holloway's resignation was promulgated in AGO Special Orders No. 422, November 28, 1864.

To Isaac S. Burrell [1]

I shall be pleased to see Col. Burrell and his Regiment, at the time and place within indicated. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 30. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Mrs. Olin J. Cochran, Windham, New Hampshire. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Colonel Isaac S. Burrell, Forty-second Massachusetts Volunteers, a one hundred days' regiment: ``My Regt. will start for Boston on Monday; and it would give me great pleasure to present it to you at the White House, on Monday AM at 9 o'clock if agreeable to you.'' See Lincoln's speech to the Forty-second Massachusetts, October 31, infra.

To Alexander K. McClure [1]

``Cypher'' Executive Mansion
Hon. A. K. McClure Washington,
Harrisburg, Pa. Oct. 30. 1864

I would like to hear from you. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 215. No reply from McClure has been found prior to the following letter, dated November 5, 1864:

``The work is as well done as it can be done, & well enough I have no doubt. We shall carry the State by from 5,000 to 10,000 on the home vote, & it may be more, unless all signs are deceptive.

``We should have had much more, but it is too late for complaint, & we shall have enough.

``I go home to-morrow greatly encouraged by the conviction that your Election will be by a decisive vote, & give you all the moral power necessary for your high & holy trust. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Page  82

To Edward Bates [1]

Please file & remind me, at next Territorial Judge appointment.

Oct. 31. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, CSmH. Lincoln's endorsement is written on an envelope on which appears a further endorsement not Lincoln's: ``Refiled Oct. 2. '69 for 5th. Circuit under late act of congress.'' On the other side of the envelope appears an endorsement of Henry Sherman of Hartford, Connecticut: ``Recd from Atty Gen's office July 1865. Enclosed herein was an original letter reminding him of his promise to give me a Judicial appointment, which has been mislaid.'' Sherman was employed in the Treasury Department 1861-1868.

To Thomas T. Davis [1]

Hon. Thos. T. Davis Executive Mansion
Syracuse, N.Y. Washington, D.C. Oct. 31. 1864

I have ordered that Milton D. Norton be discharged on taking the oath. Please notify his mother. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 216. No communication from U.S. Representative Thomas T. Davis nor further reference to Milton D. Norton has been found.

To Thomas H. Hicks or Francis S. Corkran [1]

If Gov Hicks or Francis Corcoran, will request it in writing, I will allow this lady and family to return home. A. LINCOLN

Oct. 31. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, THaroL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Major John. I. Yellott, First Potomac Home Brigade, Maryland Infantry, who was provost marshal at Frederick, Maryland, October 27, 1864:

``About the 20th. day of July 1864, I received an order from Maj Genl. Hunter then commander Department of West Virginia requiring me to send South of the Lines of the Military Forces of the United States all secessionists & their families resident in Frederick City, Md. A number of occurrences combined delayed the full execution of this order during which delay its execution was suspended by order of the President of the United States.

``Before the order of suspension reached me one or two families had been sent South and among them the family of John W Baughman consisting of Mrs Baughman & three children.

``Mrs Baughman with her family are now in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia alone, entirely isolated from her friends the order sending other families South never having gone into effect.

``I think if consistent with the Policy & opinions of the Government permission granted on the part of the same for this family to return, would be regarded by the loyal community of Frederick as but an act of Justice & humanity.''

No reply from Thomas H. Hicks or Francis S. Corkran has been found.

Page  83

To William Nast [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Reverend & Dear Sir: October 31st, 1864.

It is with feelings of cordial gratification, that I acknowledge the reception of your communication of the 20th. of October, covering the Resolutions of the Central German Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, adopted at their recent session.

I have not been unprepared for this definite and unequivocal statement of the continued loyalty and devotion of the Church you represent, to the free institutions of the country of your adoption. The conduct of your people since the outbreak of this desolating rebellion, has been the best proof of the sincerity of your present professions.

I trust it is not too early for us to rejoice together over the promise of the speedy removal of that blot upon our civilization, always heretofore a standing menace to our peace and liberties, whose destruction, so long desired by all friends of impartial freedom, has at last been rendered possible by the crimes of its own reckless friends I am very truly, Your obedient servant,

Reverend William Nast A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS-P, ISLA. Reverend William Nast's letter of October 20 is not in the Lincoln Papers. The Central German Methodist Conference had met in Cincinnati August 24-30. Nast was editor of Der Christliche Apologete, the organ of the German Methodists published at Cincinnati, Ohio.

Proclamation Admitting Nevada into the Union [1]

October 31, 1864

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation:

Whereas the Congress of the United States passed an Act which was approved on the 21st. day of March, last, entitled, ``An Act to enable the people of Nevada to form a Constitution and State Government, and for the admission of such State into the Union on an equal Footing with the original States'';

And whereas, the said Constitution and State Government have been formed pursuant to the conditions prescribed by the fifth section of the Act of Congress aforesaid, and the certificate required by the said act, and also a copy of the Constitution and ordinances have been submitted to the President of the United States;

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, PresidentPage  84 of the United States, in accordance with the duty imposed upon me by the Act of Congress aforesaid, do, hereby, declare and proclaim that the said State of Nevada is admitted into the Union on an equal footing with the original States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L.S.]

Done at the City of Washington this Thirty first day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty four, and of the Independence of the United States the Eighty ninth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Proclamations.

Speech to Forty-second Massachusetts Regiment [1]

October 31, 1864

You have completed a term of service in the cause of your country, and on behalf of the nation and myself I thank you. You are going home; I hope you will find all your friends well. I never see a Massachusetts regiment but it reminds me of the difficulty a regiment from that State met with on its passage through Baltimore; but the world has moved since then, and I congratulate you upon having a better time to-day in Baltimore than that regiment had.

To-night, midnight, slavery ceases in Maryland, and this state of things in Maryland is due greatly to the soldiers. Again I thank you for the services you have rendered the country.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily National Republican, November 1, 1864. See Lincoln to Burrell, October 30, supra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Sir: Washington, Oct. 31, 1864.

Herewith is a letter of Gov. Curtin which speaks for itself. I suggest, for your consideration, whether, to the extent of, say, five thousand, we might not exempt from the draft, upon the men being put in good shape to defend & give assurance to the border. I have not said even this much to the bearer, Gen. Todd, [2] whom I hope you will see & hear. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Page  85

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Edward C. Stone, Boston, Massachusetts. Governor Curtin's letter has not been found.

[2]   Probably Lemuel Todd, formerly major in the Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

To Edward Bates [1]

Atty General, please make out a pardon in this case.

Nov. 1. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 565. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition of citizens of the District of Columbia, October 17, 1864, asking pardon for Annie M. Branson, convicted on charges of larceny.

To John A. Dix [1]

Major General Dix Executive Mansion
New-York. Washington, Nov. 1. 1864

Please suspend execution of private P. Carroll until further order. Acknowledge receipt. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 217. See Lincoln's telegram to Raymond and Strong, November 2, infra. General Dix acknowledged receipt of Lincoln's telegram on November 2 (DLC-RTL).

Endorsement Concerning H. Warren Stimson [1]

West-Point.

I wish this ``soldier boy'' to have a chance. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 1. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1864, No. 388. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter of Sergeant H. Warren Stimson, Company A, One Hundred Forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, to John Hay, October 25, 1864:

``I have taken the liberty of addressing you, for the purpose of asking your opinion in respect to the matter of obtaining one of the appointments as cadet at West Point, annually made by the President.

``I hardly expect that you will pay any attention to me; but I thought there would be no harm in writing to you.

``I am 19 years of age. I have carried my musket nearly thirty months, and am willing to carry it, thirty more if by so doing the Rebellion may be crushed. I have had plenty of chances to be detailed: but have refused, because I believe that when a man enlists, it is his duty to fight & not to `bum.' I have been in every action since the `2d. Bull Run,' and have been wounded twice. I expect to go into another one tomorrow, as we are ordered to march at 5 A.M. Perhaps by tomorrow night I may be beyond the need of any cadetship, but I hope not.

``As far as regards education I think I am fully competent to pass a creditable examination. I was in the Sophomore class of Columbia college, and ran away from there `to go for a soldier.' I am an orphan. Hoping that my communication may meet with your favorable consideration, and trusting soon to hear from you I have the honor to remain.''

There is no record of Stimson's appointment.

Page  86

To Albert Hobbs [1]

Hon. A. Hobbs. Executive Mansion
Malone, N.Y. Washington, Nov. 1. 1864

Where is Nathan Wilcox, of whom you telegraph, to be found?

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 218. Albert Hobbs, senator in the New York legislature, had telegraphed on November 1: ``Mr Nathan Wilcox who is under sentence of death for desertion . . . is my relative & for the sake of his . . . large circle of loyal relatives I humbly pray . . . his life may be spared He was a member of the twenty second . . . Massachusetts Volunteers'' (DLC-RTL).

He replied to Lincoln's telegram on November 2: ``Nathan Wilcox is in the 22d Mass Regt fifth Corps now at the repair Depot City Point.'' (Ibid.).

Nathaniel M. Wilcox, Company C, Twenty-second Massachusetts Volunteers, had been sentenced for desertion to be shot on November 4, 1864 (Army of the Potomac, General Court Martial Orders No. 41, October 25, 1864). See further Lincoln's telegram to Grant November 2, infra.

Order for Discharge of Kentuckians [1]

[c. November 1, 1864]

Let the following named prisoners of war, take the oath of Dec. 8, 1863, and be discharged.

Josiah Gentry--- at Camp Douglas,

Archibald W. Kavanaugh, `` ``

John W. Mitchell, `` ``

Jonathan D. Jones. `` ``

Roger X. Quisenberry Camp. Chase.

William T. Simmons. Camp. Douglas.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by William H. Townsend, Lexington, Kentucky. Lincoln's order is written on a letter from General Stephen G. Burbridge, Lexington, Kentucky, November 1, 1864: ``Hon C. F Burmond speaks of going to the City of Washington in a few weeks to see you on some personal [business] connected with the release of several person[s] confined in our Military Camps I can say to you that he will make no statement that you may not rely upon and I am satisfied that the public service in this department will suffer no detriment from granting his request I hope you will do so.''

To Gideon Welles [1]

November 1, 1864

If the Sec. of the Navy can find employment for this gentleman in the capacity stated, I will discharge [him] from the service under the draft, so that he may go into the other service.

Nov. 1. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Page  87

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from John W. Forney, October 31, 1864, recommending that Thomas C. Curry of Danville, Pennsylvania, ``who has been drafted, should be permitted to enter as a Machinist in the Navy Yard.'' G. R. Wilson, master machinist at the Navy Yard, endorsed on November 2, ``We are in want of 1st. 2d & 3d Class Machinists and Pattern Makers''; and Welles forwarded the letter to Commodore John B. Montgomery who endorsed, ``Approved.''

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Genl. Grant Executive Mansion
City-Point Washington, Nov. 2. 1864

Suspend until further [order] [2] the execution of Nathan Wilcox, of 22nd. Mass. Regt. Fifth Corps, said to be at Repair Depot.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 219. See Lincoln to Hobbs, November 1, supra. Grant replied the same day: ``The following despatch from Gen Meade in reply to your telegram of three forty is forwarded for your consideration. . . .

`` `Hd Qrs A of P. Nov. 2nd. Lieut Genl U S Grant The despatch of the President . . . has been received. There is no soldier of that name given under sentence of death in this Army & the Presidents order was no doubt intended to apply to the case of Private Nathaniel M. Wilcox Company C twenty second (22d) Mass Volunteers who was to have been executed on friday next. The suspension of his execution will at once be ordered'. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   ``Order'' was omitted by Lincoln and inserted in the manuscript by a clerk.

To Joseph Holt [1]

If a report is made in the case of Wm. Stretch, please send the papers to me. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 2, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, PHi. William Stretch's case has not been found.

To Henry J. Raymond and William K. Strong [1]

Hon. H. J. Raymond & Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gen. W. K. Strong War Department,
New-York Washington, D.C., Nov. 2. 1864.

Telegraphed Gen. Dix last night to suspend execution of P. Carroll, and have his answer that the order is received by him.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 220. See Lincoln's telegram to Dix, November 1, supra. William K. Strong had telegraphed on November 1: ``I recommend that you telegraph Maj General Dix to postponePage  88

execution of sentence of death upon Private P. Carroll for two (2) weeks from 4th November'' (DLC-RTL).

On November 2, Henry J. Raymond and Thurlow Weed telegraphed: ``If possible please telegraph Genl Dix to postpone execution of Patrick Carroll fixed for friday for ten or fifteen days.'' (Ibid.).

No further reference has been found.

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion
Lexington, K Washington, Nov. 3. 1864

Suspend execution of Vance Mason until further order. Acknowledge receipt. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 221. Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin J. Spaulding, Thirty-seventh Kentucky Volunteer Mounted Infantry, had telegraphed Lincoln on November 3: ``Vance Mason Co C thirty seventh Ky Vols mounted Infy on the charge of desertion is condemned to be shot on the sixth of this month. I pray you that you reprieve him or grant a respite until I can bring the matter before you in form There are mitigatory circumstances about his case which I am sure will recommend him to your clemency'' (DLC-RTL).

General Burbridge replied on the same day: ``Your dispatch recd. Generals Orders from . . . Dept of the Ohio direct the execution of five soliders for desertion at Louisville on Sunday next. Vance Mason is one of the number I am charged with the execution of the orders & have asked that the sentences may not be carried out on Sunday but could obtain no change of the order.'' (Ibid.).

See further Lincoln's telegram to Burbridge, November 4, infra.

To William P. Fessenden [1]

Will the Sec. of the Treasury & Mr. Risley please give Dr. Roe a hearing. His object is certainly a worthy one. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 3. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. Hanson A. Risley was a special agent of the Treasury Department. Dr. Edward R. Roe, physician and editor, formerly of Jacksonville, at this time of Bloomington, Illinois.

To George G. Meade [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Major General Meade Nov. 3, 1864

Suspend execution of Samuel J. Smith, and George Brown, alias George Rock, until further order & send record. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 222. George Brown, alias George Rock, Company A, Fifteenth New York Engineers, and Samuel J. Smith alias William Jones, Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, had been sentenced for desertion. General Meade replied on the same day: ``Your dispatchPage  89

of this date directing that execution of the sentence in the cases of Samuel J Smith and George Brown alias George Rock be suspended until further orders has been received The records in these cases were forwarded to the Judge Advocate General some days ago.'' (DLC-RTL). No reference has been found to the final disposal of Smith's case, but AGO Special Orders No. 52, February 1, 1865, cancelled the suspension of sentence for George Rock (George Rock Brown) and ordered that ``the sentence will be executed at such time and place as the Commanding General may direct.''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

This man wants to go home to vote. Sec. of War please see him

Nov. 3. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA.

Approval of First Hundred Miles of Union Pacific Railroad [1]

Executive Mansion
November 4th 1864.

The permanent location of the Union Pacific Railroad, for one hundred miles west from Omaha, Nebraska, as shown by the map thereof certified by the President and Secretary of said Company, Oct. 19, 1864, is hereby approved. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ES, DNA NR RG 48, Department of Interior, Lands and Railroad Divisions, Union Pacific Railroad Company, Package 239. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of a letter from Thomas C. Durant, vice-president of the Union Pacific, November 3, 1864: ``I have the honor to ask your approval of the permanent location of the first one hundred miles of the Union Pacific RailRoad as indicated by the map forwarded to the Department of the Interior on the 24th. ulto.''

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Major General Burbridge Executive Mansion,
Lexington, Ky Washington, Nov. 4, 1864.

Suspend execution of all the deserters ordered to be executed on Sunday at Louisville, until further order, and send me the records in the cases. Acknowledge receipt. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 223. See Lincoln to Burbridge, November 3, supra. Burbridge replied on the same day: ``Your dispatch received and orders issued in conformity thereto. The record will be forwarded at once'' (DLC-RTL). AGO Special Orders No. 64, February 9, 1865, directed remission of the sentence of Vance Mason, ``on condition that he returns to and serves out the remainder of his term of enlistment. . . .''

Page  90

To Joseph Holt [1]

Judge Advocate General please procure record & papers & report on this case. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 4. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 2237. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition in behalf of Captain Frank B. Holt, First New Jersey Volunteers, dismissed for disobedience of orders. Judge Holt reported that there was room for executive clemency, and Lincoln directed that ``so much of Special Orders, No. 280, August 25th, 1864, as dismissed Captain F. B. Holt, 1st New Jersey Volunteers, is hereby revoked, and he is honorably discharged the service. . . .'' (AGO Special Orders No. 409, November 21, 1864).

Memorandum [1]

[c. November 4, 1864]

For the Message

Mrs. Hutter suggests that there be four Assylums in each State, aid by the General Government, for the orphans & perhaps the other destitute of the war.

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-RTL. Since Mrs. Elizabeth E. Hutter called on Lincoln on November 4 (see Lincoln to Stanton, infra), this undated memorandum has been assigned this date. Lincoln made no use of her suggestion in his annual message of December 6, infra.

Order Concerning Prisoners from Coles County, Illinois [1]

November 4, 1864.

Let these prisoners be sent back to Coles County, Ill., those indicted be surrendered to the sheriff of said county, and the others be discharged. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, I, XXXII, I, 643. Lincoln's order is endorsed on a report of Addison A. Hosmer, acting judge advocate general, July 26, 1864. See Lincoln's communications to Davis and to Treat, July 2, and to Ficklin, July 22, supra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

November 4, 1864

I really wish Mrs. Hutter to be obliged in this case.

She is one of the very best friends of the soldiers. Honorable Secretary of War please see her. A. LINCOLN.

Nov. 4, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Reporter, February 10, 1909. According to the article in the Reporter in which the above item appears, Mrs. Hutter was the wife of Dr. E. W. Hutter of Philadelphia, the same Elizabeth E. Hutter to whom Lincoln wrote on August 10, 1863, supra.

Page  91

To Caleb H. Carlton [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion
Chattanooga, Tenn. Washington, Nov. 5, 1864

Suspend execution of Robert W. Reed until further order & send record. Answer. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 224. Colonel Caleb H. Carlton, Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, was in command of post at Chattanooga, but no reply from him or any officer has been found. Lincoln's action was prompted by a telegram from John Boyle, Louisville, Kentucky, November 3, 1864: ``Robert W Reed Company A fourth Ky Cavalry at Chattanooga is sentenced to die November twentieth for killing John Arterburris his messmate & friend Arterburris brother witnessed the killing & represents it as committed in momentary passion wantonly provoked by deceased & repented as soon as done. . . . Officers & others think it a proper case for executive clemency & beseech you to commute the sentence to imprisonment for term of years or life. grant reprieve until the case can be laid before you. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To William H. Seward [1]

Hon. W. H. Seward Executive Mansion
Auburn, New-York Washington, Nov. 5. 1864

No news of consequence this morning. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 225.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Capt. Shindel will report to Gen. W. T. Sherman instead of to Gen. Canby as within directed. A. LINCOLN.

Nov. 5, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Reporter, February 10, 1909. According to the source, Lincoln's order overruled an order directing Captain Jacob A. Shindel, assistant quartermaster, to report to Major General Edward R. S. Canby at New Orleans.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

November 5, 1864

I think this might lie over till morning. The tendency of the order, it seems to me, is to bring on a collision with the State authority, which I would rather avoid, at least until the necessity for it is more apparant than it yet is. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 5. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-Stanton Papers. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a telegram to Stanton received on November 5 from General Benjamin F. Butler, who had been sent to New York with troops to maintain order until after the election:Page  92

``I desire to issue the following portion of an order about Brig Genl John A. Green as commander of the District of New York.

``Gen Dix objects not on account of any difference as to jurisdiction between us but because he thinks we have no power to touch Green & desires me to ask you.

``Will you sanction it?

`` `There can be no military organization in any state known to the laws save the militia & armies of the United States. The president is the constitutional Comdr in chief of the militia & army of the U.S. therefore where in any portion of the U.S. an officer of superior rank is detailed to command all other military officers in that district must report to & be subordinate to him therefore all persons exercising any military authority in this District will at once report to these HdQuarters for orders A military order purporting to be issued by Br Genl John A Green is countermanded & revoked & Brig Genl Green if exercising any military command will forthwith report to these Hd Qurs & any attempt to exercise military authority without so reporting will be summarily punished as wilful disobedience of orders.'

``I will wait for answer at the telegraph officer Troops are beginning to arrive.'' (Telegram, DLC-Stanton Papers; OR, I, XLIII, II, 549-50).

Stanton replied on the same day: ``Your telegram has been submitted to the consideration of the President, and all action upon the subject-matter will be suspended until his instructions are received.'' (OR, I, XLIII, II, 550).

On November 7 Stanton telegraphed Butler: ``The President thinks it expedient to avoid precipitating any military collision between the United States forces and the militia of the State of New York; and as General Dix, the commanding officer of the department, does not approve of the order proposed by you to be issued, in reference to the militia of the State and Brigadier-General Green, the President is of the opinion that it had better not be issued. If Green, under any color of pretense, should undertake to resist the military authority of the United States, he may then be dealt with as circumstances require, without any general order that may become the subject of abstract discussion.'' (Ibid., p. 568).

This exchange of telegrams grew out of an order issued on October 29 by Brigadier General John A. Green, Jr., commanding the New York State Militia, which reads in part as follows: ``The General-Commanding recognizes danger to the public peace in the proposed attempt of a Major-General holding a commission under the Federal Government to take under his care and supervision within the . . . district, the election to be held as aforesaid. For this contemplated interference there is no necessity, authority or excuse. The Federal Government is charged with no duty or responsibility whatever relating to an election to be held in the State of New-York. . . .'' (New York Times, November 1, 1864).

To Charlotte B. Wise [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My dear Mrs. Wise Nov. 5. 1864.

It gives me pleasure to comply with your request. Yours truly

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. On November 2, 1864, Charlotte B. (Mrs. H. A.) Wise wrote Lincoln from Boston:

``I am getting up a Navy Photograph Book for our Sailors' Fair, which opens on the 9th.

Page  93``I want your likeness to begin the book, as head of the Navy.

``Will you write your name on one of your Photographic Cards & sent [sic] it to me? . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edward R. S. Canby [1]

``Cypher'' Executive Mansion
Major General Canby Washington,
New-Orleans, La. Nov. 6. 1864

Please forward, with all possible despatch, to the Naval-Officer commanding at Mobile Bay, the following order.

A. LINCOLN.

``Naval Officer in command at Executive Mansion

Mobile Bay. Washington, Nov. 6, 1864

Do not, on any account, or on any showing of authority whatever, from whomsoever purporting to come, allow the blockade to be violated. A. LINCOLN''

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 227. See Lincoln to David G. Farragut, infra.

To David G. Farragut [1]

Naval Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Mobile Bay Washington, Nov. 6. 1864.

Do not, on any account, or on any showing of authority whatever, from whomsoever purporting to come, allow the blockade to be violated. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 228. The following endorsement by a telegraph clerk appears on the bottom of the telegram: ``Send this to Care of Capt [George D.] Sheldon/Hilton Head/to be forwarded from there to Mobile by first opportunity.'' See Lincoln's order to General Edward R. S. Canby, August 9, supra, which was also issued to Farragut on the same day. Welles' Diary under date of October 3, 1864, records: ``Had an interview with Seward, agreeable to the wishes of the President, concerning the order to A. J. Hamilton for bringing out cotton. . . . He said that the scheme was one by which certain important persons in the Rebel cause were to be converted. Had himself not much faith that it would amount to anything, and yet it might. The President believed there would be results; but had been very confidential and secret in all that was done. He (S.) had drawn up the order carefully by special request of the President, but had never communicated to any one but Stanton what had been done. . . . I remarked that the subject was of a character which seemed to deserve general consultation in the Cabinet . . . that I was especially so, it being my special duty to prevent intercourse with the Rebels and enforce the blockade. But this order conflicted with that duty, was not in good faith, I apprehended, with others of our people, or with foreign powers. I told him I had made inquiries of Fessenden, for the order expressly referred to the Treasury agents, and they would of course report to him. SewardPage  94

said there was no interference with the blockade. He had prepared the order with great care and sent one copy to General Canby, and one to Admiral Farragut, and proposed to send and get it for my perusal. I told him I already had a copy, which seemed to surprise him. . . . He appeared not to be aware that . . . all the three Departments must come into possession of this confidential circular, and not unlikely it would go into the courts. He is not yet dispossessed of his early error that the government can be carried on by executive order regardless of Department or laws.''

See further Lincoln's order to Farragut, November 11, infra.

To William H. Seward [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. W. H. Seward War Department,
Auburn, N. Y. Washington, D.C., Nov. 6. 1864.

Nothing of much importance. Day-before-yesterday rebels destroyed two more of our wooden gun-boats, at Johnsonville, on Tennessee River. Curtis, on the 4th., was at Fayetteville, Ark. still pursuing and damaging Price. Richmond papers say Yankees landed at Escambia Bay, below Hilton [2] (not far from Mobile) captured fifty men, and destroyed all camp equipage, wagons Saltworks, &c and every thing in and about Hilton. Richmond papers also confirm the destruction of the Albemarle & the consequent evacuation of Plymouth N.C. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 226.

[2]   Either the Richmond papers or Lincoln was in error. The U.S. naval expedition of October 25-28 landed below Milton, Florida, near Pensacola.

Endorsement [1]

Let this appointment be made if there is a vacancy.

Nov 7, 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Tracy, p. 246. No identification is given in the source.

Endorsement Concerning James W. Hughlett [1]

Treat him with mercy as he makes the disclosure himself.

Nov. 7. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Private James W. W. Hughlett, First Maryland Veteran Volunteers, November 1, 1864: ``I being A Member of Company G, 1st Regt Md Vet Vols I was wouned in action, at Front Royal Virginia and I was taken Prisoner also and I was Paroled and ordered to report to Camp Parole Annapolis Md During wich time I received all the Pay was Due me From the Government and I then stayed at Camp Parole untill their was two months Pay Due me and wen I came to Draw my Pay their was eight months Pay Due me on the Muster Role andPage  95

I Did Not Rectify the mistake wich I have of often bin sorry For and you would raleive my mind greatly by Leting me No My sentence I am wiling to suffer what ever sentence you May Pass I am willing to make the money good by having my Pay stoped I Drew $104.75 cents where i should only have Drew 22 the odd cents was clothing money Due me but I had received the amount Due me for clothing before that time I was A Drummer at the time I was wouned I should have writen Long ago but I had not courage enough, and I was ashamed.'' The regimental roster lists James Hughlett as discharged with his regiment on July 2, 1865.

Order Concerning A. W. White [1]

November 7, 1864

Lieut. A. W. White is allowed a leave of absence of five days from date, with pass & transportation to Philadelphia & back to Washington A. LINCOLN

Nov. 7. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, owned by Charles W. Olsen, Chicago, Illinois. Lieutenant A. W. White has not been identified.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Will Gen. Hitchcock please see & hear this lady about a special exchange A. LINCOLN

Nov. 8, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. According to a note preserved with this communication, signed by Mary Emmons Collins, Lincoln's note was given to ``Aunt Mary about special exchange of W. A. Collins . . . my grandfather.'' William A. Collins was captain of Company D, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry.

To the Managing Committee of the Sailors' Fair [1]

The Managing Committee Executive Mansion,
of the Sailor's Fair: Washington,
Boston, Mass. Nov. 8, 1864.

Allow me to wish you a great success. With the old fame of the Navy, made brighter in the present war, you can not fail. I name none, lest I wrong others by omission. To all, from Rear Admiral, to honest Jack I tender the Nation's admiration and gratitude

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, MCon. On October 15, 1864, Alexander H. Rice, chairman of the Managing Committee of the National Sailors' Fair to be held at Boston, November 9-21, had written asking Lincoln to be present (DLC-RTL). See also Lincoln to Rice, infra.

Page  96

Response to a Serenade [1]

November 8, 1864

FRIENDS AND FELLOW-CITIZENS: Even before I had been informed by you that this compliment was paid me by loyal citizens of Pennsylvania friendly to me, I had inferred that you were of that portion of my countrymen who think that the best interests of the nation are to be subserved by the support of the present Administration. I do not pretend to say that you who think so embrace all the patriotism and loyalty of the country. But I do believe, and I trust, without personal interest, that the welfare of the country does require that such support and indorsement be given. I earnestly believe that the consequences of this day's work, if it be as you assure me and as now seems probable, will be to the lasting advantage, if not to the very salvation, of the country. I cannot at this hour say what has been the result of the election; but, whatever it may be, I have no desire to modify this opinion---that all who have labored to-day in behalf of the Union organization, have wrought for the best interests of their country and the world, not only for the present, but for all future ages. I am thankful to God for this approval of the people. But while deeply grateful for this mark of their confidence in me, if I know my heart, my gratitude is free from any taint of personal triumph. I do not impugn the motives of any one opposed to me. It is no pleasure to me to triumph over any one; but I give thanks to the Almighty for this evidence of the people's resolution to stand by free government and the rights of humanity.

Annotation

[1]   New York Times, November 10, 1864. This speech is misdated November 9, 1864, in Nicolay and Hay (X, 261-62). Concerning John Hay's transcription of this speech, see the note to Lincoln's response to a serenade on November 10, infra.

To Alexander H. Rice [1]

Hon. A. H. Rice Executive Mansion,
Boston, Mass Washington, Nov. 8, 1864.

Yours received. I have no other notice that the ox is mine. If it be really so I present it to the Sailors Fair, as a contribution.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 229. Alexander H. Rice telegraphed Lincoln on November 8, 1864: ``The mammoth Ox, Genl Grant is presented to you today. Will you pass him over to the sailors fair as a contribution'' (DLC-RTL). On November 22 Rice telegraphed: ``I have the pleasure of informing you that the Mammoth Ox, General Grant, which was presented to you on the 8th of the present month, by Carlos Pierce Esq, of this city, and byPage  97

you donated to the National Sailors' Fair on the ninth inst, has yielded upwards of Three Thousand two hundred dollars to its treasury, and that sum is held as your contribution. . . .'' (Ibid.).

To William H. Seward [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. W. H. Seward War Department,
Auburn, N.Y. Washington, D.C., Nov. 8. 1864.

News from Grant, Sherman, Thomas and Rosecrans, satisfactory, but not important. Pirate Florida captured by the Wauchusetts [Wachusett] Oct. 7th. on coast of Brazil. The information is certain. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 230.

To Timothy P. Andrews [1]

November 9, 1864

This poor soldier is in distress because he can get no pay. Will Pay Master-General, please have him put on the right track to get his pay. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 9, 1864

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Anderson Galleries Catalog 4150, February 7-8, 1935, No. 363. According to the catalog description this item is an autograph note signed.

To Charles Butler [1]

Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir: Washington, Nov. 9, 1864.

I have received your letter of the 5th November, and beg to express my regret that it will not be possible to avail myself of your courteous invitation.

Praying that you will present to your distinguished guest the assurance of my high regard, I am, very truly, Your obedient servant, A. LINCOLN.

Charles Butler, Esq.,

13 East 14th St., N.Y.

Annotation

[1]   New York Citizens: Welcome to Goldwin Smith (1864), p. 14; Df, DLC-RTL. The draft is in John Hay's autograph. On November 5, 1864, Charles Butler and others of New York wrote Lincoln:

``On behalf of a number of our fellow citizens, we have the honour to invite your attendance at an entertainment, which they propose to give to Prof. Goldwin Smith, of Oxford, at the Rooms of the Union League Club, on Saturday, the 12th of November inst. at Ten oclock.

``In this distinguished Gentleman is recognized a judicious and eloquent representative of that large and right minded class of Englishmen, who, from thePage  98 beginning of this rebellion, have extended to the Rebels neither moral sympathy nor material aid; and one who . . . has steadily protested against the violations of British neutrality, to aid the establishment of a Slave Empire upon the ruins alike of American Nationality and of Republican Government. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Benjamin B. French [1]

If Commissioner of Public Buildings chooses to give laborers at White House a holiday I have no objections. A. LINCOLN.

November 9, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Hertz, II, 954. According to the source, this communication was received ``following the reelection of Lincoln,'' on November 8.

To Anson G. Henry [1]

November 9, 1864

With returns and States of which we are confident, the re-election of the President is considered certain, while it is not certain that McClellan has carried any State, though the chances are that he has carried New Jersey and Kentucky.

Annotation

[1]   Noah Brooks, ``Lincoln's Re-election,'' The Century Magazine, XLIX (April, 1895), 866. According to Brooks, ``Dr. A. G. Henry . . . had been promised that he should receive a despatch from Mr. Lincoln when the result of the presidential election . . . should be definitely ascertained. Accordingly, on . . . November 9, President Lincoln dictated a despatch, the terms of which were as follows [text as above]. When I had written the despatch at the President's dictation, I passed it to him for his signature; but he declined to `blow his own horn,' as he expressed it, and said: `You sign the message, and I will send it.'''

To Edward Bates [1]

Attorney General please comply with this request. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 10. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA GE RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Segregated Lincoln material. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Mrs. Agnes Mary Grant of Toronto, Canada, November 10, 1864, enclosing her petition to the U.S. Supreme Court (not then in session) for redress in the matter of a mortgage on ``The Saratoga Water Cure,'' which she claimed should rightfully be paid to her in gold rather than paper.

To Thomas E. Bramlette [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Bramlette War Department,
Frankfort, Ky. Washington, D.C., Nov. 10 1864.

Yours of yesterday received. I can scarcely believe that Gen. Jno. B. Houston has been arrested ``for no other offence than oppositionPage  99 to my re-election'' for if that had been deemed sufficient cause of arrest, I should have heard of more than one arrest in Kentucky on election day. If however, Gen. Houston has been arrested for no other cause than opposition to my re-election Gen. Burbridge will discharge him at once, I sending him a copy of this as an order to that effect. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 233. Governor Bramlette telegraphed Lincoln on November 9, 1864: ``Genl Jno B. Houston, a loyal man and prominent citizen was arrested and yesterday started off by Genl Burbridge to be sent beyond our lines by way of Catlettsburg for no other offence than opposition to your reelection. . . . You are doubtless reelected, but surely it cannot sanction this ostracising of loyal men who honestly opposed you'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln to Burbridge, infra.

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Burbridge War Department,
Lexington, Ky. Washington, D.C., Nov. 10. 1864.

I have just received a telegram from Gov. Bramlette saying ``Genl. Jno. B. Houston, a loyal man and prominent citizen was arrested and yesterday started off by Gen. Burbridge to be sent beyond our lines by way of Catlettsburg for no other offence than opposition to your re-election'' and I have answered him as follows below, of which please take notice and report to me.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 232. See Lincoln to Bramlette, supra. Burbridge replied on November 11: ``Gov Bramlette is wrong in saying that Jno B Huston was arrested for no other offence than opposition to your reelection. Hustons influence & speeches have been of a treasonable character & he persisted in making the latter after several warnings of what the consequences would be He has been allowed however to return from Covington under oath & bond not again to oppose his Govt. A vigorous policy against rebel sympathizers in this State must be pursued & if I have erred I fear I have made too few arrests instead of too many'' (DLC-RTL).

To William Dennison [1]

Will the Post-Master General please see the bearer, Miss. Brady, daughter of and [sic] old friend and oblige her, if possible.

Nov. 10. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-F, Des Moines, Iowa, Capital, February 12, 1922. According to the source Miss Brady was the daughter of Jasper E. Brady, former U.S. congressman from Chambersburg, Pennsylvania (1847-1849), who served as clerk in the office of the paymaster general (1861-1869).

Page  100

To Henry W. Hoffman [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
H. W. Hoffman War Department,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, D.C., Nov. 10 1864.

The Maryland soldiers in the Army of the Potomac cast a total vote of 1428, out of which we get 1160 majority. This is directly from Gen. Meade and Gen. Grant. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 235. On November 9 General Grant had telegraphed Stanton: ``The following official statement of the vote polled in the Army of the Potomac yesterday has just been received from General Meade: Maine, total vote, 1677; Lincoln's majority, 1,143. New Hampshire, 515; Lincoln's majority, 279. Vermont, 102; Lincoln's majority, 42. Rhode Island, 190; Lincoln's majority, 134. Pennsylvania (seven counties to hear from), 11,122; Lincoln's majority, 3,494. West Virginia, 82; Lincoln's majority, 70. Ohio, 684; Lincoln's majority, 306. Wisconsin, 1,065; Lincoln's majority, 633. Michigan, 1,917; Lincoln's majority, 745. Maryland, 1,428; Lincoln's majority, 1,160. U.S. Sharpshooters, 124; Lincoln's majority, 89. New York, 305; Lincoln's majority, 113. Majority for Lincoln, 8,208.'' (OR, I, XLII, III, 570).

Hoffman replied to Lincoln's telegram on the same day: ``I am much obliged for your dispatch giving soldiers vote in Army of Potomac. . . . The soldiers are quite as dangerous to Rebels in the rear as in front.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Timothy Ingraham [1]

Suspend execution of the order in the case of Brintnall, until the Judge Advocate General shall have reported to the President.

Nov. 10, 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   William D. Morley, Inc., Kolb Sale Catalog, November 17, 1941, No. 217. According to the catalog description, this item is an autograph card signed. Colonel Timothy Ingraham was provost marshal in the military governor's office in Washington. Sewall Brintnall, a government contractor was convicted on charges of attempting to bribe a government official and sentenced to pay a fine of $1,000 and remain in prison until the fine was paid. On January 25, 1865, Lincoln denied his application for pardon (DNA U.S. Army Court Martial Cases, RG 130, White House Office).

Response to a Serenade [1]

November 10, 1864

It has long been a grave question whether any government, not too strong for the liberties of its people, can be strong enough to maintain its own existence, in great emergencies.

On this point the present rebellion brought our republic to a severe test; and a presidential election occurring in regular course during the rebellion added not a little to the strain. If the loyal people, united, were put to the utmost of their strength by the rebellion, must they not fail when divided, and partially paralized, by a political war among themselves?

Page  101But the election was a necessity.

We can not have free government without elections; and if the rebellion could force us to forego, or postpone a national election, it might fairly claim to have already conquered and ruined us. The strife of the election is but human-nature practically applied to the facts of the case. What has occurred in this case, must ever recur in similar cases. Human-nature will not change. In any future great national trial, compared with the men of this, we shall have as weak, and as strong; as silly and as wise; as bad and good. Let us, therefore, study the incidents of this, as philosophy to learn wisdom from, and none of them as wrongs to be revenged.

But the election, along with its incidental, and undesirable strife, has done good too. It has demonstrated that a people's government can sustain a national election, in the midst of a great civil war. Until now it has not been known to the world that this was a possibility. It shows also how sound, and how strong we still are. It shows that, even among candidates of the same party, he who is most devoted to the Union, and most opposed to treason, can receive most of the people's votes. It shows also, to the extent yet known, that we have more men now, than we had when the war began. Gold is good in its place; but living, brave, patriotic men, are better than gold.

But the rebellion continues; and now that the election is over, may not all, having a common interest, re-unite in a common effort, to save our common country? For my own part I have striven, and shall strive to avoid placing any obstacle in the way. So long as I have been here I have not willingly planted a thorn in any man's bosom.

While I am deeply sensible to the high compliment of a re-election; and duly grateful, as I trust, to Almighty God for having directed my countrymen to a right conclusion, as I think, for their own good, it adds nothing to my satisfaction that any other man may be disappointed or pained by the result.

May I ask those who have not differed with me, to join with me, in this same spirit towards those who have?

And now, let me close by asking three hearty cheers for our brave soldiers and seamen and their gallant and skilful commanders.

Annotation

[1]   AD, NDry. Concerning this speech and Lincoln's response to a serenade on November 8 (supra), John Hay's Diary records under date of November 11: ``The speeches of the President at the two last serenades are very highly spoken of. The first I wrote after the fact to prevent the `loyal Pennsylvanians' getting a swing at it themselves. The second one, last night, the President himselfPage  102

wrote late in the evening and read it from the window. `Not very graceful,' he said, `but I am growing old enough not to care much for the manner of doing things.'''

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Rosecrans War Department,
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, D.C., Nov. 10 1864.

Suspend execution of Major Wolf until further order, & meanwhile, report to me on the case. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 234. On November 10, 1864, Lincoln received telegrams from James E. Yeatman, Able Barton, and P. L. Terry, of St. Louis, Missouri, asking clemency in the case of Major Enoch O. Wolf (DLC-RTL). Wolf was one of seven Confederates held as hostages to be shot in retaliation for the murder by Confederate guerrilla Colonel Timothy Reeves of Major James Wilson and six Union soldiers, all of the Third Missouri State Cavalry. Six Confederate soldiers had already been shot on October 29 in retaliation for the Union men murdered with Wilson. On November 7, Department of the Missouri, Special Orders No. 287, ordered that Wolf be shot on November 11, in retaliation for the murder of Major Wilson. On November 10, Rosecrans acknowledged receipt of Lincoln's telegram, and on November 11 wrote a detailed report covering the essential facts as given above (DLC-RTL). See further Lincoln to Rosecrans, November 19, infra.

To William H. Seward [1]

[November 10, 1864]

I have a despatch from Chicago as follows:

``Arnold, Farnsworth, Washburne, Lovejoy & Norton, republicans elected. 4th. & 7th. Districts in doubt. In 8th. Swett probably defeated. Other five Districts Democrats elected. Ingersoll, Republican candidate at large probably elected, but vote close.''

LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NAuE. Since Seward did not return to Washington until November 10, it seems likely that Lincoln's undated note was written on that day. The telegram from which Lincoln quotes has not been found.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

November 10, 1864

This lady would be appointed Chaplain of the First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, only that she is a woman. The President has not legally anything to do with such a question, but has no objection to her appointment. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   DeRobigne Mortimer Bennett, The World's Sages, Infidels, and Thinkers (New York, 1876), p. 951. According to the source, Lincoln gave this communication to Ella E. Gibson (Mrs. Ella E. G. Hobart), ``ordained as a ministerPage  103

by the Religio-Philosophical Society of St. Charles, Ill.'' Although she was ``unanimously elected Chaplain and the Colonel confirmed the election,'' Secretary Stanton ``declined to recognize the mustering on account of her sex, not wishing to establish a precedent.''

Discharge for Richard H. Lee [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, [November 11], 186[4].

Richard Henry Lee Private 1st. Rebel Maryland Artillery Prisoner at Fort Delaware Division 20. (said to be sick)

Let this man take the oath of Dec. 8. 1863. and be discharged.

Nov. 11. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES-P, ISLA. John Hay wrote this note on Executive Mansion stationery, and LINCOLN endorsed it with his order for discharge.

Endorsement Concerning Furlough for H. P. Morley [1]

If consistent I would be glad for this to be done A. LINCOLN

Nov. 11. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on a letter from S. Newton Pettis, asking a furlough for H. P. Morley (Marley?) of Crawford County, Pennsylvania. H. P. Morley has not been further identified, but Hiram P. Manly, Company F, One Hundred Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, was discharged on a surgeon's certificate.

To David G. Farragut [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, November 11, 1864.

An Executive order to Rear-Admiral David G. Farragut having been issued on the 9th of August last, directing that, if Andrew J. Hamilton, or any person authorized in writing by him, should come out of either of the ports of Galveston or Sabine Pass with any vessel or vessels freighted with cotton shipped to the agent of the Treasury Department at New Orleans, the passage of such person, vessels, and cargoes should not be molested or hindered, but should be permitted to pass to the hands of such consignee, the said order is from this date to be considered as revoked.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Naval Records, I, XXI, 727. See LINCOLN to Farragut, November 6, supra. The above order was enclosed by Gideon Welles to Farragut on November 14 following receipt of Farragut's report No. 511, October 30, 1864. Farragut reported that upon receiving on October 8 a copy of LINCOLN's order of August 9Page  104

he had not felt authorized to permit ships to enter the ports mentioned, and that on October 9 he had instructed Commander William E. LeRoy to escort any qualified vessels from the ports, but to allow none to enter (ibid., pp. 706-707). On November 16 Farragut wrote LINCOLN: "I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram from New Orleans forwarded by General Canby from Your Excellency and beg to state that I have never allowed the Blockade to be violated---but as I understand the Regulations of Trade dated Jany 26th 1864 articles are permitted to come out into our lines but nothing to go into the Rebel lines. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). On November 18, Farragut reported to Welles that he had issued orders to Captain John B. Marchand, senior officer of the ships blockading the coast of Texas, in part as follows: ``You will therefore consider the instructions given to Commander LeRoy of noneffect and be governed by the orders of the President as contained in the above telegram of the 6th instant, and you will at once instruct the commanding officers of the vessels of your division to the same effect. . . .'' (Naval Records, I, XXI, 730).

Endorsement [1]

[c. November 12, 1864]

Hon. John A. Bingham brings this to me.

Annotation

[1]   AE, DLC-RTL. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on the envelope of Green Clay Smith's letter to John A. Bingham, asking him to intercede for a pass for Mrs. E. M. Bradley of Georgetown, Kentucky, November 12, 1864. No further reference has been found.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Judge Advocate General Nov. 12. 1864.

Please procure record, & examine and report, upon the case of---Stettler, convicted & sent to Auburn Penitentiary for five years. His home was in Philadelphia, and his trial was here in Washington, on some charge about adulterated coffee. Yours truly

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, MM 1107. This letter is filed with papers in the case of John K. Stetler, citizen of Philadelphia, sentenced to five years' imprisonment on charges of wilful neglect of duty as a contractor furnishing coffee to the government. Holt had recommended enforcement of sentence in order to make an example of Stetler, and LINCOLN had approved the sentence on November 20, 1863. No record of LINCOLN's further action has been found.

To Joseph Holt [2]

Judge Advocate General please report on this case. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 12. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 1774. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on an application for remission of fine in the case of James Judge, citizen of Missouri, sentenced for disloyalty and violation of oath. Holt reported unfavorably and LINCOLN denied the application on January 25, 1865.

Page  105

To John A. Logan [1]

Executive Mansion
Major Genl. John A. Logan Washington,
Carbondale, Ills. Nov. 12. 1864

Yours of to-day just received. Some days ago I forwarded to the care of Mr. Washburne, a leave for you to visit Washington, subject only to be countermanded by General Sherman. This qualification I thought was a necessary prudence for all concerned. Subject to it, you may remain at home thirty days, or come here, at your own option. If, in view of maintaining your good relations with Gen. Sherman, and of probable movements of his army, you can safely come here, I shall be very glad to see you.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 236. General Logan, who had been making campaign speeches in Illinois, telegraphed LINCOLN on November 12: ``I am suffering very much with inflammation in the throat & not able to do duty at present will start to my command as soon as able Can I be permitted to remain a few days for rest & improvement of health before starting'' (DLC-RTL). Elihu B. Washburne had telegraphed LINCOLN on October 27: ``Genl. Jack Logan sends word to me that he wants to go to Washington after the election to see you about certain matters that he does not wish to write about. He wishes me to obtain the permission, which I know you will most gladly grant. Please send to me such permission and I will see it reaches him. . . .'' (Ibid.).

Memorandum Concerning John C. Lewis [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Nov 12. 1864.

Whenever proper evidence shall be brought to me along with this paper that a substitute has been procured, received and duly mustered in, in place of John C. Lewis, private in Company B. 188th. Regt. N. Y. Vols. I will will [sic] discharge the latter.

Nov. 12. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS, IHi. No further reference has been found.

To Marsena R. Patrick [1]

Executive Mansion,
Gen. Patrick Washington, Nov. 12. 1864.

Please oblige me by seeing and hearing the bearer, Lt. Col. Kretschmar, who is well vouched to me as a most worthy gentleman, and who wishes to see you on business. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Page  106

Annotation

[1]   ALS, CSmH. General Marsena R. Patrick was provost marshal general of the Army of the Potomac. Julius C. Kretchmar was lieutenant colonel of the One Hundred Third New York Volunteers.

To Edward Bates [1]

Attorney General Executive Mansion,
Sir Washington, Nov. 14, 1864.

Please allow Hon. Mr. Corwin to have a copy of your legal opinion, given me, in the case of Col. Gates. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA GE RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Segregated LINCOLN Material. The case in which Thomas Corwin was interested was probably that of Colonel William Gates. See LINCOLN to Cameron, September 5, 1861, supra.

Endorsement [1]

Charge of desertion removed, restoring such rights, if any, as were thereby cut off. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 14, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog, October 21, 1936, No. 110. According to the catalog description LINCOLN's autograph endorsement appears on an envelope. Another catalog listing of this endorsement describes the envelope as being of ``the U.S. Sanitary Commission addressed to Gen. [George?] C. Jones, Washington.'' (J. C. Morgenthau & Company, Inc., Catalog, May 8, 1934, No. 163).

Extension of Leave for Nathaniel P. Banks [1]

This leave of absence is extended indefinitely, and until further order. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 14. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on a copy of AGO Special Orders No. 341, October 11, 1864: ``The leave of absence heretofore granted Major General N. P. Banks, U.S. Volunteers, is hereby extended thirty days.''

To Stephen A. Hurlbut [1]

Private Executive Mansion Major General Hurlbut Washington, Nov. 14. 1864

Few things, since I have been here, have impressed me more painfully than what, for four or five months past, has appeared as bitter military opposition to the new State Government of Louisiana. I still indulged some hope that I was mistaken in the fact; butPage  107 copies of a correspondence on the subject, between Gen. Canby and yourself, and shown me to-day, dispel that hope. A very fair proportion of the people of Louisiana have inaugerated a new State Government, making an excellent new constitution---better for the poor black man than we have in Illinois. This was done under military protection, directed by me, in the belief, still sincerely entertained, that with such a nucleous around which to build, we could get the State into position again sooner than otherwise. In this belief a general promise of protection and support, applicable alike to Louisiana and other states, was given in the last annual message. During the formation of the new government and constitution, they were supported by nearly every loyal person and opposed by every secessionist. And this support, and this opposition, from the respective stand points of the parties, was perfectly consistent and logical. Every Unionist ought to wish the new government to succeed; and every disunionist must desire it to fail. It's failure would gladden the heart of Slidell in Europe, and of every enemy of the old flag in the world. Every advocate of slavery naturally desires to see blasted, and crushed, the liberty promised the black man by the new constitution. But why Gen. Canby and Gen. Hurlbut should join on the same side is to me incomprehensible.

Of course, in the condition of things at New-Orleans, the military must not be thwarted by the civil authority; but when the constitutional convention, for what it deems a breach of previlege, arrests an editor, in no way connected with the military, the military necessity for insulting the Convention, and forcibly discharging the editor, is difficult to perceive. [2] Neither is the military necessity for protecting the people against paying large salaries, fixed by a Legislature of their own choosing, very apparant. Equally difficult to perceive is the military necessity for forcibly interposing to prevent a bank from loaning it's own money to the State. These things, if they have occurred, are, at the best, no better than gratuitous hostility. I wish I could hope that they may be shown to not have occurred. To make assurance against misunderstanding, I repeat that in the existing condition of things in Louisiana, the military must not be thwarted by the civil authority; and I add that on points of difference the commanding general must be judge and master. But I also add that in the exercise of this judgment and control, a purpose, obvious, and scarcely unavowed, to transcend all military necessity, in order to crush out the civil government, will not be overlooked. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL; LS, DLC. The correspondence between General Edward R. S. Canby and Hurlbut may be found in OR, I, XLI, IV, 412-13. In reply toPage  108

Hurlbut's question ``to what extent am I compelled . . . to recognize the acts and proceedings of the State of Louisiana in its several branches. . . .'' Canby replied on October 29, ``It is scarcely necessary for me to say that until the President . . . revokes his proclamation of December 8, 1863, or until Congress has acted definitely upon the subject, all attempts at civil government, within the territory declared to be in insurrection, are the creation of military power, and, of course, subject to military revision and control. . . .''

On November 29, Hurlbut replied to LINCOLN's letter:

``I am this day in receipt of your letter of November 14th. I confess myself much surprised at the tenor and spirit of its contents and am well assured that correct information has not been furnished you of the position either of Genl Canby or myself.

``I recognize as thoroughly as any man the advance toward the right made by the adoption of the Free Constitution of Louisiana, and have done and shall do all in my power to vindicate its declaration of freedom, and to protect and prepare the emancipated Bondsmen for their new status & condition. The fact has been withheld from you, Mr President, but it still exists that nothing has been done for this purpose since the adoption of the Constitution---except by military authority. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

For Canby's reply to LINCOLN's letter to Hurlbut, see the note to LINCOLN's letter to Canby, December 12, infra.

[2]   Thomas P. May, the radical editor of the New Orleans Times, had been arrested for publishing a description of the convention in which delegates were described as being drunk.

Pass for Mrs. Mary A. Stevens [1]

Allow this lady, Mrs. Stevenss, [2] to pass our lines, with ordinary baggage only, and go to Houston, Texas. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 14. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   ADS, The Rosenbach Company, Philadelphia and New York. A letter from Andrew Johnson, October 31, 1864, accompanies this pass, and introduces Mrs. Mary A. Stevens: ``I am fully satisfied of her loyalty to the Gov't, and personally know that, when residing at Lexington, Ky., she manifested the same in the kindness and hospitality she was pleased to extend to Union Refugees of East Tennessee driven over the mountains into the state of Kentucky.''

[2]   LINCOLN first wrote ``Stevenson,'' then erased the last two letters and added ``s,'' making the name inaccurate as ``Stevenss.''

To Samuel A. Cony and Others [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
The Governor of Maine War Department,
Augusta, Me. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15 1864.

Please send, as soon as practicable, exactly, or approximately, the aggregate of votes cast in your State at the late election. It is desired with reference to the forthcoming Message.

A LINCOLN

Page  109Saml Cony

Gov of Maine

Augusta Me

Jos. A. Gilmore

Gov of N.H.

Concord NH.

Jno Gregory Smith

Govr of Vermont

Montpelier Vt.

John A. Andrew

Govr of Massachusetts

Boston Mass

Jas Y. Smith

Gov of Rhode Island

Providence R I.

Wm. A. Buckingham

Govr of Connecticut

Hartford Conn.

Horatio Seymour

Govr of New York

Albany N.Y.

Joel Parker

Gov of New Jersey

Trenton N.J.

A. G. Curtin

Gov. of Penna

Harrisburg Pa.

Wm. Cannon

Gov of Delaware

Dover Del

A. W. Bradford

Govr of Maryland

Annapolis

A. I. Boreman

Govr West Va.

Wheeling Va

Andrew Johnson

Mil Govr of Tenn

Nashville Tenn

Thos. E. Bramlette

Gov of Kentucky

Lexington Ky.

John Brough

Govr of Ohio

Columbus O.

Austin Blair

Gov of Michigan

Lansing Mich

O. P. Morton

Gov of Indiana

Indianapolis Ind

Richard Yates

Govr of Illinois

Springfield Ill

Willard P Hall

Lt Govr of Missouri

Jefferson City Mo

Wm. M. Stone

Gov of Iowa

Des Moines Iowa

James T. Lewis

Govr of Wisconsin

Madison Wis

Stephen Miller

Govr of Minnesota

St Paul Minn

Thomas Carney

Govr of Kansas

Leavenworth Kan

Frederick F. Low

Govr of California

Sacramento Cal

Jas W. Nye

Govr of Nevada

Carson City

Nevada

Maj Gen J. E. Steele [2]

Little Rock

Ark

Page  110Michael Hahn

Govr of Louisiana

New Orleans via Cairo

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 240-42. The names of the governors to whom the telegram was sent are listed on two separate telegraph blanks (241-42), not in LINCOLN's autograph. The telegrams from the governors in reply (DLC-RTL) were utilized by LINCOLN in compiling his tabulation of votes (December 1, infra), which furnished the basis for his analysis of the election in his annual message to congress on December 6. See also LINCOLN's second telegram to Stone and others, November 29, infra.

[2]   Clerk's error for Major General Frederick Steele.

To Jesse K. Dubois [1]

Hon J K. Dubois, Washn., Nov. 15, 1864.

Springfield Ills.

Yours of today asking that (530) five hundred and thirty men may be assigned to the 32d. Illinois shall be attended to.

You say ``State gone twenty five thousand.'' Which way did it go? How stand the members of congress and the other officers

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 237. LINCOLN's original autograph telegram has been removed from the file and a copy substituted. The date as given by the copy is open to question. No telegram of November 15 from Dubois has been found, but a telegram from Dubois, marked as received at 11 P.M. on November 14, reported ``State carried for LINCOLN & the Union by upwards of thirty thousand for Congress,'' and named the successful candidates (DLC-RTL). In view of the implication of LINCOLN's telegram, it would seem either that the date of the copy is in error or that LINCOLN had not seen Dubois' telegram of November 14.

To William P. Fessenden and Hanson A. Risley [1]

Will the secretary of the Treasury and Mr. Risley please see & hear the bearer, Mr McBernie A LINCOLN

Nov. 15. 1864

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ISLA. McBernie has not been identified.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Will Gen. Hitchcock please see the bearer, Mrs. Gimber.

Nov. 15, 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Thomas F. Madigan, A Catalogue of LINCOLNiana (1929), p. 32. Mrs. Gimber has not been identified.

Page  111

Order Concerning Alfred Everson [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, 15th November, 1864.

It is hereby ordered that the sentence of Acting Master Alfred Everson, of the Navy of the United States, convicted by Court Martial of assault with intent to kill James O'Neill, a fireman on board the captured blockade runner, Nicholas 1st, be so far mitigated as to allow him the freedom of the prison where he is confined, on condition of good behaviour on his part, as a prisoner.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, Part I. The Navy register lists Alfred Everson as resigning on April 6, 1865.

To William H. Purnell [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
W.H. Purnell, War Department,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15 1864.

I shall be happy to receive the committee on Thursday morning (17th.) as you propose. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 239. William H. Purnell of Baltimore, chairman of the Maryland State Central Committee, telegraphed LINCOLN on November 15: ``The State Central Com of the Union party of Md propose to visit the President for the purpose of tendering their congratulations on the result of the recent election particularly in their own State Will it be convenient for the Prest receive the Committee on the morning of Thursday the seventeenth . . . inst'' (DLC-RTL). See LINCOLN's reply to the Maryland committee, November 17, infra.

To George H. Thomas [1]

Cypher Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Thomas War Department,
Nashville. Tenn. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. 1864.

How much force and Artillery had Gillem? A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AL, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 238. The penciled signature is in the handwriting of a clerk. General Thomas had telegraphed Halleck on November 14, 1864, concerning the action near Russellville, Tennessee:

``The following despatch received from General [Jacob] Ammen, Knoxville, via Chattanooga:

`` `General [Alvan C.] Gillem was attacked above Morristown at 12 o'clock last night, routed, and lost his artillery, and is reported captured. Nearly 1,000 of his troops have arrived at Strawberry Plains. I sent some infantry to Morristown yesterday to support General Gillem; they were in the fight, and reported captured. . . . [John C.] Breckinridge is reported in command, with his forcePage  112 variously estimated at from 2,000 to 8,000 men'. . . .'' (OR, I, XLV, I, 876).

Thomas replied to LINCOLN's telegram on the same day:

``Gen Gillems force consisted of three regiments of Tennessee Cavalry, and one battery of six guns belonging to the Governors Guard, about fifteen hundred men.'' (DLC-RTL).

Pardon [1]

November 16, 1864

Upon rejoining his regiment as soon as practicable & faithfully serving out his term, this man is pardoned for any overstaying of time or desertion heretofore committed. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 16. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, owned by Richard F. Lufkin, Boston, Massachusetts. The soldier has not been identified.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

November 16, 1864

Hon. Sec. of War please see Mr. Gear, on the question of furnishing some small arm amunition to loyal people in Northern Alabama. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 16. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Frederic F. Van de Water, Brattleboro, Vermont. On September 28, 1864, Andrew Johnson wrote LINCOLN, introducing Jean Joseph Giers, a refugee from Morgan County, Alabama (DLC-RTL).

To Edward Bates [1]

Pardon, for unexecuted part of sentence.

Nov. 17, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 570. LINCOLN's endorsement is written on a certificate of good behavior from the deputy warden of the U.S. jail in favor of James Welch, sentenced for assault and battery.

Endorsement Concerning Arthur Taylor [1]

Let this man be paroled for sixty days from this date.

Nov. 17, 1864. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog, May 19, 1925, No. 155. According to the catalog description LINCOLN's endorsement is written on a letter from Assistant Surgeon T. E. Mitchell, asking release of Arthur Taylor, Eighth Louisiana Regiment (CSA), in the hospital at Frederick, Maryland, and not likely to recover from his wounds.

Page  113

To William P. Fessenden [1]

In addition to what is within said, I know Mr. Scovel to be one of our best friends. Will the Sec. of Treasury please see him.

Nov. 17, 1864 A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   AES, ORB. ``Scovel'' was probably James M. Scovel of Camden, New Jersey.

Reply to Maryland Union Committee [1]

November 17, 1864

The President, in reply, said: ``He had to confess that he was fully notified of the intention thus kindly to call upon him, and by that means he had a fair opportunity offered to be ready with a set speech; but he had not prepared one, having been very busy with his public duties; therefore, he could only speak as the thoughts might occur to him. He would not attempt to conceal from them the fact that he was gratified at the results of the Presidential election, and he would assure them that he had kept as near as he could to the exercise of his best judgment, for the promotion of the interests of the whole country; and now, to have the seal of approbation marked on the course he had pursued was exceedingly gratifying to his feelings. He might go further and say that, in as large proportion as any other man, his pleasure consisted in the belief that the policy he had pursued would be the best and the only one that could save the country. He had said before, and would now repeat, that he indulged in no feeling of triumph over any one who thought or acted differently from himself. He had no such feeling towards any living man.

``When he thought of Maryland in particular, it was that the people had more than double their share in what had occurred in the elections. He thought the adoption of their free State constitution was a bigger thing than their part in the Presidential election. He could, any day, have stipulated to lose Maryland in the Presidential election to save its free constitution, because the Presidential election comes every four years and the adoption of the constitution, being a good thing, could not be undone. He therefore thought in that they had a victory for the right worth a great deal more than their part in the Presidential election, although he thought well of that. He once before said, and would now say again, that those who had differed from us and opposed us would see that it was better for their own good that they had been defeated, rather than to have been successful. Thanking them forPage  114 their compliment, he said he would bring to a close that short speech.''

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily Morning Chronicle and Daily National Republican, November 18, 1864. See Lincoln to Purnell, November 15, supra. As chairman of the committee, William H. Purnell ``delivered an eloquent address, in which he said:

``They rejoiced that the people, by an almost unanimous and unprecedented majority, had again elevated the President to the proudest and most honorable position on earth, and had endorsed his course of action. They felt under deep obligations to him, because he had appreciated their condition as a slave State. It was not too much to say that, by means of the exercise of a rare discretion on his part, Maryland occupies a position in favor of freedom, having forever abolished slavery by the sovereign decree of her own people. They desired that his Administration in the future, as in the past, would result in the restoration of the Union, with freedom as its immutable basis. After further remarks of a like appropriate character, Mr. Purnell expressed the hope that the President, on retiring from his high and important position, would receive the universal approval of mankind; and `may Heaven,' he said, `crown your days with loving kindness and tender mercy.' ''

To William H. Seward [1]

Livingston

What says the Sec. of State to within? A. LINCOLN

Nov. 17, 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from H.P. Livingston, Willard's Hotel, November 14, 1864:

``Allow me to present to you a plan, whearby the Union sentiment at the South, would be strengthened, The dissatisfaction of the people with their Government, increased and their Armey demoralized.

``Their are now but (36) newspapers printed in the Confederacy. they are poor few of them makeing money.

``I would suggest that the controle of many and nearley all of them may be had by purchase of the controleing interest. The amount of funds required would be small in comparison to the advantages that would result to our cause from the control of the Southern Press.

``Their are in the South a large number of inteligent Union men who are able writers, and would hail with joy an opertunity to assist in puting down the rebellion.''

Seward endorsed in reply:

``It seems to me very judicious and wise. But I have no adequate fund. Will the President submit the plan to Sec. War. I do not know that he has the funds necessary, and of course he must judge of the propriety of the application if he has.

``If not T.W. [Thurlow Weed]---might find money by contribution.''

Endorsement Concerning John T. Cox [1]

[c. November 18, 1864]

No particular controversy

Page  115

Annotation

[1]   AE, DNA NR RG 48, Department of Interior, Indian Agents, Box 66. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the envelope containing a letter of Samuel J. Crawford and others, Leavenworth, Kansas, to Senator James H. Lane, November 18, 1864, recommending appointment of John T. Cox as agent for the Osage Indians. No record of the appointment has been found.

Proclamation Concerning Blockade [1]

November 19, 1864

By the President of the United States of America:

A Proclamation.

Whereas, by my Proclamation of the nineteenth of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty one, it was declared that the ports of certain States including those of Norfolk, in the State of Virginia, Fernandina and Pensacola, in the State of Florida, were, for reasons therein set forth, intended to be placed under blockade; and whereas the said ports were subsequently blockaded accordingly, but having, for some time past, been in the military possession of the United States, it is deemed advisable that they should be opened to domestic and foreign commerce:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, pursuant to the authority in me vested by the fifth section of the act of Congress, approved on the 13th. of July 1861, entitled ``An act further to provide for the collection of duties on imports and for other purposes,'' do hereby declare that the blockade of the said ports of Norfolk, Fernandina and Pensacola, shall so far cease and determine from and after the first day of December next that commercial intercourse with those ports, except as to persons, things and information contraband of war, may, from that time, be carried on, subject to the laws of the United States, to the limitations and in pursuance of the regulations which may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and to such military and naval regulations as are now in force or may hereafter be found necessary.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L.S.]

Done at the city of Washington, this nineteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty four, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth.

By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Proclamations.

Page  116

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Rosecrans. Nov. 19, 1864.

A Major Wolf, as it seems, was under sentence, in your Department, to be executed in retaliation for the murder of a Major Wilson; and I, without any particular knowledge of the facts, was induced by appeals for mercy, to order the suspension of his execution until further order. Understanding that you so desire, this letter places the case again within your control, with the remark only that I wish you to do nothing merely for revenge, but that what you may do, shall be solely done with reference to the security of the future. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL; LS, ORB. See Lincoln to Rosecrans, November 10, supra. On February 24, 1865, Major Enoch O. Wolf was sent to City Point and exchanged. For a detailed narrative of the case, see Oliver R. Barrett, ``Lincoln and Retaliation,'' Lincoln Herald, December, 1947, pp. 2-23.

To Alfred Sully [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Davenport, Iowa. Washington, Nov. 19. 1864.

Let the Indian ``Big Eagle'' be discharged. I ordered this some time ago. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 243. See Lincoln's order of October 26, supra. On November 14, 1864, George S. C. Dow, a lawyer and banker of Davenport, Iowa, wrote Lincoln:

``You will remember me as the person to whom you were kind enough to give an order for the release of the Indian `Big Eagle.'

``This order failed to effect his release. The person in charge and to whom I presented it, treated me very rudely. I may as well say that he insulted me most grossly. He treated also the order and yourself with great contempt because as he said, you ought to know better than to write an order in pencil, or give it to a civilian.

``I did not intend to trouble you again, but for reasons not necessary to be stated, I think I should report the facts to you, and request of you, that you will be kind enough to direct a note to the proper military officer, requesting him to issue the proper order for `Big Eagle's' discharge. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

General Alfred Sully was in command of the District of Iowa with headquarters at Davenport, from August, 1864, through April, 1865, but no reply from any officer at Davenport has been found. On December 3, 1864, AGO Special Orders No. 430, directed that ```Big Eagle,' an Indian, now in confinement at Davenport, Iowa, will, upon the receipt of this Order, be immediately released from confinement and set at liberty.''

To Mrs. Lydia Bixby [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Nov. 21, 1864.

Dear Madam,---I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts,Page  117 that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle.

I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save.

I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours, to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom. Yours, very sincerely and respectfully, A. LINCOLN.

Mrs. Bixby.

Annotation

[1]   Boston Transcript, November 25, 1864. The purported facsimiles of this letter have long been adjudged to be forgeries, but there is no reason to question the authenticity of the text of the letter which appeared in the Transcript and other contemporary sources. Controversy over the claim that John Hay composed this letter has somewhat abated, with the claim remaining unproved. Lincoln was in error as to Mrs. Bixby's five sons because her case had been inaccurately presented to him by the Adjutant General's Office. Later investigations have revealed that only two sons were killed: Sergeant Charles N. Bixby, Twentieth Massachusetts Infantry, killed May 3, 1863, and Private Oliver C. Bixby, Fifty-eighth Massachusetts Infantry, killed July 30, 1864. Private George W. (A.?) Way (Bixby), Fifty-sixth Massachusetts Infantry, who had enlisted under an assumed name, was captured July 30, 1864. Imprisoned first at Richmond and later at Salisbury, North Carolina, George Way was reported (1) to have deserted to the enemy and (2) to have died in prison at Salisbury. Neither of these reports has been established beyond doubt. Corporal Henry C. Bixby, Thirty-second Massachusetts Infantry, was honorably discharged at Boston on December 17, 1864. Private Edward (Arthur Edward) Bixby, First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, deserted May 28 or 29, 1862. The most complete single source of information among the several books and pamphlets, as well as the numerous articles on the subject, is F. Lauriston Bullard, Abraham Lincoln and the Widow Bixby (1946).

To William P. Fessenden [1]

November 21, 1864

Hon. Secretary of the Treasury please see & hear Hon. Mr. Allen who will present this. Mr. Allen's representations may be safely relied on; and if the removal he seeks shall be made, I personally know that a better man can not be found for the vacancy than Joseph G. Bowman. In fact I should dislike to appoint any other, he being an applicant A. LINCOLN

Nov. 21. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. Cyrus M. Allen of Vincennes, Indiana, was recommending his fellow townsman, Joseph G. Bowman, who had formerly resided in Wabash County, Illinois, and served with Lincoln in the Illinois legislature in 1839. Bowman was appointed assessor of Internal Revenue, First District, Indiana, 1865.

Page  118

To John Phillips [1]

Executive Mansion. Washington,
My dear Sir 21st. November, 1864

I have heard of the incident at the polls in your town, in which you bore so honored a part, and I take the liberty of writing to you to express my personal gratitude for the compliment paid me by the suffrage of a citizen so venerable.

The example of such devotion to civic duties in one whose days have already extended an average life time beyond the Psalmist's limit, cannot but be valuable and fruitful. It is not for myself only, but for the country which you have in your sphere served so long and so well, that I thank you. Your friend and Servant

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-Nicolay Papers; New York Tribune, December 9; 1864. The draft or copy in the Nicolay Papers is on Executive Mansion stationery in an unidentified handwriting. On November 9, 1864, F. W. Emmons of Sturbridge, Massachusetts, wrote Lincoln:

``I send you with this, a pamphlet of `The Centenarian Deacon John Phillips [']---of the celebration of his one Hundreth birth day and am happy to inform you that he still lives, now in his 105th year.

``He is a Democrat, of the Jeffersonian School: voted for Washington, as President of the United States; and, yesterday, voted for your re-election to this honorable and responsible place.

``He rode from home, two miles, to our Town Hall, with his son, Col. Edwd Phillips, aged 79 yrs, to cast this vote. He entered it between two unfurled flags of his country, bearing on them the Stars and Stripes; all within, at the time rising, with uncovered heads, to do him homage. And when offered two votes, to take his choice, he said: `I vote for Abraham Lincoln.'

``He has been, for several years, the oldest citizen of this town; and is now, probably, the oldest man in the commonwealth. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On January 16, 1865, Phillips replied to Lincoln's letter:

``I trust you will pardon me in trying to answer the kind letter you sent me for which I would return my thanks.

``It was an honor I never expected to receive and feel that your goodness of heart with respect for my extreme age alone prompted the act---while your mind and time must be occupied by so many national cares and anxieties.

``I feel that I have no desire to live but to see the conclusion of this wicked rebellion, and the power of God displayed in the conversion of the nation.

``I beleive by the help of God you will accomplish the first---and also be the means of establishing universal freedom and restoring peace to the Union.

``That the God of mercy will bless you in this great work and through life is the prayer of your unworthy servant.'' (LS, IHi-Nicolay and Hay Papers).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

If the service can be useful let the appointment be made.

Nov. 21, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   The Morris Book Shop (Chicago) Catalog 56, December, 1912, No. 147. According to the source, Lincoln's endorsement was written on an envelopePage  119

``addressed to Hon. Cyrus M. Allen,'' enclosing five letters recommending appointment of Theodore R. McFerson, as assistant quartermaster. McFerson has not been identified.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

Executive Mansion,
November 21, 1864.

My dear Sir: I now propose that Smithson and Yocum, respectively, be enlarged, allowing their sentences to stand as security for their good behavior---that is, not pardon them, but if they misbehave, re-arrest and imprison them on the old score.

Also, I think if Waring's premises down in Maryland are [not] [2] FOOTNOTES}>(2) in use by the government, he and his family might be allowed to re-occupy them. Yours truly, A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   NH, X, 275. Stanton replied on the same day: ``The Adjutant General has been instructed to issue orders in the cases of Yokum Smithson & Waring in conformity with the views expressed in your note of this date. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On November 25, 1864, AGO Special Orders No. 417 directed:

``I. That William T. Smithson and William Yokum, now confined in the Penitentiary at Albany, New York, under sentences published in General Orders, No. 371, of November 18th, 1863, and No. 31, of January 25th, 1864, be enlarged, until further orders, on condition of future good behavior towards the Government of the United States.

``II. That John H. Waring be allowed to re-occupy his premises in Maryland, with his family, and that he be put in possession accordingly, on condition that he shall neither hold intercourse with rebels, nor give them aid or comfort.''

[2]   Brackets in source.

To Edwin M. Stanton [3]

If another Commissary is needed, let this gentleman be appointed. A. LINCOLN.

Nov. 21, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Tracy, p. 247. According to the source this endorsement was written on a ``letter of A. Johnson to Secretary of War in favor of James H. Woodward.'' No record has been found of Woodward's appointment.

To Augustus R. Wright [1]

Hon. A. R. Wright Executive Mansion,
Louisville, Ky. Washington, Nov. 21, 1864.

Admitting that your cotton was destroyed by the Federal Army, I do not suppose any-thing could be done for you now. Congress has appropriated no money for that class of claims, and will not, I expect, while the active war lasts. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 244. Augustus R. Wright, former U.S. congressman from Georgia (1857-1859), telegraphed Lincoln fromPage  120 Louisville, Kentucky, on November 21, 1864: ``My cotton was burned by the Federal Army If I return with proof can you do anything for me. I find my brother here in want. Reply.'' (DLC-RTL).

On November 24 Wright telegraphed from Nashville, Tennessee: ``At Louisville, I met with my brother & a Mr Stewart, refugees from Rome Ga. They told me the cotton at Rome was burnt. This was the cause of my telegram. On arriving at this place, I meet others from Rome who tell me all the cotton [in] the ware houses was burnt but none other, & that my 220 bales which was over the river in a gin house, was still safe. . . .'' (Ibid.).

To Thomas E. Bramlette [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Bramlette War Department,
Frankfort, Ky. Washington, D.C., Nov. 22 1864.

Yours of to-day received. It seems that Lt. Gov. Jacobs & Col. Wolford are stationary now. Gen. Sudarth & Mr. Hodges are here & the Secretary of War, and myself are trying to devise means of pacification and harmony for Kentucky, which we hope to effect soon, now that the passion-exciting subject of the election is past.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 245. On November 22 Governor Bramlette telegraphed Lincoln:

``Lt Gov [Richard T.] Jacob is at Catlettsburg & Col [Frank L.] Wolford at Covington both are under arrest & by order of the Secret Inquisition ordered into the rebel lines Will you either order their release at once or a suspension of the order until you receive my communication of this date'' (DLC-RTL).

Bramlette's letter of the same date forwarded a petition for the release of Jacob and Wolford, signed by Joshua F. Speed and others. The arrangements which Lincoln hoped to work out with Albert G. Hodges and General Samuel G. Suddarth of the Kentucky State Militia seem not to have materialized. See Lincoln to Dickson, December 27, infra.

A communication from General Stephen G. Burbridge to Colonel Norton P. Chipman, November 23, 1864, gives the reasons for Jacob's arrest: ``Lieutenant-Governor Jacob was arrested for making speeches in Kentucky, in which he advised armed resistance to the enrollment and enlistment of slaves; advised citizens to arm to resist military interference at the polls; and generally his whole conduct and speeches have been wholly disloyal. . . .'' (OR, I, XLV, I, 1010).

To Robert N. McLaren [1]

War Department
Officer in command at Washington City,
Fort-Snelling, Minn. Nov. 24, 1864

Suspend execution of Patrick Kelly, John Lennor [sic], Joel H. Eastwood, Thomas J. Murray, and Hoffman until further order from here. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 247. Colonel Robert N. McLaren was in command at Fort Snelling. Concerning the prisoners named, see Lincoln's telegram to Rice, infra.

Page  121

To Henry M. Rice [1]

War Department
Hon. Henry M. Rice Washington City,
St. Paul, Minn. Nov. 24 1864

Have suspended execution of deserters named in your despatch, until further order from here. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 246. Henry M. Rice, former U.S. senator from Minnesota, and Governor Stephen A. Miller telegraphed on November 23, 1864: ``We respectfully apply for postponement of execution for thirty (30) days of Patrick Kelly John Lennon Joel H Eastwood Thomas J Murray & John Hoffman five (5) deserters now under sentence of death at Fort Snelling'' (DLC-RTL).

To Andrew G. Curtin [1]

Gov. Curtin War Department Washington City,
Harrisburg, Pa. Nov. 25. 1864

I have no knowledge, information, or belief, that three States, or any state, offer to resume allegiance. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 248. Governor Curtin had telegraphed on November 25, 1864: ``Our people are excited by a rumor that three States have offered to return to their allegiance. Is it true?'' (OR, III, IV, 942).

To Nathaniel P. Banks [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Banks. Nov. 26. 1864.

I had a full conferrence this morning with the Secretary of War in relation to yourself. The conclusion is that it will be best for all if you proceed to New-Orleans, and act there in obedience to your order; and, in doing which, having continued, say, one month, if it shall then, as now, be your wish to resign, your resignation will be accepted. Please take this course. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi; ADfS, DLC-RTL. Although ordered to return to his command of the Department of the Gulf on November 23 (AGO Special Orders No. 413), Banks remained in Washington for four months, with Lincoln's consent, to help in Lincoln's effort to have the Louisiana state government recognized by congress. See further Lincoln to Banks, December 2, infra.

To Edward Bates [1]

Let this appointment be made. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 26. 1864

Page  [unnumbered]

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from John H. Hubbard and others, Litchfield, Connecticut, October 4, 1864, recommending John Gould for U.S. marshal in case Henry Hammond resigned. See Lincoln's communication to the Senate, January 27, 1865, infra.

Order Concerning Joseph M. Locke [1]

November 26, 1864

Report approved. Let Captain Locke be re-instated according to the recommendation of the Lieutenant General & the Judge Advocate General. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 26, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 130, U.S. Army Court Martial Cases, White House Office. Captain Joseph M. Locke, Fourteenth Regiment, U.S. Army, had been dismissed for failure to render account of goods furnished him by the U.S. Sanitary Commission.

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Major General Rosecrans Executive Mansion,
St Louis Washington, Nov. 26. 1864.

Please telegraph me briefly on what charge and evidence Mrs. Anna B. Martin has been sent to the Penitentiary at Alton.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 249. General Rosecrans telegraphed on November 30, 1864: ``Annie B. Martin on her written request & in accordance with instructions from War Dept date of April twenty fourth eighteen sixty three sent beyond the lines not to return during the war under pain of imprisonment during the war she returned during the war under pain of imprisonment during the war she returned without authority was tried by Military Commission & sentenced to imprisonment during the war in her examination she states she is disloyal & if released would return south'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   ``St Louis'' is not in Lincoln's handwriting.

To Henry F. Harrington and Others [1]

Executive Mansion,
Gentlemen Washington, 28 November, 1864.

I have received with gratification your letter of the 12th November, and beg that you will accept my cordial thanks for your kind and generous words.

I am very truly Your friend and Servant A. LINCOLN

Revd. Henry F. Harrington

&c &c

Annotation

[1]   LS, InFtwl. The body of the letter is in John Hay's handwriting. Harrington's letter of November 14 has not been found, and Harrington has not been further identified.

Page  123

To Heads of Departments and Bureaus [1]

I shall be very glad if the Head of any Department or Bureau, can find for, and give this young lady suitable employment.

Nov. 29. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-Hitchcock Papers. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of a note of the same date from General Ethan A. Hitchcock: ``Gen. Hitchcock presents his respects to the President in behalf of Miss Eliot, the young lady who (accompanied by Miss Williams) presented a request this morning asking his assistance in obtaining some employment, and begs to recommend her to his kindness.'' Miss Eliot and Miss Williams have not been identified.

To Alvin P. Hovey [1]

Major General Hovey, or Executive Mansion,
whoever may have charge Washington,
at the proper time. Nov. 29. 1864.

Whenever John B. Castleman shall be tried, if convicted and sentenced, suspend execution until further order from me, and send me the record. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS-F, Louisville, Kentucky, Post, September 4, 1916. Captain John B. Castleman of General John H. Morgan's command was one of a group of rebels who went to Chicago during the Democratic Convention, with plans, it was charged, to release prisoners of war and to assist the Sons of Liberty in a ``North-western Insurrection.'' (OR, I, XLV, I, 1077, Colonel Benjamin J. Sweet to James B. Fry, November 26, 1864). He was captured and held in close confinement as a spy at Camp Morton. After being transferred to Point Lookout and later to the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, Castleman was returned on April 28, 1865, to Hovey's command at Indianapolis, where he was to be tried (OR, II, VIII, 87, 477, 511, 519). He was released without trial, however, on condition that he leave the United States.

According to an article accompanying the facsimile published in the Louisville Post, Lincoln gave his order of November 29 to Judge Samuel M. Breckinridge, of St. Louis, Missouri, whose wife was Virginia Castleman, sister of John B. Castleman, with the comment, ``Sam, this is for you and Virginia, entrusted in confidence, with the condition that its existence shall not be known unless the emergency arises for which this letter provides.'' Castleman's banishment lasted for eighteen months, and he never knew of Lincoln's order until the original was given to him by his brother-in-law fifteen years later.

To Ward H. Lamon [1]

Executive Mansion Nov 29th [1864?]

Will Col Lamon please say, what at present prices, the feed for two horses & two ponies, would cost, per month. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, CSmH. No reply or further reference has been found.

Page  124

To William M. Stone and Others [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Governor of Iowa. DesMoines [2]Nov. 29. 1864

May I renew my request for the exact aggregate vote of your State cast at the late election? My object fails if I do not receive it before Congress meets. A. LINCOLN

Michigan Oregon

Wisconsin Penn.

Missouri Kansas

Ohio West-Virginia.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 250. Following the name of each state listed by Lincoln, the number of the despatch and the capital city, written in by clerks in the telegraph office, have been omitted. See Lincoln's telegram to Cony and others, November 15, supra.

[2]   ``DesMoines'' is not in Lincoln's handwriting.

Endorsement [1]

November 30, 1864

I think this is a meritories application, and I shall be glad if the Head of any Bureau or Department can and will give the lady suitable employment A. LINCOLN

Nov. 30. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, CSmH. The endorsement has been removed from the application, and the lady has not been identified.

Endorsement Concerning John W. and Joseph Tatum [1]

November 30, 1864

This paper is presented to me by Friends John W. Tatum, of Del. and Joseph Tatum of New-Jersey, who are satisfied that the statement is correct. Let the men within named, be discharged on affirming according to the oath of Dec. 8. 1863, and that they will remain North. A. LINCOLN

Nov. 30. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the back of an unsigned memorandum, written on Department of Agriculture stationery, November 29, 1864: ``Three Friends confined amongst the Confederate Prisoners at `Point-Look-out'

``Noah Nickols from Yadkin County N.C aged about 45.

``Isaac Davis `` Randolph `` `` `` `` 50.

``Thomas E Davis `` `` `` `` `` ``

``These 3 Friends, were pressed into the confederate army against their will, and conscience; one of them was butted, and gagged, for not help[ing] in the confederate service;---they are willing, and desirous, to take an affirmation ofPage  125 allegiance to the United States---to testify to the Truth of the above, and exhibit some documents in confirmation thereof;---they wish to go, to their friends in Grant County Indiana.''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

[c. November 30, 1864]

Ought not there to be an examination in the case of these men.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 107, Secretary of War, Letters Received, P 1115, Register. A copy of Lincoln's endorsement is preserved in a register notation concerning the cases of Cyrus H. Carver and James H. Stagg, confined to Central Guard House for receiving stolen money. The original papers are missing and no further reference has been found.

To Charles A. Dana [1]

Will Mr. Dana, Asst. Sec. of War, please see and hear, Hon. S. F. Headley, of New-Jersey. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 1. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC.

To Andrew Johnson [1]

Gov. Johnson Executive Mansion, Washington,
Nashville, Tenn. Dec. 1, 1864.

I am applied to for the release of Alexander B. Kinney, John P. Carter, and Samuel A. Owens. Your name commending their application to favorable consideration, is on the papers. If you will say directly that you think they ought to be discharged I will discharge them. Answer. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 251. The telegram is marked by the telegraph clerk ``sent 12.35 pm.'' Governor Johnson replied on December 3, 1864: ``From Representation made to me by persons of reliability & loyalty I should have no hesitancy in releasing Alex B Ramsay [sic], John B [sic] Carter & Saml A Owen the Prisoners named in your dispatch'' (DLC-RTL).

To Andrew Johnson [2]

His Excellency Andrew Johnson Executive Mansion,
Nashville Washington,
Tennessee 1 December, 1864.

In the cases of Alexander B. Kinney, John P. Carter, and Samuel A. Owens, Col. Wm B. Stokes has recommended the release of all three. His recommendation is on file here. A. LINCOLN

Send above

John Hay AAG

Page  126

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 252. The telegram is in John Hay's autograph, ``A. LINCOLN'' appearing to have been signed by Hay also. The telegraph clerk endorsed ``sent 215.'' Colonel William B. Stokes commanded the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry. No further reference to these cases has been found.

Recommendation [1]

Executive Mansion. Dec. 1, 1864.

I do not personally know these ladies, but very cheerfully endorse Judge Wylie and Mayor Wallach, and shall be glad if the ladies can find employment in any Department or Bureau.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Tracy, p. 249. Andrew Wylie was associate justice of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. Richard Wallach was mayor of Washington. The ladies have not been identified.

To James Speed [1]

Hon. James Speed Executive Mansion
Louisville, Ky Washington, Dec. 1. 1864

I appoint you to be Attorney General. Please come on at once.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 253. James Speed replied on the same day: ``Will leave tomorrow for Washington'' (DLC-RTL). On November 24, 1864, Edward Bates submitted his letter of resignation as attorney general:

``For some months past, you have been aware of my desire to withdraw from the active labors & constant cares of the office which I hold by your favor.

``Heretofore, it has not been compatible with my ideas of duty to the public & fidelity to you, to leave my post of service for any private consideration, however urgent. Then, the fate of the nation hung, in doubt & gloom. Even your own fate, as identified with the nation, was a source of much anxiety. Now, on the contrary, the affairs of the Government display a brighter aspect; and to you, as head & leader of the Government, all the honor & good fortune that we hoped for, has come. And it seems to me, under these altered circumstances, that the time has come, when I may, without dereliction of duty, ask leave to retire to private life.

``In tendering the resignation of my office of Attorney General of the United States (which I now do) I gladly sieze the occasion to repeat the expression of my gratitude, not only for your good opinion which led to my appointment, but also for your uniform & unvarying courtesy & kindness during the whole time in which we have been associated in the public service. The memory of that kindness & personal favor, I shall bear with me into private life, and hope to retain it in my heart, as long as I live.

``Pray let my resignation take effect on the last day of November

``With heartfelt respect I remain your friend & servant'' (ibid.).

On November 30, Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt declined to accept appointment as Bates' successor: ``I have with your permission, held under consideration until this moment, the offer of the office of Attorney General of the U.States, so kindly made to me a few days since. The result is that after the most careful reflection, I have not been able to overcome the embarrassments referred to in our last interview, & which then disinclined me to accept, as theyPage  127 must now determine me respectfully to decline the appointment. . . . In view of all the circumstances, I am satisfied that I can serve you better in the position which I now hold at your hands. . . .'' (Ibid.).

On December 1, Holt recommended the appointment of James Speed: ``Referring to our conversation of yesterday, I beg to say that the opinion there expressed in regard to Mr S. remains unchanged. I can recall no public man in the State, of uncompromising loyalty, who unites in the same degree, the qualifications of professional attainments, fervent devotion to the union, & to the principles of your administration & spotless points of personal character. To these he adds---what I should deem indispensable---a warm & hearty friendship for yourself, personally & officially.'' (Ibid.).

To James Speed and Joshua F. Speed [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 1. 1864.

I have stated that if either Mr. James Speed, or Joshua F. Speed, will say in writing on this sheet that he has inquired into the cases of John H. Schramm, and C. T. Smith, and that he believes they or either of them ought to be discharged, on return of the paper I will order the discharge accordingly on the taking of the oath.

A. LINCOLN

Let these two men Smith & Schramm be discharged on taking the oath of December 8. 1863. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 10. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, and ES, owned by Foreman M. Lebold, Chicago, Illinois. Joshua F. Speed endorsed Lincoln's note on December 5, 1864: ``I have enquired into the character of the signers to the two petitions in favor of the discharge of the two men C. T. Smith & John H. Schramme---now confined at Rock Island Illinois.

``I know some of the gentlemen and all of them from enquiry to be good Union men.

``The prisoners are also men of heretofore good character---are truly penitent and would from all the information I can get---give willing obedience to the law---and whatever influence they may have in favor of the Government.

``I would not ask their release if I did not believe that they would observe their promises.''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Sir: Washington, Dec. 1, 1864.

Hon. George F. Miller, M.C. elect for the Harrisburg District, has a son---Daniel B. Miller---who for a long time has been acting Commissary of Subsistence, now wishes the appointment for him, with rank of Captain. He is now with the Army of the James. Let him be appointed. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-F, ISLA. Daniel B. Miller was appointed captain and commissary of subsistence of Volunteers on December 12, 1864.

Page  128

Tabulation and Comparison of Election Returns---1860 and 1864 [1]

[c. December 1, 1864]

[Total Lincoln Douglas Breckinridge Bell] [Lincoln McClellan Total]

118.840 California 39.173 38.516. 34.334. 6.817

77.246 Connecticut 43.792 15.522. 14.641. 3.291. 44.511. 42.105 86.616

16.039 Delawaware [sic] 3.815 1.025 7.337. 3.864 8162. 8762 16.924

339.693 Illinois 172.161. 160.215 2.404 4.913. 189.505. 158.730 348.235

272.143 Indiana 139.033. 115.509 12.295 5.306. 150.422. 130.223. 280.645

128.331 Iowa 70.409 55.111 1.048 1.763 143.331

146.216 Kentucky 1.364 25.651 53.143 66.058 80.000

50.510 Louisiana 7.625 22.681 20.204.

97.918 Maine 62.811 26.693 6.368 2.046 111.000

92.502 Maryland 2.294 5.966 42.482 41.760 40.007. 32.726. 72.733.

169.175 Massachusetts 106.533 34.372 5.939 22.331 126.742. 48.745. 175.487.

154.747 Michigan 88.480 65.057 805 405 162.413.

34.799 Minnesota 22.069 11.920 748 62 42.500.

165.538 Missouri 17.028 58.821 31.317 58.372

65.953 New-Hampshire 37.519 25.881 2.112 .441 34.486. 32.048. 66.434

1.998. 679. 2.677

------ ------ ------

36.484. 32.727 69.111

121.125 New-Jersey. 58.324 62.801 128.630.

675.156 New-York. 362.646 312.510 368.730. 361.934. 730.664.

442.441 Ohio 231.610 187.232 11.405 12.194

Page  129[Total Lincoln Douglas Breckinridge Bell] [Lincoln McClellan Total]

14.410 Oregon 5.270 3.951 5.006. 183

476.442 Pennsylvania 268.030 16.765 178.871 12.776 556.382

19.931 Rhode Island 12.224. 7.707 13.624. 8 563 22.187

145.333 Tennessee 11.350 64.709 69.274

42.844 Vermont 33.808 6.849 218 1.969. 42.490. 13.321. 55.811

46.195 West-Virginia 1.302 5.196. 19.075. 20.622 23.437 10.437 33.874

152.180 Wisconconsin [sic]. 86.110 65.021 888 161

Nevada. 16.528

15.454 Kansas 14.000. 4.000 18.000

1860 1864

California 118.840 110.000

Connecticut. 77.246 86.616

Delaware 16.039 16.924

Illinois 339.693 348.235

Indiana 272.143 280.645

Iowa 128.331 143.331

Kentucky 146.216 90.000

Maine 97.918 111.000

Maryland 92.502 72.703

Massachusetts 169.533 175.487

Michigan 154.747 162.413

Minnesota 34.799 42.500

Missouri 165.538 90.000

New-Hampshire 65.953 69.111

New-Jersey 121.125 128.680

Page  130Tabulation and Comparison of Election Returns---1860 and 1864---Continued

[Total Lincoln Douglas Breckinridge Bell] [Lincoln McClellan Total]

New-York. 675.156 730.664

Ohio 442.441 470.558 457.102

Oregon 14.410 14.410

Pennsylvania 476.442 571.000

Rhode Island 19.931 22.187

Vermont 42.844 55.811

West-Virginia 46.195 33.874

Wisconsin 152.180 146.000

------ ------

3.870.222 3.958.693

3.870.222

------

Increase--- 88.471

Add Kansas. 23.000 really 17.234. Soldiers vote not in

'' Nevada. 16.528 16.528

------ ------

127.999 33.762

Soldiers vote in Mass. 16.500 3.982.011

------

4.015.773

'' R.I. 3.000

3.870.222

------

'' N.J. 7.500 145.551

'' Del. 1.500

'' Ia. 16.500

Ills 21.000

------

193.999

Cal. 4.500

Annotation

[1]   AD, IHi-Nicolay and Hay Papers. Prepared on the basis of the figures received from the governors of the Union states (see Lincoln to Cony, November 15, and to Stone, November 29, supra), these tables furnished the basis for Lincoln's comparison of the popular vote of 1860 and 1864 in his Annual Message, December 6, infra.

Page  131

To Nathaniel P. Banks [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Banks. Dec. 2. 1864.

I know you are dissatisfied, which pains me very much; but I wish not to be argued with further. I entertain no abatement of confidence, or friendship for you. I have told you why I can not order Gen. Canby from the Department of the Gulf---that he whom I must hold responsible for military results, is not agreed. Yet I do believe that you, of all men, can best perform the part of advancing the new State government of Louisiana; and therefore I have wished you to go and try, leaving it to yourself to give up the trial at the end of a month, if you find it impracticable, or personally too disagreeable. This is certainly meant in no unkindness; but I wish to avoid further struggle about it. Yours truly

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, CSmH. See Lincoln to Banks, November 26, supra. Banks answered Lincoln on the same day: ``You are under some misapprehension as to my views of the command assigned to me at New Orleans. I am not at all dissatisfied. It is my wish on the contrary to do every thing in my power to aid you and your administration, whether or not it comports with my wishes or interests. The Secretary of War has said to me that in civil matters you had generally given directions yourself---with which, while he had known what was done---he did not interfere. My wish is to know from you what should be done by me in the execution of orders, that I have received. In accordance with your suggestion conveyed to me by Mr Nicolay I will call at the Executive Mansion at 7 o clock this evening.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Gen. Hitchcock Dec. 2. 1864.

If you can oblige Mrs. Welles, by effecting a special exchange of Lieut. or Capt. Richard Dinsmore, now in the Poor-House prison at Charleston, I will be greatly obliged Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. Richard Dinsmore, captain of Company E, Thirty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, may have been a relative or friend of Mrs. Gideon Welles (Mary Jane Hale) who was originally from Lewistown, Pennsylvania, the vicinity in which Dinsmore's regiment was recruited.

Order Concerning the Steamer Funayma Solace [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, 3d December, 1864.

A war steamer called the 'Funayma Solace,' having been built in this country for the Japanese government and at the instancePage  132 of that government, it is deemed to comport with the public interest, in view of the unsettled condition of the relations of the United States with that Empire, that the steamer should not be allowed to proceed to Japan. If, however, the Secretary of the Navy should ascertain that the steamer is adapted to our service, he is authorized to purchase her, but the purchase money will be held in trust towards satisfying any valid claims which may be presented by the Japanese on account of the construction of the steamer and the failure to deliver the same as above set forth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 59, General Records of the Department of State, Notes from the Japanese Legation, Volume I. See Lincoln's similar order of October 12, 1864. Gideon Welles' Diary under dates November 30 and December 3, 1864, gives an account of the conferences leading up to Lincoln's issuance of this order of December 3. Under date of December 5 Welles wrote: ``Mr. Seward sent for my perusal a draught of an executive order forbidding the Japanese vessel from leaving, and authorizing the Navy Department to purchase. I dislike this thing in every aspect. . . . Some weeks since application was made for a survey and appraisal of this vessel. This was ordered . . . and without any connection with the government or the Japanese. The Board valued her at $392,000, and at this price we, under direction of the President at the solicitation of Seward, agreed to take her. These late government movements make it embarrassing. I declined to give any opinion or make any suggestion in regard to the executive order, but said orally to the clerk that our offer was still considered as good. . . . Two hundred thousand dollars in gold would purchase this vessel. It is easy to perceive that Mr. [Thurlow] Weed and Mr. [Robert H.] Pruyn will realize a clever sum for their labors. They have had for one or two years the use of $800,000 in gold. This vessel has not cost them over $200,000 in gold. The government takes it at $392,000 and must pay that sum in gold to Japan. Who pockets the $192,000? It cannot be otherwise than that this subject will be inquired into. It ought to be.''

Order for Discharge [1]

I suppose there is some charge against this man; but if there is none, let him be discharged. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 4, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog 1470, November 22, 1932, No. 47. According to the catalog description this item is an autograph note signed.

Endorsement [1]

I perceive the within is about business, and not about pictures.

Dec. 5. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA FS RG 59, Appointments, Box 223. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from James McBride, consul at Honolulu, September 22, 1864, recommending John L. Barnard as consular student at Honolulu.

Page  133

To Joseph Holt [1]

Let execution be suspended until the record can be examined.

Dec. 5. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 3012. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the court-martial record of Private William Stevenson, Co. K, Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, sentenced to be shot for attempting to shoot his captain. The roster of Battery K shows Stevenson to have been discharged with the battery on January 29, 1866.

To Andrew Johnson [1]

December 5, 1864

If Gov. Johnson will say in writing on this sheet that in his opinion this man should be discharged, I will discharge him.

Dec. 5. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Let this man take the oath of Dec. 8. 1863 & be discharged as recommended by Gov. Johnson. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 22. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by James W. Smith, New York City. Lincoln's endorsements are written on the back of a fragment of a petition for the discharge of a Tennesseean who was held a prisoner of war. The man is not identified, and Johnson's reply is not given.

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States: December 5, 1864

By virtue of the authority contained in the 6th section of the act of 21 April, 1864, which enacts ``that any officer in the Naval service, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may be advanced not exceeding thirty numbers in his own grade, for distinguished conduct in battle or extraordinary heroism,''

I recommend that Commander Wm. H. Macomb, U.S. Navy, for advancement in his grade ten numbers, to take rank next after Commander Wm. Ronckendorff, for distinguished conduct in the capture of the town of Plymouth, N.C., with its batteries, ordnance stores, &c., on the 31 October, 1864, by a portion of the naval division under his command. The affair was executed in a most creditable manner. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington City, 5 December, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 3. Macomb's advancement was confirmed by the Senate on December 21, 1864.

Page  134

To the Senate [2]

To the Senate of the United States: December 5, 1864

By virtue of the authority contained in the 6th section of the act of 21 April, 1864, which enacts ``That any officer in the naval service, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may be advanced not exceeding thirty numbers in his own grade, for distinguished conduct in battle or extraordinary heroism,'' I recommend that Lieutenant Commander James S. Thornton, U.S. Navy, the executive officer of the U.S. steamer Kearsarge, for advancement in his grade ten numbers, to take rank next after Lieutenant Commander Wm. D. Whiting, for his good conduct and faithful discharge of his duties in the brilliant action with the rebel steamer Alabama which led to the destruction of that vessel on the 19 June, 1864. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington City,

5 December, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 3. Thornton's advancement was confirmed by the Senate on December 21, 1864.

To the Senate and House of Representatives [1]

To the Senate andDecember 5, 1864

House of Representatives.

In conformity to the Law of 11 July 1862. I most cordially recommend that Lieutenant Wm. B. Cushing, U.S. Navy, receive a vote of Thanks from Congress, for his important, gallant and perilous achievement in destroying the Rebel iron-clad Steamer ``Albemarle,'' on the night of the 27 October 1864, at Plymouth, N.C. The destruction of so formidable a vessel, which had resisted the continued attacks of a number of our vessels on former occasions, is an important event touching our future Naval and Military operations and would reflect honor on any Officer and redounds to the credit of this young officer and the few brave comrades who assisted in this successful and daring undertaking.

This recommendation is specially made in order to comply with the requirements of the 9th. Section of the aforesaid Act, which is in the following words, viz:---

``That any line officer of the Navy or Marine Corps may be advanced one grade, if upon recommendation of the President by name, he receives the thanks of Congress for highly distinguishedPage  135 conduct in conflict with the enemy, or, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession.'' ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington City,

5 December 1864.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2; DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No. 7. A resolution of thanks was approved on December 20, 1864. Cushing was nominated lieutenant commander on January 9 and the nomination was approved by the Senate on February 6, 1865.

To the Senate and House of Representatives [2]

To the Senate andDecember 5, 1864

House of Representatives:---

In conformity to the Law of 16 July 1862, I most cordially recommend that Captain John A. Winslow, U.S. Navy, receive a vote of Thanks from Congress, for the skill and gallantry exhibited by him in the brilliant action, whilst in command of the U.S. Steamer Kearsarge, which led to the total destruction of the Piratical craft ``Alabama,'' on the 19 June 1864,---a vessel superior in tonnage, superior in number of guns, and superior in number of crew.

This recommendation is specially made in order to comply with the requirements of the 9th. Section of the aforesaid Act, which is in the following words, viz:---

``That any line officer of the Navy or Marine Corps may be advanced one grade, if upon recommendation by the President by name, he receives the thanks of Congress for highly distinguished conduct in conflict with the enemy, or for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession.'' ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington City,

5 December 1864.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2; DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No. 6. A resolution of thanks was approved on December 20, 1864. Winslow was nominated commodore on January 9, and his promotion was approved by the Senate on February 6, 1865.

To George H. Thomas [1]

Executive Mansion,
Major General Thomas Washington,
Nashville, Tennessee. December 5th. 1864.

Let execution in the case of Oliver B. Wheeler, Sergeant in the 6th Regiment Missouri Vol's, under sentence of death for desertionPage  136 at Chattanooga, on the 15th. inst, be suspended until further order, and forward record for examination. A. LINCOLN

Major Eckert

Please forward the above JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 254. The telegram is in Edward D. Neill's handwriting. Lincoln's signature as well as Nicolay's is in Nicolay's handwriting. Brigadier General Henry B. Carrington wrote Lincoln from Indianapolis, Indiana, on November 30, 1864:

``Oliver B. Wheeler, who entered the service at the age of seventeen, is under sentence of death for desertion, after twelve months of service.

``His friends who are honorable persons, and of character, believe there are circumstances . . . softening his offence, and appealing to just clemency. They hope to obtain a suspension of the sentence, beyond Dec. 15 prox. day fixed for the execution, that they may do what they can in way of proof of tenuating circumstances. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On December 1 Oliver P. Morton wrote, introducing George Lawe of Indianapolis and George A. Wheeler of Chicago, in quest of clemency for Oliver B. Wheeler, and enclosed an undated petition signed by ``Thomas a Becket'' and fifty-one members of the theatrical profession asking clemency for Oliver B. Wheeler ``a member of the Theatrical profession . . . naturally a good natured, unreflecting, foolish boy. . . .'' (Ibid.).

On December 8 General Thomas replied to Lincoln's telegram: ``There is no record at these Hd Qrs of Oliver B Wheeler Sergt 6th Missouri Vols under sentence of death.'' (Ibid.).

The Sixth Missouri Volunteers were not in General Thomas' Department, but were in the Fifteenth Army Corps commanded by Major General Peter J. Osterhaus in the Department of the Tennessee under Major General Oliver O. Howard. No further reference to the case has been found.

Annual Message to Congress [1]

Fellow-citizens of the Senate December 6, 1864

and House of Representatives:

Again the blessings of health and abundant harvests claim our profoundest gratitude to Almighty God.

The condition of our foreign affairs is reasonably satisfactory. [2]

Page  137Mexico continues to be a theatre of civil war. While our political relations with that country have undergone no change, we have, at the same time, strictly maintained neutrality between the belligerents. [3]

At the request of the states of Costa Rica and Nicaragua, a competent engineer has been authorized to make a survey of the river San Juan and the port of San Juan. It is a source of much satisfaction that the difficulties which for a moment excited some political apprehensions, and caused a closing of the inter-oceanic transit route, have been amicably adjusted, and that there is a good prospect that the route will soon be reopened with an increase of capacity and adaptation. [4] We could not exaggerate either the commercial or the political importance of that great improvement.

It would be doing injustice to an important South American state not to acknowledge the directness, frankness, and cordiality with which the United States of Colombia have entered into intimate relations with this government. A claims convention has been constituted to complete the unfinished work of the one which closed its session in 1861. [5].

The new liberal constitution of Venezuela having gone into effect with the universal acquiescence of the people, the government under it has been recognized, and diplomatic intercourse with it has opened in a cordial and friendly spirit. The long-deferred Aves Island claim has been satisfactorily paid and discharged. [6]

Mutual payments have been made of the claims awarded by the late joint commission for the settlement of claims between the United States and Peru. [7] An earnest and cordial friendship continues to exist between the two countries, and such efforts as werePage  138 in my power have been used to remove misunderstanding and avert a threatened war between Peru and Spain. [8].

Our relations are of the most friendly nature with Chile, the Argentine Republic, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Paraguay, San Salvador, and Hayti.

During the past year no differences of any kind have arisen with any of those republics, and, on the other hand, their sympathies with the United States are constantly expressed with cordiality and earnestness.

The claim arising from the seizure of the cargo of the brig Macedonian in 1821 has been paid in full by the government of Chile. [9]

Civil war continues in the Spanish part of San Domingo, apparently without prospect of an early close.

Official correspondence has been freely opened with Liberia, and it gives us a pleasing view of social and political progress in that Republic. It may be expected to derive new vigor from American influence, improved by the rapid disappearance of slavery in the United States.

I solicit your authority to furnish to the republic a gunboat at moderate cost, to be reimbursed to the United States by instalments. [10] Such a vessel is needed for the safety of that state against the native African races; and in Liberian hands it would be more effective in arresting the African slave trade than a squadron in our own hands. The possession of the least organized naval force would stimulate a generous ambition in the republic, and the confidence which we should manifest by furnishing it would win forbearance and favor towards the colony from all civilized nations.

The proposed overland telegraph between America and Europe, [11] by the way of Behring's Straits and Asiatic Russia, which was sanctioned by Congress at the last session, has been undertaken, under very favorable circumstances, by an association of American citizens, with the cordial good-will and support as well of this government as of those of Great Britain and Russia. AssurancesPage  139 have been received from most of the South American States of their high appreciation of the enterprise, and their readiness to co-operate in constructing lines tributary to that world-encircling communication. I learn, with much satisfaction, that the noble design of a telegraphic communication between the eastern coast of America and Great Britain has been renewed with full expectation of its early accomplishment.

Thus it is hoped that with the return of domestic peace the country will be able to resume with energy and advantage its former high career of commerce and civilization.

Our very popular and estimable representative in Egypt died in April last. [12] An unpleasant altercation which arose between the temporary incumbent of the office and the government of the Pacha resulted in a suspension of intercourse. The evil was promptly corrected on the arrival of the successor in the consulate, and our relations with Egypt, as well as our relations with the Barbary powers, are entirely satisfactory.

The rebellion which has so long been flagrant in China, has at last been suppressed, with the co-operating good offices of this government, and of the other western commercial states. [13] The judicial consular establishment there has become very difficult and onerous, and it will need legislative revision to adapt it to the extension of our commerce, and to the more intimate intercourse which has been instituted with the government and people of that vast empire. China seems to be accepting with hearty good-will the conventional laws which regulate commercial and social intercourse among the western nations.

Owing to the peculiar situation of Japan, and the anomalous form of its government, the action of that empire in performing treaty stipulations is inconstant and capricious. [14] Nevertheless, good progress has been effected by the western powers, moving with enlightened concert. Our own pecuniary claims have been allowed, or put in course of settlement, and the inland sea has been reopened to commerce. There is reason also to believe that these proceedings have increased rather than diminished the friendship of Japan towards the United States.

Page  140The ports of Norfolk, Fernandina, and Pensacola have been opened by proclamation. [15] It is hoped that foreign merchants will now consider whether it is not safer and more profitable to themselves, as well as just to the United States, to resort to these and other open ports, than it is to pursue, through many hazards, and at vast cost, a contraband trade with other ports which are closed, if not by actual military occupation, at least by a lawful and effective blockade.

For myself, I have no doubt of the power and duty of the Executive, under the law of nations, to exclude enemies of the human race from an asylum in the United States. If Congress should think that proceedings in such cases lack the authority of law, or ought to be further regulated by it, I recommend that provision be made for effectually preventing foreign slave traders from acquiring domicile and facilities for their criminal occupation in our country.

It is possible that, if it were a new and open question, the maritime powers, with the lights they now enjoy, would not concede the privileges of a naval belligerent to the insurgents of the United States, destitute, as they are, and always have been, equally of ships-of-war and of ports and harbors. Disloyal emissaries have been neither less assiduous nor more successful during the last year than they were before that time in their efforts, under favor of that privilege, to embroil our country in foreign wars. The desire and determination of the governments of the maritime states to defeat that design are believed to be as sincere as, and cannot be more earnest than our own. Nevertheless, unforeseen political difficulties have arisen, especially in Brazilian and British ports, [16] and on the northern boundary of the United States, which have required, and are likely to continue to require, the practice of constant vigilance, and a just and conciliatory spirit on the part of the United States as well as of the nations concerned and their governments.

Commissioners have been appointed under the treaty with Great Britain on the adjustment of the claims of the Hudson's Bay and Puget's Sound Agricultural Companies, in Oregon, and are now proceeding to the execution of the trust assigned to them. [17]

Page  141In view of the insecurity of life and property in the region adjacent to the Canadian border, [18] by reason of recent assaults and depredations committed by inimical and desperate persons, who are harbored there, it has been thought proper to give notice that after the expiration of six months, the period conditionally stipulated in the existing arrangement with Great Britain, the United States must hold themselves at liberty to increase their naval armament upon the lakes, if they shall find that proceeding necessary. The condition of the border will necessarily come into consideration in connection with the question of continuing or modifying the rights of transit from Canada through the United States, as well as the regulation of imposts, which were temporarily established by the reciprocity treaty of the 5th of June, 1854.

I desire, however, to be understood, while making this statement, that the Colonial authorities of Canada are not deemed to be intentionally unjust or unfriendly towards the United States; but, on the contrary, there is every reason to expect that, with the approval of the imperial government, they will take the necessary measures to prevent new incursions across the border.

The act passed at the last session for the encouragement of emigration has, so far as was possible, been put into operation. It seems to need amendment which will enable the officers of the government to prevent the practice of frauds against the immigrants while on their way and on their arrival in the ports, so as to secure them here a free choice of avocations and places of settlement. [19] A liberal disposition towards this great national policy is manifested by most of the European States, and ought to be reciprocated on our part by giving the immigrants effective national protection. I regard our emigrants as one of the principal replenishing streams which are appointed by Providence to repair the ravages of internal war, and its wastes of national strength and health. All that is necessary is to secure the flow of that stream in its present fullness, and to that end the government must, in every way, make it manifest that it neither needs nor designs to impose involuntary military service upon those who come from other lands to cast their lot in our country.

Page  142The financial affairs of the government have been successfully administered during the last year. [20] The legislation of the last session of Congress has beneficially affected the revenues, although sufficient time has not yet elapsed to experience the full effect of several of the provisions of the acts of Congress imposing increased taxation.

The receipts during the year, from all sources, upon the basis of warrants signed by the Secretary of the Treasury, including loans and the balance in the treasury on the first day of July, 1863, were $1,394,796,007 62; and the aggregate disbursements, upon the same basis, were $1,298,056,101 89, leaving a balance in the treasury, as shown by warrants, of $96,739,905 73.

Deduct from these amounts the amount of the principal of the public debt redeemed, and the amount of issues in substitution therefor, and the actual cash operations of the treasury were: receipts, $884,076,646 57; disbursements $865,234,087 86; which leaves a cash balance in the treasury of $18,842,558 71.

Of the receipts, there were derived from customs, $102,316,152 99; from lands, $588,333 29; from direct taxes, $475,648 96; from internal revenue, $109,741,134 10; from miscellaneous sources, $47,511,448 10; and from loans applied to actual expenditures, including former balance, $623,443,929 13.

There were disbursed, for the civil service, $27,505,599 46; for pensions and Indians, $7,517,930 97; for the War Department $690,791,842 97; for the Navy Department $85,733,292 77; for interest of the public debt $53,685,421 69;---making an aggregate of $865,234,087.86, and leaving a balance in the treasury of $18,842,558.71, as before stated.

For the actual receipts and disbursements for the first quarter, and the estimated receipts and disbursements for the three remaining quarters of the current fiscal year, and the general operations of the treasury in detail, I refer you to the report of the Secretary of the Treasury. I concur with him in the opinion that the proportion of moneys required to meet the expenses consequent upon the war derived from taxation should be still further increased; and I earnestly invite your attention to this subject, to the end that there may be such additional legislation as shall be required to meet the just expectations of the Secretary.

The public debt on the first day of July last, as appears by the books of the treasury, amounted to $1,740,690 489 49. Probably, should the war continue for another year, that amount may be increasedPage  143 by not far from five hundred millions. Held as it is, for the most part, by our own people, it has become a substantial branch of national, though private, property. For obvious reasons, the more nearly this property can be distributed among all the people the better. To favor such general distribution, greater inducements to become owners might, perhaps, with good effect, and without injury, be presented to persons of limited means. With this view, I suggest whether it might not be both competent and expedient for Congress to provide that a limited amount of some future issue of public securities might be held by any bona fide purchaser exempt from taxation, and from seizure for debt, under such restrictions and limitations as might be necessary to guard against abuse of so important a privilege. This would enable every prudent person to set aside a small annuity against a possible day of want.

Privileges like these would render the possession of such securities, to the amount limited, most desirable to every person of small means who might be able to save enough for the purpose. The great advantage of citizens being creditors as well as debtors, with relation to the public debt, is obvious. Men readily perceive that they cannot be much oppressed by a debt which they owe to themselves.

The public debt on the first day of July last, although somewhat exceeding the estimate of the Secretary of the Treasury made to Congress at the commencement of the last session, falls short of the estimate of that officer made in the preceding December, as to its probable amount at the beginning of this year, by the sum of $3,995,097 31. This fact exhibits a satisfactory condition and conduct of the operations of the Treasury.

The national banking system is proving to be acceptable to capitalists and to the people. On the twenty-fifth day of November five hundred and eighty-four national banks had been organized, a considerable number of which were conversions from State banks. Changes from State systems to the national system are rapidly taking place, and it is hoped that, very soon, there will be in the United States, no banks of issue not authorized by Congress, and no bank-note circulation not secured by the government. That the government and the people will derive great benefit from this change in the banking systems of the country can hardly be questioned. The national system will create a reliable and permanent influence in support of the national credit, and protect the people against losses in the use of paper money. Whether or not any further legislation is advisable for the suppression of State bank issues, it will be for Congress to determine. It seems quite clear that the treasury cannot be satisfactorily conducted unless the governmentPage  144 can exercise a restraining power over the bank-note circulation of the country.

The report of the Secretary of War [21] and the accompanying documents will detail the campaigns of the armies in the field since the date of the last annual message, and also the operations of the several administrative bureaus of the War Department during the last year. It will also specify the measures deemed essential for the national defence, and to keep up and supply the requisite military force.

The report of the Secretary of the Navy presents a comprehensive and satisfactory exhibit of the affairs of that Department and of the naval service. [22] It is a subject of congratulation and laudable pride to our countrymen that a navy of such vast proportions has been organized in so brief a period, and conducted with so much efficiency and success.

The general exhibit of the navy, including vessels under construction on the 1st. of December, 1864, shows a total of 671 vessels, carrying 4,610 guns, and of 510,396 tons, being an actual increase during the year, over and above all losses by shipwreck or in battle, of 83 vessels, 167 guns, and 42,427 tons.

The total number of men at this time in the naval service, including officers, is about 51,000.

There have been captured by the navy during the year 324 vessels, and the whole number of naval captures since hostilities commenced is 1,379, of which 267 are steamers.

The gross proceeds arising from the sale of condemned prize property, thus far reported, amount to $14,396,250 51. A large amount of such proceeds is still under adjudication and yet to be reported.

The total expenditures of the Navy Department of every description, including the cost of the immense squadrons that have been called into existence from the 4th of March, 1861, to the 1st. of November, 1864, are $238,647,262 35.

Your favorable consideration is invited to the various recommendations of the Secretary of the Navy, especially in regard to a navy yard and suitable establishment for the construction and repair of iron vessels, and the machinery and armature for our ships, to which reference was made in my last annual message. [23]

Page  145Your attention is also invited to the views expressed in the report in relation to the legislation of Congress at its last session in respect to prize on our inland waters.

I cordially concur in the recommendation of the Secretary as to the propriety of creating the new rank of vice-admiral in our naval service. [24]

Your attention is invited to the report of the Postmaster General for a detailed account of the operations and financial condition of the Post Office Department. [25]

The postal revenues for the year ending June 30, 1864, amounted to $12,438,253.78 and the expenditures to $12,644,786.20; the excess of expenditures over receipts being $206,652.42 [$206,532.42].

The views presented by the Postmaster General on the subject of special grants by the government in aid of the establishment of new lines of ocean mail steamships and the policy he recommends for the development of increased commercial intercourse with adjacent and neighboring countries, should receive the careful consideration of Congress. [26]

It is of noteworthy interest that the steady expansion of population, improvement and governmental institutions over the new and unoccupied portions of our country have scarcely been checked, much less impeded or destroyed, by our great civil war, which at first glance would seem to have absorbed almost the entire energies of the nation.

The organization and admission of the State of Nevada has been completed in conformity with law, [27] and thus our excellent system is firmly established in the mountains, which once seemed a barren and uninhabitable waste between the Atlantic States and those which have grown up on the coast of the Pacific ocean.

The territories of the Union are generally in a condition of prosperity and rapid growth. [28] Idaho and Montana, by reason of their great distance and the interruption of communication with them by Indian hostilities, have been only partially organized; but it is understood that these difficulties are about to disappear, which will permit their governments, like those of the others, to go into speedy and full operation.

Page  146As intimately connected with, and promotive of, this material growth of the nation, I ask the attention of Congress to the valuable information and important recommendations relating to the public lands, Indian affairs, the Pacific railroad, and mineral discoveries contained in the report of the Secretary of the Interior, which is herewith transmitted, and which report also embraces the subjects of patents, pensions and other topics of public interest pertaining to his department.

The quantity of public land disposed of during the five quarters ending on the 30th of September last was 4,221,342 acres, of which 1,538,614 acres were entered under the homestead law. The remainder was located with military land warrants, agricultural scrip certified to States for railroads, and sold for cash. The cash received from sales and location fees was $1,019,446.

The income from sales during the fiscal year, ending June 30, 1864, was $678,007,21, against $136,077,95 received during the preceding year. The aggregate number of acres surveyed during the year has been equal to the quantity disposed of; and there is open to settlement about 133,000,000 acres of surveyed land.

The great enterprise of connecting the Atlantic with the Pacific States by railways and telegraph lines has been entered upon with a vigor that gives assurance of success, notwithstanding the embarrassments arising from the prevailing high prices of materials and labor. The route of the main line of the road has been definitely located for one hundred miles westward from the initial point at Omaha City, Nebraska, and a preliminary location of the Pacific railroad of California has been made from Sacramento eastward to the great bend of the Truckee river in Nevada.

Numerous discoveries of gold, silver and cinnabar mines have been added to the many heretofore known and the country occupied by the Sierra Nevada and Rocky mountains, and the subordinate ranges, now teems with enterprising labor, which is richly remunerative. It is believed that the product of the mines of precious metals in that region has, during the year, reached, if not exceeded, one hundred millions in value.

It was recommended in my last annual message that our Indian system be remodelled. Congress, at its last session, acting upon the recommendation, did provide for reorganizing the system in California, [29] and it is believed that under the present organization the management of the Indians there will be attended with reasonablePage  147 success. Much yet remains to be done to provide for the proper government of the Indians in other parts of the country to render it secure for the advancing settler, and to provide for the welfare of the Indian. The Secretary reiterates his recommendations, and to them the attention of Congress is invited.

The liberal provisions made by Congress for paying pensions to invalid soldiers and sailors of the republic, and to the widows, orphans, and dependent mothers of those who have fallen in battle, or died of disease contracted, or of wounds received in the service of their country, have been diligently administered. There have been added to the pension, rolls, during the year ending the 30th day of June last, the names of 16,770 invalid soldiers, and of 271 disabled seamen, making the present number of army invalid pensioners 22,767, and of navy invalid pensioners 712.

Of widows, orphans and mothers, 22 198 have been placed on the army pension rolls, and 248 on the navy rolls. The present number of army pensioners of this class is 25,433, and of navy pensioners 793. At the beginning of the year the number of revolutionary pensioners was 1,430; only twelve of them were soldiers, of whom seven have since died. The remainder are those who, under the law, receive pensions because of relationship to revolutionary soldiers. During the year ending the 30th of June, 1864, $4,504,616,92 have been paid to pensioners of all classes.

I cheerfully commend to your continued patronage the benevolent institutions of the District of Columbia which have hitherto been established or fostered by Congress, and respectfully refer, for information concerning them, and in relation to the Washington aqueduct, the Capitol and other matters of local interest, to the report of the Secretary.

The Agricultural Department, [30] under the supervision of its present energetic and faithful head, is rapidly commending itself to the great and vital interest it was created to advance. It is peculiarlyPage  148 the people's department, in which they feel more directly concerned than in any other. I commend it to the continued attention and fostering care of Congress.

The [31] war continues. Since the last annual message all the important lines and positions then occupied by our forces have been maintained, and our arms have steadily advanced; [32] thus liberating the regions left in rear, so that Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of other States have again produced reasonably fair crops.

The [33] most remarkable feature in the military operations of the year is General Sherman's attempted march of three hundred miles directly through the insurgent region. It tends to show a great increase of our relative strength that our General-in-Chief should feel able to confront and hold in check every active force of the enemy, and yet to detach a well-appointed large army to move on such an expedition. [34] The result not yet being known, conjecture in regard to it is not here indulged.

Important movements have also occurred during the year to the effect of moulding society for durability in the Union. Although short of complete success, it is much in the right direction, that twelve thousand citizens in each of the States of Arkansas and Louisiana have organized loyal State governments with free constitutions, and are earnestly struggling to maintain and administer them. The movements in the same direction, more extensive, though less definite in Missouri, Kentucky and Tennessee, should not be overlooked. But Maryland presents [35] the example of complete success. Maryland is secure to Liberty and Union for all the future. The genius of rebellion will no more claim Maryland. LikePage  149 another foul [36] spirit, being driven out, it may seek to tear her, but it will woo her no more.

At [37] the last session of Congress a proposed amendment of the Constitution abolishing slavery throughout the United States, passed the Senate, but failed for lack of the requisite two-thirds vote in the House of Representatives. Although the present is the same Congress, and nearly the same members, and without questioning the wisdom or patriotism of those who stood in opposition, I venture to recommend the reconsideration and passage of the measure at the present session. Of course the abstract question is not changed; but an intervening election shows, almost certainly, that the next Congress will pass the measure if this does not. Hence there is only a question of time as to when the proposed amendment will go to the States for their action. And as it is to so go, at all events, may we not agree that the sooner the better? It is not claimed that the election has imposed a duty on members to change their views or their votes, any further than, as an additional element to be considered, their judgment may be affected by it. It is the voice of the people now, for the first time, heard upon the question. In a great national crisis, like ours, unanimity of action among those seeking a common end is very desirable---almost indispensable. And yet no approach to such unanimity is attainable, unless some deference shall be paid to the will of the majority, simply because it is the will of the majority. In this case the common end is the maintenance of the Union; and, among the means to secure that end, such will, through the election, is most clearly declared in favor of such constitutional amendment.

The most reliable indication of public purpose in this country is derived through our popular elections. Judging by the recent canvass and its result, the purpose of the people, within the loyal States, to maintain the integrity of the Union, was never more firm, nor more nearly unanimous, than now. The extraordinary calmness and good order with which the millions of voters met and mingled at the polls, give strong assurance of this. Not only all those who supported the Union ticket, so called, but a great majority of the opposing party also, may be fairly claimed to entertain, and to be actuated by, the same purpose. It is an unanswerable argument to this effect, that no candidate for any office whatever, high or low, has ventured to seek votes on the avowal thatPage  150 he was for giving up the Union. There have been much impugning of motives, and much heated controversy as to the proper means and best mode of advancing the Union cause; but on the distinct issue of Union or no Union, the politicians have shown their instinctive knowledge that there is no diversity among the people. In affording the people the fair opportunity of showing, one to another and to the world, this firmness and unanimity of purpose, the election has been of vast value to the national cause.

The [38] election has exhibited another fact not less valuable to be known---the fact that we do not approach exhaustion in the most important branch of national resources---that of living men. While it is melancholy to reflect that the war has filled so many graves, and carried mourning to so many hearts, it is some relief to know that, compared with the surviving, the fallen have been so few. While corps, and divisions, and brigades, and regiments have formed, and fought, and dwindled, and gone out of existence, a great majority of the men who composed them are still living. The same is true of the naval service. The election returns prove this. So many voters could not else be found. The States regularly holding elections, both now and four years ago, to [39] wit, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin cast 3.982.011 votes now, against 3.870.222 cast then, showing an aggregate now of 3.982.011. To this is to be added 33.762 cast now in the new States of Kansas and Nevada, which States did not vote in 1860, thus swelling the aggregate to 4.015.773 and the net increase during the three years and a half of war to 145.551. A table is appended showing particulars. To [40] this again should be added the number of all soldiers in the field from Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Delaware, Indiana, Illinois, and California, who, by the laws of those States, could not vote away from theirPage  151 homes, and which number cannot be less than 90.000. Nor yet is this all. The number in organized Territories is triple now what it was four years ago, while thousands, white and black, join us as the national arms press back the insurgent lines. So much is shown, affirmatively and negatively, by the election. It is not material to inquire how the increase has been produced, or to show that it would have been greater but for the war, which is probably true. The important fact remains demonstrated, that we have more men now than we had when the war began; that we are not exhausted, nor in process of exhaustion; that we are gaining strength, and may, if need be, maintain the contest indefinitely. This as to men. Material resources are now more complete and abundant than ever.

The national resources, then, are unexhausted, and, as we believe, inexhaustible. The public purpose to re-establish and maintain the national authority is unchanged, and, as we believe, unchangeable. The manner of continuing the effort remains to choose. On careful consideration of all the evidence accessible it seems to me that no attempt at negotiation with the insurgent leader could result in any good. He would accept nothing short of severance of the Union---precisely what we will not and cannot give. His declarations to this effect are explicit and oft-repeated. He does not attempt to deceive us. He affords us no excuse to deceive ourselves. He cannot voluntarily reaccept the Union; we cannot voluntarily yield it. Between him and us the issue is distinct, simple, and inflexible. It is an issue which can only be tried by war, and decided by victory. If we yield, we are beaten; if the Southern people fail him, he is beaten. Either way, it would be the victory and defeat following war. What is true, however, of him who heads the insurgent cause, is not [41] necessarily true of those who follow. Although he cannot reaccept the Union, they can. Some of them, we know, already desire peace and reunion. The number of such may increase. They can, at any moment, have peace simply by laying down their arms and submitting to [42] the national authority under the Constitution. After so much, the government could not, if it would, maintain war against them. The loyal people would not sustain or allow it. If questions should remain, we would adjust them by the peaceful means of legislation, conference, courts, and votes, operating only in constitutional and lawful channels. Some certain,Page  152 and other possible, questions are, and would be, beyond the Executive power to adjust; as, for instance, the admission of members into Congress, and whatever might require the appropriation of money. The Executive power itself would be greatly diminished by the cessation of actual war. Pardons and remissions of forfeitures, however, would still be within Executive control. In what spirit and temper this control would be exercised can be fairly judged of by the past.

A year ago general pardon and amnesty, upon specified terms, were offered to all, except certain designated classes; and, it was, at the same time, made known that the excepted classes were still within contemplation of special clemency. During the year many availed themselves of the general provision, and many more would, only that the signs of bad faith in some led to such precautionary measures as rendered the practical process less easy and certain. During the same time also special pardons have been granted to individuals of the excepted classes, and no voluntary application has been denied. Thus, practically, the door has been, for a full year, open to all, except such as were not in condition to make free choice---that is, such as were in custody or under constraint. It is still so open to all. But the time may come---probably will come---when public duty shall demand that it be closed; and that, in lieu, more rigorous measures than heretofore shall be adopted.

In [43] presenting the abandonment of armed resistance to the national authority on the part of the insurgents, as the only indispensable condition to ending the war on the part of the government, I retract nothing heretofore said as to slavery. I repeat the declaration made a year ago, that ``while I remain in my present position I shall not attempt to retract or modify the emancipation proclamation, nor shall I return to slavery any person who is free by the terms of that proclamation, or by any of the Acts of Congress.'' If [44] the people should, by whatever mode or means, make it an Executive duty to re-enslave such persons, another, and not I, must be their instrument to perform it.

In stating a single condition of peace, I mean simply to say that the war will cease on the part of the government, whenever it shall have ceased on the part of those who began it.

December 6. 1864. ABRAHAM LINCOLNPage  153Table showing the aggregate votes in the States named, at the presidential election respectively in 1860 and 1864. [45]

1860. 1864.

California ...... 118,840 ......  [110]*,000

Connecticut ...... 77,246 ...... 86,616

Delaware ...... 16,039 ...... 16,924

Illinois ...... 339,693 ...... 348,235

Indiana ...... 272,143 ...... 280,645

Iowa ...... 128,331 ...... 143,331

Kentucky ...... 146,216 ......  [91]*,300

Maine ...... 97,918 ...... 115,141

Maryland ...... 92,502 ...... 72,703

Massachusetts ...... 169,533 ...... 175,487

Michigan ...... 154,747 ...... 162,413

Minnesota ...... 34,799 ...... 42,534

Missouri ...... 165,538 ......  [90]*,000

New Hampshire ...... 65,953 ...... 69,111

New Jersey ...... 121,125 ...... 128,680

New York ...... 675,156 ...... 730,664

Ohio ...... 442,441 ...... 470,745

Oregon ...... 14,410 ......  [14]†,410

Pennsylvania ...... 476,442 ...... 572,697

Rhode Island ...... 19,931 ...... 22,187

Vermont ...... 42,844 ...... 55,811

West Virginia ...... 46,195 ...... 33,874

Wisconsin ...... 152,180 ...... 148,513

--------- ---------

3,870,222 3,982,011

---------

Kansas ............ 17,234

Nevada ............ 16,528

---------

33,762

3,982,011

----------

Total ................ 4,015,773

3,870,222

----------

Net increase ... 145,551

----------

*Nearly †Estimated.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F1; DS, The Rosenbach Company, Philadelphia and New York. The two almost identical manuscripts of this message were copied by three different clerks, the respective portions appearing in the same handwriting in each copy. The figures on the vote in the November election (see note 39 infra) appear to have been inserted in both copies by Lincoln himself. Several fragments of Lincoln's original autograph draft have been preserved as indicated below in the notes to the respective passages. Endorsements by John D. Defrees on some of these fragments indicate that Defrees cut up the autograph draft and distributed the fragments among his friends. Other fragments may exist, but if so, they have escaped the editors.

[2]   The Report of the Secretary of State, upon which Lincoln's summary is based, may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 1, Volumes I-IV.

[3]   Crowned in June, 1864, Emperor Maximilian was captured and executed in June, 1867, by the Mexican forces of President Benito P. Juarez.

[4]   The revolt of 1863 led by Maximo Jerez against the government of Tomas Martinez had been suppressed in 1864.

[5]   The convention signed on February 10, 1864, and ratified on July 9, 1864, provided for completion of the work of the convention signed on September 10, 1857, and ratified in November, 1860, to adjust claims arising out of a riot in Panama during April, 1856. Five claims had been denied by the United States of Colombia, which government had succeeded the United States of New Granada in 1863.

[6]   In September, 1864, the reorganized United States of Venezuela under Juan José Falcon completed payment of a claim of $130,000, in favor of Lemvis W. Tappan, Philo S. Shelton and George R. Sampson, shipowners and merchants of Boston, who had been forced to abandon their Aves Island (West Indies) development of guano deposits.

[7]   The convention meeting at Lima, Peru, from July 17 to November 27, 1863, awarded $57,196.23 to the United States, and $25,300 to Peru.

[8]   The difficulties growing out of a Peruvian attack in 1863 on the Spanish settlement of Talambo and the subsequent seizure by Spain of the Chincha Islands was settled by treaty in January, 1865. The U.S. minister to Spain, Gustave Koerner, had promoted the arbitration. The peace was broken, however, by Peru's declaration of war on Spain in January, 1866.

[9]   See Lincoln's letter to King Leopold of Belgium, June 13, 1863, supra. Payment of the award was made in April, 1864.

[10]   A bill (S. 356) authorizing the president to transfer a gunboat to the government of Liberia was introduced in the Senate by Charles Sumner on December 13, 1864. The bill passed the Senate but died in the House. A similar act was finally passed and approved on April 17, 1866.

[11]   See Lincoln's Annual Message of December 8, 1863.

[12]   Following the death of William S. Thayer, Charles Hale of Massachusetts was appointed consul and presented his credentials in October, 1864. During the intervening time an acting vice-consul named (Francis?) Dainese, who had been acting since the death of Vice-consul Charles Marsh in January, 1864, had become persona non grata to the Egyptian government (Hale to Seward, October 22, 1864, House Executive Document No. 1, IV, 406 ff.).

[13]   The Taiping rebellion ended with the fall of Nanking, the rebel capital, in the summer of 1864 (Anson Burlingame to Seward, August 15, 1864, ibid., [II, 438).

[14]   See notes to Lincoln's orders of October 12 and December 3, supra.

[15]   See proclamation of November 19, supra.

[16]   In October, 1864, the U.S.S. Wachusett had rammed and captured the Confederate Florida in port at Bahia, Brazil. British complaints concerned a violation of neutrality by the U.S. gunboat Tioga, reported to have anchored without permission at Bimini Roadstead, in the Bahamas (Charles F. Adams to Seward, June 16, 1864, House Executive Document No. 1, II, 120).

[17]   See Lincoln's communication to the Senate and House of Representatives, March 14, supra. The U.S. settled the claims of the British companies by two payments of $325,000 on September 26, 1870, and September 15, 1871.

[18]   On October 19, 1864, a band of Confederate raiders led by Lieutenant Bennett H. Young had crossed the Canadian border and robbed a bank in St. Albans, Vermont. One U.S. citizen was killed and several were wounded in the raid.

[19]   On February 7, 1865, Representative Elihu B. Washburne introduced a bill to amend the act to encourage immigration approved July 4, 1864, and the act to regulate carriage of passengers in steamships approved March 3, 1855. Although the bill passed the House on February 24, 1865, it died in the Senate.

[20]   The Report of the Secretary of the Treasury may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 3.

[21]   The Report of the Secretary of War may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 83.

[22]   The Report of the Secretary of the Navy may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 1, Volume VI.

[23]   Secretary Welles recommended that a navy yard be built on League Island near Philadelphia. Several bills were introduced in the House authorizing establishment of yards at other places, but none passed.

[24]   An act to establish the grade of vice-admiral was approved on December 21, 1864.

[25]   The Report of the Postmaster General may be found in House Executive Document No. 1, Volume V.

[26]   An act to authorize establishment of ocean mail service between the United States and China was approved on February 17, 1865.

[27]   See Lincoln's proclamation of October 31, supra.

[28]   The Report of the Secretary of the Interior may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 1, Volume V.

[29]   The act was approved on April 8, 1864. An amendment to the act was approved on March 3, 1865, but no legislation for improving the Indian system generally was passed.

[30]   The Report of the Secretary of Agriculture may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 68. Lincoln's brief paragraph on the Department of Agriculture is a revision of the shortest of three tentative drafts prepared by the department:

``The Agricultural Department under the management of its present experienced and efficient head, is giving daily proofs of valuable benefits that enure to the agriculture of the country by the judicious application of the means appropriated by government. It is encouraging a more vigorous prosecution of industry, by its taking hold of the information that is imparted, and is opening new fields of enterprise, and new channels of wealth.

``So fully am I convinced of the capabilities and advantages of the agricultural Department to the objects of its institution, and to the benefits it is dispensing, that I respectfully commend it to your favorable consideration, and liberal encouragement.'' (DLC-RTL, 39059).

[31]   A fragment of Lincoln's autograph draft of this message comprising this paragraph and owned by Mrs. George E. Mack of New York City, bears the following endorsements:

``Washington, June 1 1866

``This is a portion of Mr. Lincoln's last annual message in his own hand writing.

``JNO. D. DEFREES

``Govt Pub Printer

``This is to be given to Morris W Defrees. J.D.D.''

[32]   The autograph fragment reads ``steadily incroached upon the insurgent borders; thus liberating. . . .''

[33]   The autograph fragment comprising this paragraph is in the Oliver R. Barrett Collection.

[34]   The autograph fragment contains a sentence which Lincoln deleted: ``We must conclude that he feels our cause could, if need be, survive the loss of the whole detached force; while, by the risk, he takes a chance for the great advantages which would follow success.''

[35]   The autograph fragment beginning with ``presents'' and continuing to the end of the paragraph is owned by Justin G. Turner of Los Angeles, California. The fragment bears on the verso a certification by John D. Defrees dated June 1, 1866.

[36]   The autograph fragment has ``unclean'' instead of ``foul.''

[37]   The autograph fragment comprising the first two sentences of this paragraph is owned by Frank L. Pleadwell of Honolulu, Hawaii. On the verso appears an undated certification by John D. Defrees.

[38]   The autograph single page comprising this paragraph down to and including the phrase ``during the three years and a half of war'' is owned by Mrs. W. R. Gordon, Beloit, Wisconsin.

[39]   The autograph fragments (notes 38 and 40) do not contain the names of the states as listed in the signed copies. Blank spaces also are left in these two fragments where the figures for votes appear. Lincoln's tabulation of election returns (see December 1, supra) was not completed until after the Annual Message had been prepared, and the signed copies show these figures to have been inserted.

[40]   The autograph single page comprising the remainder of this paragraph is in the Beloit Historical Society, Beloit, Wisconsin.

[41]   The autograph single page comprising the remainder of this paragraph is in the IHi.

[42]   The autograph page had ``re-accepting'' instead of ``submitting to.''

[43]   The autograph fragment comprising all but the last sentence of this paragraph is in the Oliver R. Barrett Collection.

[44]   The autograph fragment beginning with this sentence and including the final paragraph is in The Library of Congress. It is accompanied by a letter of John D. Defrees, April 19, 1866, presenting the fragment to ``Mrs. Perry'' of Auburn, New York.

[45]   No manuscript of this table is with the manuscript of the Message in the National Archives. The table is reproduced here as printed in the Senate Journal, page 15, immediately following the Message. A similar text appears in the House Journal and in House Executive Document No. 1.

Page  154

Response to a Serenade [1]

December 6, 1864

FRIENDS AND FELLOW-CITIZENS: I believe I shall never be old enough to speak without embarrassment when I have anything [nothing?] to talk about. [Laughter and cheering.] I have no good news to tell you, and yet I have no bad news to tell. We have talked of elections until there is nothing more to say about them. The most interesting news we now have is from Sherman. We all know where he went in at, but I can't tell where he will come out at. [Cheers and cries, ``He'll come out all right.''] I will now close by proposing three cheers for Gen. Sherman and the army.

Annotation

[1]   New York Tribune, December 8, 1864. Brackets are in the source except in the case of the single emendation..

To the Senate [1]

Executive Mansion Washington, D.C.
To the Senate of the United States Dec. 6. 1864

I nominate Salmon P. Chase of Ohio, to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States vice Roger B. Taney, deceased.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. On the bottom of Lincoln's letter appears the following endorsement:

``United States Senate

``In Executive Session

``Decr. 6. 1864.

``Read; considered by unanimous consent, and nomination unanimously confirmed.

``Attest: D.W.C. CLARKE

``Principal Executive Clerk.''

Chase wrote Lincoln on the same day: ``On reaching home tonight I was saluted ith the intelligence that you this day nominated me to the Senate for the office of Chief Justice. I cannot sleep before I thank [you] for this mark of your confidence, & especially for the manner in which the nomination was made. I shall never forget either and trust that you will never regret either Be assured that I prize your confidence & goodwill more than nomination or office'' (DLC-RTL).

Story Written for Noah Brooks [1]

[December 6, 1864]

THE PRESIDENT'S LAST, SHORTEST, AND BEST SPEECH.

On thursday of last week two ladies from Tennessee came before the President asking the release of their husbands held as prisonersPage  155 of war at Johnson's Island. They were put off till friday, when they came again; and were again put off to saturday. At each of the interviews one of the ladies urged that her husband was a religious man. On saturday the President ordered the release of the prisoners, and then said to this lady ``You say your husband is a religious man; tell him when you meet him, that I say I am not much of a judge of religion, but that, in my opinion, the religion that sets men to rebel and fight against their government, because, as they think, that government does not sufficiently help some men to eat their bread on the sweat of other men's faces, is not the sort of religion upon which people can get to heaven!''

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ADS, MeHi. Nicolay and Hay date this item ``December 3, 1864'' (X, 279), while Tracy dates it ``Nov.---, 1864'' (pp. 248-49.) December 3 was on Saturday, which would seem from Lincoln's narrative to have been in the past at the time of writing. December 6 has been assigned because the item appeared in the Washington Daily Chronicle on December 7, 1864. Noah Brooks records the circumstances under which it was written:

``. . . Upon another occasion, hearing that I was in the parlor, he sent for me to come up into the library, where I found him writing on a piece of common stiff box-board with a pencil. Said he, after he had finished, `Here is one speech of mine which has never been printed, and I think it worth printing. Just see what you think.' He then read the following, which is copied verbatim from the familiar handwriting before me: [text as above]

``To this the President signed his name at my request, by way of joke, and added for a caption, `The President's Last, Shortest, and Best Speech,' under which title it was duly published in one of the Washington newspapers. . . .'' (``Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln,'' Harper's New Monthly Magazine, July, 1865, p. 230).

Endorsement [1]

On the strength of Gen. Dix' indorsement, I approve.

Dec. 7. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Arthur Hanson, Charleston, West Virginia. Lincoln's endorsement has been removed from the attendant documents.

To James B. Fry [1]

December 7, 1864

I know nothing of this gentleman or his case, except as presented by these papers. I merely submit to the Provost Marshal General whether an inquiry is not due him. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 7, 1864.

Page  156

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by R. E. Burdick, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from John Foster, December 6, 1864, asking reinstatement as clerk in the office of the provost marshal general. Relating that he had been dismissed on charges of having made speeches in favor of McClellan's election, Foster submitted letters disproving the charges. No record has been found of his reinstatement.

To Willard P. Hall [1]

Gov. Hall Executive Mansion, Washington,
Jefferson City Mo. Dec. 7, 1864.

Complaint is made to me of the doings of a man at Hannibal, Mo. by the name of Haywood, who, as I am told, has charge of some militia force, and is not in the U.S. service. Please inquire into the matter & correct anything you may find amiss if in your power. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 255. Governor Hall forwarded a copy of Lincoln's telegram to General Rosecrans at St. Louis (OR, I, XLI, IV, 799). No further reference to the complaint has been found. Colonel John T. K. Hayward, Thirty-eighth Regiment Enrolled Missouri Militia, operated against guerrillas in the area around Hannibal, Missouri.

To John B. Henderson [1]

December 7, 1864

Will Senator Henderson please see and hear this Missouri lady, and report to me on the case she shall present. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 7, 1864

Let this man be discharged on taking the oath of Dec. 8, 1863.

Dec. 8, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 2193, November 15, 1927, No. 343. According to the catalog description, Senator Henderson's recommendation for the discharge appears between Lincoln's endorsements, but no names are given in the source.

Memorandum:
Appointment of Daniel H. Brush, Jr. [1]

File & remember. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 7. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1864, No. 297. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Daniel H. Brush, Carbondale, Illinois, November 3, 1864, asking his son's appointment to West Point. Daniel H. Brush, Jr., did not enter West Point until June, 1867, and graduated in 1871.

Page  157

Memorandum
Concerning Benjamin F. Flanders [2]

[December 7? 1864]

Gen. Banks thinks Mr. Montague, while a good man would scarcely be active enough for Flander's place. He thinks Col. Frank W. Howe would be better.

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-RTL. The supplied date is that given to the memorandum by The Library of Congress. On the verso of the manuscript Lincoln merely endorsed ``Flanders.'' Neither Montague nor Frank W. Howe have been further identified. Benjamin F. Flanders had been defeated for governor of Louisiana in 1864, but remained special agent of the Treasury Department at New Orleans (U.S. Official Register, 1865).

Memorandum
Concerning William W. Ketchum [3]

If there should be a change of Governor of New-Mexico, I wish to be reminded of this paper. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 7. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA FS RG 59, Appointments, Box 323. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Simon Cameron, December 2, 1864, recommending William W. Ketchum for ``Governor of New Mexico, or Gov. of some other Territory.'' Henry Connelly remained governor of New Mexico.

Memorandum
Concerning New Mexico Appointments [4]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 7, 1864.

To-day Mr. Perea, Delegate from New-Mexico, asks that Arny, Secretary of the Territory be removed, and Charles P. Clever be appointed in his stead. Also Dr. Steck, Sup. Ind. Affairs, be removed, & Philip P. Delgado. Also John Greiner, Receiver of Public-Monies & James L. Collins appointed [in] his place.

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-RTL. William F. M. Arny remained in office. Felipe Delgado, nominated to replace Michael Steck on February 21, 1865, was confirmed by the Senate on March 3, 1865. John Greiner remained in office.

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States: December 7, 1864

In answer to the Senate's Resolution of yesterday, requesting information in regard to aid furnished to the rebellion by British subjects,

Page  158I transmit a Report from the Secretary of State and the documents by which it was accompanied. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington

7 December, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2. The report of Secretary Seward transmitted by Lincoln is printed in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, Senate Executive Document No. 2.

To James Speed [1]

Attorney General please have a Brief made of these and all other papers on file in relation to Indiana vacant Judgeship.

Dec. 7. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments, Indiana, Box 406. Lincoln's endorsement is written on an envelope containing testimonials in favor of John D. Howland for judge of the U.S. District Court to succeed Albert S. White, who died on September 24, 1864. David McDonald received the nomination and was confirmed by the Senate on December 13, 1864.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion, Washington,
Sir: Dec. 7. 1864.

Senator Hicks again calls on me in relation to the Commission sitting in Maryland, constituted of Rogers, Timmons & Straughn. Please have it looked after, so as to know whether anything, and if any thing, what, is wrong. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NHi. See footnote to Lincoln to Bowman, August 6, supra. A letter of Thomas H. Hicks to Thomas Timmons, December 15, 1864, enclosed by Timmons to Lincoln on December 19, sets forth the charges as follows:

``I learn that you have been somewhat disturbed at hearing that I had preferred charges agt yourself & colleagues in the commission or court to investigate character, decide loyalty and issue certificates &c. I preferred no charge, but spoke of universal rumors in regard to tardiness in discharge of duty, I said nothing that was not true, to wit---that the Court had affected but little by way of satisfying the loyal people of our State, and that you had told me that the trouble grew out of yr inability to get the detective list. . . .

``I made no specific charge, I spoke of general and believed reports, but did not know of my own knowledge, but did know that true or false, these reports was injuring us Politically in the state and that the Prest was held responsible for all that is being done by his appointees, and I felt it to be my duty to put him in possession of the fact that the reports indicated above was damaging his administration. . . . I urged an investigation, and the Secretary had heard this report before I said anything of it. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Endorsement [1]

If this is consistent, I shall be glad for it to be done.

Dec. 8, 1864 A. LINCOLN.

Page  [unnumbered]

Annotation

[1]   Estate of Gabriel Wells Catalog 4, May, 1950, No. 126. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement is written on a short note addressed to the Senate Chamber regarding the promotion of an officer. No names are given.

To Thomas B. Fairleigh [1]

Col. Farleigh Executive Mansion Washington D.C
Louisville, Ky Dec. 8. 1864

I am appealed to in behalf of a man by the name of Frank Fairbairn, said to have been for a long time, & still in prison, without any definite ground stated. How is it? A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 256. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas B. Fairleigh, Twenty-sixth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, replied on the same day: ``Farbai[r]n was arrested & sent here & there being no proof against him I released him He was again arrested by order from District Hd Qrs but again released yesterday by orders from the same source'' (DLC-RTL).

Recommendation for John C. Hutton [1]

If this gentleman could find, in any Department or Bureau, employment suitable to him I should be glad. A LINCOLN

Dec. 8. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA FI RG 56, General Records of Treasury Department, Personnel File, John C. Hutton. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition signed by officers of the Third Regiment, Delaware Volunteers, October 16, 1864, recommending Dr. John C. Hutton, hospital steward, who had been forced to resign from the service because of ill health. Hutton is listed in the U.S. Official Register, 1865, as clerk in the office of the Sixth Auditor.

To William S. Rosecrans [1]

Major General Rosecrans comdg Executive Mansion
St. Louis Mo Dec. 8. 1864

Let execution in case of John Berry & James Berry be suspended until further order. A. LINCOLN

Major Eckert

Will you please hurry off the above Tomorrow is the day of execution. JOHN HAY A.A.G.

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 257. This telegram is in John Hay's handwriting except for Lincoln's signature. An article in The Missouri Republican (St. Louis) for November 16, 1864, announced the court-martial sentence of Second Lieutenant James Berry, Company D, Fourteenth Kansas Cavalry, ``that he be shot to death with musketry, in St. Louis, on the 9th proximo. The charges . . . were that he deserted . . . at Forth Smith in January last, and took away a horse and equipments. . . . John W. Berry, a brotherPage  160

. . . Sergeant of the same company, on similar charges . . . was also sentenced to be shot; but . . . the sentence has been mitigated to imprisonment and hard labor. . . .''

Order Concerning Elijah Morgan [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 9, 1864.

Today, on the application of Hon. Mr. Whaley, of West Virginia, I direct that Elijah Morgan a prisoner of war at Fort-Delaware, be discharged on taking the oath of Dec. 8, 1864. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   American Autograph Shop Catalog, January, 1937, No. 154. According to the catalog description this is an autograph order signed. If the source is correct, Lincoln erred in referring to the oath of December 8, 1864, instead of December 8, 1863.

Pass [1]

Allow this Soldier's wife to pass free from Washington to NewYork. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 9. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, CSmH.

Recommendation for Discharged Soldiers [1]

I shall be glad if any Department or Bureau can give employment to the discharged soldiers. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 9, 1864

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Catalog, March 12, 1920, No. 538. According to the catalog description this communication is an autograph note signed.

To James Speed [1]

December 9, 1864

Induced by the within, and by other representations, to believe there may have been [a] mistake, and consequent injustice in the removal of Justice Miller, let him be re-appointed. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 9. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, 1864, Box 117. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from David K. Cartter, chief justice, and Andrew Wylie, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, December 5, 1864, stating that their decision to remove Justice of Peace Nehemiah H. Miller from office would have been different if they had seen evidence produced by Miller after his trial.

Page  161

To Robert K. Stone [1]

December 9, 1864

If Dr. Stone pleases to call & see me at 9. A.M. to-morrow, I will talk with him about trying to oblige his family in regard to Mrs. Ritchie at Richmond. A. LINCOLN.

Dec. 9, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. Dr. Robert K. Stone's wife was Margaret Ritchie whose family lived in Richmond. Lincoln gave an order ``to pass Mourning Garments &c . . . This was gratefully accepted & the box, got as far, as Fortress Monroe, on its way, to her sisters, in Richmond. . . .'' (Stone to Lincoln, April 11, 1865, DLC-RTL).

Introduction [1]

Introducing Col. Jason March. A. LINCOLN.

Dec. 10, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   American Autograph Shop Catalog, September, 1942, No. 103. According to the catalog description, this is an autograph note signed. Jason Marsh (not ``March'') was colonel of the Seventy-fourth Illinois Infantry.

Order Appointing Commissioners
to Investigate the Military Division Bordering upon and West of the Mississippi [1]

Executive Mansion, December 10, 1864.

Ordered, First That Maj. Gen. William F. Smith and the Hon. Henry Stanbery be, and they are hereby, appointed special commissioners to investigate and report, for the information of the President, upon the civil and military administration in the military division bordering upon and west of the Mississippi, under such instructions as shall be issued by authority of the President and the War Department.

Second. Said commissioners shall have power to examine witnesses upon oath, and to take such proofs, orally or in writing, upon the subject-matters of investigation as they may deem expedient, and return the same together with their report.

Third. All officers and persons in the military, naval, and revenue services, or in any branch of the public service under the authority of the United States Government, are required, upon subpoena issued by direction of the said commissioners, to appear before them at such time and place as may be designated in said subpoenaPage  162 and to give testimony on oath touching such matters as may be inquired of by the commissioners, and to produce such books, papers, writings, and documents as they may be notified or required to produce by the commissioners, and as may be in their possession.

Fourth. Said special commissioners shall also investigate and report upon any other matters that may hereafter be directed by the Secretary of War, and shall, with all convenient dispatch, make report to him in writing of their investigation, and shall also from time to time make special reports to the Secretary of War upon such matters as they may deem of importance to the public interests.

Fifth. The Secretary of War shall assign to the said commissioners such aid and assistance as may be required for the performance of their duties, and make such just and reasonable allowances and compensation for the said commissioners and for the persons employed by them as he may deem proper. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, I, XLI, IV, 817. Lincoln's order is printed in the source as an enclosure with Stanton's communication to General Edward R. S. Canby, December 10, 1864, notifying Canby that the commissioners ``are directed to report to you and to commence their investigations at New Orleans. . . .'' See Lincoln to Canby, December 12, infra.

To Joseph Roberts [1]

[c. December 10, 1864]

It is confessed in this case that Samuels when arrested, had on his person a paper prima facie showing that he was going North to obtain medical supplies for the rebels. Will the officer in command at Fort-Monroe [2] please give him an opportunity of trying to prove that this was not his real object, and report the evidence, with his opinion on it, to me? A. LINCOLN

Let the Prisoner Samuels be discharged. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 10. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Max Thorek, Chicago, Illinois. Lincoln's endorsements are written on a letter of General Benjamin F. Butler to C. C. Callam of Baltimore, September 15, 1864:

``I suppose yours is the fiftieth communication I have received about [Abraham] Samuels, some asking that he be tried, and some asking one thing, and some another; and this is the last communication I shall answer about Samuels from any source, except under orders from the President.

``Samuels' case is this: He left Richmond with a list of Medical supplies in his pocket under an agreement to procure those supplies for the Rebel Medical Department.

Page  163``He was detected, arrested, examined, and confined, and he will be confined during the War, so far as any act of mine can aid that desirable result.''

Lincoln's first undated endorsement was presumably written between September 15 and December 10, probably closer to the later date. On January 8, 1865, General Butler wrote Lincoln:

``Abraham Samuels was arrested in January, 1864, when endeavoring to make his way through my lines across the Potomac. Upon examination he confessed that the paragraph in the Richmond Examiner, December 28th, 1863, herewith furnished, was furnished to that paper by himself in answer to a paragraph in a former issue saying . . . that Samuels had endeavored to escape to the Yankees. He farther confessed that when he left Richmond he had the list of medical stores which is mentioned in the Examiner, which he recovered from the medical purveyor of the Confederate Army, and that he had engaged to run the blockade and bring back the stores: that he had destroyed this paper. From all the surroundings and his story I was satisfied that he was in the interest of the Confederates, and I caused him to be held as a dangerous and disloyal person, and confiscated the money he had with him . . . and placed it to the credit of the United States where it remains.

``A great number of applications were made for his release, to all of which I would not listen until after we had so constructed our lines about Richmond that I was satisfied that Samuels' vocation as blockade runner was gone, and then upon an intimation from the President I released him, not because of his innocence . . . but because he was no longer dangerous. . . .'' (Private and Official Correspondence of General Benjamin F. Butler, V, 474-75).

[2]   Lincoln first wrote ``Gen. Wallace,'' and changed to ``the officer in command at Fort-Monroe.'' Colonel Joseph Roberts, Third Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery was in command through December, 1864.

To Edward R. S. Canby [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Canby: Dec 12, 1864.

I think it is probable that you are laboring under some misapprehension as to the purpose, or rather the motive of the government on two points---Cotton, and the new Louisiana State Government. It is conceded that the military operations are the first in importance; and as to what is indispensable to these operations, the Department Commander must be judge and master. But the other matters mentioned, I suppose to be of public importance also; and what I have attempted in regard to them, is not merely a concession to private interest and pecuniary greed.

As to cotton. By the external blockade, the price is made certainly six times as great as it was. And yet the enemy gets through at least one sixth part as much in a given period, say a year, as if there were no blockade, and receives as much for it, as he would for a full crop in time of peace. The effect in substance is, that we give him six ordinary crops, without the trouble of producing any but the first; and at the same time leave his fields and his laborers free to produce provisions. You know how this keeps up his armies atPage  164 home, and procures supplies from abroad. For other reasons we cannot give up the blockade, and hence it becomes immensely important to us to get the cotton away from him. Better give him guns for it, than let him, as now, get both guns and ammunition for it. But even this only presents part of the public interest to get out cotton. Our finances are greatly involved in the matter. The way cotton goes now carries so much gold out of the country as to leave us paper currency only, and that so far depreciated, as that for every hard dollar's worth of supplies we obtain, we contract to pay two and a half hard dollars hereafter. This is much to be regretted; and while I believe we can live through it at all events, it demands an earnest effort on the part of all to correct it. And if pecuniary greed can be made to aid us in such effort, let us be thankful that so much good can be got out of pecuniary greed.

As to the new State Government of Louisiana. Most certainly there is no worthy object in getting up a piece of machinery merely to pay salaries, and give political consideration to certain men. But it is a worthy object to again get Louisiana into proper practical relations with the nation; and we can never finish this, if we never begin it. Much good work is already done, and surely nothing can be gained by throwing it away.

I do not wish either cotton or the new State Government to take precedence of the military, while the necessity for the military remains; but there is a strong public reason for treating each with so much favor as may not be substantially detrimental to the military.

Allow me a word of explanation in regard to the telegram which you kindly forwarded to Admiral Faragut for me. [2] That telegram was prompted by a piece of secret information inducing me to suspect that the use of a forged paper might be attempted on the Admiral, in order to base a claim that we had raised our own blockade.

I am happy in the hope that you are almost well of your late and severe wound Yours very truly,

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL. The copy is on Executive Mansion stationery. On December 2, apropos of Lincoln's communication to Hurlbut of November 14, supra, General Canby had written Lincoln:

``Major General Hurlbut has shown me your communication of the 14th inst., in which that officer and myself are charged with bitter animosity to the new State Government of Louisiana.

``I have had very little official connection with the convention, and none at all with the State Government, or the State Legislature. Matters connected with these bodies, being under the supervision of the Department Commander, do not reach me, except by way of appeal, and my own duties have been sufficiently engrossing, to prevent any disposition to interfere, unless the subject was submitted to me for decision. Of the three instances cited in evidence of this bitterPage  165 animosity, the first is the only one of which I have any knowledge, either official or personal. The others I had never heard of until I read your letter. In the case of Mr. [Thomas P.] May I did interfere upon an appeal, and for the reason simply, that the power claimed by the Convention to punish for contempt not committed in its presence, could not be admitted without establishing, in the military circumstances of the community, a very dangerous precedent. That opinion I still entertain. I saw then, and I see now, no reason why the usual limit of legislative power, and which the convention had, a few days previous, (Act 30, of the Convention,) defined for the Legislature, and, by implication, for itself, should have been transcended. There was no necessity for it, for the convention was under military protection, and that protection would have been given to it under any circumstances, and to any extent.

``Of the details of the insult offered to the convention in the release of Mr. May, I know nothing. My decision was communicated to General Banks, and the orders were given by him; but I do know, that, while we differed on some points, we concurred in the opinion, that the convention had no legitimate power to arrest, or try, or punish any one, for a contempt, not committed in its presence.

``I think it only necessary to add to this, that it has been, and is my purpose, not only as a question of duty, but of feeling, to give whatever support and aid I can, to the State Government; but it is proper that your Excellency should be advised, that matters that will, ultimately, come under the control of the State Government, are now so complicated with questions of military administration, that, in the changes to be made, differences of opinion may arise, which should not subject officers of the army to the imputation of opposition or animosity. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

[2]   See Lincoln to Canby, November 6, supra.

To Henry S. Lane [1]

Will Senator H. S. Lane please call and see me at once.

Dec. 12, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Anderson Galleries Catalog 3995, November 10, 1932, No. 66. According to the catalog description this item is an autograph note signed.

Order for Discharge of Thomas Rice and Reuben Turner [1]

December 12, 1864

At the request of Hon. Mr. Randall of Ky, it is ordered that Thomas Rice prisoner of War at Rock-Island, and Reuben Turner, prisoner of war at Johnson's Island, be discharged, on taking the oath of Dec. 8. 1863. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 12. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi:. Although written at the request of Representative William H. Randall, Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Daniel Breck, December 5, 1864, introducing ``my friend, Mr. Billingsley'' of Richmond, Kentucky.

Page  166

To Cyrus Wick [1]

Executive Mansion Washington
My Dear Sir 12 De[ce]mber 1864

I take pleasure in acknowledgeing the receipt of your letter and poem and in thanking you for your kindness Yours very truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-HW. The copy of Lincoln's letter was enclosed by Cyrus Wick to Herndon, January 23, 1867. Wick's poem, ``inspired by a sentiment expressed in one of his [Lincoln's] messages early in 1861 and by the scenery where his childhood was passed'' was written after Wick's regiment (Seventeenth Indiana Volunteers) had been ``encamped for several weeks on Nolin Creek one mile and a quarter from Hodgenville La Rue County Kentucky'' in November, 1862. A printed copy which Wick sent to Lincoln in November, 1864, brought Lincoln's brief acknowledgment.

To Grenville M. Dodge [1]

Major Gen. Dodge Executive Mansion
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, Dec. 13. 1864

Please suspend the sending South of Mrs. Nancy H. Thompson, wife of Gideon H. Thompson, of Platte Co. Mo. but now in rebel army, until further order, & in mean time, ascertain and report to me whether there is any thing, & what, against her, except that her husband is a rebel. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 259. Major General Grenville M. Dodge relieved Rosecrans as commander of the Department of the Missouri (AGO General Orders No. 294, December 2, 1864). No further reference to Mrs. Nancy Thompson has been found. There are references in the Official Records to Colonel Gideon W. (not H.) Thompson of the Confederate Army.

To Ira Goodnow [1]

I shall be glad if Capt. Goodenow can & will find a suitable position for this fine little boy. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 13, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Parke-Bernet Catalog 1352, May 27, 1952, No. 181. According to the catalog description, this item is an autograph note signed. Ira Goodnow was doorkeeper of the House of Representatives.

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States: December 13, 1864

I transmit to the Senate, for consideration with a view to ratification, ``a treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation, and for thePage  167 extradition of fugitive criminals, between the United States of America and the Republic of Hayti, signed by their respective plenipotentiaries at Port-au-Prince on the 3d of November'' last.

Washington, December 13, 1864. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 8. The treaty was ratified by the Senate on January 17, 1865.

To the Senate [2]

To the Senate of the United States: December 13, 1864

I transmit to the Senate, for consideration with a view to ratification, ``a treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation between the United States of America and the Republic of Honduras,'' signed by their respective plenipotentiaries, at Comayagua, on the 4th of July (1864) last. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington, December 13, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 8. The treaty was ratified by the Senate on February 20, 1865.

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Major General Wallace Executive Mansion
Baltimore, Md. Washington, Dec. 13. 1864

Do not send Levin L. Waters and the judges away, until further order; and send me at once a statement of the cause or causes for which they are dealt with. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 258. On December 2, 1864, Samuel B. Lawrence, assistant adjutant general to General Wallace, ordered Brigadier General Henry H. Lockwood to ``arrest Daniel Jones and Joseph Bralton of Somerset County, and Levin D. [L.] Waters, of Princess Anne, and send them, as disaffected and dangerous men, by steamer to Fortress Monroe, to be sent across the lines into Confederate jurisdiction. . . .'' (OR, I, XLIII, II, 729).

See further, Lincoln to Wallace, December 19, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. General Grant. Executive Mansion,
City-Point, Va. Washington, Dec. 14. 1864.

Please have execution of John McNulty, alias Joseph Riley, Co. E. 6. N.H. Vols. suspended, and record sent to me.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 260. General Grant replied on the same day, forwarding the following despatch from General Meade: ``I yesterday remitted the sentence in the case of John McNulty alias JosephPage  168

Riley Company E 6th New Hampshire Vols and beg leave to refer to my letter to you in the case. The record will be forwarded to the President as directed.'' (DLC-RTL).

The roster of the Sixth New Hampshire Volunteers lists John McNulty as having deserted on October 15, 1864. Returned to his regiment, he was reported on the muster roll of July 17, 1865, as absent without leave since July 4, 1865.

To William H. Seward [1]

Will the Sec. of State please call at once? A. LINCOLN

Dec. 14. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, ORB.

To James Speed [1]

Send me a nomination for Gooding. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 14. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments, New Mexico, Box 660. Lincoln's endorsement is written on an envelope containing recommendations of David S. Gooding for associate justice is New Mexico. Gooding's nomination was tabled by the Senate on January 10, 1865.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

December 14, 1864

I think a man who offers to volunteer and is rejected, should not afterwards be drafted and forced to serve. This lady alleges that such is the case of her husband. Please have the case investigated and reported on.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 107, Secretary of War, Letters Received, P 1165, Register. Although the original documents are missing from the file, Lincoln's endorsement referring the case of William Richardson, Company F, Second District of Columbia Volunteers, is preserved as a notation in the Register. No further reference has been found.

To William P. Fessenden [1]

Will the Secretary of the Treasury please see & hear Mr. Gumpert, so well vouched within? A. LINCOLN

Dec. 15, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog, November 13-14, 1916, No. 213. According to the catalog description, this item is an autograph endorsement signed on a recommendation by William D. Kelly of Gustave Gumpert for appointment as special agent in the Treasury Department.

Page  169

To Caleb H. Carlton [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Chattanooga Tenn. Washington, Dec. 16. 1864.

It is said that Harry Walters private in the Anderson Cavalry is now, and for a long time has been in prison at Chattanooga. Please report to me what is his condition, and for what he is imprisoned. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 262. Colonel Caleb H. Carlton, Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, was in command at Chattanooga, but no reply to Lincoln's telegram has been found. Harry Walters of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry (known as ``Anderson Cavalry'' because recruited to serve as bodyguard to General Robert Anderson) is listed as discharged on a surgeon's certificate in February, 1865.

Pass for William Y. Dulin [1]

Allow this gentleman to pass to Fairfax Co. Virginia.

Dec. 16, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Anderson Galleries Catalog 3927, November 1920, 1931, No. 141. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's note is written on a card, on the back of which is endorsed: ``Mr. Dulon, give pass to Fairfax Co & Alexandria for one month. C.C.A.'' Mayor Richard Wallach of Washington wrote Lincoln on December 16, 1864: ``Mr William Y. Dulin who bears this once resided in Fairfax County Virginia where he had large possessions. . . . He desires your permission to go there & attend to some matters of personal interest.

``I have known him for many years & have the most implicit confidence in his integrity. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To George H. Thomas [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Thomas War Department,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, D.C., Dec. 16. 1864.

Please accept for yourself, officers, and men, the nation's thanks for your good work of yesterday. You made a magnificent beginning. A grand consummation is within your easy reach. Do not let it slip. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 261. On December 15, General Thomas telegraphed General Halleck from Nashville: ``I attacked the enemy's left this morning and drove it from the river, below the city, very nearly to the Franklin pike, a distance about eight miles. Have captured General [James R.] Chalmers' headquarters and train, and a second train of about 20 wagons, with between 800 and 1,000 prisoners and 16 pieces of artillery. The troops behaved splendidly. . . . I shall attack the enemy again to-morrow, if he stands to fight, and, if he retreats during the night, will pursue him, throwing a heavy cavalry force in his rear, to destroy his trains, if possible.'' (OR, I, XLV, II, 194).

Page  170

To Gideon Welles [1]

Allow the bearer to bring me the record containing the evidence in the case of Capt. Reynolds. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 17. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, CtHi. Lincoln's note probably referred to the case of Captain Edward M. Reynolds of the Marine Corps, dismissed as morally unfit. (Navy Department, General Orders No. 43, December 7, 1864).

To Joseph K. Barnes [1]

Executive Mansion Washington
Surgeon General, Dec. 19, 1864

Please have an examination made of Corporal Charles H. Thompson of Co. B. 11th N.H. Vols. in the 9th Corps, with reference to discharge for physical disability Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Sigurd S. Storm, Chicago, Illinois. Corporal Charles H. Thompson, wounded at Spotsylvania on May 16, 1864, was discharged for disability on January 19, 1865.

To Joseph H. Choate [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 19, 1864.

My Dear Sir---I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of your kind invitation to be present at the annual festival of the New England Society to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrims, on Thursday, the 22d of this month.

My duties will not allow me to avail myself of your kindness. I cannot but congratulate you and the country, however, upon the spectacle of devoted unanimity presented by the people at home, the citizens that form our marching columns, and the citizens that fill our squadrons on the sea---all animated by the same determination to complete and perpetuate the work our fathers began and transmitted.

The work of the Plymouth emigrants was the glory of their age. While we reverence their memory, let us not forget how vastly greater is our opportunity. I am very truly, your obedient servant,

Joseph H. Choate, Esq. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   New York Herald, December 23, 1864. On November 28, 1864, Joseph H. Choate, chairman, wrote Lincoln: ``On behalf of The New England Society in the City of New York, I have the honor to invite you to be present, as the guest of the Society, at its Annual Festival in commemoration of the Landing of the Pilgrims, to be held at the Astor House on Thursday the 22nd day of December next at 6 oclock P.M. . . .''(DLC-RTL).

Page  171

To Ladies Managing the Soldiers' Fair at Springfield, Massachusetts [1]

The ladies managing the Executive Mansion,
Soldier's Fair at Washington,
Springfield, Massachusetts. Dec. 19, 1864.

Your kind invitation to be present at the opening of your Fair is duly received by the hand of Mr. Ashmun. Grateful for the compliment, and ever anxious to aid the good cause in which you are engaged, I yet am compelled by public duties here, to decline. The recent good news from Generals Sherman, Thomas, and indeed from nearly all quarters, will be far better than my presence, and will afford all the impulse, and enthusiasm, you will need Your Obt. Servt A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by E. H. Brewer, Chicago, Illinois. Charles Marsh, secretary of committee, Springfield, Massachusetts, wrote Lincoln on December 10:

``The object of this communication which will be presented to you by our distinguished fellow citizen, Hon. Geo. Ashmun, is to invite you to be present at the opening of a `Soldiers Fair' to be held in this City, on the 19th, 20th, 21st, & 22d days of the present month

``While we appreciate the laborious and harassing duties, incident to your high position, we venture to suggest that the respite afforded by the acceptance of this invitation would prove most welcome to you.

``You need no other assurance, than that given by the recent vote of the Old Bay State, that, here, you would be among your friends. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Proclamation Calling for 300,000 Volunteers [1]

December 19, 1864

By the President of the United States:

A Proclamation.

Whereas, by the act approved July 4, 1864, entitled ``An Act further to regulate and provide for the enrolling and calling out the national forces, and for other purposes,'' it is provided that the President of the United States may, ``at his discretion, at any time hereafter, call for any number of men, as volunteers, for the respective terms of one, two, and three years, for military service,'' and ``that in case the quota, or any part thereof, of any town, township, ward of a city, precinct, or election district, or of any county not so sub-divided, shall not be filled within the space of fifty days after such call, then the President shall immediately order a draft for one year, to fill such quota, or any part thereof, which may be unfilled:''

Page  172And whereas by the credits allowed in accordance with the act of Congress on the call for five hundred thousand men made July 18th. 1864, the number of men to be obtained under that call was reduced to two hundred and eighty thousand; and whereas the operations of the enemy in certain States have rendered it impracticable to procure from them their full quotas of troops under said call; and whereas, from the foregoing causes, but two hundred and forty thousand men have been put into the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps under the said call of July 18, 1864, leaving a deficiency on that call of two hundred and sixty thousand: (260,000):

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, in order to supply the aforesaid deficiency, and to provide for casualties in the military and naval service of the United States, do issue this my call for three hundred thousand (300,000) volunteers to serve for one, two, or three years. The quotas of the States, districts, and sub-districts under this call will be assigned by the War Department through the Bureau of the Provost Marshal General of the United States, and, ``in case the quota or any part thereof of any town, township, ward of a city, precinct or election district, or of any county not so sub-divided, shall not be filled'' before the fifteenth day of February, eighteen hundred and sixty-five, then a draft shall be made to fill such quota, or any part thereof, under this call, which may be unfilled on said fifteenth day of February 1865.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L.S.]

Done at the city of Washington, this nineteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four; and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Proclamations.

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Executive Mansion
Major General Wallace Washington, Dec. 19. 1864

Several days ago I sent you a despatch directing that one Waters and two others should not be sent away immediately, and asking you to send me a statement of the cause or causes of your actionPage  173 in regard to them. I have received nothing from you on the subject. May I against [sic] ask for such statement? and also where the men now are? A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 263. Lincoln's telegram is marked by the telegraph operator as sent at 3:10 P.M. Wallace replied on the same day:

``The telegram of your Excellency of this date relative to the cases of Levin S Walters [Levin L. Waters] and two (2) others has been received. The reports called by your Excellency in a previous telegram December thirteenth were forwarded to Washington on the fifteenth inst & were full & explicit & were accompanied by all the papers in their cases.

``They are in charge of the Provost Marshal of this Department. . . .'' See Lincoln to Wallace, infra.

To Lewis Wallace [2]

Major General Wallace Executive Mansion,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, Dec. 19, 1864.

To whom were the reports sent? I have not received them

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 264. See Lincoln's telegram, supra. On December 31, 1864, Nicolay or Hay referred the papers to Stanton, but they are missing from the file (DNA WR RG 107, Secretary of War Letters Received, P 1256). See further, Lincoln to Stanton, January 4, 1865, infra.

To Benjamin W. Brice [1]

December 20, 1864

Will the Pay-Master-General please inform Hon. Mr. Eckley what is the trouble about Col. Fyffe's pay, & whether there is any thing the President can lawfully do about it. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 20, 1864

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Verne Miners, Chicago, Illinois. Benjamin W. Brice was appointed paymaster general as of November 29, 1864. Lincoln's note was enclosed in a letter of U.S. Representative Ephraim R. Eckley to Brice of the same date, asking why Colonel Edward P. Fyffe, Twenty-sixth Ohio, Veteran Reserve Corps, could not get his pay. Brice endorsed the letter on December 21, 1864, that there appeared to be ``no difficulty on the part of Col. Fyffe drawing his pay, except the want of funds. . . . Major H. A. Hutchins, is now in funds, and Col. Fyffe can be paid. . . .''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Secretary of War please see & hear this man.

Dec. 20, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 2193, November 15, 1927, No. 284. According to the catalog description this item is an autograph endorsement signed on a portion of an envelope.

Page  174

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Major General Wallace Executive Mansion
Baltimore, Md. Washington, Dec. 20. 1864

Suspend execution of James P. Boileau, until further order from here. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 265. No reply or further reference to Boileau has been found.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Butler Dec. 21, 1864.

On the 9th. of August last I began to write you a letter, the inclosed being a copy of so much as I then wrote. So far as it goes, it embraces the views I then entertained, and still entertain. A little relaxation of complaints made to me on the subject, occurring about that time, the letter was not finished and sent. I now learn, correctly I suppose, that you have ordered an election, similar to the one mentioned, to take place on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Let this be suspended, at least until conferrence with me, and obtaining my approval. Yours truly A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL; LS, RPB. The letter sent is in Hay's handwriting signed by Lincoln. The enclosed copy of Lincoln's communication of August 9 (supra), is also in Hay's handwriting.

Butler telegraphed his reply on December 27:

``I have just received your note relating to the Election on the Eastern Shore. The President is incorrectly informed. I have not, nor has any officer under my command ordered an election on that Shore.

``The inhabitants asked of me, leave to hold a meeting to take into consideration their relations to the state Government of Virginia. I replied that I would not order such a meeting, but that if the people chose to assemble . . . to petition for a redress of supposed grievances, or to consider any question of civil order I could see no military objection. . . .

``I have heard nothing on the subject since, and do not know even when the meeting is to be

``Shall I issue an order to prevent their assembling to vote on civil affairs?'' (DLC-RTL. As published in Private and Official Correspondence of General Benjamin F. Butler, V, 443, this telegram is misdated December 29.)

See further Lincoln's telegram to Butler on December 28, infra.

To Mary Todd Lincoln [1]

Mrs A Lincoln Washington
Continental Hotel Dec. 21. 1864

Do not come on the night train. It is too cold. Come in the morning. A. LINCOLN

Page  175Please send above and oblige the President. JOHN HAY

A.P.S.

Annotation

[1]   D, RPB. This telegram is entirely in John Hay's handwriting. As printed both by Nicolay and Hay (VIII, 148) and Tarbell (Appendix, p. 357), it is misdated ``1862.'' No reply has been found.

Pass for Slaughter S. Bradford [1]

December 21, 1864

Allow the bearer, S. S. Bradford, to pass by any route to his home in Culpeper Co. Va, and there to remain so long as he does not misbehave. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 21. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   ADS---F, ISLA. See Lincoln to Wright, October 17, supra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

December 21, 1864

Submitted to the Secretary of War. The recommendations are excellent, & it is said that Col. Post was wounded, perhaps mortally at the late battles in front of Nashville. I commend the case to the special attention of the Secretary A. LINCOLN

Dec. 21, 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter signed by Governor Richard Yates and other state officials of Illinois, November 29, 1864, recommending promotion of Colonel Philip Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, to brigadier general. Post was brevetted brigadier general of Volunteers as of December 16, 1864, the date of his citation for gallant and distinguished service in the battles before Nashville, Tennessee. In 1893 he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Approval of Treasury Regulation No. 55 [1]

Executive Mansion
December 22. 1864.

I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, having seen and considered the within amended Regulation numbered LV. prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, do hereby approve of the same, and I further declare and order that products moving in compliance with the said Regulation shall be exempt from seizure and from confiscation and forfeiture to the United States.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 56, General Records of the Treasury Department, Copies of Letters from the Secretary of the Treasury, Volume VIII, Set BE, Restricted Commercial Intercourse. The original order has not been found. A copy of the amended Regulation, December 22, 1864, is as follows:Page  176

``Regulation LV. concerning Commercial Intercourse series of July 29. 1864, is hereby amended as follows:

``LV. All existing authorities to purchase products in insurrectionary States are hereby revoked; except that products purchased in good faith under such authorities, and paid for, in whole or in part, prior to the 29th. day of July 1864, may be transported to market as before the passage of the Act of July 2. 1864, subject to the following limitations and conditions; and included in the following classes:

``1st. Those which have been wholly paid for.

``2d. Those upon which part payment has been made, coupled with a legal obligation to pay the residue, so that the articles purchased are at the risk of that purchaser, and such payment is in no wise dependent upon their delivery.

``3d. Where part payment has been made, without such obligations as to the balance, so much of the products alleged to have been purchased as the amount actually advanced will pay for at the stipulated price.

``The original permits must be produced in each case, and proof furnished to the satisfaction of a proper permit officer and a Supervising or Assistant Special Agent, for the Agency or district in which proof is to be made that the property desired to be moved comes within one of the classes named above, and that the privilege conferred by the original permit has been in no way violated or abused,---a certificate of which facts must be endorsed upon the permit over their official signature, which permit, so endorsed, will then be considered as revived and in full force, to the extent specified in the endorsement, in accordance with this rule. W. P. FESSENDEN Sec. Treas.'' (Ibid.).

To John B. Majors [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
St. Joseph, Mo. Washington, Dec. 22, 1864.

Postpone the execution of Higswith, Holland & Way, for twenty days. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 266. Captain John B. Majors of the Forty-third Missouri Regiment was senior officer at St. Joseph. On December 22, Brigadier General James Craig of the Enrolled Missouri Militia, telegraphed Lincoln from St. Joseph: ``I respectfully & earnestly recommend that the execution of Higswith Holland & Utz sentenced to be hung tomorrow in this city be postponed for twenty (20) days'' (DLC-RTL). Lincoln misread ``Utz'' as ``Way.'' A further error seems to have been made in transmitting the telegram, for the name ``Higswith'' is an error for ``Highsmith.'' Concerning the cases of James P. Holland, John H. Utz, and Henry W. Highsmith, see Lincoln's further telegram to Majors, January 9, and his endorsement to Joseph Holt, January 11, 1865, infra.

Order Concerning John Bliss [1]

Executive Mansion Dec. 22, 1864

To-day John Bliss, of Co. L in 1st Vermont Cavalry, comes to me voluntarily, under apprehension of being treated as a deserter. Now on condition that he returns to his regiment at once and faithfully serves out his term . . . he is fully pardoned. A. LINCOLN

Page  177

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 1179, December 6, 1915, No. 233. According to the catalog description this item is an autograph note signed. The ellipsis is in the source. Lincoln's order was promulgated by AGO Special Orders No. 465, December 23, 1864.

Pass for James Harrison [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 22, 1864.

Allow Mr. James Harrison, of St. Louis, Mo. at such point as he may choose, to pass our military lines, once and return, at his pleasure. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS, MoSHi; ADf, DLC-RTL. Letters from Edward Bates, December 12, and Samuel T. Glover and others, December 15, 1864, recommended Harrison to Lincoln (DLC-RTL). On December 17 at Washington, Harrison wrote Lincoln:

``Believing that I can command the influence and credit necessary to bring out a large amount of cotton from Red River and its tributaries, say from 10,000 bales upwards . . . and supposing that it would be an object of importance to the Government to get out cotton in large quantities; I have determined to ask permission to pass through our lines to go up Red River to the head quarters of the rebel commander to negotiate arrangements for his permission to trade. . . .

``When I shall have made arrangements with the Confederate authorities to bring out cotton, and for their protection to my Boats and property against seizure; I want your permission to take steam Boats through our lines to within the Confederate lines and return with their cargoes

``To accomplish this object . . . I respectfully ask an order from the President, or from the Secretaries of both the army and Navy to their respective commanders in that department. . . .'' (Ibid.).

See further Lincoln's order of December 23, infra.

To James Speed [1]

Attorney General please make out a pardon in this case.

Dec. 22, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 537. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from A. Q. Keasbey, Newark, New Jersey, October 3, 1864, asking pardon for Charles Donnelly, convicted of counterfeiting.

To Adoniram J. Warner [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion
Indianapolis, Ia. Washington, Dec. 22. 1864

Postpone, the execution of John Doyle Lennan alias Thomas Doyle, for ten days. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 267. On December 22, 1864, Felix Lennan of Indianapolis telegraphed Lincoln: ``My brother John Doyle Lennan alias Thomas Doyle is under sentence of death for desertion and ordered to be shot tomorrow at Indianapolis Ind. I humbly petition you for the postponement of the execution for ten days. please give me an answer'' (DLC-RTL). See further Lincoln to Warner, December 30, infra.

Page  178

Endorsement [1]

If the facts within stated be shown to be true, let the transfer be made. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 23. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES-P, ISLA. This endorsement has been removed from attendant papers.

Order Concerning James Harrison [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, December 23, 1864.

All Military and Naval commanders will please give to James Harrison, Esq. of St. Louis, Missouri, (with any number of [2] SteamBoats not exceeding three, taking in tow any number of barges, scows, flats, and the like, not having steam power, which they may be able to so take, with [3] such goods & money, as the Treasury agents may grant permits for under the rules of the Dept. and none other, and only with crews to navigate the whole, and necessary provisions for himself and said crews,) protection and safe conduct from New-Orleans [4] or Memphis to Red River, and up said river and its tributaries, till he shall pass beyond our Military lines, and also give him such protection and safe conduct on his return to our lines, back to New-Orleans [5] or Memphis, with any cargoes he may bring; and on his safe return from beyond our lines, with said boats and tows, allow him to repeat once or twice if he shall desire.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   DfS, DLC-RTL. The signed draft includes corrections in Lincoln's autograph as noted. Accompanying the draft is Harrison's signed pledge, also with corrections by Lincoln:

``Washington, D.C. December 23, 1864.

``In consideration that the President of the United States today delivers to me a paper of which the within is a copy, I pledge him my word of honor that whatever I may do thereunder shall be at my own expense and risk of person and property, with no claim upon him or upon the government in any contingency whatever; that I will take absolutely nothing into the insurgent lines, which could be of value to them, except the boats, tows, goods money and provisions as stated; and that I will not take said boats, tows, and other matters stated, [Lincoln amended ``provisions'' to ``other matters stated''] or any of them, into said insurgent lines, unless I shall first have the personal pledge of Gen. Kirby Smith, or the officer in chief command, given directly by him to me, that said boats and tows shall without condition, safely return to our Military lines.

``JAS HARRISON''

[2]   Lincoln deleted ``inferior'' at this point.

[3]   Lincoln revised to the present reading from ``without money, and without cargoes outgoing, and only with crews. . . .''

[4]   Lincoln deleted ``Cairo'' and inserted ``New-Orleans or Memphis.''

[5]   See note 4.

Page  179

To Robert K. Stone [1]

Will Dr. Stone please make me a prescription for a ring worm?

Dec. 23, 1864. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ISLA.

To Thomas J. Durant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My Dear Sir December 24, 1864.

I have received the elegantly-mounted volume, commemorative of the celebration in honor of the passage of the Ordinance of Emancipation of the State of Louisiana, held on the 11th of June, in New Orleans, which you, in behalf of the following citizens of that State: Henry Raymond, Francois Boisdore, John Smith, Peter Hillud [Hillard?], Robert Smith, A. L. Young, Henry Chevanne [Chevunne? Chevarre?], Lawrence Quanders, Rev. Geo. W. Steptoe, Rev. R. H. Steptoe, and Rev. S. W. Rogers, have had the goodness to transmit to me. [2]

I beg that you will express to the donors the assurance of my grateful appreciation of their kindness, and that you will accept my personal acknowledgements for the manner in which you have conveyed this manifestation of their regard.

I am very truly Your Obedient Servant

Thomas J Durant Esq

Annotation

[1]   Df, DLC-Nicolay Papers. The draft is in John Hay's handwriting on Executive Mansion stationery. The letter was printed in the Washington Daily Morning Chronicle on January 31, 1865, with the following note: ``On the passage of the act of emancipation, an elegantly bound volume was sent to President Lincoln by the colored people of Louisiana in commemoration of the event. The following letter of the President, after receiving the gift, was read by Thomas J. Durant, Esq. on Wednesday [January 25], before a large assemblage of ladies, gentlemen, and colored people.''

[2]   The book and the letter from Durant, December 8, 1864, accompanying it, are in the Oliver R. Barrett Collection.

Endorsement
Concerning Samuel D. Lockwood [1]

Judge Lockwood, the writer, is one of the best men in the world.

File. A.L.

Dec. 24, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   American Autograph Shop Catalog, March, 1939, No. 101. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement was written on a letter from Samuel D. Lockwood, Batavia, Kane County, Illinois, December 6, 1864. The conclusion of Lockwood's letter is reproduced as follows:

`` . . . I feel fully conscious that heavier burden's & responsibilities neverPage  180 rested on the mind and heart of any man, but I sincerely hope & believe, that you will come out of them all with an untarnished reputation & the complete establishment for our Country of the Glorious principle enunciated in the Declaration of Independence, `That all men are created equal.' If such shall be the result of your sacrifices & labours, no man need ever aspire to a more glorious or a more benificent reputation. May God grant it.

``Please excuse this hasty scrawl. Ill health & cramp in my hand forbid my revising or copying it.''

To Joseph Holt [1]

December 24, 1864

Judge Advocate General please report to me on this case.

Dec. 24, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 26, 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2740. Lincoln's endorsements are written on the court-martial record of August P. Dumont, contractor of Philadelphia, sentenced, November 3, 1864, on charges of willful neglect of duty, to $1,000 fine and imprisonment until the fine was paid or not to exceed one year.

To John McClelland [1]

John McClelland Executive Mansion
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, Dec. 24. 1864

A letter of yours is laid before me, in which you seek to have John S. Young, James Mallory & R. T. Bridges released, adding ``My word for it they are innocent.'' It is fair to presume that you would not say this without knowing what you say to be true. But a telegraphic despatch of Gov. Johnson, now before me, says of this very man Mallory ``has been guilty of the most outrageous and atrocious murders known to civilization'' and that ``the punishment of death is not half atonement for the crimes he has committed on the defenceless & unoffending Union-men of the country'' As I know Gov. Johnson would not purposely misle[a]d me, I think it be well for you to communicate the particulars of your information to him. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 268. This telegram as printed by Nicolay and Hay is incorrectly addressed to ``John McClernand.'' John McClelland was assessor of internal revenue at Nashville (U.S. Official Register, 1865. His letter referred to by Lincoln has not been found. Andrew Johnson's telegram of December 3, 1864, reads in part as follows: ``James R Mallory who was convicted of violation of the Laws & usages of civilized warfare of murder & two robberies sentenced to be hung on the second instant has been respited by Genl Thomas for a short time so that his friends can have an opportunity as they say to present circumstances which will mitigate his sentence. Two young ladies, one assuming to be his sister & the other his cousin asked & obtained a simple letter of introduction to the President & will be presented byPage  181

them in a few days. This man Mallory . . . has been a terror to the whole surrounding country and has been guilty of the most outrageous and atrocious murders known to civilization. . . . I told the two young ladies who will apply for the pardon that I could not even recommend a commutation of his punishment to imprisonment for life . . . & that the punishment of death was not half atonement for the crimes he had committed on the defenceless & unoffending Union men of the country. Duty & conscience required me to say as much to the President in this case.'' (DLC-RTL).

James R. Mallory, citizen of Tennessee, was sentenced to death by hanging, on charges of murder and violation of the laws and customs of war. On April 21, 1864, Lincoln approved the sentence, and on August 9, 1864, endorsed a second application for clemency, ``Second application denied. August 9. 1864 A. LINCOLN'' (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, MM 1375). See further Lincoln to Miller, December 28, infra.

To William H. Seward [1]

December 24, 1864

Gen. C. S. Todd, once much of a man, is now superannuated, and would be an incumbrance upon the Commander in New-Orleans, unjustifiable in me to impose upon him. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 24. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, NAuE. Lincoln's endorsement is written on Seward's letter of December 23, 1864, to Representative George H. Yeaman: ``I have had the honor to receive and have commended to the consideration of the President, your note of the 21st instant and the accompanying letter addressed to me by C. S. Todd, Esqr.''

A letter from Charles S. Todd to Francis P. Blair, Sr., November 29, 1864, sets forth Todd's wish to live in New Orleans, the inadequacy of his current salary as assessor of internal revenue at Owensboro, Kentucky, and his belief that ``as a pupil of [William Henry] Harrison and Minister to Military Governments guided by [Simon] Bolivar and [Czar] Nicholas'' he would be valuable to General Nathaniel P. Banks in a military appointment (DLC-RTL).

To William T. Sherman [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My dear General Sherman. Dec. 26, 1864.

Many, many, thanks for your Christmas-gift---the capture of Savannah.

When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering that ``nothing risked, nothing gained'' I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went farther than to acquiesce. And, taking the work of Gen. Thomas into the count, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate military advantages; but, in showing to the world that your army could be divided, putting the stronger partPage  182 to an important new service, and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of the whole---Hood's army---it brings those who sat in darkness, to see a great light. But what next? I suppose it will be safer if I leave Gen. Grant and yourself to decide.

Please make my grateful acknowledgments to your whole army, officers and men. Yours very truly A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC; LS copy, DLC-Stanton Papers. The signed copy in the Stanton Papers is in John Hay's handwriting and is endorsed by Lincoln at the top of the first page ``(Original sent by Gen. Logan).'' General Sherman's despatch to Lincoln from Savannah, Georgia, via Fort Monroe, Virginia, December 22, 1864, was received on December 25: ``I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah with 150 heavy guns & plenty of ammunition & also about 25000 bales of cotton.'' (DLC-RTL).

Sherman replied on January 6, 1865: ``I am gratified at the receipt of your letter of Dec 26, at the hand of General Logan. Especially to observe that you appreciate the division I made of my army, and that each part was duly proportioned to its work. The motto, `Nothing ventured Nothing won' which you refer to is most appropriate, and should I venture too much and happen to lose I shall bespeak your charitable influence. I am ready for the Great Next as soon as I can complete certain preliminaries, and learn of Genl Grant his and your preference of intermediate `objectives.' '' (DLC-RTL).

To Gideon Welles [1]

Hon. Secretary of the Navy. Executive Mansion,
Sir: Washington, Dec. 26. 1864.

The unexecuted part of the sentence of the General Court-Martial in the case of Com. Charles Wilkes, U.S.N. is hereby remitted, this remission to take effect at the end of one year from the day on which the sentence took effect. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR NB RG 45, Executive Letters, No. 178. Commodore Charles Wilkes had been sentenced by court-martial, April 27, 1864, to be reprimanded and suspended from duty for three years, for publication of official correspondence. See Lincoln's communications to Browning and to Ewing, May 16, supra.

To J. Bates Dickson [1]

Officer in Command at Executive Mansion
Lexington, Ky: Washington, Dec. 27. 1864

If within your power, send me the particulars of the causes for which Lieut. Govr. Jacobs was arrested and sent away.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 269. See Lincoln to Bramlette, November 22, supra. On December 26, 1864, Richard T. Jacob wrote Lincoln from Richmond, Virginia: ``On the night of the 11th of November last, I was arrested by the order of . . . General Burbridge at my country home. . . . I was carried to Lexington, and kept at General McLeans head quarters some two hours. I courted [?] and confidently expected to have had an interview with General Burbridge. I was by his orders carried under strict guard, and expelled through the Federal lines under the penalty of death if I returnedPage  183

during the war. I was thus forced by necessity into the Confederate lines, to accept the hospitality and protection of a people that I had fought against. . . . A poor return for wounds received, and hard service rendered to ones country. Even a thief has the boon of being condemned before he is punished. . . . It is difficult to defend ones self, when no charges are preferred. I have not even a conjecture to go on except a telegram that I had cut out of the Cincinnatti Commercial. Which is as follows, `The Post's Washington letter says the arrest of Lieutenant Governor Jacob will lead to important disclosures. There are rumors of a wide spread conspiracy existing in that State, not to take it over to a rebel confederacy, but to inaugurate a second revolution, the object of which is to make Kentucky independent of the General Government.' If my arrest would lead to important disclosures would not common sense have suggested that I should have been detained and examined. If there was a wide spread conspiracy I knew not of it, nor do I believe for one moment there was any such. I never was connected with a conspiracy. . . . True Mr. President I was opposed to your re-election, and it is the only charge that can with truth be brought against me. . . . Three days after the election I was seized. I find this in the Richmond Sentinel of the first of December taken from the Louisville Journal. [`]We are happy to announce that President Lincoln has consented to the release of Lieutenant Governor Jacob and Col. Frank Wolford. We sincerely hope that this may be the commencement of a new policy. . . .' Now Sir, I wish to find out whether this is true or not, and if so whether you will not order that I be passed through the lines to return to my duties as Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky. . . . As I have committed no crime, I ask not for pardon, but merely simple justice. . . .''

Captain J. Bates Dickson, assistant adjutant general in command in the absence of General Stephen G. Burbridge, answered Lincoln's telegram on December 28, 1864: ``So far as I am informed, . . . Jacob's offense was making treasonable and seditious speeches, calculated and intended to weaken the power of the Government. . . . His arrest was advised by Doctor [Robert J.] Breckinridge and other prominent loyal men of Kentucky. General Burbridge will address you fully on the subject upon his return. I have had no communication with him since the 14th instant, and do not know his present location'' (OR, I, XLV, II, 402).

See further Lincoln to Grant, January 5, 1865, infra.

To Haidie M. Jones [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Miss Haidie M. Jones. Dec 27. 1864

I have received your pretty present by the hand of Hon. Mr Ashley, and for which please accept my thanks Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ISLA. James M. Ashley was U.S. representative from Toledo, Ohio. No further identification of Miss Jones or her present has been found.

To John Maclean [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My Dear Sir December 27, 1864.

I have the honour to acknowledge the reception of your note of the 20th of December, conveying the announcement that the TrusteesPage  184 of the College of New Jersey have conferred upon me the Degree of Doctor of Laws.

The assurance conveyed by this high compliment, that the course of the government which I represent has received the approval of a body of gentlemen of such character and intelligence in this time of public trial, is most grateful to me.

Thoughtful men must feel that the fate of civilization upon this continent is involved in the issue of our contest. Among the most gratifying proofs of this conviction is the hearty devotion everywhere exhibited by our schools and colleges to the national cause.

I am most thankful if my labors have seemed to conduce to the preservation of those institutions under which alone we can expect good government and in its train sound learning and the progress of the liberal arts.

I am sir very truly Your Obedient Servant A. LINCOLN

Dr. John MacLean

Annotation

[1]   LS, NjP. President John Maclean of the College of New Jersey, Princeton, wrote Lincoln on December 20, 1864:

``I have the honour to inform you, that, at the semi-annual meeting of the Trustees of this College this day, the Degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon you, by the unanimous consent of the Board.

``Hoping that this expression of their respect for you both personally, and as the Head of our Nation will not be unacceptable to you, I am most sincerely and with the highest respect. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Knox College at Galesburg, Illinois, was first to honor Lincoln with an LL.D., on July 4, 1860, and Columbia College, New York City, came next with an LL.D. conferred on June 26, 1861.

Memorandum: Appointment of William H. Lee [1]

[c. December 27, 1864]

West-Point. Mr. Lee, the father, was in the Ills. Leg. 1854-5.

Annotation

[1]   AE, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1864, No. 362. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter of William L. Lee, Rock Island, Illinois, December 27, 1864, to Edwin M. Stanton, submitting the application of his son William H. Lee for appointment to West Point. No record of Lee's appointment has been found.

Memorandum: Appointment of Franklin Yeaton [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Dec. 27, 1864.

I this morning promise Mr. Fessenden that when I shall appoint the ten cadets at large for the now incoming year, Franklin Yeaton shall be one. A. LINCOLN

Page  185

Annotation

[1]   ADS, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1864, No.225. Franklin Yeaton of New Brunswick, Maine, entered West Point in July 1865 and graduated in 1869.

Order Concerning William N. Symington [1]

Allow William Symington, now a prisoner at Fort Warren to leave there and report to me now at Washington. A. LINCOLN.

December 27, 1864.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ISLA. Orville H. Browning's Diary records on December 27: ``President sent for me. . . . He wished to talk . . . about releasing Mrs Symingtons Son who is a prisoner at Fort Lafayette [sic]. . . .'' Under date of January 11, 1865, Browning records: ``At 9 O'clock this morning went with Wm N Symington to the Presidents and got a pass for him to go to Richmond & report himself to his uncle Andrew Johnston to be exchanged for any prisoner of ours, either civil or military. If no exchange can be effected he is to return here and report to me. . . .''

Order for Hanson A. Risley [1]

December 27. 1864

I, H A Risley agent for the purchase of products of insurrectionary states on behalf of the Government of the United States at Norfolk Va. do hereby certify that I have agreed to purchase from I. Seymour ten thousand bales of Cotton and one million feet of Lumber, which products it is represented are or will be at points on or near the lines of the United States forces in the State of Florida on or before the first day of May 1865 and which he stipulates shall be delivered to me unless prevented from so doing by the authority of the United States.

I therefore request safe conduct for the said Seymour and his agents and his means of transportation and said products from the points on or near the lines of the United States forces in Florida aforesaid to Fernindena when the products so transported are to be sold and delivered to me under the stipulations referred to above and pursuant to regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury H A RISLEY

Sup. Spl Agt &

Executive Mansion Dec 27. 1864

An authorised agent of the Treasury Department having with the approval of the secretary of the Treasury contracted for the products above mentioned and the party having agreed to sell and deliver the same to such agent, it is ordered, that products moving in compliance with and for fulfilment of said contract and being transported to such agent or under his direction shall be free fromPage  186 seizure or detention by any officer of the Government: and commandants of military departments, districts, posts and detachments, naval stations, gunboats, flotillas and fleets, will observe this order and give the said Seymour his agents and means of transportation free and unmolested passage for the purpose of getting said products through the lines, other than blockaded lines, and safe conduct within our lines, while the same are moving in compliance with Regulations of the secretary of the Treasury and for fulfilment of said contract with the agent of the Government.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, RPB.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Butler War Department,
Fort-Monroe, Va Washington, D.C., Dec. 28. 1864.

I think you will find that the Provost-Marshal on the Eastern Shore has, as by your authority, issued an order, not for a meeting, but for an election. The order printed in due form was shown to me, but as I did not retain it I can not give you a copy. If the people on their own motion wish to hold a peaceful meeting I suppose you need not to hinder them. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 271. See note to Lincoln's communication to Butler on December 21, supra. Colonel Frank J. White wrote Butler on December 30 from Eastville, Virginia: ``In obedience to your telegram, received this morning, I have the honor to enclose the only order issued by me concerning an election upon this shore. This order was issued by me in obedience to what I supposed to be your instructions. . . .'' ( Private and Official Correspondence of General Benjamin F. Butler, V, 444). The order has not been found.

To John G. Foster [1]

Executive Mansion,
General: Washington, 28 December, 1864.

The bearer, Mr. Charles D. Chase, visits your Department on business. He is a gentleman with whom I am personally acquainted and whom I can commend to your courteous consideration. Yours very truly A LINCOLN

Major General Foster

Annotation

[1]   LS, IHi. Except for Lincoln's signature this letter on Executive Mansion stationery is in John Hay's handwriting. On the verso is an undated note written to Foster by Charles D. Chase: ``Being unable to attend to my business SouthPage  187

in person, I beg to introduce Mr. W C Churchill, for whom I ask any facilities which might have been extended me from the letter of the President.''

Chase and Churchill have not been further identified. General Foster was in command of the Department of the South at Hilton Head, South Carolina.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department, Washington, D.C.,
City-Point, Va. Dec. 28. 5/30. P.M. 1864.

If there is no objection, please tell me what you now understand of the Wilmington expedition, present & prospective.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 270. Grant replied on the same day: ``The Wilmington expedition has proven a gross and culpable failure. Many of the troops are now back here. Delays and free talk of the object of the expedition enabled the enemy to move troops to Wilmington to defeat it. After the expedition sailed from Fort Monroe three days of fine weather was squandered, during which the enemy was without a force to protect himself. Who is to blame I hope will be known.'' (OR, I, XLII, III, 1087).

The joint expedition under Admiral David D. Porter and General Benjamin F. Butler was abandoned on December 25 when Butler and General Godfrey Weitzel decided that Fort Fisher at Wilmington, North Carolina, could not be carried by assault.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Let this man, Louis A. Welton be enlarged, the sentence against him standing as a security for his good behavior. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 28. 1864.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2120. See Lincoln's communication to Morgan, Weed, and Raymond, August 31, supra. A letter from Welton dated October 23, 1864, undertakes to defend his action on the ground that although a contract to supply the rebels was found on his person, his intention was to use his connections in the South to obtain large amounts of cotton for the United States (DLC-RTL). On December 20, Henry T. Blow wrote Lincoln:

``From the conversation with you to day, I am encouraged to hope that you will bear with me while I say something in regard to the release of Mr. L A Welton.

``I never learned the circumstances which proved his guilt . . . until you informed me of them, but concluded of course that our Government had acted justly. . . .

``I do not hesitate to say also, that to ask the pardon of any man who has been tried and found guilty of so grave a crime . . . is a hard task, and only undertaken for the following reasons.

``Mr. Welton is the brother in law of Wm. M. Fishback one of the Editors & proprietors of the Missouri Democrat. Mr. F. is deeply attached to his wife's brother, and believes that however circumstances may have been against him, that he is innocent. . . . Mr. Fishback is loyal to the core, he has for yearsPage  188 been . . . the proprietor . . . of a paper which has done as much to further the cause of freedom & patriotism as any printed in the West. . . .

``Such a man deserves, I am sure enjoys your sympathy & respect, he prays you to pardon Welton. . . .

``I knew Welton before he acted so badly . . . and . . . if I thought for a moment, that he would ever again dishonor himself & be faithless to his . . . country, I would be the last one to appeal to you in his behalf. . . .'' (Ibid.).

Lincoln's order for Welton's release was promulgated on December 30, 1864, in AGO Special Orders No. 475.

To John F. Miller [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, Dec. 28. 1864.

Suspend execution of James R. Mallory, for six weeks from Friday the 30th. of this month, which time I have given his friends, to make proof, if they can, upon certain points. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 272. See Lincoln to McClelland, December 24, supra. Brigadier General John F. Miller replied on the same day: ``Your dispatch granting respite to James R. Mallory for six (6) weeks from thirtieth (30) received'' (DLC-RTL).

See further Lincoln's telegram to Miller, February 4, 1865, infra.

Pass for Francis P. Blair, Sr. [1]

Allow the bearer, F.P. Blair, Senr. to pass our lines, go South and return A. LINCOLN

Dec. 28. 1864

Annotation

[1]   ADS, DLC-RTL. This card pass is preserved with the autograph document addressed to the House of Representatives, February 10, 1865, infra.

On December 30, 1864, Blair wrote Jefferson Davis two letters, copies of which are among the Lincoln Papers. The covering letter is as follows:

``The loss of some papers of importance . . . which I suppose may have been taken by some persons who had access to my house when Genl Earlys army was in possession of my place induces me to ask the privilege of visiting Richmond & beg the favor of you to facilitate my inquiries in regard to them.''

The second letter sets forth Blair's real purpose:

``The fact stated in the enclosed note may seem to answer inquiries as to the object of my visit, which if allowed by you I would not communicate fully to any one but yourself. The main purpose I have in seeing you is to explain the views I entertain in reference to the state of the affairs of our country & to submit to your consideration ideas which in my opinion you may turn to good & possibly bring to practical results that may not only repair all the ruin the war has brought upon the Nation but contribute to . . . the welfare of other nations that have suffered from it.

``In candor I must say to you in advance that I come to you wholly unaccredited except in so far as I may be by having permission to pass our lines & to offer to you my own suggestions---suggestions which I have submitted to no one in authority on this side & will not without my conversation with you may lead me to suppose they may lead to something practicable. With the hope of such result, if allowed I will confidentially unbosom my heart frankly & withoutPage  189 reserve. You will of course hold in reserve all that is not proper to be said to one coming as I do merely as a private citizen and addressing one clothed with the highest responsibilities

``Unless the great interests now at stake induce you to attribute more importance to my application than it would otherwise command I would not expect that you would invite the intrusion. I venture however to submit the matter to your judgment.''

For Lincoln's report on Blair's mission, see the communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, 1865, infra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

The writer of this is Gen. Grant's father. Let Mr. McKenezie be appointed if his services are needed. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 28. 1864

Annotation

[1]   AES-P, ISLA. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Jesse R. Grant, Covington, Kentucky, November 10, 1864, recommending appointment of Alexander McKenzie of Kentucky as quartermaster. McKenzie was appointed captain and assistant quartermaster of Volunteers as of January 28, 1865.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

I specially request that the Secretary of War give a hearing to these men---representatives of Co. F of 4. Mass. Heavy Artillery.

Dec. 28. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. Twelve unattached companies of heavy artillery raised in the summer of 1864 for coastal defense in Massachusetts were sent to Washington in September to garrison forts around the District of Columbia. On November 12, 1864, these companies were consolidated into the Fourth Massachusetts Heavy Artillery (AGO Special Orders No. 395), and continued in the defenses of the capital until mustered out on June 17, 1865.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Butler Dec. 29, 1864.

There is a man in Co I. 11th. Conn. Vols. 1 Brigade 3. Division 24th. Army Corps, at Chapins Farm, Va, under the assumed name of Wm. Stanley, but whose real name is Frank R. Judd; and who is under arrest, and probably about to be tried for desertion. He is the son of our present Minister to Prussia, who is a close personal friend of Senator Trumbull and myself. We are not willing for the boy to be shot, but we think it as well that his trial go regularly on, suspending execution until further order from me & reporting to me A. LINCOLN

Page  190

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 273. See Lincoln to Stanton, November 21, 1863. The case of Frank R. Judd is tangled. Following his enlistment in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry on February 6, 1864, he was appointed to West Point, where he reported on June 4, 1864, but left without taking his entrance examination. He enlisted as Frank Judson in the Third Massachusetts Cavalry on July 15, 1864, and was listed as a deserter on September 30, 1864. He enlisted in the Eleventh Connecticut Volunteers under the name of William Stanley on November 26, 1864. See further Lincoln to Ord, January 19, 1865.

To Thomas B. Fairleigh [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Louisville Kentucky Washington, Dec. 29th, 1864.

Suspend execution of death sentence of George S. Owen until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination.

Maj. Eckert A. LINCOLN

Please send the above telegram Yours JNO G NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 274. This telegram, in the hand of Nicolay, bears his autograph signature but not Lincoln's. Thomas B. Fairleigh replied on December 30: ``No such man here as Geo S Owen under sentence your despatch has been forwarded to Division District & Dept Head Quarters'' (DLC-RTL). George S. Owen has not been further identified.

To James Speed [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Hon. Attorney General Dec. 29, 1864.

Please give me your opinion in writing whether the Secretary of the Navy, or any of his subordinates, is bound in law, on application of individuals, to furnish exemplified copies of records, or parts of records, of Naval Courts-Martial, on file in the Navy Department.

Also, whether the Secretary of the Navy, or any of his subordinates is bound in law to answer to a Commission of a State court, directing the taking of his or their testimony, as to the contents of records of Naval Courts-Martial on file in the Navy Department.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS copy (ADfS?), DLC-RTL; LS, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, 1864, Box 117. Attorney General Speed replied in a twelve-page opinion on January 3, 1865. His conclusions were: `` . . . the written record of the proceedings before a naval Court martial becomes, when the proceedings are consummated by the action of the proper revisory authority, the record of an adjudicated case tried and determined by a legally constituted court of justice; and . . . any limitation to an exemplified copy of such a record on file in thePage  191

Navy Department, when properly applied for by an individual, would be contrary to law. . . .

``With respect to the second point submitted to me, I am of opinion, that the Secretary of the Navy, and any of his subordinates, having knowledge of the contents of records of naval courts martial on file . . . after the proceedings have been consummated . . . are bound in law to answer to a commission of a State Court directing the taking of his and their testimony as to the contents of such records. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

If the services are needed let this appointment be made.

Dec. 29, 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Retz & Storm Catalog, No. 110. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement appears on the verso of a petition signed by Richard Yates and others, October 10, 1864, for appointment of Orlu C. Richardson as commissary. Richardson had resigned as captain in the Thirtieth Illinois Infantry on August 12, 1864. He was appointed captain and commissary as of March 2, 1865.

Endorsement [1]

Send some papers in these cases. A. LINCOLN.

Dec. 30, 1864

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Catalog, December 3, 1923, No. 558. According to the catalog description, this clipped endorsement has on the verso, ``John B. Hibbitt, Private Co. A 9th Cavalry Confined at Rock Island---Papers on file at Commissary General Wm. R. Neblett Co. C.'' No further reference has been found.

Endorsement [2]

Send me papers in this case. A. LINCOLN

Dec. 30, 1864

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog, October 9, 1914, No. 1194. According to the catalog description, on the back of this clipped endorsement appear part of four lines in Lincoln's autograph.

To Elijah C. Middleton [1]

Mr. E.C. Middleton Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir. Washington, Dec. 30, 1864.

Your picture presented by Mr. Lutz is, in the main, very good. From a line across immediately above the eye-brows, downward it appears to me perfect. Above such line I think it is not so good,---that is, while it gives perhaps a better fore-head, it is not quite truePage  192 to the original. If you were present I could tell you wherein, but I can not well do so on paper. The next best thing I suppose would be to carefully study a photograph Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NN. No communication from Elijah C. Middleton has been found, but his firm (Middleton, [Hines] Strabridge & [D. C.] Fabronius) were lithographers at Cincinnati, Ohio, who published a chromolithograph of Lincoln in the autumn of 1864. Mr. Lutz has not been identified.

To Adoniram J. Warner [1]

Executive Mansion Washington
Col. Warner---Indianapolis, Ia. Dec. 30. 1864

It is said that you were on the Court-Martial that tried John Lennan, and that you are disposed to advise his being pardoned and sent to his regiment. If this be true, telegraph me to that effect at once. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 275. See Lincoln to Warner, December 22, supra. Colonel Adoniram J. Warner replied on the same day: ``I do not advise that Jno Lenon be pardoned and sent to his regt he enlisted under a false name & I believe with the intention of deserting after drawing his bounty. In consideration however of his age & his conduct since his trial I could recommend that his sentence be commuted to hard labor for life'' (DLC-RTL).

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Gen. Hitchcock, please see & hear this lady.

Dec. 31. 1864. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from James Pollock, director of the United States Mint at Philadelphia, December 29, 1864, introducing Mrs. G.J. Laurence: ``She desires to have her nephew Lt. G.L. Brown of the 101st P.V. now a prisoner at Columbia S.C. released or exchanged. . . .''

Order Designating Offices to Receive Subscriptions to Union Pacific Railroad [1]

December 31, 1864

By the authority conferred upon the President of the United States by the 2d. section of the act of Congress, approved July 2d., 1864, entitled ``An act to amend an act to aid in the construction of a Railroad and Telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean,'' &c. &c.

I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do hereby designate the Merchants' National Bank, Boston; the Chicago and

Page  193Rock Island Railroad Company's Office, Chicago; the First National Bank at---Philadelphia; the First National Bank at Baltimore; the First National Bank at---Cincinnati; and the Third National Bank at St. Louis, in addition to the General Office of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, in the city of New York, as the places at which the said Union Pacific Railroad Company shall cause books to be kept open to receive subscriptions to the capital stock of said Company. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington, D.C.

December 31st., 1864.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA NR RG 48, Department of Interior, Union Pacific Railroad, Package 239.

To James Speed [1]

Attorney General please make out pardons in these two cases.

Dec. 31. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, CSmH. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Representative Austin A. King, December 31, 1864, asking pardon for Levi Brashear and William A. Guthrie, both of Platte County, Missouri, indicted for conspiracy in April, 1862.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Hon. Secretary of War. Dec. 31, 1864.

You may remember that some time in June last (I think) an Assistant Inspector General on Col. Speer's [2] staff, in Gen. Butler's army, by name Andrew J. Smith, was convicted of a rape upon a colored girl. Gen. Butler, Mr. Holt, and yourself, each in turn, on examination of the evidence, thought there was no doubt of his guilt, while I thought there was some slight room for doubt on the question of personal identification [sic]. I concluded however, to let him suffer a while, and then discharge him. Twice within two or three weeks I made a short order for his pardon for the unexecuted part of the sentence, which, however it seems has not yet been done. Let it be done now. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 94, Adjutant General, Letters Received, P 1567 (with V-31-VS-1865). On November 28 Lincoln had endorsed the record in the case of Lieutenant Andrew J. Smith, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, sentenced to prison for ten years for rape: ``Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence Nov. 28. 1864, A. LINCOLN.'' Again on December 12, he endorsed the record ``Pardon Dec. 12, 1864 A. LINCOLN'' (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2099). No record of the promulgation of Lincoln's order has been found.

[2]   Colonel Samuel P. Spear.

Page  194

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

Please send me the papers within refered to.

Dec. 31. 1864 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Dale Carnegie, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of E.A. Manning, ``Pastor D st. M.E. Church, So. Boston,'' to Senator Charles Sumner, May 30, 1864, setting forth his physical disability for which local authorities had refused to exempt him from the draft. Sumner endorsed on June 1, 1864: ``I hope you will be able to grant the within request. It seems strange that the local officers have failed to do it.'' No further reference has been found.

To Adoniram J. Warner [1]

Col. A.J. Warner Executive Mansion, Washington,
Indianapolis, Ia. Decr. 31. 1864.

Suspend execution of John Lennan until further order from me & in the mean time send me the record of his trial.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 276. See Lincoln to Warner, December 30, supra.

Endorsement [1]

[1865]

This application is made on the idea that the incumbent is to go out at the end of four years. A.L.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA NR RG 48, Indian Agencies, Applications, Choctaw, Box 1271. Lincoln's undated endorsement is written on an envelope marked ``D. W. Houston/Garnett Kansas/Application for the office of Agent of the Choctaw Indians.'' No record has been found of Houston's appointment.

Endorsement [1]

Will Sec. of Treasury and Comr. of Int. Revenue, please file & preserve. A LINCOLN

21. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, MS. Lincoln's endorsement, with the name of the month cut off, has been clipped from an envelope.

Endorsement Concerning Robert H. Hendershot [1]

[c. January 1, 1865]

I know something of this boy, and believe he is very brave, manly and worthy. A. LINCOLN.

Page  195

Annotation

[1]   William S. Dodge, Robert Henry Hendershot; or, The Brave Drummer Boy of the Rappahannock (Chicago, 1867), p. vi. According to the source, Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of Francis E. Spinner, January 1, 1865, recommending Hendershot for appointment to West Point. See Lincoln's letter to Stanton, March 15, 1864, supra.

To Salmon P. Chase [1]

Chief Justice Chase Executive Mansion
My dear Sir: Washington, Jan. 2. 1865.

Without your note of to-day, I should have felt assured that some sufficient reason had detained you. Allow me to condole with you in the sad bereavement you mention Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, RPB, ADfS, DLC-RTL. On January 2, 1865, Chase wrote Lincoln: ``The death of my only surviving sister prevented me from joining personally in the congratulations of this morning. But let me assure you that no one more earnestly wishes every blessing of the New Year to you and yours. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). Chase referred to the customary call of government officers to pay their New Year's respect.

Reply to a Delegation of Kentuckians [1]

January 2, 1865

You howled when Butler went to New-Orleans. Others howled when he was removed from that command. Somebody has been howling ever since at his assignment to military command. How long will it be before you, who are howling for his assignment to rule Kentucky, will be howling to me to remove him?

Annotation

[1]   New York Tribune, January 4, 1865. Lincoln's reply was made to a delegation of Kentuckians who applied ``to have Gen. Butler assigned to a command that should embrace their State.'' The account notes further, that the Kentuckians in reply persisted in their demand for Butler.

To William H. Seward [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Hon. Sec. of State Jan. 3. 1865

A hungarian by the name of Foegelmeisy, was on Gen. Stahl's staff, and by his going out of active service is thrown out. Some of our Pennsylvania friends are desirous to get him a Consulship. Can you find one for him? If you can, I will ascertain the Christian name. Yours truly A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NAuE. Frederick W. Seward endorsed this letter, ``Appoint.'' The resignation of Colonel Philip Figyelmesy (Figyelmessy), additional aide-decamp on the staff of General Julius H. Stahel, was accepted as of DecemberPage  196

1864 (AGO Special Orders No. 45, January 28, 1865), and his appointment as consul at Demerara, British Guiana, was confirmed by the Senate on January 30, 1865.

To James Speed [1]

Attorney General please make out a pardon in this case.

Jan. 3, 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U. S. Pardon Attorney, A 577. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a copy of the conviction of Edward Tichenor (Tichnor), July 13, 1864, in the U. S. District Court of Oregon on charges of cutting timber from public lands.

Cotton Permit for Fergus Peniston [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, January 4th. 1865.

Whereas satisfactory evidence, has been furnished to me by Fergus Peniston, that he is now and was prior to April 1864 the legitimate owner of large amounts of cotton and naval stores situated in Louisiana and Southern Mississippi and reposing special trust and confidence in said Peniston, I do by these presents, authorize him to proceed with steamboats barges and other conveyances, at his own risk, up and down the Mississippi river and land at any points on said river between Natchez & Port Hudson, also up and down Red river and its tributaries and navigate the waters of Lakes Pontchartrain & Borgne to and from East & West Pascagoula and mouth of Pearl River and up and down Pearl & Pascagoula Rivers for the purpose of bringing out Twenty three Thousand Six Hundred & Forty Bales of Cotton and Seventeen Thousand Two Hundred Barrels of naval stores and continue said voyages until this stated amount of cotton & naval stores shall have been brought by him to new orleans. And in order to secure the products specified in this permit, I do furthermore authorize said Peniston to take on his boats or conveyances outside the Military lines of the United States and carry to any of the above designated localities, plantation supplies to the extent of Thirty per cent of the value of the cotton or naval stores brought to new orleans by his vessels.

Nothing in this permit is to be so construed as to prevent said Peniston from disposing of said cotton or naval stores in new orleans or new york at his option, after payment of the Internal Revenue & other taxes, fixed by Congress, not including however the Twenty five per cent tax.

Page  197All officers of the army or navy of the United States & civil officers of the Government are hereby particularly required not only to not obstruct but to extend to said Peniston all facilities that may be required to carry out the design of this permit which is the introduction of cotton and naval stores within the Military lines of the United States.

Annotation

[1]   Df (copy), DLC-RTL. The unsigned draft or copy is written on Executive Mansion stationery. On January 3 Hannibal Hamlin wrote Lincoln: ``I have confered with Mr Peniston in relation to the action you have so kindly taken in his case, and the Permit you have given him to obtain the cotton contracted for. The permit meets that case fully, but does not meet the case of the cotton owned and paid for. If you will allow him to explain the matter to you, I am sure you will see it is as I state. May I not ask that you will see him, and also that you will give your permit to him to get the cotton he has paid for. I will regard it as a favor to me.'' (DLC-RTL).

See also Lincoln's order concerning Peniston, January 28, infra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

January 4, 1865

I did promise Gen. Logan that this appointment should be made if it consistently could, and I personally carried the paper to Col. Hardie who will inform the Secretary of War all about it.

Jan. 4. 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement has been removed from attendant papers, and the appointment has not been identified.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

January 4, 1865

I think this order should be so modified as to allow unrestricted trade from Kentucky across the Ohio river. Will the Secretary of War, please see Mr. Marshall, the bearer, & consider the matter?

Jan. 4. 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Green Clay Smith, Covington, Kentucky, December 28, 1864, introducing Thornton F. Marshall, who ``calls on you in regard to the trade regulations in our portion of Ky.'' On January 5, Marshall wrote Lincoln: ``I submitted the order of Genl Burbridge upon the subject of trade between Kentucky & Ohio to the Secretary of War together with your note to him upon the same subject. I cannot get to see him today & . . .I shall leave for Kentucky this evening. I therefore much regret I can't return you the Secretarys decision upon the subject as you requested. I will leave the matter with Col Pennabaker [Charles D. Pennebaker] agent for the State of Kentucky, with the request that if the Secretary's action is not in accordance with your suggestion, he will inform you. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Page  198

To Edwin M. Stanton [3]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir Washington, Jan. 4, 1865.

You remember that upon consultation with me you ordered two men arrested by Gen. Wallace to be discharged, and the third, a Mr. Waters, to be held for trial. As Waters is a State Senator elect, I think extra effort to give him a speedy trial should be made, so as to avoid injurious inferrences arising. Please attend to this. Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Charles C. Harris, New York City. See Lincoln's communications to Wallace, December 19, 1864. On January 5, 1865, a petition signed by Daniel Clarke, Spring Harwood, and others, was submitted to Lincoln:

``The undersigned a committee of Democratic Senators from Maryland, respectfully represent . . .that Levin L. Waters the Senator Elect from Somerset County, is now in confinement in the jail of Baltimore City under the orders of Major General Wallace upon the charge that he `flew the rebel flag from his office for months after the 19th of April 1861'

``This charge . . .we are authorized to deny and we are prepared to disprove. . . .

``The undersigned therefore respectfully ask . . .the release of the said Levin L. Waters. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

No reply from Stanton has been found. See further Lincoln's telegram to Wallace, January 21, infra.

To John Williams [1]

John Williams Executive Mansion
Springfield, Ills. Washington Jan. 4. 1865

Let Trumbo's substitute be regularly mustered in, send me the evidence that it is done and I will then discharge Trumbo.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 277. On January 4, John Williams telegraphed Lincoln: ``Chas A Trumbo Co K one hundred fourteenth (114) Ills only stay of his widowed mother wishes to put an acceptable substitute in his place Can you grant permission'' (DLC-RTL). AGO Special Orders No. 36, January 23, 1865, directed the discharge of Private Charles A. Trumbo ``upon the receipt of this order.''

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Genl. Grant Executive Mansion,
City-Point, Va Washington, Jan. 5, 1864.

Richard T. Jacob, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky, is at the Spotswood---House in Richmond under an order of Gen. Burbridge not to return to Kentucky. Please communicate leave to him to pass your lines, and come to me here at Washington. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 278. See Lincoln to Dickson, December 27, 1864, supra, and Lincoln to Jacob, January 18, infra.

Page  199

To the House of Representatives [1]

January 5, 1865

To the House of Representatives of the United States.

I herewith return to your honorable body, in which it originated, a ``Joint Resolution to correct certain clerical errors in the Internal Revenue Act'' without my approval.

My reason for so doing is, that I am informed that this Joint Resolution was prepared during the last moments of the last session of Congress, for the purpose of correcting certain errors of reference in the Internal Revenue Act, which were discovered on an examination of an official copy procured from the State Department, a few hours only before the adjournment. It passed the House and went to the Senate, where a vote was taken upon it, but by some accident it was not presented to the President of the Senate for his Signature.

Since the adjournment of the last session of Congress, other errors of a kind similar to those, which this resolution was designed to correct, have been discovered in the law, and it is now thought most expedient to include all the necessary corrections in one Act or Resolution.

The attention of the proper Committee of the House, has I am informed, been already directed to the preparation of a bill for this purpose. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Executive Mansion,

January 5, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No. 123. The joint resolution (H. R. 123) introduced and passed on July 2, 1864, was presented to Lincoln on December 21. The act to amend the act of June 30, 1864, was approved by Lincoln on March 3, 1865.

Order Permitting Robert E. Coxe to Bring Products through the Lines [1]

Executive Mansion,
January 5, 1865

An authorized agent of the Treasury Department having, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, contracted for the cotton and other products above mentioned, [2] and the party having agreed to sell and deliver the same to such agent.

It is ordered that the cotton and other products, moving in compliance with, and for fulfilment of said contract, and being transported to said agent, or under his direction, shall be free from seizurePage  200 or detention by any officer of the government, and, commandants of military Departments, districts, posts and detachments, naval stations, gun boats, flotilla's and floats [fleets] will observe this order, and give the said Robert E Coxe, his agents and transports, free and unmolested passage for the purpose of getting the said cotton or any part thereof through the lines, other than blockaded lines, and safe conduct within our lines while the same is moving in strict compliance with the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury, and for fulfilment of said contract with the agent of the government ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, ORB. The original order has not been located. The copy along with other documents in the case was submitted by Hanson A. Risley to General Grant on April 21, 1865, with a request for another pass for Robert E. Coxe to pass through the lines. Although Lincoln's order is dated January 5, Risley's request to Grant explained that it was not signed by the President until March 16, at which time Lincoln gave him also a pass for Robert E. Coxe dated March 15 (infra). In the meantime, according to Risley, ``Mr. Coxe not yet having gone through the lines, and the President being dead, I went this morning to Genl Grant, and got another pass. . . .'' (Ibid.). See also the note to Lincoln's passes for James W. Singleton, infra.

[2]   Hanson A. Risley's request for safe conduct for Coxe, upon which Lincoln's permit was written as an endorsement, enumerates ``Fifty Thousand bales of cotton, Ten Thousand boxes of manufactured tobacco, Ten Thousand barrels turpentine, and Ten Thousand barrels rosin. . . .'' (Ibid.).

Passes for James W. Singleton [1]

Allow the bearer James W Singleton, to pass our lines with ordinary baggage, and go South A LINCOLN

Jany 5. 1865

Allow the bearer James W Singleton to pass our lines, with any Southern products, and go to any of our trading posts, there to be subject to the Regulations of the Treasury Department

Jany 5. 1865 A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copies, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's order issued to Robert E. Coxe, supra. Orville H. Browning's Diary records under date of December 24, 1864, a conference with Lincoln ``about letting Genl Singleton go to Richmond for the purpose of purchasing Cotton &c. . . .If it succeeds quite a number of gentlemen, including Senator [Edwin D.] Morgan of N. Y.---Mr [Robert E.] Coxe now of Canada, Judge [James] Hughes of the court of claims, and myself.'' The entry stops thus abruptly, but on January 5, 1865, Browning writes again: ``The President sent me word last night that he wished to see me this morning I had previously talked with him about permitting Singleton to go South . . .a scheme out of which he, Singleton, Judge Hughes of the Court of Claims, Senator Morgan myself and some others, hope to make some money. . . .'' The Richmond Examiner for January 16, 1865, announced Singleton's arrival in that city. A note from Browning to Lincoln, undated but January 30, 1865 (incorrectly catalogued as 1864 in the Lincoln Papers) is as follows:Page  201

``Singleton has returned. Has letters & messages for you, and much to tell that it will be interesting to hear.

``We will call at 7 o'clock this evening, or any other time that may suit your convenience.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir, Washington, Jan. 5, 1865.

Since parting with you, it has occurred to me to say that while Gen. Sherman's ``get a good ready'' is appreciated, and is not to be overlooked, time, now that the enemy is wavering, is more important than ever before. Being on the down-hill, & some what confused, keeping him going. Please say so much to Genl. S. Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. On December 31, General Sherman had written General Halleck from Savannah, Georgia: `` . . .I write only to say that since my last . . .there is nothing of importance. . . .The city is perfectly quiet. . . .As soon as I can accumulate a sufficient surplus of forage and provisions to load my wagons, I shall be ready to start. . . .I propose . . .to make lodgments in South Carolina, about Port Royal, opposite this city, and up about Sister's Ferry. When all is ready I can feign at one or more places and cross at the other, after which my movements will be governed by those of the enemy, and such instructions as I may receive from Lieutenant-General Grant before starting. I do not think I can employ better strategy than I have hitherto done, namely, make a good ready and then move rapidly to my objective, avoiding a battle at points where I would be encumbered by wounded, but striking boldly and quickly when my objective is reached. I will give due heed and encouragement to all peace movements, but conduct war as though it could only terminate with the destruction of the enemy. . . .I should like to receive, before starting, the detachments left behind in Tennessee. . . .'' (OR, I, XLIV, 842).

To Napoleon J. T. Dana [1]

Executive Mansion Washington
Major General Dana Jany 6 1865

The attached document perporting to be an order issued by your authority, is sent you with the request that you will inform me whether such order has been issued by you, and if it has, please inform me by what authority it is that you undertake to impose terms in the premises not imposed by the government and which in effect, entirely thwart and defeat the object of the government

It is suggested that if executing in good faith the order of the government in the matter in question, or any other matter, operates injuriously to the Military Service, it would be proper for you to report to the government fully upon it, and that would be the only proper course Yours &c A. LINCOLN

Page  202

Annotation

[1]   LS (copy?), DLC-RTL. Filed with this letter is a newspaper clipping of General Dana's order to Lieutenant Colonel J. P. Harper, permit officer at Memphis, Tennessee, December 26, 1864:

``The very great latitude allowed to persons in procuring `applications' from the Purchasing Agent of the Treasury Department, and the facility with which they are issued, appears to render it imperative, on the part of the military authorities, that all applicants be required to set aside doubts as to their actually and `bona fide' owning or controlling the products named in their application; and that they are not mere speculators and adventurers, who have procured papers merely to furnish them the opportunity of going around to hunt up products for purchase; nor persons who have gotten them merely for the object of passing through the lines.

``Of the class of applicants who own products there may be two descriptions, viz: those who have raised them, and those who have purchased them.

``Of the first division of this class, prior to issuing a safe conduct or permit, you will require an affidavit of themselves, and one other loyal, disinterested respectable person, showing when and where the products were raised, the quantity, where they are at the time of making the affidavit, and in whose possession, in case they have been moved from the place where they were raised, the time of removal, etc.

``Of the second division of this class, you will require affidavit as above, of who was the last preceding owner---the time and place of purchase, the price paid, or to be paid, and the description of money or property in which payment was made, or is to be made, the place where the products were when purchased, the quantity, and the place where they are at the time of making the affidavit, and in whose possession.

``Of the persons controlling products you will require a similar affidavit, showing precisely where the products were raised or were stored at the time they obtained control of them; the quantity and to whom belonging; the means and circumstances by which they obtained control; the place where they are at the time of making affidavit and in whose possession.

``In all instances where persons are unable to make the above proofs, or when you are satisfied of any fraudulent intent, you are forbidden to issue safe guard or permit, and you will note that fact on the application.

``You will keep exact record of all rejected applications.''

On January 17, General Dana replied to Lincoln's letter:

``I have the honor to reply to the letter of your Excellency dated the 6th instant, and, whilst I express my unfeigned regret . . .that any misconception of mine, arising from a misunderstanding of the policy of the government, under the requirements of orders from my immediate superior, should subject me to your Excellency's disapprobation, I have no hesitancy in believing that I shall henceforth, in the matter, have no fear of censure, as I believe I now fully understand your wishes. . . .

``It was hardly to be expected that, in the inauguration of a system so new to us and so entirely contrary to our previous instructions, that Commanders would not find many difficulties to encounter; but I expected to obviate these in a very short time. When my first safeguards were issued . . .certain persons who held them were arrested by Naval Commanders who desired to know by what proofs I was satisfied they `owned or controlled' the products and stated that they knew the contrary. Thereupon I issued the letter of instructions and supposed, so far from thwarting and defeating the objects of the government, that I was carrying them out in good faith. . . .On the 5th of January Genl. Canby . . .disapproved my action . . .and I immediately discontinued the requirement. . . .

``I am persuaded that however much many persons, who had not fully informed themselves at the inauguration of a new set of regulations, were disposed to complain and make trouble, they are now convinced that they werePage  203 more impatient than injured, and that the people of this Department [of the Mississippi] are, at present, well satisfied that the Executive Order and Treasury Regulations of Sept 24 are being carried out with the least possible obstruction. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Executive Mansion, Washington,
City Point Jan. 6. 1865

If there is a man at City-Point, by the name of Waterman Thornton who is in trouble about desertion, please have his case briefly stated to me & do not let him be executed meantime

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 279. Grant replied on January 7: ``In reply to your dispatch of this morning I have to state that Genl Griffin commanding 2nd Division 9th Army Corps telegraphs me that private Waterman Thornton one hundred seventy ninth (179) New York Volunteers was executed yesterday . . . for desertion to the enemy'' (DLC-RTL).

Endorsement [1]

This boy having served faithfully since is pardoned for the old desertion A. LINCOLN

Jan. 7. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement has been clipped from attendant papers.

To Richard L. Ferguson [1]

R. L. Ferguson Executive Mansion
Provost-Marshal Washington,
Warrensburg, Mo Jan. 7. 1865.

Suspend, until further order, proceedings to enforce a bong [2] given by Hicklin, Hicklin & Spratt. It is not my view of the law that Provost-Marshals are to decide whether bonds are or are not forfeited. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 280. No reply or further reference has been found.

[2]   In appearance this word cannot well be anything but ``bong,'' but Lincoln probably intended to write ``bond.''

To the Senate and House of Representatives [1]

January 7, 1865

To the Senate and House of Representatives.

I transmit to Congress a copy of two Treaties between the United States and Belgium, for the extinguishment of the Scheldt dues, &c,Page  204 concluded on the 20th of May, 1863, and 20th of July, 1863, respectively, the ratifications of which were exchanged at Brussels on the 24th of June last, and I recommend an appropriation to carry into effect the provisions thereof relative to the payment of the proportion of the United States towards the capitalization of the said dues. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington, January 7th 1865.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2. The treaties transmitted are printed in House Executive Document No. 19. The appropriations act approved on March 2, 1865, appropriated $55,584 and interest for the first installment due under the treaties.

To Schuyler Colfax [1]

Hon. Schuyler Colfax, Executive Mansion,
Speaker, House of Representatives, Washington,
Sir, January 9 1865.

I transmit herewith the letter of the Secretary of War with accompanying report of the Adjutant General, in reply to the Resolution of the House of Representatives, dated December 7, 1864, requesting me ``to communicate to the House the Report made by Colonel Thomas M. Key, of an interview between himself and General Howell Cobb on the 14th day of June, 1862, on the bank of the Chickahominy, on the subject of the exchange of prisoners of war.'' I am, Sir, Very Respectfully, Your obdt. servant,

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No. 20. Stanton's letter of January 5 and accompanying report were printed in Thirty-eight Congress, Second Session, House Executive Document No. 20, in spite of Stanton's opinion that ``As the discourse with Howell Cobb on the subject of the existing contest was improper, it is believed that its publication would also be improper.''

To Mrs. Milton C. Egbert [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Mrs. Milton C. Egbert. Jan. 9. 1865

Col. Forney assures me that you will not be displeased if I tender, as I most heartily do, my sincere thanks for your munificient Christmas donation of five thousand dollars to the sick and wounded soldiers in the Philadelphia hospitals. Your Obt. Servt.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS-P, ISLA. On January 7, 1865, John W. Forney wrote Lincoln: ``About a month ago Mrs. M. C. Egbert, through her husband, Dr. Milton C. Egbert, of Venango Co. Penna. sent Five thousand dollars for a Christmas dinner forPage  205

the sick and wounded soldiers in the hospitals in Philadelphia. This was the result of benevolence and patriotism. . . . The husband of Mrs. Egbert is an immensely wealthy man, having amassed a very large fortune out of the oil trade. . . . Mrs Egbert is a young and accomplished woman much beloved by a large circle of friends in Philadelphia. These friends are now exceedingly anxious that you should address Mrs. Egbert a line . . . alluding to the noble donation she has made. . . . Her address is Mrs. Milton C. Egbert, Egbert Farm, Venango Co. Penna. If you will write the lines . . . and send the note to me I will forward it to her friends in Philadelphia. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Mrs. Charles J. Faulkner [1]

Mrs. Faulkner: [2] Executive Mansion,
Madam Washington, Jany. 9. 1865.

It was with regret I learned that your brother, whom I had ordered to be discharged on taking the oath, under the impression that he was a private, is a captain. By an understanding the Commissary of prisoners detains such cases until a further hearing from me. I now distinctly say that if your Father shall come within our lines and take the oath of Dec. 8. 1863, I will give him a full pardon, and will, at the same time, discharge your brother on his taking the oath, notwithstanding he is a captain. Respectfully

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Louis H. Max, Wilmington, Illinois; ADfS, DLC-RTL. On the back of the letter appear two endorsements, the first certifying that Charles James Faulkner took the oath of allegiance on May 30, 1865, and the second, by James Speed, ordering: ``Pardon & file this paper.'' On the bottom of the letter, however, appears the following unsigned note in pencil: ``My Father never took the oath of allegiance after the War and did not return until after the surrender.'' It would appear that Lincoln's letter was written to Mary Boyd Faulkner, who was the wife of the Charles James Faulkner, Sr. (see note to Lincoln's order to Martindale, July 17, 1864, supra). But this seems improbable, since her father was not living at the time and no brother has been identified who would fit the description in Lincoln's letter. Another possibility is that Lincoln's letter was intended for ``Miss'' rather than ``Mrs.'' Faulkner. In this case the father would be Charles James Faulkner, Sr., and the brother would be Captain Elisha Boyd Faulkner, captured in June, 1864, and confined on Johnson's Island at the time of Lincoln's letter. Which one of Charles James Faulkner's six daughters may have received Lincoln's letter has not been ascertained.

[2]   ``Mrs. Faulkner:'' is not in the autograph draft.

To John B. Majors [1]

Officer in command Executive Mansion, Washington,
at St. Joseph, Missouri. January 9, 1865.

Postpone the execution of the death sentence of Holland, High-smith and Utz ten days longer unless you receive orders from me to the contrary A. LINCOLN.

Page  206Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY

Jan'y 9th 1865.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 281. This is in the handwriting of Nicolay, including Lincoln's signature. See Lincoln's telegram to Majors, December 22, 1864, supra, and his endorsement concerning Holland, Highsmith, and Utz, January 11, 1865, infra.

Order Concerning Solomon Young [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Jan 9, 1865

Let Solomon Young be examined to ascertain whether he possesses the physical qualifications for a soldier, in which case he will be discharged from confinement in jail and enrolled as a substitute for William D McMahon drafted in the first Ward of this city.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, owned by R. E. Burdick, New York City.

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States January 9, 1865

In compliance with the Resolution of the Senate of the 15th. ultimo, requesting information concerning an arrangement limiting the Naval Armament on the Lakes, I transmit a Report of this date from the Secretary of State, to whom the Resolution was referred. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington 9th. January 1865

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F3. Seward's report of January 9, which Lincoln transmitted, referred the Senate to President Monroe's message of April 6, 1818; ``with the accompanying papers . . . found in the series of American State papers published by Messrs. Gales & Seaton under the authority of Congress, Class I, Foreign Relations, volume IV, pages 202 to 207 inclusive.''

To Lyman Trumbull [1]

Hon. Lyman Trumbull, Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir: Washington, January 9, 1865.

The paper, relating to Louisiana, submitted to the Judiciary Committee of the Senate, by Gen. Banks, is herewith returned. The whole of it is in accordance with my general impression, and I believe it to be true; but much the larger part is beyond my absolute knowledge, as in it's nature it must be. All the statements which lie within the range of my knowledge are strictly true; and I thinkPage  207 of nothing material which has been omitted. Even before Gen. Banks went to Louisiana I was anxious for the loyal people there to move for re-organization and restoration of proper practical relations with the Union; and when he, at last, expressed his decided conviction that the thing was practicable, I directed him to give his official co-operation to effect it. On the subject, I have sent and received many letters to and from Gen. Banks and many other persons. These letters, as you remember, were shown to you yesterday, as they will be again, if you desire.

If I shall neither take sides nor argue, will it be out of place for me to make what I think is the true statement of your question as to the proposed Louisiana Senators?

``Can Louisiana be brought into proper practical relations with the Union, sooner, by admitting or by rejecting the proposed Senators?'' [2] Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, VtU; ADfS, DLC-RTL. On January 9, Senator Trumbull wrote Lincoln:

``Agreeably to our verbal understanding, I enclose you the statement of Maj. Gen. Banks made to the Judiciary Com. of the Senate. The committee meets Wednesday, before which please return it, if convenient.

``In my statement as to what constitutes `enemy property' I may have been in error in supposing that the domicil & character of the owner was immaterial. As to some property this would be true but not in all cases.'' (DLC-RTL).

The lengthy statement of General Nathaniel P. Banks may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, Senate Miscellaneous Document No. 7.

[2]   Charles Smith and R. King Cutler, senators-elect from Louisiana, were not seated.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major General Butler Executive Mansion,
Fort-Monroe, Va. Washington, Jan. 10. 1865

No principal report of yours on the Wilmington expedition has ever reached the War Department, as I am informed there. A preliminary report did reach here, but was returned to Gen. Grant at his request. Of course, leave to publish, can not be given, without inspection of the paper, and not then, if it should be deemed to be detrimental to the public service. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 282. On January 8, General Butler was relieved from command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina and replaced by General Edward O. C. Ord. On January 9, he telegraphed Lincoln: ``I have telegraphed to the Secretary of War for leave to publish my report of the Wilmington affair. I have received no answer. He is absent; in his absence I respectfully ask your leave to publish it. It is but justice. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On January 11, Butler telegraphed Grant: ``I have asked the President forPage  208 permission to publish my report of the Wilmington affair. He answers that no report has ever been received at the War Department. You told me you had forwarded it. Has it been lost again? If so, I have a copy.'' (OR, I, XLVI, II, 97).

General John A. Rawlins replied the same day: ``General Grant telegraphed to Captain [George K.] Leet to return your report to enable him to revise his endorsement on it. It will arrive here probably to-day, and will be returned by special messenger to-morrow. He has requested its publication.'' (Ibid., p. 98).

To John W. Garrett [1]

Mr. J. W. Garrett Executive Mansion
My dear Sir. Washington, Jan. 10. 1865

It is said we shall soon all be in the dark here, unless you can bring coal to make gas. I suppose you would do this, without my interference, if you could; and I only write now to say, it is very important to us; and not to say that you must stop supplying the army to make room to carry coal. Do all you can for us in both matters. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC-Garrett Papers. President John W. Garrett of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad replied on January 13:

``I have the pleasure of acknowledging the receipt of your valued favor of the 10th inst.

``The pressure upon our Company for supplies for army purposes, and for the immense variety of interests which depend upon the route . . . is exceedingly great. . . .

``The demand for coal for the manufacture of gas, as well as the Bituminous coals for the Navy, and other purposes . . . is much beyond our present capacity. . . .

``I have . . . repeatedly advised the Gas Light Company of Washington, that our capacity on the Road betwixt Baltimore and Washington, is much greater than the entire demands upon us, and that any coal brought to Baltimore by other routes, can be transferred, without delay or difficulty, to Washington. It is true, that by . . . proper foresight, the Managers . . . should have obtained a portion of their supplies elsewhere . . . but I am especially determined that our friends at the White House, as well as in the City of Washington, shall not suffer by being `placed in the dark'. . . .

``I have instructed that, until the Gas Light Company can improve its position, a sufficient quantity of gas coal shall be forwarded to them daily, to the partial exclusion of much other very urgent business. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Proclamation Concerning Commerce [1]

January 10, 1865

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

Whereas, the Act of Congress of the 28th. of September 1850, entitled ``An act to create additional collection districts in the State of California and to change the existing districts therein, and to modify the existing collection districts in the United States,'' extendsPage  209 to merchandise warehoused under bond the privilege of being exported to the British North American Provinces, adjoining the United States, in the manner prescribed in the Act of Congress of the 3d. of March 1845, which designates certain frontier ports through which merchandise may be exported, and further provides ``that such other ports situated on the frontiers of the United States adjoining the British North American Provinces, as may hereafter be found expedient may have extended to them the like privileges on the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury, and proclamation duly made by the President of the United States, specially designating the ports to which the aforesaid privileges are to be extended.''

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of the Treasury, do hereby declare and proclaim that the port of St. Albans, in the State of Vermont, is and shall be entitled to all the privileges in regard to the exportation of merchandise in bond to the British North American Provinces adjoining the United States, which are extended to the ports enumerated in the 7th. Section of the Act of Congress of the 3d of March 1845, aforesaid, from and after the date of this proclamation.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

[L. S.]

Done at the City of Washington, this Tenth day of January, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the Eighty-ninth. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Proclamations.

Cotton Permit for Henry J. Eager [1]

Executive Mansion
January 11, 1865.

An authorized agent of the Treasury Department having with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, contracted for the cotton above mentioned and the party having agreed to sell and deliverer [sic] the same to such agent.

It is ordered that the Cotton moving in compliance with and for fulfilment of said contract and being transported to said agent, or under his direction, shall be free from seizure or detention by any officer of the Government and commanders of military departments,Page  210 districts posts and detachments, naval stations gunboats flotillas and fleets will observe this order and give the said Henry J. Eager his agents and transports free and unmolested passage for the purpose of getting the said cotton or any part thereof through the lines other than blockaded lines, and safe conduct within our lines while the same is moving in strict compliance with the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury and for fulfilment of said contract with the agent of the Government.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 56, Cotton and Captured Property Records, No. 17500. An accompanying certificate of the same date signed by Hanson A. Risley agrees to purchase from Henry J. Eager 10,000 bales of cotton.

Endorsement Concerning Winston Somers [1]

I personally know Dr. Somers & suppose his appointment will be proper if the vacancy exists. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 11. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Dale Carnegie, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition of Thompson R. Webber and other citizens of Champaign County, Illinois, recommending Dr. Winston Somers for surgeon of the Board of Enrollment for the Seventh District in Illinois. Dr. Somers was appointed January 13, 1865, to replace Dr. Joseph T. Miller, resigned.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Sentences in these three cases commuted to imprisonment in the penitentiary at hard labor during the war. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 11, 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 2944. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the court-martial record in the cases of James P. Holland, John H. Utz, and Henry W. Highsmith. See Lincoln's telegram to Majors, January 9, supra. On January 13, General Grenville M. Dodge telegraphed Lincoln from St. Louis: ``Utz, Highsmith & Holland whose execution you have ordered delayed until further orders attempted to kill the Jailer at St Joseph and escape last night. They were however defeated They are bad men & their sentence should be carried into effect'' (DLC-RTL).

To Joseph Hooker [1]

Major General Hooker Executive Mansion
Cincinnati, O Washington, Jan. 11. 1865

It is said that you have ordered Andrew Humphreys to imprisonment at hard labor, in accordance with his original sentence, onPage  211 the ground that it was not legally competent for Gen. Hovey, having approved the sentence to afterwards modify it. While I incline to the belief that you are technically right, please let Gen. Hovey's modification be acted upon until further order from me.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 284. See Lincoln to Stanton, October 22, 1864, supra. General Alvin P. Hovey in command at Indianapolis, Indiana, answered Lincoln's telegram by letter on the same day:

``In answer to your telegram . . . `Duplicate of Message sent to Maj. Genl. Hooker' I have the honor herewith to transmit a copy of my communication to Genl. Hooker dated January 10th 1865.''

[Enclosure]

``I have just received your letter of the 6th Inst. requesting me to carry into effect the sentence of the Military Commission in the case of Andrew Humphreys. I herewith send you a copy of the order promulgated, and most respectfully ask your attention to the following points: First, your letter doubts my authority to organize a military commission.

``Now if my letter of instructions from the Secretary of War does not give me that power, the trial is void and the sentence cannot be legally carried into effect. If I had the right to convene the court, then by the acts of Congress, Approved July 2nd 1864, I am clothed with the full power to pardon the convicted or mitigate his punishment. . . .

``In my opinion there are two errors committed by the commission, on the trial of Humphreys, which would, before a civil court reverse his case. . . .

``With a defective record, with the light testimony, and with a strong feeling in the public mind in his favor, I deemed it prudent and politic to release him.

``He resides in Green County, an inaccessible part of the State, and his re-arrest would be attended, at this time, with considerable feeling.

``Believing, as I do, that my action has been entirely lawful, and for the good of the country, I most earnestly request, that you will not order his arrest, until the president shall have acted. . . .

``The record . . . has been sent to the President more than ten days since. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To John F. Miller [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Officer in command at War Department,
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, D.C., January 11 1865

Postpone the execution of S. W. Elliott and C. E. Peacher until the third day of February 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 283. On January 10, Andrew Johnson telegraphed Lincoln for a respite of fifteen days for Cornelius E. Peacher, and John S. Brien telegraphed a request for twenty days respite for Captain S. W. Elliott (DLC-RTL). General Miller replied on January 11: ``Your order postponing execution of S. W. Elliott & C. E. Peacher to thirtieth [sic] of February next is received'' (ibid.). Elliott's first initial, given incorrectly as ``S'' in this correspondence, appears as ``J'' later on. See Lincoln's telegrams to Miller, January 25 and 27, infra.

Page  212

To James Speed [1]

January 11, 1865

Submitted to the Attorney-General, with the request that he reminds me of this application whenever, we shall make a judicial appointment in South Carolina or Georgia. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 11. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments, South Carolina, Box 866. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a recommendation signed by the presidential electors of New York in favor of the application of A. J. Dittenhoefer of New York City, a native of South Carolina, for judge of the U.S. District Court for South Carolina. No record of Dittenhoefer's appointment has been found.

To J. Bates Dickson [1]

Officer in command at Executive Mansion,
Lexington, Washington,
Kentucky Jan'y 12th, 1865.

Suspend execution of sentence of death in case of Solomon Spiegel 9th Michigan cavalry until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination. A. LINCOLN.

Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram. JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 285. This telegram was written and signed by Nicolay. No reply or further reference has been found. Captain J. Bates Dickson was in command in the absence of Colonel Stephen G. Burbridge.

Endorsement [1]

These papers first seen or known of by me, Jan. 12, 1865 A. L.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Amasa J. Parker, W. F. Allen, and William Kelly, New York state commissioners, November 3, 1864, concerning imprisoned citizens of New York. A letter from Stanton to Lincoln, November 2, 1864, requesting an audience for the New York commissioners is endorsed by John Hay: ``At one o'clock, the President answered & they came.'' (Ibid.).

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Executive Mansion,
City-Point, Va. Washington, Jan. 12. 1865.

If Henry Stork of, 5th. Pa. Cavalry has been convicted of desertion, and is not yet executed, please stay till further order & send record. A. LINCOLN

Page  213

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 287. On January 10, 1865, James K. Moorhead wrote Lincoln:

``I respectfully ask that the record in the case of Henry Stork private 5th Pa Cavalry tried at City Point for desertion some ten days since, be ordered here and execution of sentence deferred until approved.

``Please do this promptly and oblige. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On January 13, Grant replied to Lincoln's telegram that he would stay execution of Henry Stork if he was still alive. (DLC-Grant Papers).

The roster of the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry lists Henry Stork of Company C as mustered out with the company on August 7, 1865.

To Joseph Holt [1]

January 12, 1865

Judge Advocate General please examine & report on this case.

Jan. 12. 1865 A. LINCOLN

So much of sentence as imposes confinement in the Penitentiary remitted. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2627. Lincoln's endorsements are written on the court-martial record of Captain William McNally, Company G, Seventy-seventh New York Volunteers, convicted on charges of bribery and conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline. Holt recommended remitting confinement.

To Montgomery C. Meigs [1]

January 12, 1865

Quarter-Master-General, please see Mr. Duncan, of Montreal, who wishes to exhibit a discovery for the protection of wooden structures against fire A. LINCOLN

Jan. 12. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Charles W. Olsen, Chicago, Illinois. Duncan has not been further identified.

Order Concerning David Levy [1]

January 12, 1865

If David Levy shall enlist and serve faithfully for one year or until otherwise honorably discharged I will pardon him for the past. A. LINCOLN.

Jan. 12, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   Isaac Markens, Abraham Lincoln and the Jews (1909), p. 48. On January 10, 1865, James W. Bowen, provost marshal of the Tenth District, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, wrote Lincoln: ``The bearer, Mrs. Maria Davis, of this District,Page  214

visits Washington, with the view of obtaining a pardon of her son, David Levy, a member of Co. L. 3d Regt. Penna. Cavalry, who is absent without leave. . . . From her statement . . . it will appear that he was induced to desert by an older comrade. . . . The family have already suffered, by the death of two of its members, a husband and son . . . while in the Service. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

According to Markens, in 1902 Levy's application for a pension was denied on the basis of his record of desertion; whereupon, ``He immediately wrote to the Bureau that he was pardoned for that desertion by President Lincoln and as evidence of the fact he forwarded to the Pension Office a small card . . . whereon was written in his well-known handwriting: [text as above]

``Upon receipt of this Eugene F. Ware, the Commissioner of Pensions, ordered that the pardon be recognized. . . .''

To James Speed [1]

Attorney General please file & inform me at whose recommendation Duffield was appointed. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 12. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a letter from Charles D. Poston, delegate in congress from Arizona, January 10, 1865, recommending ``Col. King S. Woolsey of Prescott Arizona as a Suitable person for United States Marshall of said Territory in place of Milton P. Duffield the present incumbent who is unworthy of the office. . . .'' No reply has been found. Duffield is listed as ``Milton H. Duffield'' in the U.S. Official Register for 1865.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Let the appointment within requested be made if it consistently can. A. LINCOLN.

Jan. 12, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Milton Kronovet Catalog 53, September 26, 1949. According to the catalog description, this endorsement appears on a letter to John P. Usher, December 30, 1864, recommending an officer for promotion.

To John P. Usher [1]

January 12, 1865

Will the Secretary of the Interior please have the Comr. of Pensions to make a particular report in this case, in order that it can be judged whether the man is or is not entitled to a pension?

Jan. 12. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Ray Henderson, Lakewood, Ohio. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a copy of a letter of Joseph H. Barrett to Dave Crone, Dover, Pennsylvania, November 25, 1864: ``Your invalid pension claim No. 36,298 is rejected the disability for which you claim a pension is not found to have originated in the line of duty as a soldier in the Military Service of the United States.''

Page  215

To Gideon Welles [1]

Hon. Secretary of the Navy Executive Mansion
Sir: Washington, Jan. 12. 1865

If it is legally possible, let Frank C. Birney, son of the late Major General Birney, be appointed to the Naval School. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by John O. Needles, Baltimore, Maryland. Frank C. Birney, son of Major General David B. Birney who died on October 18, 1864, entered the Naval Academy in July, 1865, and graduated in June, 1869.

To Benjamin F. Butler [1]

Major General Butler Executive Mansion,
Fort-Monroe, Va. Washington, Jan. 13. 1865.

Yours asking leave to come to Washington is received. You have been summoned by the Committee on the Conduct of the War to attend here, which of course you will do. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 288. The date of Butler's telegram requesting ``permission to visit Washington upon personal business to adjust some accounts to get some vouchers and evidence in a suit commenced against me. . . .'' is given as received on January 3 and sent on January 1 (DLC-RTL), but the date January 13 given in the Official Records (I, XLVI, II, 120) seems more probable.

Memorandum [1]

File as an application for District Attorney in Georgia, when an appointment shall be made. A. LINCOLN.

Jan. 13, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 1423, April 16, 1919, No. 204. The application is not identified in the source, and no appointment of U.S. attorney for Georgia is listed in the U.S. Official Register for 1865.

To Leonard Myers [1]

January 13, 1865

If Hon. Mr. Myers will request me in writing, on this sheet, to discharge this man on refunding any bounty received, I will do it, because Mr. Myers requests it. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 13, 1865

Let this man be discharged on refunding any bounty received.

Jan. 13, 1865 A. LINCOLN

Page  216

Annotation

[1]   American Art Association Anderson Galleries Catalog 3823, February 25-26, 1930, No. 245. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsements are written on the back of a letter from Leonard Myers, U.S. representative from Pennsylvania, asking for release of a soldier under arrest for receiving bounty money twice. Between the two endorsements Myers made the request in a second note.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va. Washington, D.C., January 14 1865.

You have perhaps seen in the papers that Ex. Senator Foote, with his family, attempted to escape from Richmond to Washington, and that he was pursued and taken back. His wife and child are now here. Please give me the earliest information you may receive concerning him---what is likely to be done with him &c.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 290. Concerning Henry S. Foote, formerly of Mississippi, but a member of the Confederate Congress from Tennessee, Grant replied on January 15: ``I send you by telegraph message from Davis & other dispatches from Richmond Whig, concerning the arrest of Ex Senator Foote, which is all the information I have on the subject. Any further information that I obtain will be sent you what is likely to be done with him is difficult to conjecture. I suppose they will at furthest do nothing more than imprison him.'' (DLC-RTL).

Having resigned from the Confederate Congress, Foote was arrested at Occoquan, Virginia, on January 10, while attempting to pass through the lines (OR, II, VIII, 68-69). He arrived in New York City from Europe on April 6, 1865, only to be arrested by order of General Dix (ibid., p. 472). He was paroled on April 22 (ibid., p. 504).

To Andrew Johnson [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Gov. Johnson War Department, Washington, D.C.,
Nashville, Tenn. January 14th. 1865

Yours announcing ordinance of emancipation received. Thanks to the Convention and to you. When do you expect to be here? Would be glad to have your suggestions as to supplying your place of Military Governor. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 289. The date is not in Lincoln's handwriting. On January 13, Governor Johnson had telegraphed Lincoln: ``The Convention composed of more than five hundred delegates from all parts of the State have unanimously adopted an amendment to the constitution forever abolishing Slavery in this State and denying the power of the Legislature passing any law creating property in man. Thank God that the tyrants rod has been broken. This amendment is to be submitted to the people for ratification on thePage  217

birth day of the Father of his Country, when, without some reverse of arms, the state will be redeemed and the foul blot of Slavery erased from her escutcheon. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On January 17, he replied to Lincoln's question:

``The ordinance abolishing slavery will be adopted by the people on the 22d of February. Legislature and the Governor will be elected on the 4th of March, and will meet on the first Monday in April, when the State will be organized & resume all the functions of a state in the Union. I would prefer remaining where I am until that time, and then hand it all over to the people. . . .

``I would rather have the pleasure and honor of turning over the state, organized . . . than be Vice President of the United States. At some convenient time after the first Monday in April, I could be qualified &c. There are precedents for qualifying Vice Presidents after the fourth of March. Give me your opinion on the subject . . .'' (Ibid.).

See further Lincoln to Johnson, January 24, infra.

To Grenville M. Dodge [1]

Major General Dodge. Executive Mansion
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, January 15, 1865

It is represented to me that there is so much irregular violence in Northern Missouri as to be driving away the people and almost depopulating it. Please gather information, and consider whether an appeal to the people there to go to their homes, and let one another alone, recognizing as a full right of protection for each, that he lets others alone, and banning only him who refuses to let others alone, may not enable you to withdraw the troops, their presence itself a cause of irritation and constant apprehension, and thus restore peace and quiet & returning prosperity. Please consider this and telegraph or write me. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 291. On January 16, General Dodge replied:

``I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 15th inst.

``Since I assumed command here the troubles in North Missouri have increased from the fact that the troops that were in those Counties, infested by guerilla bands, were nearly all withdrawn . . . to send to General Thomas; but there is no doubt that this country is now more quiet than it has been before for three years.

``Where these troubles exist the people are to a great extent disloyal and it is the protection, aid, and sympathy that they give to the enemy and to outlaws that causes these troubles. . . .

``Allow me to assure you that the course you propose would be protested against by the State authorities, the legislature, the convention and by nearly every undoubtedly loyal man in North Missouri, while it would receive the sanction of nearly every disloyal, semi-loyal, and non-committed person there, all such could, under that course live and should want to stay in that country, while every loyal man would have to leave these counties when the disloyal sentiment is in the ascendancy. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Representative William A. Hall of Huntsville, Missouri, was apparently shown Dodge's letter, and wrote Lincoln on January 19:

Page  218``Gen Dodge is misinformed as to the state of things in North Missouri. The statements I made to you were within my own knowledge.

``Gov. King will lay before you many facts of the same character which I presented.

``Gen. Dodge probably derives his information through officers who are themselves in some degree to blame.

``I wish to be distinctly understood as not in any thing I have stated cast any censure on Gen. Dodge.'' (I bid.).

Endorsement [1]

Let this boy be discharged on refunding any bounty received.

Jan. 16 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   John Heise Autographs, Catalog 2467, No. 58. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Samuel Latta, Friendship, New York, asking release of his son Emmett, who had enlisted when only fifteen years old.

Endorsement Concerning Ezekiel F. Clay [1]

Let this man be paroled according to the within. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 16, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Parke-Bernet Catalog 611, December 4-5, 1944, No. 271. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement appears on a petition signed by senators and representatives from Kentucky requesting that Ezekiel F. Clay, a prisoner of war, be paroled.

Pass for Mrs. Harriet C. Bledsoe [1]

Allow the bearer, Mrs. Harriet C. Bledsoe, to pass our lines with ordinary baggage and go South. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 16. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ADS-P, DLC-Bledsoe Papers. Harriet C. Bledsoe was the wife of Albert T. Bledsoe, who had served as acting assistant secretary of War of the Confederacy. According to a newspaper article concerning this pass, Mrs. Bledsoe ``ran the blockade, hoping that in the North she could get clothing material for her children. . . . She had known Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln in her younger days in Springfield, Ill., and she wrote to Bishop Charles P. McIlvaine, of the Methodist Church . . . a relative of the Bledsoes by marriage, and he asked that President Lincoln should grant her an interview and hear her request for a pass. . . .'' (Jersey City Journal, February 8, 1930).

Pass for John Eaton [1]

Allow Col. Eaton to pass to Gen. Grant's Head Quarters & return

Jan. 16. 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES-F, John Eaton, Grant, Lincoln and the Freedmen, p. 230.

Page  219

To Joseph Holt [1]

January 17, 1865

Unexecuted part of sentence remitted, on condition that prisoner serves with his regiment to the end of it's term, if it has not already ended. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 17. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 2048. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the court-martial record of Isaac R. Simmons, Third Volunteer Cavalry, sentenced on charges of desertion, to dishonorable discharge, loss of pay, and imprisonment for three years on Dry Tortugas.

To Joseph Holt [2]

January 17, 1865

Pardon on condition of serving out his time faithfully in his regiment. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 17. 1865

Pardon for unexecuted part of sentence. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23, 1865

Annotation

[1]   ES and AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2361. Lincoln's endorsements appear on the court-martial record of Charles Brady, Twentieth Massachusetts Volunteers, sentenced for absence without leave, to three years' imprisonment at hard labor and to have branded on his left hip the letter ``D'' three inches high. Holt noted that the sentence was ``excessively harsh.'' The first endorsement is in Hay's handwriting but signed by Lincoln.

Order Concerning Sisters of Charity of Nazareth [1]

January 17, 1865

Let no depredation be committed upon the property or possessions of the ``Sisters of Charity'' at Nazareth Academy, near Bardstown, Ky A. LINCOLN

Jan. 17. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ADS, Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Mother House, Nazareth, Kentucky. Accompanying Lincoln's small card in the Nazareth Archives is the following letter from Senator Lazarus W. Powell, January 17, 1865: ``I received your letter of the 9th inst., two days ago. I called on the president this morning and presented your case for his consideration. He promptly gave me a safe-guard which I enclose herewith; it will protect you from further depredations. It affords me pleasure to serve you in this matter. If I can serve you further, command me.''

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United Sates: January 17, 1865

I herewith lay before the Senate, for its constitutional action thereon, a treaty concluded at the Isabella Indian Reservation, inPage  220 the State of Michigan, on the 18th day of October, 1864, between H. J. Alvord, special commissioner, and D. C. Leach, United States Indian agent, acting as commissioner on the part of the United States, and the chiefs and headmen of the Chippewas of Saginaw, Swan Creek, and Black River, in the State of Michigan, parties to the treaty of August 2, 1855, with amendments.

A letter of the Secretary of the Interior of the 12th instant and a copy of a communication of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, of the 22d ultimo, with inclosure accompanying the treaty.

Executive Mansion, ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Washington, January 17, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 87. The treaty was ratified with amendments on May 22, 1866.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.,
Hon. Secretary of War January 17, 1865.

My dear Sir: Some time last autumn (I think it was) Shelby made a raid into Missouri; and Gen. Brown had something to do in driving him out. If Gen. Brown's report of the matter is on file, please send me a copy of it. Yours truly, A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   NH, X, 341. For General Egbert B. Brown's report of Confederate Colonel Joseph O. Shelby's raid, see OR, I, XLI, I, 344 ff.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

Please send me the papers in the case of Lieut. John T. Arnette.

Jan. 17. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, RPB. Lincoln's note is on a small card pasted on a letter from William Price, Baltimore, January 4, 1865:

``John T. Arnett is represented by his sisters as being a prisoner in Fort Delaware, having been a soldier in the army of the rebels, and captured with a rebel uniform on, at the time. These ladies say, that you promised to release their brother, if they would satisfy you of the truth of their statement, that they have two brothers in the land & naval service of the U. States and three first cousins in the same service.

``I am satisfied from the evidence adduced to me that their statement is correct, of which however you will be able to judge from the the [sic] depositions I have caused to be taken, & the other papers they will present to you.''

To Francis P. Blair, Sr. [1]

F. P. Blair, Esq Washington,
Sir: Jan. 18. 1865

Your having shown me Mr. Davis' letter to you of the 12th. Inst., you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now, andPage  221 shall continue, ready to receive any agent whom he, or any other influential person now resisting the national authority, may informally send to me, with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Yours &c A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi; ADfS, DLC-RTL; ALS copy, CSmH; ALS copy, NAuE. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra, for Jefferson Davis' letter and other related documents.

Cotton Permit for Mrs. R. I. Ward [1]

Executive Mansion January 18 1865.

An authorized agent of the Treasury Department having with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, contracted for the cotton above mentioned and the party having agreed to sell and deliver the same to such agent.

It is ordered, that the cotton moving in compliance with and for fulfilment of said contract, and being transported to said agent, or under his direction, shall be free from seizure or detention by any officer of the Government, and commanders of military departments, districts posts and detachments naval stations, gunboats flotillas and fleets, will observe this order and give the said Mrs. R. I. Ward her agents and transports, free and unmolested passage, for the purpose of getting the said cotton, or any part thereof through the lines other than blockaded lines, and safe conduct within our lines while the same is moving in strict compliance with the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury and for fulfilment of said contract with the agent of the Government.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, RTL. Lincoln's permit is written on the certificate of the same date signed by Hanson A. Risley, supervising special agent of the Treasury, and issued to Mrs. R. I. Ward of Louisville, Kentucky, agreeing to purchase 1,000 bales of cotton. Both permit and certificate have ``Cancelled'' written across the face.

To---Goodwin [1]

Mr.---Goodwin Executive Mansion,
Supreme Court Room Washington, Jan. 18, 1865.

My dear Sir Since talking with you I have concluded to appoint a successor to Mr. Larned at once. This is not because of any change of feeling for, or estimate of, Mr. Larned. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by H. Gail Davis, South Bend, Indiana. See Lincoln to Speed, infra. Stephen A. Goodwin and Daniel Goodwin, Jr., were law partners of Edwin C. Larned in Chicago. Which of them Lincoln was addressing cannot be determined.

Page  222

To Richard T. Jacob [1]

Hon. Richard T. Jacob Executive Mansion,
Sir: Washington, Jan. 18, 1865.

You are at liberty to proceed to Kentucky, and to remain at large so far as relates to any cause now past. In what I now do, I decide nothing as to the right or wrong of your arrest, but act in the hope that there is less liability to misunderstanding among Union men now than there was at the time of the arrest. Respectfully

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln to Grant, January 5, supra.

To George C. Miller [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, January 18, 1865

My Dear Sir---Please accept my cordial thanks for the cane you were so kind as to send me, and the letter by which it was accompanied. Yours truly, A. LINCOLN

George C. Miller, Esq.

Annotation

[1]   Cincinnati, Past and Present, Or, Its Industrial History (M. Joblin and Company, Cincinnati, 1872), p.33. George C. Miller, manufacturer of agricultural implements at Cincinnati, wrote Lincoln on December 30, 1864:

``My Father being a soldier of the Revolution and I haveing some knowledge of the War of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve, being Seventy Five years old on the above date. I have been Led to Fix a value upon the union, Liberty and Independence of the States above all other matters of an Earthly nature. Have twice voted for your Honor. . . . Beleaveing that you are the Man. that God has Raised up and appointed as Our Leader in the Putting Down of the Greatest and Wickedest Rebellion that has ever taken place in the World. . . .

``I have made and Desire to Present to you a Cane in some Measure Emblematical of What I hope Our Nation Will be, before your Second term Expires. Being Composed of as Maney Sections and Pieces as there Ware States, and of a verry Beautifull Curled White Oak Not of the kind that Could be Split into Railes with Mall and wedge Conveniently.

``The Sections are not Bound together by a Rope of Sand But With a Rod of Iron. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To James Speed [1]

If Larned's resignation is on file, please send me nomination for Perkins Bass at once. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 18. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Appointments, Illinois, Box 373. Lincoln's endorsement appears on an envelope marked ``Perkins Bass for U.S. Dist. Atty. for Northern Dist. of Illinois,'' which contains recommendations. Nominated on January 18, to succeed Edwin C. Larned, Bass was confirmed by the Senate on January 19, 1865. See Lincoln to Goodwin, supra.

Page  223

To Grenville M. Dodge [1]

Major General Dodge Executive Mansion
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, Jan. 19. 1865

If Mrs. Beattie alias Mrs. Wolff, shall be sentenced to death, notify me, and postpone execution till further order. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 292. General Dodge replied on the same day: ``Mrs. Beattie has been sent to her friends in the rebel lines.'' (DLC-RTL). In a second telegram of the same date he queried: ``Have you any orders for Maj Wolfe Had he not better be sent to Johnsons Island for exchange'' (ibid.). The identity of Mrs. Beattie is not clarified but is indicated in an item appearing in the St. Louis Missouri Republican, November 22, 1864:

``Mrs. Kate Beattie.---A good deal of local interest has been excited within a few days past, in regard to a woman professing to be Mrs. Wolff---wife of the rebel Major condemned to be shot in retaliation for the murder of Maj. Wilson. All our readers know that she is now a prisoner, but the following advertisement from Memphis . . . will be of interest:

`` `Information Wanted: Fifty dollars reward will be given for information as to the whereabouts of Mrs. Kate Beattie, wife of Capt. Tuck. Beattie, of Lexington, Mo. . . . Mrs. Beattie is about five feet four inches tall, has light blue eyes, hair closely shingled, and a scar upon the right cheek. She is rather eccentric, intelligent, and prepossessing in manners.

`` `Address, W. W. Cason, Adams Street, Memphis, Tenn. . . .' ''

Concerning Major Enoch O. Wolf, see Lincoln's communications to General Rosecrans, November 10 and 19, 1864, supra

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lieut. General Grant: Jan. 19, 1865.

Please read and answer this letter as though I was not President, but only a friend. My son, now in his twenty second year, having graduated at Harvard, wishes to see something of the war before it ends. I do not wish to put him in the ranks, nor yet to give him a commission, to which those who have already served long, are better entitled, and better qualified to hold. Could he, without embarrassment to you, or detriment to the service, go into your Military family with some nominal rank, I, and not the public, furnishing his necessary means? If no, say so without the least hesitation, because I am as anxious, and as deeply interested, that you shall not be encumbered as you can be yourself. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Foreman M. Lebold, Chicago, Illinois; LS, DLC-Nicolay Papers. On January 21 Grant replied from Annapolis Junction, Maryland: ``Your favor of this date in relation to your son serving in some Military capacity is received. I will be most happy to have him in my Military family in the manner you propose. The nominal rank given him is immaterial but I would suggest that of Capt. as I have three staff officers now, of conciderable service, in noPage  224

higher grade. Indeed I have one officer with only the rank of Lieut. who has been in the service from the begining of the war. This however will make no difference and I would still say give the rank of Capt. Please excuse my writing on a half sheet. I had no resource but to take the blank half of your letter.''

Robert T. Lincoln was appointed captain and assistant adjutant general of Volunteers, February 11, 1865, and resigned June 10, 1865.

To Ethan A. Hitchcock [1]

Will Gen. Hitchcock please see and hear the bearer, Col. Coburn, on the subject within? A. LINCOLN

Jan. 19. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, In. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of a four-page letter from Oliver P. Morton, January 12, 1865, presented by Colonel John Coburn, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers, requesting immediate action in regard to exchanging Confederate prisoners in Indiana prisons for members of the Fifty-first and Seventy-third Indiana Regiments, suffering in Southern prisons.

To Joseph Holt [1]

January 19, 1865

Will the Judge Advocate General please give me his opinion whether it would be legally competent for the President to direct a new-trial in this case, and if yea, whether this is a proper case in which to so direct? A. LINCOLN

Jan. 19. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of a long letter from A.G. Riddle and R. Stockett Mathews, counsel for Thomas W. Johnson and others, January 18, 1865, asking for a new trial of their clients, who had been convicted along with the notorious blockade runner Pardon Worsley. Chief ground for the request was new evidence and the fact that the defense had not been allowed to introduce witnesses to refute Worsley's testimony that Johnson supplied him with goods with full knowledge that he was trading with the rebels. See further Lincoln to Holt, February 17, infra.

To Edward O. C. Ord [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Major General Ord. Jan. 19. 1865.

You have a man in arrest for desertion passing by the name of Stanley---William Stanley I think---but whose real name is different. He is the son of so close a friend of mine that I must not let him be executed. Please let me know what is his present and prospective condition. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 293. See Lincoln's telegram to Butler, December 29, 1864, supra. No reply from General Ord has been found.

Page  225

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Let this appointment be made. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 19. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter to Stanton signed by members of the Y.M.C.A. of Elmira, New York, November 4, 1864, recommending appointment of Reverend Thomas S. Dewing as hospital chaplain. Acting Surgeon General C.H.Crane, endorsed on January 17, 1865: ``There is a General Hospital at Elmira, NY, to which no Chaplain has been appointed.'' Dewing was nominated as hospital chaplain at Elmira on January 23, and his appointment was confirmed on February 20.

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir. Washington, Jan. 19, 1865.

You remember that from time to time appeals have been made to us by persons claiming to have attempted to come through our lines with their effects to take the benefit of the Amnesty proclamation, and to have been despoiled of their effects under Gen. Butler's administration. Some of these claims have color of merit, and may be really meritorious. Please consider whether we can not set on foot an investigation, which may advance justice in the premises. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Jan. 19. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. No reply has been found.

To John P. Usher [1]

January 19, 1865

I personally know this man---Vital Jarrot---to be one of the best of men; & as I believe, having peculiar qualifications for the place---and I shall be glad to appoint him if no obstacle be known at the Department. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 19. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA NR RG 48, Appointments, Indian Agents, Box 72. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of Vital Jarrot to Senator Lyman Trumbull, Philadelphia, January 16, 1865: ``After reaching this place transacting some business here on my way to Washington City, I received a telegram, from my son in law, calling me back home immediately. You will therefore pardon me for calling upon you to represent me with the Executive. To be short---at the solicitations of the traders along the Platte I have consented to apply to Mr Lincoln for the Indian Agency of the Sious on the Platts. I am informed that said agency is now vacant and I am vain enough to concur, with the Indian traders I have seen, in believing that I could do much with the Indians in bringing them back to peaceful relations with us. To give what, I am informed, was the cause of theirPage  226

present hostility would require more space than an ordinary letter. I shall therefor neither trouble you with the details of the origin, progress and present condition of the troubles with those Indians. Should you however please apply and procure me the appointment, it will be time for me then to lay all the information I have received on the subject, before the proper department. This is my only application I have ever made for executive favor of any kind and I do not think that I am expecting too much, to believe that the President on your recommendation will appoint me.''

Vital Jarrot of St. Clair County, Illinois, who had followed his father Nicholas Jarrot in the Indian trade, had been known to Lincoln from the period of the Black Hawk War and had served with Lincoln in the Illinois House of Representatives in 1838-1839. He was nominated agent of the Upper Platte Agency on February 17 and confirmed by the Senate on March 3, 1865.

To John A. Dix [1]

Major General Dix Executive Mansion
New-York. Washington, Jan. 20. 1865

Let W. N. Bilbo be discharged on his parole. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 294. William N. Bilbo, an old Whig of Tennessee, wrote Lincoln from New York on January 26, 1865: ``Accept my unfeigned gratitude for my prompt release from the malicious or profoundly ignorant charge of being a southern spy. To those who know me the charge is simply ridiculous. I may be justly charged of being impulsive, defiant, and precipitant, but never as a hypocrite or spy---never never. Sir, I have written this for other purposes than a return of my grateful acknowledgement for your confidence and friendship. I have at last succeeded this evening through my friends in prevaling upon the `World' the organ of the Democracy to declare on Saturday or friday that to vote for or against the `Amend-ment' clause on Tuesday next was no test of Democracy and rather indirectly to advise the Democracy to vote for it. I was thus promised this evening by its Editor So you need not have any apprehension now upon its passage. Gov Seymour has declared that he had no interest upon the subject, and if it passed he would have no regrets. . . . Mr Seward first intrusted this matter to me, and I first won over Judge [Thomas A. R.] Nelson who introduced me to you and who has been indefatigable in his assiduous efforts to procure other Democrats to vote for it. The Bill will pass and thus I will have discharged my obligations to you & Mr Seward as an old line whig, and my paramount obligations to eternal justice and an universal humanity. Had you not better have the article of the `World' copied in the Chronicle the next day, to ease the Democratic scruples of some members of congress.''

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Executive Mansion
City-Point, Va Washington, Jan. 20. 1865

If Thomas Lamplugh, of the first Delaware Regiment, has been sentenced to death, and is not yet executed, suspend & report the case to me. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 295. General John A. Rawlings replied on the same day: ``The following dispatch has just been received from Genl Meade. . . . `The proceedings in the case of private Lemplough firstPage  227

(1st) Delaware Vols will be forwarded to the President and action in the case suspended till his orders are received.' '' (DLC-RTL).

No further action has been found in the case of ``Thomas Lamplaugh,'' alias Thomas Carey, sentenced to be shot for desertion. The court-martial record ends with Lincoln's suspension of sentence on January 20 (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 3380).

Order Concerning Export of Hay [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington City, Jan. 20, 1865.

Ordered: That no clearances for the exportation of hay from the United States be granted until further orders, unless the same shall have been placed on shipboard before the publication hereof.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Stan. V. Henkels Catalog, October 16, 1930, No. 85; James D. Richardson, Messages and Papers of the President, VI, 275. According to the catalog description, this is a document signed.

Pass for H. P. Livingston [1]

Allow the bearer, H. P. Livingston, to pass from any Northern Port to Savannah Ga. & then report to the U.S. Military Commandant.

Jan. 20. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS, owned by Richard Lufkin, Boston, Massachusetts.

Recommendation for L. J. Czapkay [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, January 20, 1865.

I am not personally acquainted with Dr. L. J. Czapkay, of whom the letter on the other half of this sheet is written; but the writer is one of our United States Senators, of high standing, whom I cheerfully indorse; and I add that I hope Dr. Czapkay may have a pleasant sojourn in Europe and may find all reasonable facilities for effecting the objects of his visit. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL. The copy of Lincoln's letter written on Executive Mansion stationery is in John Hay's handwriting. A copy of Senator John Conness' letter of January 19, also in Hay's handwriting, is as follows:

``The bearer of this letter is a citizen of the U.S. and of Cal and is one of our most ardent patriots and a gentleman of wealth and discretion He has a letter of Commissioner Newton to represent that Department at the coming `International Exhibition' in Prussia. My object is to get an autograph letter from you with the condition precedent that no expense shall accrue from the proceeding.'' (Ibid.).

Page  228

Reply to Baron de Wetterstedt [1]

January 20, 1865

BARON WETTERSTEDT: My memory does not recall an instance of disagreement between Sweden and the United States. Your predecessor was most agreeable in his intercourse with this Government, and I greet you with the same good feeling which was entertained for him while he resided with us. The consideration which your Government has manifested by raising the rank of its mission here, is acknowledged with sincere satisfaction. You may be assured that on my part every occasion will be improved to exhibit the sincere desire which this Government entertains for the prosperity and welfare of the Government and Kingdom of Sweden and Norway.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily Morning Chronicle, January 21, 1865. Lincoln replied to Baron de Wetterstedt, minister from Sweden and Norway, whose speech upon presenting his credentials called attention to the esteem which the King of Sweden and Norway expressed for the United States in ``thus elevating his legation in America to the first rank of our diplomatic hierarchy.''

To Joseph J. Reynolds [1]

Executive Mansion Washington,
Major General Reynolds. Jan. 20. 1865

It would appear by the accompanying papers that Mrs. Mary E. Morton is the owner, independently of her husband, of a certain building, premises and furniture, which she, with her children, has been occupying and using peaceably during the war, until recently, when the Provost-Marshal, has, in the name of the U.S. government, seized the whole of said property, and ejected her from it. It also appears by her statement to me, that her husband went off in the rebellion at the beginning, wherein he still remains.

It would seem that this seizure has not been made for any Military object, as for a place of storage, a hospital, or the like, because this would not have required the seizure of the furniture, and especially not the return of furniture previously taken away.

The seizure must have been on some claim [of] confiscation, a matter of which the courts, and not the Provost-Marshals, or other military officers are to judge. In this very case, would probably be the questions ``Is either the husband or wife a traitor?'' ``Does the property belong to the husband or to the wife?'' ``Is the property of the wife confiscable for the treason of the husband?'' and other similar questions, all which it is ridiculous for a Provost-Marshal to assume to decide.

Page  229The true rule for the Military is to seize such property as is needed for Military uses and reasons, and let the rest alone. Cotton and other staple articles of commerce are seizable for military reasons. Dwelling-houses & furniture are seldom so. If Mrs. Morton is playing traitor, to the extent of practical injury, seize her, but leave her house to the courts. Please revise and adjust this case upon these principles. Yours &c A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DLC (on deposit); LS copy, DLC-RTL. This letter is incorrectly dated 1864 in Nicolay and Hay (IX, 287), as a result of the fact that the copy in the Lincoln Papers is misdated 1864. General Joseph J. Reynolds was in command of the Department of Arkansas. No further reference to this case has been found.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Let the order dishonorably dismissing Captn. Burrage be revoked.

Jan. 21, 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 130, U.S. Army Court Martial Cases, White House Office. Captain Henry S. Burrage, Company A, Thirty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, had been dismissed on charges of holding communication with the enemy. AGO Special Orders No. 61, February 7, 1865, ordered that he be restored to his command. He was mustered out of service on June 8, 1865.

To Joseph Holt [2]

January 21, 1865

Let the unexecuted portion of the sentence be remitted and the soldier be returned to duty with his regiment to serve his full enlistment including period of absence. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 21. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2703. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the court-martial record of Private Vance Mason, Company C, Thirty-seventh Kentucky Volunteers, sentenced to be shot for desertion.

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Major General Wallace. Executive Mansion

Baltimore, Md. Washington, Jan. 21. 1865

Two weeks or ten days ago as I remember I gave direction for Levin L. Walters to be either tried at once or discharged. If he has not been tried, nor a trial of him progressing in good faith, discharge him at once. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 296. See Lincoln to Stanton, January 4, supra. General Wallace replied on January 22: ``I referred your telegram relative to Waters to Maj Genl [Edward M.] McCook President of the Military Commission and he replies as followsPage  230

`` `The trial of Levin L. Waters is progressing in good faith. The papers in his case were sent to the commission about ten (10) days ago. The accused asked to have thirty (30) witnesses summoned, then some more, which was ordered. These witnesses are now reporting and his trial commenced Monday night. I received no instructions from you to have him tried at once, or discharged but only received telegram from Mr Stanton to proceed without delay to have Waters tried The delay you will observe has been from a disposition to accomodate Waters. Remembering your former directions I have had the effort made to hasten the proceedings I assure you I would not thwart your wishes or trifle with a prisoners liberty Under these circumstances shall the trial proceed''' (DLC-RTL).

See further Lincoln to Wallace, January 22, infra.

Cotton Permit for John D. Champlin [1]

Executive Mansion, City of Washington.
January, [22?] 1865.

It having been made satisfactorily to appear to me that John D. Champlin of the City of New York, is the owner of a large amount of Cotton, now being in the vicinage of the Port of Galveston and City of Houston, State of Texas, amounting to Eleven Thousand Bales, which it is right and proper he should be permitted, and which it is the true policy of the United States that he be authorized together with any other Cotton of which he may obtain possession to take and carry away from said State of Texas.

Now therefore, it is hereby ordered that permission be and is hereby given to the said John D. Champlin by himself, his agents, servants and employees, by means of Steamers, Ships or other Vessels, to proceed to, and take such Cotton and transport the same from said Port of Galveston, to the Port of Havana, or any Port within the United States.

And said Steamers, Ships or other Vessels, with such Cotton, shall be and are hereby declared free and exempt from seizure or detention or any molestation by any Officer of the Government. And Commandants of Military Departments, Districts, Posts, Detachments, Naval Stations, Ships of War, Squadrons, Gun Boats, Flotillas, and Fleets will observe this order, and obey the same---and will give the said John D. Champlin, his agents, servants and employees, Steamers, Ships, Vessels and Transports free and unmolested way and right of way for the purpose of getting and taking away said Cotton or any part thereof from the place aforesaid.

The said John D. Champlin is not to carry into the Port of Galveston any article goods or merchandize contraband of war, but may take into said Port Bagging and Rope and such articles as are not contraband of war, for the purposes aforesaid.

Page  231

Annotation

[1]   Df (copy?), DLC-RTL. The editors have not been able to determine whether Lincoln ever signed or issued this permit. The bracketed portion of the date is supplied on the basis of John D. Champlin's memorial of January 20, 1865:

``Your memorialist, John D. Champlin, of the city of New York respectfully represents as follows:

``I am a native of the State of Rhode Island and at present a resident of the City of New York For more than twenty years next preceding the . . . Rebellion, I was a resident of Louisiana and other Southern States. . . .

``I am now the owner of about Eleven Thousand Bales of Cotton, all at and in the vicinity of Galveston and Houston in the State of Texas.

``I desire to obtain from the United States authorities the requisite authority and permission to bring such cotton from Texas by the way of the Port of Galveston. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Memorandum Concerning the Draft [1]

[c. January 22, 1865]

The draft matter complained of by Gov. Fenton is this, that in giving credits for part calls one three-years man is counted equal to three one-year men, while on the pending call each man is to count one and only one, whether he enlist for one, two, or three years. The practical difficulty may be illustrated by the following supposed case. The towns of A & B---before any enlisted, had each 100 men. On the late call A gave sixty six one year men, leaving only 34 at home, while B. gave 33 three-years men, leaving 67 at home. On the pending call each owes 100 men, subject to its credit. But while A gets credit for 66---it owes 34---taking the last man in it; while B gets credit for 99---owes one, and has sixty-six left quietly at home. This ugly conjuncture occurs in some sort accidentally, some towns putting in one years men and others three years men, while attaching no consequence to the difference, but which now burthens the one class absolutely beyond their immediate power to bear. While the above is only a supposed case, I am told there are realities that are even stranger---when there are not men enough in the town to answer it's quota. It gives no present relief that the one year men are to come home sooner than the three year men, as the former . . . [2]

Annotation

[1]   AD, RPB. This memorandum is written in pencil on a blotter. The date has been assigned on the assumption that Governor Reuben E. Fenton's conference with Lincoln, January 22-24, provided the data of which Lincoln takes notice. On January 26, upon returning to Albany, Governor Fenton wrote Lincoln: ``Honorables James A. Bell, George H. Andrews, Thomas B. Van Buren, and E. C. Topliff, Members of the Legislature, visit you in regard to filling the quotas for our State. They will represent to you the public feeling, and what we deem just cause for complaint. I beg you consider favorably what they may say; and allow me again to earnestly renew my recommendations as to the mode of filling the present quota.'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln to Stanton, infra.

[2]   The last one and one-half lines are illegible.

Page  232

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Executive Mansion.
Hon. Sec of War. January 22, 1865.

The Governor has a pretty good case. I feel sure he is more than half right. We don't want him to feel cross and we in the wrong. Try and fix it with him. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Tracy, p. 251. See Lincoln's memorandum concerning the draft, supra.

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Major General Wallace Executive Mansion
Baltimore, Md. Washington Jan. 22. 1865

The case of Waters being as you state it, in your despatch of today, of course the trial will proceed. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 297. See Lincoln to Wallace, January 21, supra.

To Christopher C. Augur [1]

January 23, 1865

Returned to Gen. Augur for the exercise of his own discretion. And it is suggested that like cases be not refered to the President, unless it be such as he specially directs. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2203. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the court-martial record of Private Frank Carpenter, alias Harry J. Carpenter, Third Vermont Volunteers, sentenced to be shot for desertion. General Augur had approved the sentence. Although Lincoln's later endorsement pardoning Carpenter is missing, the jacket covering the papers indicates that Carpenter was pardoned and returned to his regiment on March 7 (9?), and the Roster of Company K, Third Vermont Regiment, lists Franklin Carpenter as pardoned on March 9 and returned to his regiment on March 23, 1865.

To William O. Bartlett [1]

Office U. S. Military Telegraph,
W. O. Bartlett, Esq War Department,
New-York. Washington, D.C., Jan. 23. 1865

Please come and see me at once. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 298. See Lincoln to Wakeman, January 26, infra.

Endorsement Concerning William F. Hinkle [1]

[c. January 23, 1865]

West-Point---An interesting testimonial.

William F. Hinkle.

Page  233

Annotation

[1]   AE, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1864, No. 75. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Charles Case, Washington, January 23, 1865, recommending William F. Hinkle for reappointment. An endorsement in another hand notes that Hinkle ``failed to pass his entrance examination both in June & Sep. 1864.'' No record of Hinkle's reappointment has been found.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Pardon, on condition of re-inlisting and faithfully serving a term.

Jan. 23, 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 45. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the court-martial record of Private Llewellyn Sawyer, Fifth Maine Battery, sentenced to two years' imprisonment at hard labor, on charges of desertion. Lincoln's pardon of Sawyer was promulgated in AGO Special Orders No. 63, February 8, 1865.

To Joseph Holt [2]

Pardon, for unexecuted part of sentence on condition of serving out remainder of his term in his regiment. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 316. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the court-martial record of Private Thomas McGrath, Company I, Twenty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers, sentenced to fifteen years at hard labor on charges of drunkenness and striking an officer. McGrath was mustered out of service on August 26, 1865.

Order Concerning John Dugan and Christopher V. Hogan [1]

January 23, 1865

The within named Hogan, or Dugan was arrested and imprisoned by my authority. This writ of habeas corpus is suspended, and the officer having Hogan or Dugan in custody is directed not to produce his body, but to hold him in custody until further orders giving this order in his return to the court.

Jan. 23, 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   New York Times, January 25, 1865. The Times article in which this order appears relates the following:

``To-day was set apart for the return of writs of habeas corpus on the Superintendent of the Old Capitol Prison, commanding him to produce the bodies of Christopher V. Hogan and John Dugan, with the date and cause of their arrest. They were formerly employed as detectives on the Metropolitan Police force, and subsequently Hogan was a special detective of the Treasury Department. While so acting, a robbery was committed, in February last. The trunk of Major [Benjamin] Malone, a Paymaster in the Army, was robbed of nearly $2,000. Some time after, Hogan and Dugan were arrested by Superintendent Wood, on charge of being concerned in the robbery, and they have ever since been held in custody.

Page  234This morning, at the convening of the general term of the court, Mr. Wood appeared to answer the writ, and handed his return to the court. Superintendent Wood answered: `The body of Hogan, or Dugan, is in my possession. He was arrested and imprisoned by authority of the President of the United States. I do not produce his body by reason of the order of the President of the United States indorsed upon said writ, to which reference is hereby respectfully made.' The indorsement of the President on each writ is as follows: [text as above]''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

January 23, 1865

Order of dismissal having been revoked and officer dismissed because Senate had not confirmed, now let him have his reappointment if vacancy has not been filled. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 23, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 130, U.S. Army Court Martial Cases, White House Office. The original of this order has not been found, but the transcript is preserved in the record of the case of First Lieutenant Isaac M. Beebe, Company A, Twelfth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, dismissed for unofficer-like conduct and inattention to duty by reason of drunkenness. Beebe's reappointment was confirmed by the Senate on February 14, 1865.

To Grenville M. Dodge [1]

Major General Dodge Executive Mansion
St. Louis, Mo Washington, Jan. 24. 1865

It is said an old lady in Clay county, Mo, by name, Mrs. Winfred E. Price, is about being sent South. If she is not misbehaving let her remain A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 300. General Dodge replied on January 26: ``No order has been issued from these Head Quarters banishing Mrs Winfred E Price nor from any subordinate that I can learn of'' (DLC-RTL).

Endorsement [1]

[January 24, 1865]

Charge to me A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, ORB. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a telegram of Robert T. Lincoln to Fred P. Anderson, January 24, 1865.

Endorsement Concerning David Zimmerman [1]

A substitute will be accepted when mustered in for this man.

Jan. 24. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Page  [unnumbered]

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by R. E. Burdick, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of J. H. Zimmerman, Stoystown, Pennsylvania, to Representative Alexander H. Coffroth, December 17, 1864, asking to be allowed to furnish a substitute for his brother David Zimmerman, Company G, Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. The roster of Company G lists David Zimmerman as not accounted for at muster out.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Executive Mansion
City-Point. Washington Jan. 24. 1865

If Newell W. Root, of Conn. Heavy Artillery is under sentence of death please telegraph me briefly the circumstances.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 299. On January 25, 1865, Captain and Judge Advocate P.T. Whitehead telegraphed: ``I have the honor to report in regard to Private Newell W. Root alias Geo H Harris Co H 1st Conn Heavy Artillery, that he was tried by this Court on Dec 19th 1864 & convicted of `deserting to the Enemy' & sentenced to be hung. His sentence is approved by General Meade & ordered to be carried into effect at City Point on Friday 27th inst. . . . Root deserted to the Enemy near Dutch Gap & gave himself up to the rebels as a union deserter; was released . . . and on making his way through . . . Ky represented himself as a rebel Deserter for the purpose of getting out of the service. he gave the name of Harris & came to City Point in arrest under that name. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). See further, Lincoln's telegram to Grant, January 25, infra.

To Andrew Johnson [1]

Hon. Andrew Johnson Executive Mansion
Nashville, Tenn. Washington, Jan. 24. 1865

Several members of the Cabinet, with myself, considered the question to-day as to the time of your coming on here. While we fully appreciate your wish to remain in Tennessee until her State-Government shall be completely re-inaugerated, it is our unanamous conclusion that it is unsafe for you to not be here on the fourth of March. Be sure to reach here by that time.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 301. See Lincoln to Johnson, January 14, supra.

To William A. Menzies [1]

William Menzies, Esq. Executive Mansion
Dear Sir Washington, Jan. 24. 1865

Wilmington, N.C. is ours, of right and in fact Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Page  236

Annotation

[1]   ALS, The Rosenbach Company, Philadelphia and New York. No communication from Menzies related to this note has been found. William A. Menzies was a resident of Bourbon County, Kentucky, and the father of Representative John W. Menzies. An accompanying envelope carries Lincoln's endorsement: ``William Menzies/New-York.'' Fort Fisher was captured on January 15, and the port of Wilmington which was to surrender on February 22, was blockaded.

Reply to Philadelphia Delegation [1]

January 24, 1865

REVEREND SIR, AND LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: I accept, with emotions of profoundest gratitude, the beautiful gift you have been pleased to present to me. You will, of course, expect that I acknowledge it. So much has been said about Gettysburg, and so well said, that for me to attempt to say more may, perhaps, only serve to weaken the force of that which has already been said. A most graceful and eloquent tribute was paid to the patriotism and selfdenying labors of the American ladies, on the occasion of the consecration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg, by our illustrious friend, Edward Everett, now, alas! departed from earth. [2] His life was a truly great one, and, I think, the greatest part of it was that which crowned its closing years. I wish you to read, if you have not already done so, the glowing, and eloquent, and truthful words which he then spoke of the women of America. Truly, the services they have rendered to the defenders of our country in this perilous time, and are yet rendering, can never be estimated as they ought to be. For your kind wishes to me, personally, I beg leave to render you, likewise, my sincerest thanks. I assure you they are reciprocated. And now, gentlemen and ladies, may God bless you all.

Annotation

[1]   Washington Daily Morning Chronicle, January 25, 1865. This speech is incorrectly dated January 25, 1865, in Hertz, II, 960. Lincoln replied to a speech of Reverend William Suddards, delivered on presenting ``a truly beautiful and superb vase of skeleton leaves, gathered from the battle-fields of Gettysburg.''

[2]   Edward Everett died on January 15, 1865.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

January 24, 1865

I personally know Captn Winters & think he should have another chance. Let the order dismissing him be set aside upon his making right the matter of his accounts.

Jany 24. 1865

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA RG 130, U.S. Army Court Martial Cases, White House Office. The transcript of Lincoln's endorsement is preserved on the White House registerPage  237

of court-martial cases. Captain Gilbert E. Winters, commissary of subsistence of Volunteers, had been dismissed for inefficiency on September 16, 1863. He was reinstated on March 3, 1865.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va. Washington, D.C., Jan. 25 1865

Having received the report in the case of Newell W. Root, I do not interfere further in the case. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 303. See Lincoln to Grant, January 24, supra. Newell W. Root was hanged on January 27, 1865.

Memoranda on Robert Burns [1]

[January 25, 1865]

I can not frame a toast to Burns. I can say nothing worthy of his generous heart, and transcendent genius A. LINCOLN

I can not frame a toast to Burns. I can say nothing worthy of his generous heart and transcending genius. Thinking of what he has said, I can not say anything which seems worth saying

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS-P, ISLA. LINCOLN had been invited to attend the annual celebration of the Burns Club of Washington in 1864 (Robert Crawford to Lincoln, January 23, 1864, DLC-RTL). Alexander Williamson, a clerk in the Second Auditor's Office who had tutored ``Willie'' and ``Tad'' Lincoln, wrote again on January 24, 1865: ``The `Executive Committee of Management for the Celebration of the 106th Anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns' have instructed me as their Secretary to request the honor of your recognition of the genius of Scotland's bard, by either a toast, a sentiment, or in any other way you may deem proper. It takes place tomorrow.''(Ibid.).

The Washington Evening Star of January 26, 1865, reported the meeting of the Burns Club on the previous evening: ``Mr. Williamson, remarking that the President's pressing duties had prevented him writing a letter or a toast in response to the invitation to be present . . . read a hastily written memorandum which the President had sent him, in substance as follows

`` `I cannot now frame a toast to Burns or say to you aught worthy of his most generous heart and transcending genius.' ''

To John F. Miller [1]

Officer in Command at Executive Mansion
Nashville, Tenn. Washington. Jan. 25. 1865

Do not allow---Elliott, under sentence of death to be executed without further order from me; and if an exchange of himPage  238 for Capt. S. T. Harris, now a prisoner, supposed to be at Columbia South-Carolina, can be effected, let it be done. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 302. See Lincoln to Miller, January 11, supra. General Miller replied on the same day: ``Your orders suspending sentence of J W Elliott until further orders from yourself & authorizing Exchange of Capt J T Harris just recd'' (DLC-RTL). Although Elliott appears in earlier correspondence also as ``S. W. Elliott,'' ``J. W.'' appear to be the correct initials.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Secretary of War. Executive Mansion
My dear Sir. Washington Jan. 25. 1865

About Jews. I wish you would give Dr. Zacharie a pass to go to Savannah, remain a week and return, bringing with him, if he wishes, his father and sisters or any of them. This will spare me trouble and oblige me. I promised him long ago that he should be allowed this whenever Savannah should fall into our hands.

Blumenberg, at Baltimore. I think he should have a hearing. He has suffered for us & served us well---had the rope around his neck for being our friend---raised troops---fought, and been wounded. He should not be dismissed in a way that disgraces and ruins him without a hearing. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NHi. Stanton replied on the same day: ``An order for leave to Zacharie as directed by you has been issued & sent to Mr Nicolay. In relation to [Leopold] Blumenburg---I had no knowledge of the proceedings in his case they having transpired during my absence, but the Provost Marshal reports that he was removed for cause of which a statement will be furnished you. Among other things one charge was cruelty in gaging men to make them confess they were deserters. This charge General Fry reports was fully established.'' (DLC-RTL).

An undated letter from Dr. Isachar Zacharie (cataloged in the Lincoln Papers in December, 1864) seems certainly to have been written after January 25, 1865: ``I leave on Saturday per steamship Arago for Savannah where I hope to find my Dear old Father and friends---if you have any matters that you would have properly attended to, I will consider it a favour for [you] to let me attend to it for you. . . .'' (Ibid.).

Major Leopold Blumenburg, Fifth Maryland Infantry, wounded at Antietam and later appointed provost marshal of the Third District in Maryland, had been dismissed from the service on January 17, 1865.

Endorsement [1]

Pardon, on condition of returning to his regiment and faithfully serving to the end of the term of the regiment. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 26. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. This endorsement has been clipped from attendant papers.

Page  239

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lieutenant General Grant January 26, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of William H. Jeffs Company B Fifty sixth Massachusetts volunteers until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination. A. LINCOLN.

Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY

Priv. Sec.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 305. Across the top of this telegram appears a pencilled note: ``Repeated Jany 28 '65 to Comdg Officer Norfolk Va.'' Grant replied on the same day, quoting a telegram from Major General John G. Parke: ``No proceedings in the case of Wm. A Jeffs Co `B' fifty sixth (56) Mass Vols have been recd at these HdQuarters In case the sentence should be death the proceedings will be forwarded you'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln's telegram to George F. Shepley, January 28, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [2]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lieutenant General Grant Jan'y 26, 1865.

Suspend execution of Hamel Shaffer ordered to be shot at City-Point tomorrow, until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 306. On the received copy of this telegram appears Grant's endorsement to Major General John G. Parke: ``The above just received. Please send proceedings to these Head Quarters.'' (DNA WR RG 108, Headquarters of the Army, Letters Received, P 25). A telegram from Nellie O. Shaffer, Concord (no state), January 26, 1865, asked: ``My husband Hamel Shaffer is sentenced to be shot tomorrow at City Pt Will you please delay the sentence until I reach him answer immedy'' (DLC-RTL). Efforts to identify Hamel Shaffer and locate the record of his case have failed, but see Lincoln's telegram to Grant, February 6, infra.

To Abram Wakeman [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Abram Wakeman. War Department,
New-York. Washington, D.C., January 26 1865

I have telegraphed W. O. Bartlett to come and see me. He neither comes, nor answers. Can you not send him? A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 304. Wakeman replied on the same day: ``Mr B only got your dispatch this morning He will go over tonight'' (DLC-RTL). William O. Bartlett also replied: ``Mr Wakeman was absent.Page  240

Your telegram but just received. I will be there tomorrow.'' (Ibid.). Lincoln's business with James Gordon Bennett's close associate William O. Bartlett is suggested by Bartlett's letter to Bennett, November 4, 1864:

``My Dear Sir: I am from Washington, fresh from the bosom of Father Abraham. I had a full conversation with him, alone, on Tuesday evening, at the White House, in regard to yourself, among other subjects.

``I said to him: There are but few days now before the election. If Mr. Bennett is not certainly to have the offer of the French Mission, I want to know it now. It is important to me.

``We discussed the course which the Herald had pursued, at length, and I will tell you, verbally, at your convenience, what he said; but he concluded with the remark that in regard to the understanding between him and me, about Mr. Bennett, he had been a `shut pan, to everybody'; and that he expected to do that thing (appoint you to France) as much as he expected to live. He repeated: `I expect to do it as certainly as I do to be reelected myself.'

``I wanted to see you; but I am obliged to do some work in Pennsylvania, about the election, and cannot till my return.'' (Oliver Carlson, The Man Who Made the News, James Gordon Bennett, p. 370).

See further, Lincoln to Bennett, February 20, infra.

To Gideon Welles [1]

Hon. Secretary of the Navy Executive Mansion,
My dear Sir Washington, Jan. 26. 1865.

I now understand that the record of the trial of Smith brothers at Boston is before you. Please do not let any execution of sentence take place, until the record shall have been before me. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR NB RG 45, Executive Letters, No. 83. Concerning Benjamin G. and Franklin W. Smith, see Lincoln to Welles, August 28, 1864, supra, and the order annulling sentence in the case, March 18, 1865, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lt. General Grant 27 January, 1865.

Stay execution in case of Barney Roorke 15th New York Engineers until record can be examined here. A. LINCOLN.

Send above dispatch and oblige JOHN HAY A.A.G.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 307. This telegram, including Lincoln's signature, is in John Hay's handwriting. Grant replied on the same day:

``Maj Gen Parke furnishes the following . . . in relation to Barney Rouke 15th N Y Engineers of whom you telegraphed this morning

`` `Private Barney Rouke 15th N.Y. Engineers was not sentenced capitally. His sentence to be dishonorably discharged . . . and to be confined at hard labor for . . . ten (10) years . . . at Albany N.Y. . . . the record forwarded Jany 2nd 1865 to the Judge Advocate General for reference to the Secretary of War. . . .' '' (DLC-RTL).

Page  241A petition in behalf of Barney Rourke, Company F, Fifteenth New York Engineers, sentenced for shooting a member of his company, was referred by Lincoln to Stanton on January 13, 1865, but is missing from the files (DNA WR RG 107, Secretary of War, Letters Received, P 69, Register).

To John F. Miller [1]

Executive Mansion,
To the Commanding Officer Washington,
at Nashville Tenn 27 January, 1865.

Let execution in case of Cornelius E. Peacher be stayed until further orders. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 308. See Lincoln to Miller, January 11, supra. Lincoln approved the sentence of Peacher on January 27 and ordered execution (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, OO 1188), but sent this telegram afterwards. No record of further action by Lincoln has been found. General Miller telegraphed on January 31: ``Your dispatch ordering that the execution of C. E. Peacher be stayed until further orders has been recd'' (DLC-RTL).

Order Concerning Cornelius C. Van Arsdale [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, 27 January, 1865.

Let Cornelius C. Van Arsdale Prisoner of War be discharged on taking the oath of Dec. 8. 1863. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, RPB. This order, in John Hay's handwriting on Executive Mansion stationery, signed by Lincoln, is accompanied by an envelope addressed by Hay ``For Mrs. C. W. Frazier.'' Van Arsdale and Mrs. Frazier have not been further identified.

Reply to Delegation of Christian Commission [1]

January 27, 1865

You owe me no thanks for what I have been able to do for you. If I may be permitted to say it, I owe you no thanks for what you have so excellently done for the country and for me; we are both alike working in the same cause, and it is because of the fact of its being a just one which gives us our mutual joy and reward in its service.''

Annotation

[1]   New York Tribune, January 28, 1865. Lincoln replied to an address by George H. Stuart, who with ``300 to 500 members of the Christian Commission called upon the President to-day, to thank him for his hearty co-operation with their labors in the field of war.''

What appears to be another version of this reply is printed in Hertz (II, 879) as follows:

Page  242``We have been only doing our duty my friends, whatever we have been able to do together. You owe me no thanks for what I have done for the country, whatever that may be,---and I owe none, to you. We cannot repay the soldiers. (Jan. 1865).''

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States: January 27, 1865

In answer to a resolution of the Senate, dated January 23, 1865, returning to me certain nominations and requesting information whether the offices to which the persons named are respectively nominated are vacant, and, if so, how they became vacant, I herewith transmit a communication from the honorable the Attorney-General giving the information required. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Executive Mansion,

January 27, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   Executive Journal, XIV, 115. Attorney General James Speed's letter of January 26, submitted the following:

``1. Charles A. Peabody, nominated as attorney of the United States for the eastern district of Louisiana. Mr. Peabody was nominated in place of Rufus Waples, esq., the former incumbent, removed.

``2. Culver P. Chamberlin, nominated as attorney of the United States for the northern district of Florida.

``Mr. Chamberlin has been twice commissioned for this post in the recess of the Senate, once in April, 1863, and again in July, 1864, the post of the former incumbent, Chandler C. Yonge (appointed M'ch 14th, 1858), being, without inquiry as to the effect of the so-called secession of Florida, vacant by lapse of time.

``3. Delos Lake, nominated as attorney of the United States for the northern district of California. Mr. Lake was, on August 17th, 1864, commissioned to this post in the recess of the Senate, vice W. H. Sharp, removed.

``4. Charles P. Redmond, nominated as attorney of the United States for the eastern district of Arkansas. Mr. Redmond was commissioned in recess, on September 24, 1864, to fill a vacancy in this post caused by the removal of Charles E. Jordan, the former incumbent, who was commissioned July 29th, 1861.

``5. Bennett Pike, nominated as attorney of the United States for the western district of Mo. Mr. Pike was nominated in place of Robert J. Lackey, removed, and having been confirmed by the Senate on Dec. 13th, 1864, his commission has before this been issued.

``6. Cuthbert Bullitt, nominated as U.S. marshal for the eastern district of Louisiana. Mr. Bullitt was, on July 6th, 1864, in the recess of the Senate, commissioned in place of the former incumbent, James Graham, removed.

``7. William O. Stoddard, nominated as U.S. marshal for the eastern district of Arkansas. Mr. Stoddard was commissioned on Sept. 24th, 1864, the post then being, to say nothing as to the effect of the so-called secession of Arkansas, vacant by the expiration of the term of office of Samuel P. Haliburton, former incumbent, commissioned July 1st. 1859.

``8. John Gould, nominated as U.S. marshal for the district of Connecticut. Mr. Gould was appointed and commissioned on Dec. 1st, 1864, in recess, the post being then vacant by the resignation of Henry Hammond, the former incumbent.

``9. John A. Bingham, nominated as solicitor for the United States before the Court of Claims. Mr. Bingham was commissioned to this post July 27th, 1864,Page  243 in recess, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Gibson, the former incumbent.

``10. John J. Weed, nominated as assistant solicitor for the United States before the Court of Claims. Mr. Weed was commissioned to this post on July 27th, 1864, in recess, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. McPherson, the former incumbent.

``11. Sydney A. Hubbell, nominated as associate justice of the supreme court of the Territory of New Mexico. Mr. Hubbell was commissioned August 10th, 1864, in recess, in place of Judge Perry E. Brocchus, superseded.''

Endorsement Concerning Francis P. Blair, Sr. [1]

January 28. 1865

To-day Mr. Blair tells me that on the 21st. Inst. he delivered to Mr. Davis the original of which the within is a copy, and left it with him; that at the time of delivering it, Mr. Davis read it over twice in Mr. Blair's presence, at the close of which he, Mr. B. remarked that the part about ``our one common country'' related to the part of Mr. D's letter about ``the two countries'' to which Mr. D. replied that he so understood it. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL; AES copy, NAuE. Lincoln's endorsement is written on the copy of his letter to Blair of January 18, supra. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To Edward O. C. Ord [1]

Executive Mansion,
Major General Ord Washington,
Army of the James 28 January, 1865.

Give me a brief report in case of Charles Love, 7th New Hampshire, tried for desertion, & transmit record for my examination.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 309. This telegram, including Lincoln's signature, is in John Hay's handwriting. The roster of Company I, Seventh New Hampshire Volunteers, lists Charles Love as deserted April 28, 1864, returned to service April 4, 1865, and mustered out July 20, 1865. No reply from General Ord has been found, but see Lincoln to Grant, February 16, infra.

Order Concerning Fergus Peniston [1]

Executive Mansion
Washington January 28. 1865.

Mr Fergus Penniston of New Orleans claiming that he has bought products of the insurrectionary States under proper authoritiesPage  244 of the Treasury Department issued prior to July 2, 1864, and proposing to get the Permits issued under said Authorities renewed or revived as provided in ``Amended Regulation LV, series of July 29, 1864'' dated January 4, 1865 signed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and approved by me, all officers of the Army and Navy and civil officers of the Government will respect all Permits to said Penniston renewed or revived in pursuance of said Amended Regulation, and cotton being transported under such renewed or revived Permits will be free from seizure detention or forfeiture, and be allowed free and unmolested passage as permitted by Agents of the Treasury Department in accordance with said amended Regulation. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Copy preserved in the file of Cotton Case No. 562, U.S. Court, Southern District of Illinois, Springfield, Illinois. Fergus Peniston and William S. Pike were claimants for 956 bales of cotton taken by the U.S. Navy on the Ouachita expedition, about April, 1864. Lincoln's original order has not been found. See Lincoln's order of January 4, supra.

Pass for Mrs. J. B. Holliday [1]

Allow the bearer to visit her husband, Major J. B. Holliday, a prisoner of war, at Johnson's Island. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 28, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Galleries Catalog 2193, November 15, 1927, No. 285. A petition signed by citizens of Nicholas County, Kentucky, January 23, 1865, endorsed by Representative George H. Yeaman, asked that ``Mrs. Lallie Holliday'' be given a pass to visit her husband at Johnson's Island.

To William H. Seward [1]

Can the Sec. of State do any thing with this?

[January?] 28, 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, NAuE. Lincoln's endorsement appears on an envelope postmarked in 1864. The month date of Lincoln's endorsement is torn off. The undated letter in the envelope is from Madame de Give in Belgium: ``It is now 13 months ago that my husband, Mr. Laurent de Give, belgian Consul left me in a great sorrow: he was obliged by heavy considerations to visit Atlanta, Ga. Since then, I have tried several times and by different ways to send him some news of the only beloved little child the Lord left us, but you know, Sir the blocade is such that it is absolutely impossible to force it. We are united by the laws, but how can I tell you the deep affection, the love, the mutual estimm which filled our hearts! Sir, be human and generous and take under your protection a poor lady, so sad and unhappy that no words could give you a just idea of her despair; she kneels before you and pry [sic] you by your mother, by all you love the most on this earth to send to his address the letter which follows.''

Page  245

To George F. Shepley [1]

U.S. Military Telegraph
To Commanding Officer By Telegraph from Washington D.C
Norfolk dated January 28th. 1865

Suspend execution of death sentence of Wm. H. Jeffs Co. ``B'' 56th. Mass Vols, until further orders, and forward record of the trial for examination. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Official copy, OFH. See the same telegram sent to General Grant, January 26, supra. General George F. Shepley replied on January 29: ``Your order in reference to Wm. H. Jeffs . . . has been received. There is no such man at Norfolk and as far as I am informed no such man within this District I have communicated your order to the Major General Commanding the Department'' (DLC-RTL).

On January 30, Shepley telegraphed again: ``Wm B Jeffs . . . is not to be found in this District or Department. The 56th Mass Vols is not in this Department & never has been.''(Ibid.).

No further correspondence has been found. The roster of the Fifty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteers lists William H. Jeffs as mustered out of service on July 12, 1865.

To James Speed [1]

Will the Attorney General please give his opinion in writing on the legal points presented in this paper. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 28. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA GE RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Segregated Lincoln Material. Lincoln's endorsement is written on a ten-page letter from Governor Andrew G. Curtin, January 25, 1865, protesting the violations of the Enrollment Act of March 3, 1863, by the Provost Marshal General's Office. Too long and involved to summarize or quote adequately, Curtin's letter and Attorney General Speed's opinion may be consulted in the Official Records (III, IV, 1076-80, 1158-61).

To George H. Stuart [1]

[January 29, 1865]

Near the close let us have ``Your Mission'' repeated by Mr. Philips. Dont say I called for it. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, ORB. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of the printed program of the ``Third Anniversary Meeting of the U.S. Christian Commission'' held in the Hall of the House of Representatives at 7 P.M. on January 29, 1865. The order of exercises listed item 7, ``SINGING---`YOUR MISSION'---By Mr. PHILIP PHILLIPS, of Cincinnati.'' An endorsement appears on the bottom of the program: ``This is the original Programme used by President Lincoln in the Hall of the House of Representatives Washington on the occasion of the third anniversary of the U.S. Christian Commission January 29th. 1865 when Mr. Philip Phillip sang `Your Mission' at the close of the Hymn the PresidentPage  246

wrote on the other side with his own hand a request that it [be] repeated which was done between 11 & 12 O'clock P.M. GEO. H. STUART.''

George H. Stuart, chairman of the Commission, conducted the meeting. On January 30, Phillips wrote Lincoln:

``I learn through Mr Geo H Stuart . . . that you made the request to him in writing for me to repeat my little song---`Your Mission' at our Aniversary last sunday night. The honor created in me a strong desire to have the request in writing as you gave it to him. But Mr S wanted it himself, and said I could apply to you for another and you to send it to me by mail.

``This little favor in your own hand writing I should appreciate nearly as highly as having the honor of singing many songs---together with Two (2) hearty votes for you during the last five years. . . .

``I will send to you my last little singing Book for your little Boy containing the Song `Your Mission''' (DLC-RTL).

No reply to Phillips' letter has been found. The text of ``Your Mission'' may be found in the Annals of the Christian Commission, pp. 256-57.

To Thomas T. Eckert [1]

Major T. T. Eckert Executive Mansion
Sir Washington, Jan. 30. 1865

You will proceed with the documents placed in your hands; and, on reaching Gen. Ord, will deliver him the letter addressed to him by the Secretary of War; then, by Gen. Ord's assistance, procure an interview with Messrs. Stephens, Hunter and Campbell, or any of them, deliver to him, or them, the paper on which your own letter is written, [2] note on the copy which you retain the time of delivery, and to whom delivered, receive their answer in writing, waiting a reasonable time for it, and which, if it contain their decision to come, through, without further condition, will be your warrant to ask Gen. Ord to pass them through as directed in the letter of the Secretary of War to him. If by their answer they decline to come, or propose other terms, do not have them passed through. And this being your whole duty return and report to me. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California; ALS copy, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra, for other documents concerning the ``Peace Mission.''

[2]   See to Stephens and others, infra.

To Joseph Holt [1]

Judge Advocate General, please procure record & report on this case

Jan. 30. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2032. Lincoln's endorsement appears on papers in the court-martial record of Captain Hooker A. DeLand, Company F, First Michigan Volunteers, cashiered and sentenced to Dry Tortugas until the end of his term of service, on charges of cowardice. Holt reported unfavorably.

Page  247

To Edward O. C. Ord [1]

Major General Ord Washington, D.C.,
Hd. Qrs. Army of James Jan. 30, 1865.

By direction of the President you are instructed to inform the three gentlemen, Messrs. Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, that a messenger will be despatched to them, at or near where they now are, without unnecessary delay. Edwin M Stanton

Sec of War

Annotation

[1]   AD, IHi. The body of this letter is in Lincoln's handwriting; the signature is Stanton's. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra, for related documents.

To Edward O. C. Ord [2]

Major General Ord. [January 30, 1865]

Please procure for the bearer, Major Thomas T. Eckert an interview with Messrs. Stevens, Hunter and Campbell; and if on his return to you, he requests it, pass them through our lines to Fortress-Monroe, by such route, and under such other Military precautions as you may deem prudent, giving them protection and comfortable quarters while there. Let none of this have any effect upon your military movements or plans.

Annotation

[1]   ADf, NHi. This autograph draft of instructions to General Ord is written in pencil. On the bottom of the page appears an endorsement in another handwriting: ``This paper was written by President Linclon [sic], January 30th. 1865, and was copied by Mr. Stanton and given to Gen. Eckert to deliver in person to Genl. Ord, and led to the interview which took place afterwards between the gentlemen herein named and the President.'' Stanton addressed the message to Grant instead of Ord. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To William H. Seward [1]

January 30, 1865

Will the Secretary of State please see and hear the bearer Mr. Ulrich & oblige him if he conveniently can? He is a young man raised in the place of my residence, and of a most respectable family, as he also is himself. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 30. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA FS RG 59, Appointments, Box 395. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a petition signed by Richard J. Oglesby and others, dated incorrectly December 25, 1865, but written in December 1864, recommending appointment of Bartow A. Ulrich as consul or vice-consul. No record has been found of Ulrich's appointment.

Page  248

To Alexander H. Stephens, John A. Campbell and Robert M. T. Hunter [1]

Messrs Alex H Stephens, [January 30, 1865]

J. A. Campbell and R. M. T. Hunter.

Gentlemen I am instructed by the President of the United States to place this paper in your hands with the information that if you pass through the U.S. Military lines it will be understood that you do so for the purpose of an informal conference, on the basis of the letter, a copy of which is on the reverse side of this sheet; and that if you choose to pass on such understanding, and so notify me in writing, I will procure the Commanding General to pass you through the lines, and to Fortress-Monroe, under such military precautions as he may deem prudent; and, at which place you will be met in due time by some person or persons for the purpose of such informal conferrence. And further that you shall have protection, safe-conduct, and safe return, in all events.

THOS. T. ECKERT.

Maj & A.D.C.

Annotation

[1]   AD, CSmH. The body of the letter is in Lincoln's handwriting; the names of the persons addressed and the signature are in Eckert's autograph. On the verso is Lincoln's autograph copy of his letter to Blair, January 18, supra. Although supplied by Nicolay and Hay with the date February 1, 1865 (XI, 16), this letter was obviously given to Eckert on January 30 (see to Eckert, supra), and was delivered by him on February 1. On the verso of the copy retained by Eckert appears his endorsement dated at City Point, Virginia, February 1, 1865: ``A copy of the above [Lincoln to Blair, January 18, 1865], also a copy of my letter to Messrs. Alex H. Stephens, J. A. Campbell & R. M. T. Hunter were delivered in person to Alex H. Stephens at 4.15 PM. by him read, then by Mr Campbell & then by Mr Hunter.'' (Original owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California.) See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To James M. Ashley [1]

So far as I know, there are no peace commissioners in the city, or likely to be in it. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 31. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-HW. The copy of Lincoln's endorsement is preserved with the copy of the letter of Representative James M. Ashley, January 31, 1865, on which it was written. Both copies were sent to Herndon by Ashley in a letter dated November 23, 1866. Ashley's letter of January 31, 1865, is as follows: ``The report is in circulation in the House that Peace Commissioners are on their way or are in the city, and is being used against us. If it is true, I fear we shall loose the bill. Please authorize me to contradict it, if not true.''

Page  249

To George C. Cadwalader [1]

Executive Mansion,
Officer in command Washington,
at Philadelphia, Pa. January 31, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of John Murphy, ordered for February 10th 1865 at Fort-Mifflin, until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination. A. LINCOLN

Maj. Eckert

Please send above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY Priv. Sec.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 313. This telegram is signed by Nicolay but not by Lincoln. General George Cadwalader replied on the same day: ``Your telegram of this date suspending execution . . . of John Murphy ordered for February tenth next until further orders is received. The record of his trial was forwarded yesterday by mail to the Dept.'' (DLC-RTL).

Not the same John Murphy about whom Lincoln telegraphed General Meade on October 8 and 12, 1863, Private John Murphy, an unassigned substitute, had been sentenced to be shot for desertion. Appeals from his wife and others were endorsed by Lincoln: ``Sentence commuted to hard labor during the war. Jan. 25. 1865. A. LINCOLN.'' (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 3237; AGO Special Orders No. 68, February 11, 1865). No record of further action by Lincoln has been found.

To Samuel S. Cox [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Hon. Samuel S. Cox Jan. 31, 1865.

Thank you for the speech. I sought it for the humor said to be in it; but while it meets expectations in that respect, it has a far higher merit, so far as I can judge by the hasty glance I have only found time to give it. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   The Collector, April, 1950, p. 85; Parke-Bernet Catalog 1026, January 10-11, 1949, No. 53. The speech was probably Cox's speech of January 26, 1865, opposing House Resolution 214, which provided that heads of executive departments were entitled to seats on the floor of the House. See Congressional Globe, January 27, 1865, New Series No. 27, pp. 437-44. No correspondence from Cox in regard to a speech has been found.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. General Grant Executive Mansion
City-Point, Va. Washington Jan. 31. 1865

A messenger is coming to you on the business contained in your despatch. Detain the gentleman in comfortable quarters until he arrives & then act upon the message he brings, as far as applicable,Page  250 it having been made up to pass through Gen. Ord's hands, & when the gentlemen were supposed to be beyond our lines.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 312. For Grant's telegram of January 31 to which Lincoln is replying, see Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To Hannibal Hamlin [1]

Hon. H. Hamlin, Executive Mansion, Washington, D.C.,
President of the Senate, January 31, 1865.

Sir, I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of war, covering papers bearing on the arrest and imprisonment of Colonel Richard T. Jacobs, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Kentucky, and Colonel Frank Wolford, one of the Presidential Electors of that State, requested by Resolution of the Senate, dated December 20, 1864. Very Respectfully, Yr. obdt. servant,

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2. The lengthy report from Stanton on the arrest and imprisonment of Richard T. Jacob and Frank Wolford may be found in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, Senate Executive Document No. 16.

To William H. Seward [1]

Hon. William H. Seward Executive Mansion
Secretary of State Washington, Jan. 31. 1865

You will proceed to Fortress-Monroe, Virginia, there to meet, and informally confer with Messrs. Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, on the basis of my letter to F. P. Blair, Esq., on Jan. 18. 1865, a copy of which you have.

You will make known to them that three things are indispensable, towit:

1. The restoration of the national authority throughout all the States.

2. No receding, by the Executive of the United States on the Slavery question, from the position assumed thereon, in the late Annual Message to Congress, and in preceding documents.

3. No cessation of hostilities short of an end of the war, and the disbanding of all forces hostile to the government.

You will inform them that all propositions of theirs not inconsistent with the above, will be considered and passed upon in aPage  251 spirit of sincere liberality. You will hear all they may choose to say, and report it to me.

You will not assume to definitely consummate anything. Yours &c. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   ALS, NAuE; ALS copy, DLC-RTL. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To William H. Seward [2]

Hon. Sec. of State, please see this gentleman who is the gentleman from Canada spoken of yesterday. A. LINCOLN

Jan. 31, 1865

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Gordon A. Block, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The gentleman has not been identified.

To Lewis Wallace [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Major General Wallace War Department,
Baltimore, Md. Washington, D.C., Jan. 31 1865

Suspend sending off of Charles E. Waters until further order & send record if it has not been already sent. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 310. This telegram is marked as sent at 10 A.M. General Wallace replied: ``Charles E. Waters left for Philadelphia on the Nine-twenty . . . train this A.M. He can be re arrested at Wilmington if you so direct

``If I hear from you at once, I will order the Commander at Wilmington to stop him'' (DLC-RTL).

A second telegram from Wallace corrected the error: ``I supposed your Telegram referred to Levin L Waters, and was informed that he had gone North this A.M. as I telegraphed you---this is an error. he is at Annapolis Md has taken his seat in the Senate. of Chas E. Waters we know nothing. Who is he?'' (Ibid.).

Nicolay replied at 12:20 P.M.: ``Your second dispatch in regard to Waters is received. The President's dispatch of this morning did not refer to Levin T. [L.] Waters, but to a man who it was represented had been convicted by a military commission of unlawful trade with the rebels or something of that kind, and was to be sent this morning to the Albany Penitentiary. His name was given as Chas. E. Waters. If such prisoner is on his way north let him be brought back and held as directed in the President's dispatch.'' (DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 311).

Wallace's reply was received at 1:45 P.M.: ``The man Chas E Waters was tried & sentenced in Washington not Baltimore I have telegraphed to General Dix at N York to send him back to Washington.''

Archibald Stirling, Jr., counsel for Charles E. Waters, wrote Lincoln from Baltimore on February 11, 1865, asking a pardon for Waters, who had been convicted on testimony of the blockade runner Pardon Worsley.

Page  252

To Thomas T. Eckert [1]

Major T. T. Eckert Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Care Gen. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va. Washington, D.C., Feb. 1 1865

Call at Fortress-Monroe & put yourself under direction of Mr. S. whom you will find there. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 316. See Lincoln's instructions to Seward, January 31, supra, and his communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

``Cypher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department,
City-Point. Washington, D.C., February 1. 1865

Let nothing which is transpiring, change, hinder, or delay your Military movements, or plans. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 314. For Grant's reply, see Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

Order Concerning John S. Loveaire [1]

February 1, 1865

Let this man re-inlist for not less than two years, in any regiment, & upon faithfully serving out of which term, or until other wise honorably discharged, he is pardoned for all military offences now past. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 1. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, IHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from the Reverend E. D. Saunders, Philadelphia, January 24, 1865: ``Mr. J. G. Loveaire, who desires to make a brief statement respecting his son, rendered me more service, in raising volunteers, than any other citizen of Philadelphia. He is the esteemed Lieutenant of Police in the 15th. Ward. . . .'' The son was probably Private John S. Loveaire, Company B, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, sentenced by court-martial on December 28, 1864, ``to be confined at hard labor for the period of two years,'' on the charge of desertion (AGO General Court Martial Orders No. 115, February 25, 1865). No record of the promulgation of Lincoln's order has been found. On February 15, Reverend Saunders wrote Lincoln: ``Your kind response to my application for the pardon of young Levaire (son of Mr. Levaire Lieutenant of Police 15th ward) has been very thankfully received. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Order Concerning William Peacock [1]

February 1, 1865

Allow the bearer, William Peacock to enter any regiment having as much as two years to serve, and upon faithfully serving outPage  253 his term in which he is pardoned for any desertions heretofore committed. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 1, 1865

Annotation

[1]   Parke-Bernet Catalog 1026, January 10-11, 1949, No. 54. According to the catalog description, this note appears on a card on the back of which General John A. Dix wrote on February 6, 1865, an order to General Lewis C. Hunt, commanding troops in the city and harbor of New York, to ``execute the President's order.''

Resolution Submitting the Thirteenth Amendment to the States [1]

February 1, 1865

Thirty-Eighth Congress of the United States of America; At the second Session, Begun and held at the City of Washington, on Monday, the fifth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four.

A RESOLUTION

Submitting to the legislatures of the several States a proposition to amend the Constitution of the United States.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of both houses concurring), That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the constitution of the United States, which, when ratified by three-fourths of said Legislatures, shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of the said Constitution, namely: Article XIII. Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

SCHUYLER COLFAX

Speaker of the House of Representatives.

H. HAMLIN

Vice President of the United States, and President of the Senate.

Approved, February 1. 1865. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA FS RG 11, Department of State. This printed form with blanks filled in by a clerk is the original resolution approved by Lincoln. Printed portionsPage  254

are reproduced in italics. Engrossed copies bearing the signatures not only of Colfax, Hamlin, and Lincoln, but also of members of the Senate and House of Representatives, are in IHi and ORB. Presumably other signed copies may be in existence. Lincoln's approval of this resolution, although signed in accordance with his usual practice in approving resolutions and acts of congress, was unnecessary in the case of an amendment to the constitution. On February 7 the Senate passed a resolution declaring that ``such approval was unnecessary,'' since the Supreme Court had decided in a case arising in 1798 that the president ``has nothing to do with the proposition or adoption of amendments to the Constitution'' (Remarks of Senator Trumbull, Congressional Globe, February 7, 1865, pp. 629-30). For an account of the adoption of the resolution, see Nicolay and Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History, X, 72-90.

Response to a Serenade [1]

February 1, 1865

The President said he supposed the passage through Congress of the Constitutional amendment for the abolishment of Slavery throughout the United States, was the occasion to which he was indebted for the honor of this call. [Applause.] The occasion was one of congratulation to the country and to the whole world. But there is a task yet before us---to go forward and consummate by the votes of the States that which Congress so nobly began yesterday. [Applause and cries---``They will do it,'' &c.] He had the honor to inform those present that Illinois had already to-day done the work. [2] [Applause.] Maryland was about half through; but he felt proud that Illinois was a little ahead. He thought this measure was a very fitting if not an indispensable adjunct to the winding up of the great difficulty. He wished the reunion of all the States perfected and so effected as to remove all causes of disturbance in the future; and to attain this end it was necessary that the original disturbing cause should, if possible, be rooted out. He thought all would bear him witness that he had never shrunk from doing all that he could to eradicate Slavery by issuing an emancipation proclamation. [Applause.] But that proclamation falls far short of what the amendment will be when fully consummated. A question might be raised whether the proclamation was legally valid. It might be added that it only aided those who came into our lines and that it was inoperative as to those who did not give themselves up, or that it would have no effect upon the children of the slaves born hereafter. In fact it would be urged that it did not meet the evil. But this amendment is a King's cure for all the evils. [Applause.] It winds the whole thing up. He would repeat that it was the fitting if not indispensable adjunct to the consummation of the great game we are playing. He could not but congratulate all present,Page  255 himself, the country and the whole world upon this great moral victory.

Annotation

[1]   New York Tribune, February 3, 1865, 5:3. The Tribune carried a less acceptable text of this speech on page one. Collation with the text appearing in the New York Times and Herald shows the page five text to be generally superior to either. Brackets are in the source. This response is misdated January 31 by Nicolay and Hay (X, 352).

[2]   On February 1, Governor Richard J. Oglesby telegraphed Lincoln that the Illinois legislature had approved the amendment (DLC-RTL).

To George F. Shepley [1]

Gen. Shepley Executive Mansion
Norfolk, Va. Washington, Feb. 1. 1865

It is said that Henry W. Young, private in 63rd. N.Y. Vols. Co. E. is in arrest for desertion. If he shall be tried and sentenced to any punishment, do not let sentence be executed until further order from me, meantime send me record of the trial.

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 318. General Shepley replied on February 2: ``Private Henry W Young Co E. sixty third 63 N York Vols is in arrest. has not been tried. His trial is delayed by the absence of the Judge Advocate under orders The record will be forwarded to you before sentence is executed if he shall be convicted.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Let Colonel Thomas be appointed. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 1. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, RPB. Lincoln's endorsement appears on an envelope, labeled ``Colonel Stephen Thomas, Vermont Vols, Brigadier General Vols, Recommended by Hon. J. S. Morrill, Hon. Collamer, Hon. Portus Baxter.'' Colonel Stephen Thomas, Eighth Vermont Infantry, was appointed brigadier general on February 1, 1865.

To Montgomery Blair [1]

Executive Mansion,
Washington, 186 .

Mr. Blair will hereafter know that I ought not to stop now

Feb'y 2d 1865. A L.

Annotation

[1]   ADS, DLC-RTL. This note is written on Executive Mansion stationery. The date at bottom of the sheet is in Hay's handwriting, ``2d'' having been written over ``1st.'' On the verso is Blair's unsigned and undated note: ``Mr M Blair desires to see the President on several subjects of public importance, one of whichPage  256

ought to have immediate attention He has been in attendance several days If the President can find an opportunity to see him, he would be much obliged.'' Presumably Hay added the date later, from memory of the fact that Blair sought his interview at the time of Lincoln's departure for the Hampton Roads conference, at or near 11 A.M., on February 2.

To Stephen G. Burbridge [1]

Officer in command Executive Mansion,
at Frankfort, Kentucky Washington, Feb'y 2, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of W. E. Walker until further orders, and forward record of trial for examination.

A. LINCOLN.

Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY Priv. Sec.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 321. Nicolay's signature is autograph, but Lincoln's is not. Pierce B. Hawkins ``late Colonel 11th Ky,'' telegraphed Lincoln on January 29: ``In behalf of loyal parents & friends I ask the release of an inexperienced boy named W E Walker recently ordered to be shot without any chance of trial this boy will take the amnesty oath & adhere to every requirement of the same to the fulfillment of the promise I together with his friends pledge our lives'' (DLC-RTL).

General Burbridge replied on February 4: ``Execution of death sentence in case of W. E. Walker, guerrilla, has been suspended. He was ordered to be shot in retaliation for the murder of union citizens.'' (Ibid.).

See Lincoln to Hawkins, February 11, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

``Cipher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Lieut. Genl. Grant War Department,
City-Point, Va Washington, D.C., Feb. 2, 1865.

Say to the gentlemen I will meet them personally at Fortress-Monroe, as soon as I can get there. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 320. For Grant's telegram and other related documents see Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To William H. Seward [1]

``Cipher'' Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Hon. W. H. Seward. War Department,
Fortress-Monroe, Va Washington, D.C., Feb. 2. 1865

Induced by a despatch of Gen. Grant, I join you at Fort-Monroe so soon as I can come. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 319. For Grant's telegram and related documents, see Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

Page  257

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Let the within request be complied with, unless there be some insuperable objection not occurring to me. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 2. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by R. E. Burdick, New York City. See Lincoln's memorandum concerning the draft, January 22, supra. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of a statement dated February 1, 1865, signed by James A. Bell and George H. Andrews of the New York Senate:

``In deference to the forcible objections urged by the Hon: Secy. of War to the proposition originally made by Governor Fenton, the undersigned have the honor to submit the following:

``That so much of the revised quota as was added to the State of New York by the orders of Jany. 24. 1865 say (16,000) be deferred for future investigation; this deferred portion of the quota to be deducted pro rata from the various districts of the State.''

To John F. Driggs [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My Dear Sir: 3d February, 1865.

I have received at your hands a very fine specimen of the Mackinaw Salmon Trout and I beg that you will convey to Mr. Williams my cordial thanks for his kind thoughtfulness; and accept my acknowledgments for your courtesy in the transmission of his present. I am, sir, very truly yours A. LINCOLN.

Hon. J. F. Driggs &c &c

Annotation

[1]   LS, owned by Milton H. Shutes, Oakland, California. Written by John Hay, this letter was signed by Lincoln following his return from the Hampton Roads conference. Representative John F. Driggs of Saginaw, Michigan, wrote Lincoln on February 1: ``I have the honor to present you with a fair specimen of our Mackinaw Salmon Trout. The Fish was sent me by Express, and came from Mr. Harvey Williams, one of my constituents who is eighty years of age, and who has followed fishing on Lake Huron for thirty or forty years. He has been a life long Democrat, but at the last Election made a trip of forty miles in one of his fishing boats to vote for you and the Union candidates. May I beg of you an autograph receipt to send to the old gentleman which I know he will highly prize.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Carl Schurz [1]

Executive Mansion,
General: Washington, Feb. 3d., 1865.

I have received your note of today. There will be no objection made to your leaving Washington for a few days, and returning upon the permission heretofore granted. Yours truly

Major General Carl Schurz A. LINCOLN

Page  258

Annotation

[1]   LS, DLC-Schurz Papers. The note from Schurz has not been found. He was engaged in organizing veterans' corps in various states (Schurz, Reminiscences, III, 108).

To James B. Fry [1]

This is too large a job for the officers to be encumbered with now in the midst of preparations for the approaching draft.

Feb. 4. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Charles W. Olsen, Chicago, Illinois. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter to Fry from Orison Blunt and other members of the Committee of the Board of Supervisors of New York, February 4, 1865, asking for the figures and the manner of arriving at the quotas assigned on December 23, 1864. Stanton endorsed below ``I concur with the President that the job is too large for the present but direct such force as can be, to be put on it. The draft will go on in the meantime.''

This endorsement Stanton crossed out and continued: ``The demand of the committee appears to me unreasonable & impracticable, but the Provost Marshal General will put on it such force as he can and in the meantime go on with the draft. Filling the army cannot be delayed by calls on the office of the Provost Marshal that will require months to fill and which can serve no other purpose than delay.''

As printed in OR, III, IV, 1121, Lincoln's endorsement is preceded by an endorsement of the same date by Fry:

``Respectfully referred to the Secretary of War.

``The principles and figures upon which the quotas of the city of New York were assigned on the 24th ultimo, and which designate the number of men required, have been already examined by a committee on the part of the Board of Supervisors of New York, who approved of the same and reported that the revised quotas of January are correct, except that they allege an excessive enrollment. It is respectfully submitted that it is unnecessary now to inquire into the basis of previous assignments, which have now no practical bearing, when current business requires all the time of the office.''

See Lincoln to Fry, February 6, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Washington,
City-Point. Va. Feb 4 1865

The President desires me to repeat that nothing transpired, or transpiring with the three gentlemen from Richmond, is to cause any change hindrance or delay, of your military plans or operations. EDWIN M STANTON

Secretary of War

Annotation

[1]   AD, owned by Edwin C. Stone, Boston, Massachusetts. This telegram is in Lincoln's autograph, signed by Stanton. A copy in the Lincoln Papers is marked ``Sent in Cipher at 12.20 P.M.''

Page  259

To Charles W. Hill [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Officer in command at War Department,
Johnson's Island, Ohio Washington, D.C., Feb. 4 1865

Parole Lieut. John A. Stephens, prisoner of War, to report to me here in person, and send him to me. It is in pursuance of an arrangement I made yesterday with his uncle, Hon. A. H. Stephens. Acknowledge receipt A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 323. ``Acknowledge receipt'' is not in Lincoln's handwriting. Colonel Charles W. Hill replied on February 5: ``Your telegram relating to Lieut Jno A Stevens is just received. He will leave Sandusky first train tomorrow to report to you'' (DLC-RTL). See Lincoln to Alexander H. Stephens, February 10, infra.

To John F. Miller [1]

Officer in command Executive Mansion,
at Nashville, Tennessee Washington, February 4, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of James R. Mallory until further orders. A. LINCOLN

Maj. Eckert

Please send the above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 322. Nicolay signed Lincoln's name as well as his own. See Lincoln to Miller, December 28, 1864, supra. On February 3, 1865, John S. Brien had telegraphed Lincoln from Nashville: ``There are important papers prepared & will be forwarded to you signed by Brig Gen Jno F Miller. Gen Rousseau, Gov Johnson & others asking mitigation of the sentence of Jas R Mallery, for fear they may not reach you in time to have you answer by the tenth, the day for his execution, will you extend the time so as to make it certain you can act on the papers. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

General Miller acknowledged receipt of Lincoln's telegram on February 4 (ibid.). No further record of Lincoln's action in the case of James R. Mallory has been found, but on September 7, 1865, President Andrew Johnson directed that sentence be executed in the case of ``James R. Mallory, alias Capt. James R. Mallory, of the so-called Confederate service, a murderer.'' (OR, II, VIII, 743).

To the Senate [1]

To, the Senate of the United States: February 4, 1865

In compliance with the Resolution of the Senate of the 13th. ultimo, requesting information upon the present condition of Mexico, and the case of the French war transport steamer ``Rhine,'' I transmit a report from the Secretary of State, and the papers by which it was accompanied. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington, February. 4th. 1865.

Page  260

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2. Seward's report and accompanying papers are printed in Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, Senate Executive Document No. 33.

To Thomas E. Bramlette [1]

His Excellency Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Governor Bramlette War Department,
Frankfort, Ky. Washington, D.C., Feb. 5 1865

Your despatch received. Will send official copy of Constitutional amendment by mail to-morrow, this being Sunday. Precedents justify the Legislature to act on ex-officio notice, of congress having passed the proposed amendment; nevertheless I will send you the authenticated copy. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 324. Governor Bramlette's telegram has not been found. Secretary Seward wrote Lincoln on February 5: ``A certified copy of Constitutional Amendment was sent (as I had directed) to every Governor of every state on Wednesday last---Bramlette included. He will be so advised by telegraph to day.'' (DLC-RTL).

To the Senate and House of Representatives [1]

Fellow citizens of the Senate, and [February 5, 1865]

House of Representatives.

I respectfully recommend that a Joint Resolution, substantially as follows, be adopted so soon as practicable, by your honorable bodies.

``Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, of the United States of America in congress assembled: That the President of the United States is hereby empowered, in his discretion, to pay four hundred millions of dollars to the States of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West-Virginia, in the manner, and on the conditions following, towit: The payment to be made in six per cent government bonds, and to be distributed among said States pro rata on their respective slave populations, as shown by the census of 1860; and no part of said sum to be paid unless all resistance to the national authority shall be abandoned and cease, on or before the first day of April next; and upon such abandonment and ceasing of resistance, one half of said sum to be paid in manner aforesaid, and the remaining half to be paid only upon the amendment of the national constitution recently proposed byPage  261 congress, becoming valid law, on or before the first day of July next, by the action thereon of the requisite number of States''

The adoption of such resolution is sought with a view to embody it, with other propositions, in a proclamation looking to peace and re-union.

Whereas a Joint Resolution has been adopted by congress in the words following, towit

Now therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do proclaim, declare, and make known, that on the conditions therein stated, the power conferred on the Executive in and by said Joint Resolution, will be fully exercised; that war will cease, and armies be reduced to a basis of peace; that all political offences will be pardoned; that all property, except slaves, liable to confiscation or forfeiture, will be released therefrom, except in cases of intervening interests of third parties; and that liberality will be recommended to congress upon all points not lying within executive control.

[Endorsement]

Feb. 5. 1865

To-day these papers, which explain themselves, were drawn up and submitted to the Cabinet & unanamously disapproved by them. A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADf, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement printed at the end of this communication appears on the verso of the autograph draft. Gideon Welles' Diary records under date of February 6: ``There was a Cabinet-meeting last evening. The President had matured a scheme which he hoped would be successful in promoting peace. It was a proposition for paying the expenses of the war for two hundred days, or four hundred millions, to the Rebel States, to be for the extinguishment of slavery, or for such purpose as the States were disposed. . . . It did not meet with favor. . . . The earnest desire of the President to conciliate and effect peace was manifest, but there may be such a thing as so overdoing as to cause a distrust or adverse feeling. In the present temper of Congress the proposed measure, if a wise one, could not be carried through successfully. . . .''

To William Dennison [1]

February 6, 1865

Mr. Washburne has presented me all the papers in this case; and finding Mrs. Bushnell as well recommended as any other, & she being the widow of a soldier who fell in battle for the Union, let her be appointed. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 6. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Mrs. Karl Wentsel, Sterling, Illinois. Mrs. Emily J.C. Bushnell, widow of Major Douglas R. Bushnell, Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers, whoPage  262

was killed on November 27, 1863, at the battle of Ringgold, Georgia, was appointed postmaster at Sterling, Illinois, to succeed L. K. Hawthorn (U.S. Official Register,1865).

To James B. Fry [1]

Executive Mansion,
Provost-Marshal-General: Washington February 6, 1865.

These gentlemen distinctly say to me this morning that what they want is the means from your office of showing their people that the quota assigned to them is right. They think it will take but little time---two hours, they say. Please give them double the time and every facility you can. Yours, truly, A. LINCOLN.

February 6, 1865.

The Provost-Marshal brings this letter back to me and says he cannot give the facility required without detriment to the service, and thereupon he is excused from doing it. A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   OR, III, IV, 1142. Following receipt of Lincoln's endorsement of February 4, supra, James B. Fry wrote the Committee of the Board of Supervisors of New York on February 5 that having laid their request before the president and having ``received their instructions to this effect, I beg you will excuse me from giving time to an investigation into the December assignment.'' (Ibid., p. 1128).

To this letter the committee replied on the same date that they thought the figures necessary, ``in order to show the occasion of the increase of the quotas assigned in January,'' but that they ``desire now to be allowed to copy from the records the enrollment of the remaining Congressional districts of the loyal States. . . .'' (Ibid., pp. 1129-30).

Fry replied on the same day, quoting Lincoln's and Stanton's endorsement on the committee's letter of February 4, supra (ibid., 1132-33). On February 6, the committee interviewed the president and submitted their case in writing:

``To His Excellency the President of the United States:

``Under your call of Dec. 19, 1864, for 300,000 men, there was assigned to the County of New-York, on the 23d of December, a quota of 4,423 men.

``On the 24th of January, 1865, our quota was increased to 21,019 men.

``We ask:

``1. Inasmuch as the increase in our quota is due in great part to a reassignment of quotas after the correction of the enrollment in other districts, we think it but fair that our quota should be reassigned after the correction of our enrollment. We ask, therefore, that upon the completion of the correction of our enrollment, which will be in about twenty days, our quota be reassigned.

``2. In case our County shall keep her Provost-Marshals reasonably busy mustering in recruits, that the Provost Marshals be not withdrawn from that duty to enforce the draft.

``3. To satisfy our constituents as to the justice of this increase of our quota, we ask leave to copy the figures on which the quotas of December and January are based. As the quota of each district depends on the figures for every other district, we shall be obliged to copy the figures of all the districts of the loyal States. This we will do at any hour of day or night which may be least inconvenient to the War Department, and we will do it in less than two hours.'' (New York Tribune, February 9, 1865. The original document has not been found and does not appear in the Official Records.)

Page  263The committee's account of Lincoln's response is as follows:

``Although your Committee received no positive assurance from the President to the two first points presented to him, they were led to believe that His Excellency saw their force and justice.

``In regard to the third point, however, in which our correspondence with the Provost-Marshal General had been so unsatisfactory, he remarked that it had been represented to him that we desired these figures for the purpose of showing that the Government was wrong. Your Committee assured him, however, that their only object was to be put in possession of the data on which they might satisfy themselves and their constituents that the quota assigned them was just.'' (Ibid.)

During the interview, Lincoln gave the committee the letter to Fry (as above). Upon receiving Lincoln's letter, Fry went to the president and obtained the endorsement excusing him at Lincoln's request. Fry addressed two further letters to the committee on February 6, refusing their request and dismissing the matter with the statement, ``I have no further time at my disposal to devote to this subject.'' (OR, III, IV, 1144).

Much disgruntled, the committee returned to New York and published their report, including the correspondence exchanged with Provost Marshal Fry (New York Tribune, February 9, 1865).

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

To Gen: Grant February 6, 1865

Headquarters Armies of the U.S.

Suspend execution in case of Simon J. Schaffer 15th N.Y. Engineers until further orders and send me the record.

Send above A LINCOLN

JNO. G. NICOLAY Priv. Sec.

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 326. The body of the telegram is in John Hay's handwriting. The date appears to have been added by a clerk. Lincoln's signature and the remainder is by Nicolay. Grant replied on the same day: ``The execution in the case of Simon J Schaffer 155h N Y Engineers was suspended until further orders on the 27th January and the Record was forwarded to Washington on the following day'' (DLC-RTL). The court-martial record in the case of Simon J. Shaffer, alias Samuel Jefferson, Fifteenth New York Engineers, sentenced February 4, 1865, to be shot for desertion, indicates that he was sent to Dry Tortugas (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2455). Grant's reference to having sent the record on January 27 suggests that the ``Hamel Shaffer'' of Lincoln's telegram to Grant, January 26, supra, may have been confused with Simon J. Shaffer.

To Frederick Hassaurek [1]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,
Frederick Hassaurek. War Department,
Cincinnati, O. Washington, D.C., Feb. 6. 1865

A despatch from Gen. Grant says ``Lieut. Markbeit has been released from prison, and is now on his way North.''

A. LINCOLN

Page  264

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 325. Concerning Lieutenant Leopold Markbreit, see Lincoln to Hitchcock, September 19, 1864, supra. Frederick Hassaurek replied to Lincoln's telegram on February 8: ``It is with the deepest emotion that I acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 6th inst. communicating to me the release of my brother. Language cannot express my gratitude to you for this proof of your considerate kindness and sympathy. May God bless you for it as you are blessed by my mother, sisters, and by your most obed. servant.'' (DLC-RTL).

To Andrew Johnson [1]

Governor Andrew Johnson Executive Mansion
Nashville Tennessee Feb. 6. 1865

Let the matter of the McKendree Church remain as it is without further action until you see me. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 327. This telegram is entirely in John Hay's handwriting. On January 24, Governor Johnson wrote Lincoln, enclosing a copy of his decision dated January 23, 1865, in the case of the McKendree Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee:

``The Methodist Episcopal Church, denominated the `McKindree Church,' in the City of Nashville, was taken possession of under an order of the Secretary of War, issued November 30th 1863, and is now held by Bishop Simpson in pursuance thereof

``Application has been made to the President of the United States, for the restoration of said Church, Parsonage, and other property pertaining to said Church therewith.The President thereupon referred the questions of restoration to me for consideration and decision It appears from a statement of facts, which have been filed in this Office in reference to the Loyalty of the parties who make the application for the restoration, that Bishop [Joshua] Soule is and has been Loyal . . . and the Officiating Ministers and Trustees have long since taken the Amnesty Oath, and . . . there is . . . proof that . . . they have complied with the Constitution and Laws of the United States. . . .

``It is therefore my decision, that the Bishop and the Officiating Minister, and the Trustees . . . in whom the title and control is vested, are entitled to the possession of the `McKindree Church,' and other property pertaining to the Same . . . and that they . . . be restored to the possession and occupation of the Same, until such time, as it shall be disposed of by regular proceedings in Court under the Confiscation Acts of Congress. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

Order to Make Corrections in the Draft [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington City.
February 6th. 1865.

Whereas complaints are made in some localities, respecting the assignments of quotas and credits allowed for the pending call of troops to fill up the armies---now, in order to determine all controversies in respect thereto, and to avoid any delay in filling up the armies---It is ordered---That the Attorney General, Brigadier General Richard Delafield, and Colonel C. W. Foster, [2] be, and theyPage  265 are hereby constituted, a Board to examine into the proper quotas and credits of the respective States and districts, under the call of December 19th. 1864, with directions that, if any errors be found therein, to make such corrections as the law and facts may require, and report their determination to the Provost Marshal General. The determination of said Board to be final and conclusive, and the draft to be made in conformity therewith.

2. The Provost Marshal General is ordered to make the draft in the respective districts, as speedily as the same can be done after the 15th. of this month. ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   DS, IHi.

[2]   General Richard Delafield had succeeded General Joseph G. Totten as chief engineer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Colonel Charles W. Foster was assistant adjutant general of Volunteers.

To Thomas T. Eckert [1]

War Department
Major T. T. Eckert Washington City,
Dear Sir. Feb. 7 1865

Please furnish me copies of all despatches sent by the Secretary of War or myself, on or about the peace negotiation, from 29th. Ult. till I left on the 2nd. Inst. both inclusive.

So far as I can remember they will be

One by Sec. of War to Gen. Ord, sent after mid-night Sunday night & may be dated either 29th. or 30th.

One sent by him to Gen. Ord on 30th. written in my hand.

One sent by me to Gen. Grant on 31st.

One sent by me to Gen. Grant on 2nd. Inst.

One sent by me to Hon. W. H. Seward on 2nd. Inst.

You may add one sent by Sec. of War to Gen. Grant on my return on the 4th Yours truly A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To William Lloyd Garrison [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
My Dear Mr. Garrison 7 February, 1865.

I have your kind letter of the 21st of January, and can only beg that you will pardon the seeming neglect occasioned by my constant engagements. When I received the spirited and admirablePage  266 painting ``Waiting for the Hour'' I directed my Secretary not to acknowledge its arrival at once, preferring to make my personal acknowledgment of the thoughtful kindness of the donors; and waiting for some leisure hour, I have committed the discourtesy of not replying at all.

I hope you will believe that my thanks though late, are most cordial, and I request that you will convey them to those associated with you in this flattering and generous gift.

I am very truly Your friend and Servant A. LINCOLN.

Wm. Lloyd Garrison Esq

Annotation

[1]   LS, RPB; Df, DLC-RTL. This letter is misdated January 24, 1865, by Nicolay and Hay (X, 344). The body of the signed letter as well as the draft in the Lincoln Papers is entirely in John Hay's handwriting. On January 21, 1865, William Lloyd Garrison had written Lincoln:

``About the first of July, last year, what was deemed by critics . . . an admirable painting, was sent by Adams's Express to your address . . . accompanied by a letter from me in behalf of the donors, whose contributions to the object in view amounted to upwards of five hundred dollars. This meritorious picture . . . was entitled `Watch Night---or, Waiting for the Hour.' It represented a group of negro men, women and children waiting . . . for the midnight hour of December 31, 1862, to pass, and the introduction of that new year which was to make them forever free. Many photographic copies were made of it, and it was by my advice that it was presented to you as the most fitting person in the world to receive it. . . .

``For some cause or other, no acknowledgment has been made . . . of the receipt of the picture, or of my letter, which contained the names of the donors. As . . . Mr. Summer assured me . . . that he had seen the picture again and again at the White House, all anxiety has been relieved as to its safe arrival. . . . But as the money raised . . . was collected by ladies who desire that the donors may be officially apprised of its legitimate application, I write in their behalf to say that it would relieve them of much embarrassment if you would be so obliging . . . as to send me a line, stating that the painting . . . was duly received by you. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To John Glenn [1]

``Cypher''
Lt. Col. Glenn. Executive Mansion
Commanding Post at Washington,
Henderson, Ky. Feb. 7. 1865

Complaint is made to me that you are forcing negroes into the Military service, and even torturing them---riding them on rails and the like---to extort their consent. I hope this may be a mistake. The like must not be done by you, or any one under you. You must not force negroes any more than white men. Answer me on this. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 329. No reply from Lieutenant Colonel John Glenn, One Hundred Twentieth Colored Infantry, has been found. See Lincoln to Stanton, infra.

Page  267

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieutenant General Grant: Executive Mansion,
City Point, Va. Washington, February 7, 1865.

Gen. Singleton, who bears you this claims that, he already has arrangements made if you consent to bring a large amount of Southern produce through your lines. For its bearing on our finances I would be glad for this to be done if it can be without injuriously disturbing your military operations, or supplying the enemy. I wish you to be judge and master on these points. Please see and hear him fully, and decide whether anything, and if anything, what can be done in the premises. Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   DfS (copy?), DLC-RTL. The words ``if you consent'' in the first sentence and the signature are in Lincoln's autograph. See Lincoln's pass for James W. Singleton, January 5, supra, and communication to Grant, March 8, infra. Under dates of February 1, 7, 9, and 22, Orville H. Browning's Diary records the continuance of General Singleton's venture. The entry for February 9 is in part as follows: ``At night I went to the Presidents. He had just prepared his answer to a resolution of Congress calling on him for information in relation to the recent peace conference . . . and read it all to me. He also gave me a letter to Genl. Grant, respecting the purch[a]ses of produce in the South by Singleton. The letter is dated the 7th. and is intended to be delivered by Singleton. . . .''

To Ulysses S. Grant [2]

Executive Mansion,
Lieut. Gen. Grant Washington, Feb. [post 7], 1865.

Some time ago you telegraphed that you had stopped a Mr. Laws from passing our lines with a boat and cargo, and I directed you to be informed that you must be allowed to do as you please in such matters. To-night Mr. Laws calls on me, and I have told him, and now tell you that the matter, as to his passing the lines is under your control absolutely; and that he can have any relaxation you choose to give him & none other. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS, DLC-RTL. This letter is supplied with the date ``February [1?], 1865, in Nicolay and Hay (X, 354), but must have been written after February 7, the date on which Grant telegraphed to Stanton: ``A. M. Laws is here with a steamer partially loaded with sugar and coffee, and a permit from the Treasury Department to go through into Virginia and North Carolina, and to bring out 10,000 bales of cotton. I have positively refused to adopt this mode of feeding the Southern army unless it is the direct order of the President. It is a humiliating fact that speculators have represented the location of cotton at different points in the South, and obtained permits to bring it out, covering more than the entire amount of the staple in all the cotton-growing States. . . .'' (OR, I, XLVI, II, 445).

Stanton replied on the same day: ``The President directs that you will regardPage  268 all trade permits, licenses, or privileges of every kind, by whomsoever signed . . . as subject to your authority and approval as commander of the U.S. forces in the field, and such permits as you deem prejudicial to the military service by feeding or supporting the rebel armies . . . you may disregard and annul, and if necessary to the public safety seize the property of the traders. In short, the President orders that you `as being responsible for military results, must be allowed to be judge and master on the subject of trade with the enemy.' '' (Ibid.).

No communication from Laws, or reply from Grant to Lincoln's letter, has been found, and it seems possible that Lincoln's undated draft was never sent.

Introduction for Mrs. Long [1]

Please see Mrs. Dr. Long AL.

Feb. 7. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ADS, ORB. This note is written on a small card. Mrs. Long has not been identified.

To James Speed [1]

February 7, 1865

I have sufficient evidence that R. A. Gray, bearer of this, is loyal man, and entitled to be treated as such, but I know nothing as to his rights concerning the property, or rents mentioned within.

Feb. 7. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA GE RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, Segregated Lincoln Material. Lincoln's endorsement appears on an unsigned document:

``It being represented to me that H. Jouette Gray, of Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Virginia is the owner of a lot of land on the North side of Pearl street, between Western Row and Plum streets, now occupied by certain tenants under a lease originally made to one Alexander McKenzie; And it being further shown to my satisfaction that said Gray, although within the rebel lines, is nevertheless, loyal to the Federal Government, and has not in any [way] aided the rebellion, I do hereby authorize and permit the said Gray, personally or by attorney to collect the ground rents, due or to become due on said property, and to sell or otherwise dispose of said real estate in such manner as to him may seem right and proper, Washington January 1865''

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Hon. Sec. of War. Executive Mansion,
Dear Sir Washington, Feb. [7?], 1865.

Complaint is made to me that our recruiting officers at, and in vicinity of of [sic] Mayville, Ky. are forcing negroes into the service. Please enquire into this & stop it if true. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Joseph L. Block, Chicago, Illinois. The date is supplied on the basis of Lincoln's telegram to Glenn, supra. No reply from Stanton has been found.

Page  269

To Alfred Sully [1]

Officer in command Executive Mansion,
at Davenport Iowa: Washington, Feb'y 7, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of John Davis alias John Lewis until further orders and forward record of trial for examination. A. LINCOLN

Maj. Eckert:

Please send the above telegram. JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 328. This telegram is in Nicolay's handwriting. Although General Alfred Sully is listed in the tables of organization as commanding officer of the District of Iowa, Captain J. F. Miller replied to Lincoln's telegram on February 8: ``Your telegram relative to the suspension of Execution of Jno Davis Alias Jno Lewis recd no record of trial is here nor do I know where it can be found unless at Judge Advocate Generals office'' (DLC-RTL). AGO General Court Martial Orders No. 194, April 14 1865, promulgated the pardon of John Davis, alias John Lewis, substitute recruit, on condition that he serve out his term.

To William P. Fessenden [1]

February 8, 1865

As this letter is written by my old friend, who is one hundred and four years old, I sincerely desire that his friend, this young lady may obtain the employment he asks for her. Will the Sec. of the Treasury please see & hear her? A. LINCOLN

Feb. 8, 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES, CSmH. Lincoln's endorsement or note has been removed from attendant papers, and as a result neither the old friend nor the young lady can be identified. It is a guess, however, that Deacon John Phillips may have been the old friend. See Lincoln to Phillips, November 21, 1864, supra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Lieut. Gen. Grant Executive Mansion
City Point, Va. Washington, Feb. 8. 1865

I am called on by the House of Representatives to give an account of my interview with Messrs. Stephens, Hunter & Campbell; and it is very desireable to me to put in your despatch of Feb. 1st. to the Sec. of War, in which among other things you say ``I fear now their going back without any expression from any one in authority will have a bad influence'' I think the despatch does you credit while I do not see that it can embarrass you. May I use it?

A LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 331. Grant replied on the same day:Page  270

``By all means use my dispatch, referred to in yours of this date, if you desire to do so.

``It was marked `confidential' in contra distinction to official dispatches but not to prevent such use being made of it as you or the Secretary of War might think proper.'' (DLC-RTL).

Grant's telegram to Stanton of February 1 will be found in Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, February 10, infra.

To Joseph Holt [1]

February 8, 1865

Judge Advocate General please procure record & report on this case. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 8, 1865

Pardon for unexecuted portion of sentence and discharge the Prisoner. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 16, 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES and ES, DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 2498. Lincoln's first endorsement appears on an envelope and the second on the record in the case of Franklin Wells, citizen of Maryland, sentenced to hard labor for eight years from May 17, 1864, or to be released upon payment of $1,000, on charges of violation of laws and customs of war. Holt recommended that the punishment already inflicted seemed sufficient.

To the Senate and House of Representatives [1]

To the Honorable, the Senate February 8, 1865

and House of Representatives:

The Joint Resolution entitled, ``Joint Resolution declaring certain States not entitled to representation in the Electoral College,'' has been signed by the Executive, in deference to the view of Congress implied in its passage and presentation to him. In his own view, however, the two Houses of Congress, convened under the Twelfth Article of the Constitution, have complete power to exclude from counting all electoral votes deemed by them to be illegal; and it is not competent for the Executive to defeat or obstruct that power by a veto, as would be the case if his action were at all essential in the matter. He disclaims all right of the Executive to interfere in any way in the matter of canvassing or counting electoral votes; and he also disclaims that by signing said Resolution he has expressed any opinion on the recitals of the preamble or any judgment of his own upon the subject of the Resolution. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Executive Mansion

February 8, 1865.

Page  271

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2; DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No.56; ADf, DLC-RTL. The joint resolution (H.R. 126) approved on February 8, 1865, declared that Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Tennessee were in ``such condition on the eighth day of November, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, that no valid election . . . was held'' and that these states were not entitled to representation in the electoral college.

To the Senate and House of Representatives [2]

To the Senate February 8, 1865

and House of Representatives:

I transmit to Congress a copy of a note of the 4th instant addressed by J. Hume Burnley. Esquire, Her Britannic Majestys Chargé d' Affaires to the Secretary of State, relative to a sword which it is proposed to present to Captain Henry S. Stellwagen, Commanding the United States frigate Constellation, as a mark of gratitude for his services to the British brigantine Mersey. The expediency of sanctioning the acceptance of the gift, is submitted to your consideration. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington, 8th. February, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2; DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No.55. A joint resolution approved on March 3, 1865, authorized Captain Stellwagen to accept the sword. Burnley's letter of February 4 is in part as follows:

``Her Majesty's consul at St. Thomas has reported to his government the friendly and efficient assistance given by Captain Stellwagen . . . to the British brigantine Mersey, of Liverpool, which he fell in with in a disabled condition, and in a state of imminent peril from the effects of a severe hurricane. . . . Captain Stellwagen went on board the Mersey and most liberally supplied the wants of the ship and crew, thus enabling her master to bring her in safety to . . . St. Thomas.

``Her Majesty's government . . . have caused the accompanying sword of honor to be prepared . . . as a mark of their gratitude, and I am instructed . . . to deliver it to you, with a request that Captain Stellwagen may be permitted to accept it. . . .'' (Ibid.).

To John G. Smith [1]

His Excellency Executive Mansion,
Gov. Smith Washington, Feb'y. 8th, 1865.

Complaint is made to me by Vermont that the assignment of her quota for the draft on the pending call is intrinsically unjust, and also in bad faith of the government's promise to fairly allow credits for men previously furnished. To illustrate a supposed case is stated as follows.

Vermont and New Hampshire must between them furnish 6000Page  272 men on the pending call, [2] and being equals each must furnish as many as the other in the long run. But the Government finds that on former calls, Vermont furnished a surplus of 500, and New Hampshire a surplus of 1500. These two surpluses making 2000 an[d] added to the 6000, making 8000 to be furnished by the two states or 4000 each less by fair credits. Then subtract Vermont's surplus of 500 from her 4000, leaves 3500 as her quota on the pending call; and likewise subtract New Hampshire's surplus of 1500 from her 4000 leaves 2500 as her quota on the pending call. These 3500 & 2500 make precisely the 6000 which the supposed case requires from the two states; and it is just---equal---for Vermont to furnish 1000 more now than New Hampshire, because New Hampshire has heretofore furnished a 1000 more than Vermont which equalizes the burthens of the two in the long run. And this result so far from being bad faith to Vermont is indispensable to keeping good faith with New Hampshire. By no other result can the 6000 men be obtained from the two states and at the same time deal justly and keep faith with both; and we do but confuse ourselves in questioning the process by which the right result is reached. The supposed case is perfect as an illustration.

The pending call is not for 300,000 men subject to fair credits, but is for 300,000 remaining after all fair credits have been deducted; and it is impossible to concede what Vermont asks, without coming out short of the 300,000 men, or making other localities pay for the partiality shown her.

This upon the case stated---if there be different reasons for making an allowance to Vermont let them be presented and considered. Yours truly

Annotation

[1]   Df (copy?), DLC-RTL. Although cataloged as a draft in the Lincoln Papers, this document may possibly be a copy made from Lincoln's original letter and corrected by him. A single phrase, as noted, appears in Lincoln's autograph. Governor Smith, who had been in Washington several days conferring with Provost Marshal General James B. Fry about the draft quotas, wrote Lincoln on February 10 before his departure: ``Will you allow me to publish your letter of yesterday in reference to the call for three hundred thousand volunteers, in the papers in Vermont.'' (DLC-RTL). No reply from Lincoln has been found.

[2]   ``On the pending call,'' inserted in Lincoln's handwriting.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

February 8, 1865.

Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War.

Do not fail to have an interview with this most extraordinary and intelligent black man. A. LINCOLN.

Page  273

Annotation

[1]   Frank A. Rollin, Life and Public Services of Martin R. Delany (1883), p.171. According to the source, Martin R. Delany, Negro doctor and editor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, proposed to Lincoln that Negro officers of colored troops be appointed as a means of enlisting Southern Negroes in the army. AGO Special Orders No.98, February 27, 1865, directed; ``Major Martin R. Delany, U.S. Colored Troops, now in this city, will report in person, without delay, to Brevet Major-General Saxton, U.S. Volunteers, Superintendent of Recruitment and Organization of Colored Troops, Department of the South, at Beaufort, South Carolina, or wherever he may be.''

To George C. Cadwalader [1]

Major General Cadwallader Executive Mansion,
Philadelphia Washington, 9 February, 1865.

Please suspend execution in case of Thomas Adams, 186th Pa Vols & send record to me. A. LINCOLN

Maj: Eckert

Please send above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 332. This telegram is in John Hay's handwriting, with Lincoln's signature and instructions to Eckert added in Nicolay's handwriting. General George Cadwalader replied on the same day: ``Your telegram directing the suspension of execution in the case of Thomas Adams, One hundred & Eighty Sixth 186 Penna Vols is received and shall be complied with. The record of the case was forwarded to the Judge Advocate General of the Army February Second. . . .'' (DLC-RTL). The roster of Company D, One Hundred Eighty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, lists Thomas Adams as dishonorably discharged on August 23, 1865.

To George W. Getty [1]

Commanding General Executive Mansion,
Sixth Army Corps, Washington, February 9th., 1865.

Suspend the execution of the sentence of Private James L. Hycks 67 Pa Vols, until further orders. A. LINCOLN

Major Eckert

The President request that you will send the above. The man was to have been executed on 10th inst. EDW D NEILL

Sec: to Pres: US. etc

Annotation

[1]   LS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 333. Brigadier General Getty replied the same day: ``I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your telegram of this date suspending the execution of Private Hicks 67th Pa Vols'' (DLC-RTL).

On the court-martial record in the case of Private James L. Hicks, sentenced on charges of desertion, appears Lincoln's endorsement, ``Pardon, March 22. 1865 A. LINCOLN.'' (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, LL 3119). The roster of the Sixty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers shows Hicks as mustered out with his regiment on July 14, 1865.

Page  274

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion, Washington,
Lieutenant General Grant: February 9, 1865.

Suspend execution of death sentence of Hugh F. Riley, eleventh Mass Vols. now in front of Petersburg, until further orders, and forward record for examination. A. LINCOLN.

Maj: Eckert

Please send above telegram JNO. G. NICOLAY

Annotation

[1]   D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 334. This telegram is in Nicolay's handwriting, including Lincoln's signature. Governor John A. Andrew telegraphed Lincoln on February 9: ``I earnestly pray you to order by telegraph delay of execution of Hugh F Riley of Eleventh Battalion Mass Volunteers before Petersburg under sentence to be shot. . . . He is an old soldier though only a boy Please telegraph reply.'' (DLC-RTL). Nicolay replied: ``The President has today sent a dispatch ordering that the execution of Hugh F. Riley . . . be suspended until further orders. . . .'' (D, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 335). The roster of the Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteers lists Riley as dishonorably discharged on October 31, 1865.

To John Eaton [1]

Col Eaton: February 10, 1865

You will continue your supervision of Freedmen over the same territory & on the same principles as in the past, making such improvements as experiences may suggest, until legislation shall require some farther change A. LINCOLN

Feb. 10. 1865

Annotation

[1]   LS-F, Eaton, Grant, Lincoln and the Freedmen, p.230. According to Eaton's account, the dispute in congress over shifting the Freedmen's Bureau from the War Department to the Treasury prompted him to consult the president: ``I asked Mr. Lincoln if he would give me a word over his own signature to strengthen me against the difficulties I felt might still be encountered. To this he agreed . . . and asked me to write out an order which I deemed would be most useful for my purposes. I wrote the following informal order, summarizing the verbal instructions he had already given me. . . .'' (Ibid., p. 231).

To the House of Representatives [1]

February 10, 1865

To the Honorable, the House of Representatives.

In response to your resolution of the 8th. Inst. requesting information in relation to a conference recently held in Hampton Roads

Page  275I have the honor to state that on the day of the date I gave Francis P. Blair sent a card written on as follows, towit: [2]

Allow the bearer, F. P. Blair, Senr. to pass our lines, go South and return

Dec. 28. 1864 A. LINCOLN

That at the time I was informed that Mr. Blair sought the card as a means of getting to Richmond, Va. but he was given no authority to speak or act for the government; nor was I informed of any thing he would say or do on his own account, or otherwise. Afterwards Mr. Blair told me that he had been to Richmond, and had seen Mr. Jefferson Davis; and he Mr. B. at the same time left with me a manuscript letter, as follows, towit: [3]

F. P. Blair Esqr. Richmond Va

Sir: 12 Jany 65

I have deemed it proper and probably desirable to you to give you in this form the substance of remarks made by me to be repeated by you to Presdt. Lincoln &c &c

I have no disposition to find obstacles in forms, and am willing now as heretofore to enter into negociations for the restoration of Peace; am ready to send a commission whenever I have reason to suppose it will be received, or to receive a commission if the U.S. Govt. shall choose to send one. That notwithstanding the rejection of our former offers, I would if you could promise, that a Commissioner, Minister or other Agent would be received, appoint one immediately and renew the effort to enter into conference with a view to secure peace to the two countries.

Yrs &c JEFFN DAVIS

Afterwards, and with the view that it should be shown to Mr. Davis I wrote and delivered to Mr. Blair a letter as follows, to-wit: [4]

F. P. Blair, Esq Washington,

Sir: Jan. 18. 1865

Your having shown me Mr. Davis' letter to you of the 12th. Inst. you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now, and shall continue,Page  276 ready to receive any agent whom he, or any other influential person now resisting the national authority, may informally send to me with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Yours &c A. LINCOLN.

Afterwards Mr. Blair dictated for and authorized me to make an entry on the back of my retained copy of the letter last above recited, which entry is as follows. [5]

January 28. 1865

To-day Mr. Blair tells me that on the 21st. Inst. he delivered to Mr. Davis the original of which the within is a copy, and left it with him; that at the time of delivering it, Mr. Davis read it over twice in Mr. Blair's presence, at the close of which he, Mr. B. remarked that the part about ``our one common country'' related to the part of Mr. D's letter about ``the two countries'' to which Mr. D. replied that he so understood it. A. LINCOLN

Afterwards the Secretary of War placed in my hands the following telegram, indorsed by him, as appears. [6]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,

Cipher War Department.

The following Telegram received at Washington, M. Jan 29. 1865.

From Hd Qrs Army of James 6.30 pm 1865.

Hon. Edwin M. Stanton. Secretary of War. Jan. 29.

The following dispatch just rec'd from Maj. Gen. Parke, who refers it to me for my action. I refer it to you in Lieut Gen. Grant's absence.

E. O. C. ORD Maj. Gen. Comd'g

``Hd Qrs A of Potomac 4 P.M. Jan. 29. 1865.

Maj. Gen. E. O. C. Ord Hd Qrs A of J.

The following dispatch is forwarded to you, for your action. Since I have no knowledge of Gen. Grant's having had any understanding of this kind I refer the matter to you as the ranking officer present in the two Armies. Signed JNO. G. PARKE ``Maj. Gen. Comd'g.''

``From Hd Qrs 9th A. Corps 29.

Maj. Gen. Jno. G. Parke, Hd Qrs A. of P.

Alex H. Stevens, R. M. T. Hunter & W. J. A. Campbell desire to cross my lines in accordance with an understanding claimed to exist with Lt. Gen Grant, on their way to Washington as peace Commissioners. Shall they be admitted? They desire an early answer to come through immediately Would like to reach City Point tonight if they can. If they cannot do this they would like to come through at 10 A.M. tomorrow morning.

Signed O. B. WILCOX Maj Gen. Cmdg ``9th Corps''

Respectfully referred to the President for his instructions as he may be pleased to give EDWIN M STANTON Sec of War

8.30 PM Jan 29. 1865

Page  277It appears that about the time of placing the foregoing telegram in my hands, the Secretary of War despached Gen. Ord as follows, to-wit: [7]

Copy War Department Washington City

Maj Gen Ord. Jany 29th 1865 10. P.M

This Department has no knowledge of any understanding by Genl Grant to allow any person to come within his lines as commissioners of any sort. You will therefore allow no one to come into your lines under such character or profession, until you receive the President's instructions, to whom your telegram will be submitted for his directions

(signed) EDWIN M. STANTON Sec'y of War

Sent in Cipher at 2. A.M. 30th

Afterwards, by my direction, the Secretary of War telegraphed Gen. Ord as follows, towit: [8]

Copy.

Maj. Gen. E. O. C. Ord, War Department Washington D.C.

Hd. Qrs. Army James. 10.30 A.M. January 30.1865.

By direction of the President you are instructed to inform the three gentlemen, Messrs Stephens, Hunter and Campbell, that a messenger will be dispatched to them at, or near where they now are, without unnecessary delay. Signed EDWIN M. STANTON Secretary of War.

Afterwards I prepared and put into the hands of Major Thomas T. Eckert, the following instructions and message. [9]

Major T. T. Eckert Executive Mansion

Sir. Washington, Jan. 30. 1865

You will proceed with the documents placed in your hands; and, on reaching Gen. Ord, will deliver him the letter addressed to him by the Secretary of War; then, by Gen. Ord's assistance, procure an interview with Messrs. Stephens Hunter and Campbell, or any of them, deliver to him or them the paper on which your own letter is written, note on the copy which you retain, the time of delivery and to whom delivered, receive their answer in writing waiting a reasonable time for it, and which, if it contain their decision to come through, without further condition, will be your warrant to ask Gen Ord to pass them through as directed in the letter of the Secretary of War to him. If by their answer they decline to come, or propose other terms, do not not [sic] have the [m] passed through. And this being your whole duty, return and report to me. Yours truly A. LINCOLN

Messrs Alex H. Stephens, J. A. Campbell & R. M. T. Hunter

Gentlemen: I am instructed by the President of the United States to place this paper in your hands with the information that if you pass through the U.S. Military lines it will be understood that you do so for the purpose of an informal conference, on the basis of the letter, aPage  278 copy of which is on the reverse side of this sheet, and that if you choose to pass on such understanding, and so notify me in writing, I will procure the Commanding General to pass you through the lines, and to Fortress-Monroe, under such military precautions as he may deem prudent; and, at which place you will be met in due time by some person or persons for the purpose of such informal conference. And further that you shall have protection, safe-conduct, and safe return, in all events. THOS. T. ECKERT.

City Point Va. Maj & A.D.C.

February 1st. 1865.

Afterwards, but before Major Eckert had departed, the following despatch was received from Gen. Grant [10]

Office U.S. Military Telegraph,

Cipher War Department.

The following Telegram received at Washington, M. Jan. 31. 1865.

His Excellency Abraham Lincoln. From City Point Va.

President of the U.S. 10.30 AM Jan. 31. 1865.

The following communication was received here last evening.

``Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant Petersburg Va.

Comd'g Armies U.S. Jan. 30. 1865.

Sir: We desire to pass your lines under safe conduct and to proceed to Washington to hold a conference with President Lincoln upon the subject of the existing war, and with a view of ascertaining upon what terms it may be terminated, in pursuance of the course indicated by him in his letter to Mr Blair of January 18th. 1865, of which we presume you have a copy, and if not, we wish to see you in person if convenient, and to confer with you upon the subject. Signed, Very Respy Yours ALEXANDER STEVENS

J. A. CAMPBELL

R. M. T. HUNTER''

I have sent directions to receive these gentlemen and expect to have them at my Quarters this evening awaiting your instructions.

U. S. GRANT Lieut Genl Comdg Armies US

This, it will be perceived, transferred Gen. Ord's agency in the matter to Gen. Grant. I resolved, however to send Major Eckert forward with his Message, and accordingly telegraphed Gen. Grant as follows, towit: [11]

Telegram copy.

Lieut Genl Grant Executive Mansion

City Point Va. Washington Jany 31st. 1865

A messenger is coming to you on the business contained in your despatch. Detain the gentlemen in comfortable quarters until he arrives and then act upon the message he brings, as far as applicable, it having been made up to pass through Genl Ord's hands, and when the gentlemen were supposed to be beyond our lines (signed) A. LINCOLN

Sent in Cipher at 1.30. P.M.

Page  279When Major Eckert departed he bore with him a letter of the Secretary of War to Gen. Grant as follows, towit: [12]

Letter Copy War Department Washington D.C.

Lt Genl Grant Comd'g &c. Jany 30th 1865

General: The President desires that you will please procure for the bearer, Major Thomas T. Eckert, an interview with Messrs Stephens, Hunter, & Campbell,---and if on his return to you he requests it---pass them through our lines to Fortress Monroe by such route and under such Military precautions as you may deem prudent, giving them protection & comfortable quarters while there; and that you let none of this, have any effect upon your movements or plans.

By order of the President

(signed) EDWIN M. STANTON Secretary of War

Supposing the proper point to be then reached I despatched the Secretary of State with the following instructions, Major Eckert, however, going ahead of him. [13]

Hon. William H. Seward. Executive Mansion

Secretary of State. Washington, Jan. 31. 1865

You will proceed to Fortress-Monroe, Virginia, there to meet, and informally confer with Messrs. Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, on the basis of my letter to F. P. Blair, Esq. of Jan. 18. 1865, a copy of which you have.

You will make known to them that three things are indispensable, towit:

1 The restoration of the National authority throughout all the States.

2 No receding by the Executive of the United States, on the Slavery question, from the position assumed thereon, in the late Annual Message to Congress, and on preceding documents.

3 No cessation of hostilities short of an end of the war, and the disbanding of all forces hostile to the government.

Page  280You will inform them that all propositions of theirs, not inconsistent with the above, will be considered and passed upon, in a spirit of sincere liberality.

You will hear all they may choose to say, and report it to me.

You will not assume to definitely consummate any thing. Yours &c

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

On the day of it's date the following telegram was sent to Gen. Grant. [14]

Telegram Copy.

Lieut Genl Grant War Department Washington D.C.

City Point Va. Feby 1st. 1865

Let nothing which is transpiring, change, hinder, or delay your Military movements, or plans (signed) A. LINCOLN

Sent in cipher at 9.30 a.m

Afterwards the following despatch was received from Gen. Grant. [15]

In Cipher Office U.S. Military Telegraph,

War Department.

The following Telegram received at Washington,

2.30 P.M. Feby 1st. 1865

His Excellency A. Lincoln From City Point Va

Prest U.S. Feb'y 1st. 12.30 P.M 1865

Your despatch received; there will be no armistice in consequence of the presence of Mr Stephens and others within our lines. The troops are kept in readiness to move at the shortest notice if occasion should justify it U. S. GRANT Lieut Genl

To notify Major Eckert that the Secretary of State would be at Fortress-Monroe, and to put them in communication the following despatch was sent. [16]

Telegram Copy

Maj T. T. Eckert War Department Washington D.C.

Care Genl Grant City Point Va. Feby 1st. 1865

Call at Fortress Monroe & put yourself under direction of Mr S. whom you will find there (signed) A. LINCOLN

Sent in cipher at 5.30 P.M.

On the morning of the 2nd. Inst. the following telegrams were received by me respectively from the Secretary of State and Major Eckert. [17]

Recd 4. 30 AM Feb 2nd United States Military Telegraph,

In cipher War Department.

The President U.S. Fort Monroe Va 11 30 PM Feb 1. 1865

Arrived at ten (10) this evening. Richmond party not here. I remain here. WM H. SEWARD

Page  281Recd United States Military Telegraph,

In cipher Feb 2nd. War Department.

His Excellency A Lincoln City Point Va

President U.S. 10 PM Feb 1. 1865

I have the honor to report the delivery of your communication and my letter at four fifteen 4. 15 this afternoon, to which I received a reply at six (6) P.M, but not satisfactory.

At eight (8) PM the following note addressed to Genl Grant was received. [18]

To ``Lt Gen Grant, City Point Va

Sir, Feb 1. 1865''

``We desire to go to Washington City to confer informally with the President personally in reference to the matters mentioned in his letter to Mr Blair of the eighteenth 18th January ultimo, without any personal compromise on any question in the letter.

``We have the permission to do so from the authorities in Richmond.''

Very Respectfully Yours'' (signed) ``ALEX H. STEPHENS

``R. M T. HUNTER

``J. A CAMPBELL''

At nine thirty (9.30) P.M I notified them that they could not proceed further unless they complied with the terms expressed in my letter. The point of meeting designated, in above note, would not in my opinion, be insisted upon Think Fort Monroe would be acceptable. Having complied with my instructions, I will return to Washington to-morrow unless otherwise ordered. THOS T. ECKERT Maj &c

On reading this despatch of Major Eckert I was about to recall him and the Secretary of State when the following telegram of Gen. Grant to the Secretary of War was shown me. [19]

Page  282Office U.S. Military Telegraph,

In cipher War Department.

The following Telegram received at Washington,

4.35 A.M. Feby 2nd. 1865

From City Point Va. Feby 1st. 10.30 P.M 1865

Hon Edwin M Stanton Secy of War.

Now that the interview between Maj. Eckert, under his written instructions, and Mr Stevens & party, has ended I will state confidentially, but not officially to become a matter of record, that I am convinced, upon conversation with Messrs Stevens & Hunter that their intentions are good and their desire sincere to restore peace and union. I have not felt myself at liberty to express even views of my own or to account for my reticency. This has placed me in an awkward position which I could have avoided by not seeing them in the first instance. I fear now their going back without any expression from any one in authority will have a bad influence. At the same time I recognize the difficulties in the way of receiving these informal commissioners at this time and do not know what to recommend. I am sorry however that Mr Lincoln cannot have an interview with the two named in this despatch if not all three now within our lines. Their letter to me was all that the Presidents instructions contemplated, to secure their safe conduct if they had used the same language to Maj Eckert (signed) U.S. GRANT Lt Genl

This despatch of Gen. Grant changed my purpose; and, accordingly, I telegraphed him and the Secretary of State respectively as follow. [20]

Copy. War Department

Lieut Genl Grant Washington D.C.

City Point Va. Feby 2nd. 1865

Say to the gentlemen I will meet them personally at Fortress Monroe as soon as I can get there (signed) A. LINCOLN

Sent in cipher at 9.A.M.

Copy War Department

Hon Wm. H. Seward Washington D.C.

Fortress Monroe Va. Feby 2nd. 1865

Induced by a despatch from Genl Grant, I join you at Fort Monroe as soon as I can come (signed) A. LINCOLN

Sent in cipher at 9. A.M.

Before starting the following despatch was shown me; I proceeded nevertheless. [21]

Page  283Office U.S. Military Telegraph,

Cipher War Department.

The following Telegram received at Washington, M. Feby. 2d. 1865

From City Point Va 9 A.M. Feby. 2d. 1865

Hon Wm. H. Seward Secretary of State Ft. Monroe

Copy to Hon. Edwin M. Stanton Secretary of War Wash.

The gentlemen here have accepted the proposed terms and will leave for Ft. Monroe at 9.30 A.M. U.S. GRANT Lt. Genl.

On the night of the 2nd. I reached Hampton Roads found the Secretary of State and Major Eckert on a Steamer anchored off shore, and learned of them that the Richmond gentlemen were on another Steamer also anchored off shore in the Roads, and that the Secretary of State had not yet seen, or communicated with them. Here I ascertained that Major Eckert had litterally complied with his instructructions [sic] and I saw, for the first, the answer of the Richmond gentlemen to him, which in his despatch to me of the 1st. he characterizes as ``not satisfactory.[''] That answer is as follows, towit: [22]

Copy

Thomas J. [T.] Eckert City Point Va.

Major & A.D.C. Feby 1st. 1865

Major. Your note delivered by yourself this day has been considered. In reply we have to say that we were furnished with a copy of the letter of President Lincoln to Francis P. Blair Esq of the 18th of Jany ult. another copy of which is appended to your note.

Our instructions are contained in a letter of which the following is a copy.

``Richmond Jany 28th 1865

``In conformity with the letter of Mr Lincoln of which the foregoing is a copy, you are to proceed to Washington City for informal conference with him upon the issues involved in the existing war and for the purpose of securing peace to the two countries. With great respect Your ob't Servt (signed) JEFFERSON DAVIS''

The substantial object to be obtained by the informal conference is, to ascertain upon what terms the existing war can be terminated honorably.

Our instructions contemplate a personal interview between President Lincoln and ourselves at Washington City, but with this explanation we are ready to meet any person or persons that President Lincoln may appoint, at such place as he may designate.

Our earnest desire is that a just and honorable peace may be agreed upon, and we are prepared to receive or to submit propositions which may, possibly, lead to the attainment of that end. Very Respectfully Yours (signed) ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS

R. M. T. HUNTER

JOHN A. CAMPBELL

Page  284A note of these gentlemen, subsequently addressed to Gen. Grant, has already been given in Major Eckert's despatch of the 1st. Inst. I also here saw, for the first [time], the following note addressed by the Richmond gentlemen to Major Eckert: [23]

Copy.

Thomas C. [T.] Eckert City Point Va.

Major & A.D.C. Feby 2nd. 1865

Major. In reply to your verbal statement that your instructions did not allow you to alter the conditions upon which a passport could be given to us, we say that we are willing to proceed to Fortress Monroe and there to have an informal conference with any person or persons that President Lincoln may appoint on the basis of his letter to Francis P. Blair of the 18th of Jan'y ult. or upon any other terms, or conditions that he may hereafter propose not inconsistent with the essential principles of self government and popular rights upon which our institutions are founded.

It is our earnest wish to ascertain after a free interchange of ideas and information, upon what principles and terms, if any, a just and honorable peace can be established without the further effusion of blood, and to contribute our utmost efforts to accomplish such a result.

We think it better to add that in accepting your passport we are not to be understood as committing ourselves to anything, but to carry to this informal conference the views and feelings above expressed. Very Respectfully Yours &c (signed) ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS

J. A. CAMPBELL

R. M. T. HUNTER

Note

The above communication was delivered to me at Fort Monroe at 4.30 P.M. Feby 2nd. by Lieut Col Babcock of Gen'l Grants Staff

(signed) THOS T. ECKERT Maj & A.D.C

On the morning of the 3rd., the three gentlemen, Messrs Stephens, Hunter and Campbell, came aboard of our Steamer and had an interview with the Secretary of State and myself of several hours duration. No question of preliminaries to the meeting was then and there made or mentioned. No other person was present; no papers were exchanged, or produced; and it was, in advance, agreed that the conversation was to be informal, and verbal merely. [24] On our part, the whole substance of the instructions to the Secretary of State, herein before recited, was stated and insisted upon, and nothing was said inconsistently therewith; while, by the other party it was not said that, in any event, or on any condition, they ever would consent to re-union, and yet theyPage  285 equally omitted to declare that they never would so consent. They seemed to desire a postponement of that question, and the adoption of some other course first, which, as some of them, seemed to argue, might, or might not, lead to re-union, but which course, we thought, would amount to an indefinite postponement. The conferrence ended without result. The foregoing, containing, as is believed, all the information sought, is respectfully submitted. [25]

Executive Mansion, ABRAHAM LINCOLN

February 10th, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AD, DLC-RTL; DS, DNA RG 233, House Executive Document No. 59. On February 8, Schuyler Colfax wrote Lincoln: ``The Senate have been hesitating for two days about Mr. Sumner's resolution, asking for information as to the recent Conference at Hampton Roads. . . . I stated . . . to Mr. [Thaddeus] Stevens this morning that I understood from you that you had no objection to communicating the information, & a resolution has been passed unanimously, asking for it. . . . Under the circumstances, even if the Senate pass the resolution today, I hope you will reply to the House Resolution, in duplicate, if you feel required to answer the delayed Senate Resolution to that Body. I know the answer cannot fail to increase the confidence of the American people in you.'' (DLC-RTL).

The autograph manuscript of Lincoln's communication is composed of Lincoln's autograph letters, telegrams received, etc., which he collected for the purpose. In succeeding footnotes each document is described as it appears in Lincoln's manuscript. Peculiarities of punctuation and spelling follow Lincoln's original manuscript rather than the signed document sent to the House of Representatives.

[2]   ADS.

[3]   ALS.

[4]   ALS copy.

[5]   AES.

[6]   Received telegram endorsed in Stanton's autograph.

[7]   Copy.

[8]   Copy.

[9]   ALS copy and copy. The original autographs of these two documents, carried by Eckert, are described under their respective dates, supra.

[10]   Telegram received. An autograph copy in Lincoln's handwriting is in the Seward Papers, NAuE.

[11]   Copy.

[12]   Copy.

[13]   ALS copy.

Not included in Lincoln's report but important to the narrative is the following:

``Head Quarters Armies of the United States,

``January 31st 1865.

``Hon. Alexander H. Stephens, J. A Campbell, and R. M. T Hunter

``Gentlemen! Your communication of yesterday requesting an interview with myself and a safe conduct to Washington and return, is received. I will instruct the Commanding Officer of the forces near Petersburg to receive you, notifying you at what point of the line and the time when and where conveyance will be ready for you.

``Your letter to me has been telegraphed to Washington for instructions. I have no doubt but that before you arrive at my Headquarters an answer will be received directing me to comply with your request. Should a different reply be received I promise you a safe and immediate return within your own lines. I am, very respectfully (sgd) U. S. GRANT

``Official Lieutenant General.

``T. S. Bowers.

``Asst. Adjt. Gen'l.'' (Copy, owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California).

[14]   Copy.

[15]   Telegram received.

[16]   Copy.

[17]   Telegrams received.

[18]   The original note signed by Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, as well as the autograph draft of Eckert's telegram, is now owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California.

[19]   Telegram received. Not included by Lincoln in his report but important to the narrative is the following telegram:

``City Point Va Feby 1st. 1865

``Hon Edwin M Stanton. ``10.30 PM

``In reply to the letters delivered by me to Messrs Stephens, Campbell & Hunter, they give a copy of their instructions from Jefferson Davis, which I think is a verbatim copy of that now in the Presidents possession, am posative about the last two words, which differs from the ending of copy delivered by me & to which the President called my particular attention.

``After giving object of conference they add, 'Our instructions contemplate a personal interview with President L at Washington, but with this explanation we are ready to meet any person or persons that President L. may appoint at such place as he may designate. Our earnest desire is that a just & honorable peace may be agreed upon & we are prepared to receive or to submit propositions which may possibly lead to the attainment of that end. Signed Alex H Stephens, R M T Hunter & J A Campbell.' They say the ending of letter I delivered to them is the only objectionable point & one that, in their opinion, should be left out of both, the letter they bring as well as the one they receive, adding if they accept the latter & terms are not agreed upon, it would be an acknowledgement that might prejudice future interests of people they represent. THOS. T. ECKERT.'' (ALS, owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California).

[20]   Copies.

[21]   Telegram received.

[22]   Copy. The original manuscript of this letter is owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California.

[23]   Copy. The original manuscript of this letter is owned by Justin G. Turner, Los Angeles, California.

[24]   Lincoln deleted four lines at this point: ``and that no one was to be committed by it. Perhaps a pledge of secrecy, as to particulars, was implied, though not expressed. I believe, however, there can be no impropriety in stating that.''

[25]   The autograph manuscript ends without the date and signature which appear on the signed copy sent to the House of Representatives.

To Edward O. C. Ord [1]

Will Gen. Ord please see & hear these ladies on the within?

Feb. 10, 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Anderson Auction Company-Metropolitan Art Association Catalog 1110, October 22, 1914, No. 434. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's endorsement is written on a petition of two ladies (unnamed) to have their property, taken from them by General Butler, restored.

Order Concerning E. R. Scott [1]

Executive Mansion, Feb. 10, 1865

Let Captain Scott be paroled and bailed to Lieutenant General Scott. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Clipping, ICHi-MacChesney Scrapbook, XXXIII, 8028. According to the source, Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of a letter from Winfield Scott, February 8, 1865, concerning his great-nephew Captain E. R. Scott.

To David D. Porter [1]

Executive Mansion, February 10, 1865.

Sir: It is made my agreeable duty to enclose herewith the joint resolution approved 24th January, 1865, tendering the thanks of Congress to yourself, the officers and men under your command, for their gallantry and good conduct in the capture of Fort Fisher, and through you to all who participated in that brilliant and decisive victory under your command. Very respectfully,

Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

Commanding North Atlantic Squadron,

Hampton Roads, Virginia.

Annotation

[1]   OR, I, XI, 459. The resolution of thanks was approved by Lincoln on January 24, 1865.

Page  286

To the Senate [1]

To the Senate of the United States. February 10, 1865

In answer to the Resolution of the Senate of the 8th instant, requesting information concerning recent conversations or communications with insurgents, under executive sanction, I transmit a Report from the Secretary of State, to whom the Resolution was referred. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Washington,

10th February, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   DS, DNA RG 46, Senate 38A F2. See Lincoln's communication to the House of Representatives, supra. The resolution introduced in the House by Thaddeus Stevens and the resolution introduced in the Senate by Charles Sumner were both adopted on February 8. Lincoln's reply was directed to the House as a result of the request of Schuyler Colfax. The report of Secretary Seward, dated February 10, 1865, pointed out that ``the Senate may properly be referred to a special message of the President bearing upon the subject of the resolution and transmitted to the House this day. Appended to this report is a copy of an instruction which has been addressed to Charles Francis Adams, Esq., envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at London, and which is the only correspondence found in this department touching the subject referred to in the resolution. . . .''

The extract from Seward's letter to Adams, February 7, follows:

``On the morning of the 3d, the President, attended by the Secretary, received Messrs. Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell on board the United States steam transport River Queen in Hampton Roads. The conference was altogether informal. There was no attendance of secretaries, clerks, or other witnesses. Nothing was written or read. The conversation, although earnest and free, was calm, and courteous, and kind on both sides. The Richmond party approached the discussion rather indirectly, and at no time did they either make categorical demands, or tender formal stipulations or absolute refusals. Nevertheless, during the conference, which lasted four hours, the several points at issue between the government and the insurgents were distinctly raised, and discussed fully, intelligently, and in an amicable spirit. What the insurgent party seemed chiefly to favor was a postponement of the question of separation, upon which the war is waged, and a mutual direction of efforts of the government, as well as those of the insurgents, to some extrinsic policy or scheme for a season during which passions might be expected to subside, and the armies be reduced, and trade and intercourse between the people of both sections resumed. It was suggested by them that through such postponement we might now have immediate peace, with some not very certain prospect of an ultimate satisfactory adjustment of political relations between this government and the States, section, or people now engaged in conflict with it.

``This suggestion, though deliberately considered, was nevertheless regarded by the President as one of armistice or truce, and he announced that we can agree to no cessation or suspension of hostilities, except on the basis of the disbandment of the insurgent forces, and the restoration of the national authority throughout all the States in the Union. Collaterally, and in subordination to the proposition which was thus announced, the antislavery policy of the United States was reviewed in all its bearings, and the President announced that he must not be expected to depart from the positions he had heretofore assumed in his proclamation of emancipation and other documents, as these positions were reiterated in his last annual message. It was further declared by the PresidentPage  287 that the complete restoration of the national authority was an indispensable condition of any assent on our part to whatever form of peace might be proposed. The President assured the other party that, while he must adhere to these positions, he would be prepared, so far as power is lodged with the executive, to exercise liberality. His power, however, is limited by the Constitution; and when peace should be made, Congress must necessarily act in regard to appropriations of money and to the admission of representatives from the insurrectionary States. The Richmond party were then informed that Congress had, on the 31st ultimo, adopted by a constitutional majority a joint resolution submitting to the several States the proposition to abolish slavery throughout the Union, and that there is every reason to expect that it will be soon accepted by three-fourths of the States, so as to become a party of the national organic law.

``The conference came to an end by mutual acquiescence, without producing an agreement of views upon the several matters discussed, or any of them. Nevertheless, it is perhaps of some importance that we have been able to submit our opinions and views directly to prominent insurgents, and to hear them in answer in a courteous and not unfriendly manner.'' (Thirty-eighth Congress, Second Session, Senate Executive Document No. 18).

To James Speed [1]

Please file. I have sent to the Senate a nomination of Richard W. Thompson of Indiana to fill the vacancy. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 10. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 60, Papers of Attorney General, 1865, Box 125. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of resignation signed by James Hughes, Judge of the U.S. Court of Claims, February 3, 1865. On February 13, Richard W. Thompson wrote from Terre Haute, Indiana: ``I learned, on Saturday, by telegram from Messrs [Henry S.] Lane & [John D.] Defrees, that you had appointed me Judge of the Court of Claims. Since then I have given the subject much reflection, and am constrained, by a sense of duty to my family, to decline it. The office would require me to be away from home a greater part of the time, which is so contrary to all the calculations I have made for the future, that I could not discharge its duties without violating others which I have no right to disregard. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

On February 21, Lincoln nominated Charles C. Nott in place of Thompson, and the Senate confirmed Nott's appointment on February 22, 1865.

To Alexander H. Stephens [1]

Executive Mansion
Hon. A. H. Stephens Washington, Feb. 10, 1865

According to our agreement, your nephew, Lieut. Stephens, goes to you, bearing this note. Please, in return, to select and send to me, that officer of the same rank, imprisoned at Richmond, whose physical condition most urgently requires his release Respectfully

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADfS (copy?), NNP; ALS, owned by Robert G. Stephens, Washington, Georgia. The autograph draft, or autograph copy, was given to J. Pierpont Morgan by Robert Todd Lincoln in 1908, accompanied by Alexander H.Page  288

Stephens' autograph notation of his nephew's name and address, which Stephens gave Lincoln during the Hampton Roads Conference. See Lincoln to Charles W. Hill, February 4, supra.

To Henry B. Anthony and William Sprague [1]

February 11, 1865

I would like to give Mr. Hammond some tolerably good appointment; but understanding that giving him the place of Internal Revenue Collector in his District, would be embarrassing or disagreeable to Senators Anthony and Sprague, I will thank them to make an effort to find something respectable for him which, would not be disagreeable to them. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 11. 1865.

Annotation

[1]   AES, MH-Slattery Collection. This endorsement appears to have been cut from a letter. George T. Hammond, editor of the Newport, Rhode Island, Daily News, had written Lincoln on September 14, 1864:

``Can I have a private or unembarrassed interview with you for a few moments if I go to Washington on purpose?

``If so when shall I come?

``My paper has supported the Republican party from its formation and your administration from its beginning without reward, and if this is a sufficient reason to grant me the favor which I ask, more for your benefit than my own, you will favor me with an early reply. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

No record of his appointment to a federal job has been found, but see Lincoln's notes to Heads of Departments, and to Welles, infra.

To Ulysses S. Grant [1]

Executive Mansion,
Lieut Genl. Grant Washington Feby [c.11] 1865.

City Point. Dr. Ray whom you know will talk to you about a certain matter about which I would like your opinion informally expressed. Yours Very Respectfully A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DLC-RTL (4070-22). The bracketed portion of the date has been supplied on the basis of the date of Grant's reply, which is described in the transcript preserved in the Lincoln Papers as appearing on the same sheet as Lincoln's note:

``Trade will be subject to the approval of the Dept. Commanders so far as left for the military to control. I see less objection to whiskey being introduced into the South than to any other one article. Dr. Ray has asked my opinion particularly as to the propriety of taking this article up White river, the Yazoo and the St. Francis. Gen Dana will have to be referred to in matters of trade on the Yazoo, and Gen Reynolds when permits are desired on the other two streams.

``Washington D.C. U.S. GRANT

``Feby 11th 1865. Lt. Genl.''

On January 17, Governor Richard J. Oglesby had written Lincoln: ``Dr C H

Page  289Ray formerly of the Tribune is here and I believe is being approached with an offer to engage in an enterprise at Chicago Ills which may lead to a chism in our cause in this State, he desires to turn his attention towards other matters in the border or Rebel States, I really hope you may be able to give the Doctor such privilidges as may induce him to abide by his wishes in this respect and relieve him from the pursuasions of his friends to return just now to the editorial chair. I would like to see him do well and shall be verry much pleased if you can find it agreeable to respond to his wishes. The excitement growing out of the Senatorial contest is still unabated. I think it would be wise to favor any policy to abate it.'' (DLC-RTL).

See further Lincoln's authorization for Ray, February 15, infra

To Pierce B. Hawkins [1]

P. B. Hawkins Executive Mansion
Frankfort, Ky Washington Feb. 11. 1865

Gen. Burbridge may discharge W. E. Waller, if he thinks fit.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 337. In Lincoln's telegram to Burbridge, February 2, supra, the name was ``Walker,'' but Hawkins telegraphed Lincoln on February 11: ``Genl Burbridge says he would release W E Waller if he had the power Aching hearts ask it of you. he ought to be'' (DLC-RTL). No further record of the case has been found.

To Heads of Departments [1]

Washington, Feb. 11, 1865.

Will the Head of any Department to whom this card may be presented, give the bearer, Mr. Hammond, an interview?

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   NH, XI, 32. See Lincoln's communication to Anthony and Sprague, supra, and to Welles, infra.

To Edward O. C. Ord [1]

Major Genl. Ord Executive Mansion,
Army of James. Washington, Feb. 11, 1865

Suspend execution of sentence in case of Major T. C. Jameson & send me the record. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 336. General Ord replied the same day: ``Your dispatch is received. The matter will be attended to'' (DLC-RTL).

On February 13, William Lloyd Garrison wrote Lincoln enclosing a clipping of his speech celebrating the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment (delivered on February 4) and acknowledging receipt of Lincoln's letter of February 7,Page  290supra. Garrison added a request for clemency in the case of Major Thorndike C. Jameson, Fifth Rhode Island Artillery, dishonorably discharged, fined $8,000, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment on charges of fraud (DLC-Nicolay Papers). AGO General Court Martial Orders No.149, March 17, 1865, promulgated Jameson's pardon and release from imprisonment.

Pass for Abraham U. Colby [1]

Let this gentleman & wife pass from New York to Savannah.

Feb. 11. 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   Newark Galleries Catalog 128, December 5, 1930, No. 161. According to the catalog description, Lincoln's note accompanies an affidavit of Dr. Robert Watts endorsed by Dr. Willard Parker and Representative William H. Randall of Kentucky, that Abraham U. Colby was suffering from a disease of the lungs.

Pass for John T. Heard [1]

Surgeon J. Theodore Heard is allowed to visit Washington, D.C, provided he does not overstay his Leave of Absence.

Feb. 11. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ADS, IHi. The leave of absence of Surgeon John T. Heard, medical director of the Fourth Army Corps, was extended ten days by AGO Special Orders No.91, February 24, 1865.

To James Speed [1]

Atty. Genl. make out pardon for unexpired part of sentence.

Feb. 11, 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, DNA RG 204, U.S. Pardon Attorney, A 583. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter of M. J. Payne, Jefferson City, Missouri, to Austin A. King, February 1, 1865, asking pardon for George Walkey convicted of counterfeiting.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

Will the Sec. of War please see & hear the bearer & do as well for those he represents as we have heretofore done for ``Friends''?

Feb. 11. 1865. A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, NHi. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Oliver L. Davis, Danville, Illinois, January 30, 1865, introducing Jonah M. Davis of Ridge Farm, who is ``on his way to Washington to obtain, if possible, some relief for the Society of Friends of Ellwood Township. The township is unable to raise sufficient funds, without the aid of the `Friends' to obtain volunteers to fill their quota, and the `Friends' are not only conscientiously opposed to bearing arms, but they are opposed to voluntarily furnishing money to pay others . . .''

Page  291

To Edwin M. Stanton [2]

Hon. Sec. of War Executive Mansion,
Sir Washington, Feb. 11, 1865.

On a petition presented to me I have concluded to not allow the death penalty to be enforced on Norman L. King; but I wish to see Mr. Holt's review of the evidence, before finally disposing of the case. Please have it made and sent to me. Yours truly

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, IHi. Norman L. King, citizen of Washington, D.C., had been sentenced to death on January 19, 1865, for violating laws and customs of war. Joseph Holt's report was adverse to the petition for clemency, but a note on the jacket of the court-martial record dated April 28, 1865, indicates a pardon ``by the late President.'' (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 3306). On February 17, Reverend Phineas D. Gurley wrote Lincoln: ``My esteemed friend and neighbor Mr. King, the life of whose son you have recently saved, will call to-morrow with Senator Pomeroy to see you further about the case. . . . I deeply and fully sympathize with them in their desire that he should be released from his imprisonment as well as saved from death. . . .'' (DLC-RTL).

To Gideon Welles [1]

[c. February 11, 1865?]

Hon. Sec. of Navy, please give the bearer, Mr. Hammond, a short interview A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, owned by Joseph L. Block, Chicago, Illinois. See Lincoln's notes to Anthony and Sprague and to Heads of Departments, supra.

Endorsement Concerning Daniel M. Taylor [1]

West Point. Daniel Morgan Taylor. This is a good letter, written by the boy himself. A. LINCOLN.

Feb. 12, 1865.

Annotation

[1]   Copy, DNA WR RG 94, U.S. Military Academy, 1865, No. 325. The copy of Lincoln's endorsement appears on a copy of a letter from Daniel Morgan Taylor, Washington City, January 6, 1865. Taylor entered West Point in July 1865 and graduated in June 1869.

To Joseph Hooker [1]

Major General Hooker Executive Mansion
Cincinnati, O. Washington, Feb. 12. 1865

Is it Lieut. Samuel B. Davis whose death sentence is commuted? If not done, let it be done. Is there not an associate of his also in trouble? Please answer. A. LINCOLN

Page  292

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 339. Hooker replied on the same day: ``It is Lieut Saml B. Davis whose death sentence has been commuted to confinement at hard labor at Ft Delaware. No associate of his is in any immediate danger that I know of'' (DLC-RTL).

Lieutenant Samuel Boyer Davis, CSA, was ordered released from confinement at Fort Warren (AGO General Court Martial Orders No. 660, December 20, 1865). On February 7, 1865, Senator George R. Riddle and Senator Willard Saulsbury of Delaware had written Lincoln asking clemency for Davis (DLC-RTL). A letter from Hooker to Lincoln dated February 7 indicates that Davis had been arrested in Cincinnati on charges of being a spy, and sentenced to death by a military commission ``now in session in this city. The sentence was approved by me, with the view of commuting it to confinement . . . during the war, which was done day before yesterday.'' (OR, II, VIII, 191-92).

Pass for Mrs. Edward Byrne [1]

Allow Mrs. Edward Byrne to pass our lines Northward, and go Louisville, Ky. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 12. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ADS, ICHi. Mrs. Edward Byrne has not been identified.

Pass for Mrs. Willis F. Jones [1]

Allow Mrs. Willis F. Jones to pass our lines with ordinary baggage, go South & return. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 12. 1865

Annotation

[1]   ADS, owned by William H. Townsend, Lexington, Kentucky. This pass written on a small card accompanies a letter to Lincoln from Martha M. Jones, Versailles, Kentucky, February 1, 1865:

``My husband, Maj. Willis F. Jones, Adgnt Gen of [Charles W.] Field's Division of the Confederate Army was killed in battle before Richmond on the 13th of October last. I have been separated from him for two long years, during which time I have experienced almost every conceivable trial---the most severe of which resulted from the unsuccessful applications made in my behalf to the War Department by many of the most eminent military and professional men of this state for permission for me to visit him there during a dangerous and protracted illness.

``I now address your Excellency and entreat you to grant me the privilege of going to Richmond that I may visit his tomb, and the friends who attended his last moments and received his personal effects which are of sacred and inestimable value to me; and also permission to bring from the South his man servant, whom I desire to manumit in consideration of his fidelity to his master. . . .''

To John Pope [1]

Major Genl. Pope Executive Mansion,
St. Louis, Mo. Washington, Feb. 12, 1865.

I understand that Provost-Marshals in different parts of Missouri are assuming to decide that the conditions of bonds are forfeited,Page  293 and thereupon are seizing and selling property to pay damages. This, if true, is both outrageous and ridiculous. Do not allow it. The courts and not Provost-Marshals, are to decide such questions, only when military necessity makes an exception. Also excuse John Ecton of Clay Co. & Wesley Martin of Platte from being sent South & let them go East, if anywhere.

A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   ALS, DNA WR RG 107, Presidential Telegrams, I, 338. General John Pope had been placed in command of the Department of the Missouri to succeed General Samuel R. Curtis who was transferred to the Department of the Northwest (AGO General Orders No. 11, January 30, 1865). He replied on February 13: ``Dispatch recd & attended to Provost Marshal system in Mo is oppressive and absurd I am examining into & will correct the whole matter'' (DLC-RTL).

On February 11, Austin A. King had written Lincoln:

``I ask the President for a despatch to Gen. Pope changing the order for the banishment of John Ecton of Clay County, and Wesley Martin of Platte County, from being sent South---and at their options, to be banished to the state of Illinois, or some other loyal state, East of the Mississippi---and that Ecton's personal property only---be sold by the U.S. Marshal---when required to do so, by the proper order made under the confiscation act---and not under a military order, and by a Military Provost Marshal.

``I respectfully ask for this order by a despatch as early as you conveniently can.''

See further, Lincoln to Pope, February 14, infra.

To Edwin M. Stanton [1]

February 12, 1865

In a long verbal conversation with me Judge Fisher assured, as within, of his confident belief that Dr. Worrell is partially insane. I suppose that on this ground, he should be discharged.

Feb. 12. 1865 A. LINCOLN

Annotation

[1]   AES, owned by Dale Carnegie, New York City. Lincoln's endorsement appears to have been clipped from a document. The register of letters received by the adjutant general lists an application of George P. Fisher for relatives of Dr. E. Worrell, which is missing from the file (DNA WR RG 94, Adjutant General Letters Received, P 226). The court-martial record in the case of Edward Worrell, citizen of Delaware, sentenced to imprisonment for one year for violating laws of war and aiding a prisoner to escape from Fort Delaware, shows that this application was denied on January 25, 1865, but a later endorsement, probably the one of February 12, appears to have been cut from the record (DNA WR RG 153, Judge Advocate General, NN 2475).

Endorsement Concerning Garrett Davis [1]

February 13, 1865

I personally know Senator Davis to be of the highest moral character, and I still wish these prisoners discharged, because he asksPage  294 it, notwithstanding others, or another may have attempted wrong in the matter. A. LINCOLN

Feb. 13. 1865

Annotation

[1]   AES-P, ISLA. Lincoln's endorsement appears on a letter from Garrett Davis, February 10, 1865:

``I herewith inclose to you the bundle of papers you handed me this morning just as they were, except I have attatched my name to the list of prisoners whose release I asked for, and which i inadvertently omitted to do when I handed the list to you.

``I acknowledge my increased respect for you because of the frank manner in which you brought the matter to my attention this morning. I am free to say, as I did say to you, that the letter of Mr. Simmons was inadvertently put into the bundle, and if I had observed it at the time I should have withheld it. I am however gratified that it turned out otherwise, and I ask that you will have this note placed in the same file.

``I have recd. several letters makeing to me a similar overture to that of Mr. Simmons; but to him, & the other writers, I replied, I never had, and never would receive a cent for any such services As I said this morning, I now report to you, that in the course of 40 years, as lawyer, member of the Legislature, representative & senator in Congress I have in a great many cases rendered services to soldiers, their widows, children, pensioners & prisoners; and I have made it the rule of my life, never to charge or receive a dollar for any such services, and I have faithfully lived up to that rule. If ever there was a man invulnerable to all imputations of peculation, extortion, or the raising of money without equivalent, or for services which the most scrupulous would say money ought not to be received, I claim to be that man.

``You will remember, Mr President, that until within the last month I had not asked for the release of a single confederate prisoner. I had heard that many persons were interveneing to obtain the release of such prisoners, & extorting from their friends large sums of money. It was to prevent, to some extent, such extortions that I sought interviews with & asked you to make orders that certain prisoners applying, should have the benefit of the amnesty proclamation. I never applied for any one that I did not believe would faithfully keep his pledges. I determined then, & I inflexibly [?] adhere to the purpose, on my return home, unspareingly to denounce those extortioners; and I would prefer to enter upon this task, with all my correspondence, received & sent, in relation to these topics, to be on file in the war office.''

To Military Officers Commanding in West Tennessee [1]

To the Military Officers Washington,
Commanding in West-Tennessee. Feb. 13. 1865

While I can not order as within requested, allow me to say that it is my wish for you to relieve the people from all burthens, harrassments, and oppressions, so far as is possible, consistently with your Military necessities; that the object of the war being to restore and maintain the blessings of peace and good government, I desire you to help, and not hinder, every advance in that direction.

Page  295Of your Military necessities you must judge and execute; but please do so in the spirit and with the purpose above indicated.

A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   AES, DLC-RTL. Lincoln's endorsement appears on the back of the following printed document:

``MR. PRESIDENT: In accordance with your direction, we now state in writing the relief which the people of the District of West Tennessee ask at your hands, viz:

``1st. To be relieved from all interference of the military authorities with the administration of justice by the civil courts.

``And to this end, 1st, that the judges of the courts and all officers thereof be left entirely free, in the discharge of their several functions of office, from the control or interference of the military authorities; and that they be declared exempt from all military duty, whether of the regular or militia service; and, 2d, that all jurors, witnesses, and parties and their counsel, attending said courts, lawfully summoned thereto, or prosecuting or defending their rights therein, shall be exempt from such military duty while so in attendance.

``2d. That said military authorities be prohibited from imposing upon the people assessments, taxes, duties, or charges, of any kind whatever, and collecting the same, unless authorized so to do specifically by the President or Secretary of War.

``3d. That all officers and soldiers who have served in the armies of the United States and have been honorably discharged from said service, on account of physical disability, and also all such officers and soldiers as shall have served out the term of their enlistment, the same being for three years, shall be held exempt from all military duty, whether militia or otherwise.

``4th. That all persons who have come within the lines of the United States army and taken the oath of amnesty, in good faith, under, and trusting to the assurances of, General Grant's general order No. 10, shall be exempt from such military duty, and so long as they continue to be quiet citizens and obedient to the laws shall be permitted to remain.

``5th. That the people be relieved from the imposition of any other draft than such as is in accordance with law; they do not ask to be exempt from draft, but insist that it be levied upon them in accordance with the laws of the United States and administered by the same rules and regulations as elsewhere in the United States.

``6th. That the President give assurances that so soon as Tennessee shall have ratified the amendments to her Constitution made by the Convention of Nashville, and now being submitted to the people, he will, by proclamation, so far as he lawfully may, declare the State of Tennessee no longer in insurrection against the authority of the United States.

``7th. That all persons who have furnished acceptable Substitutes be exempt from all military Service. [This seventh request is inserted, not in Lincoln's autograph, on the right-hand margin of the document.]

``Mr. President, the granting of the relief above asked for, it is believed, will so powerfully impress public sentiment as to enable us, by a splendid vote and overwhelming majority, to carry the above-mentioned amendments of the State Constitution---to regenerate the State, and to restore her to her place in the Union. Respectfully, your obedient servants, ``WM. WALLACE,

``HOHN CALDWELL,

``P. E. BLAND.''

Accompanying the document is a letter from Bland and Wallace, Executive Mansion, Washington, Feb. 11, 1865:

``Having learned this morning that Brig. Genl. [Benjamin H.] Grierson will probably call on you during the day; and knowing him to be more thoroughlyPage  296 acquainted with the condition and wants of our people than perhaps any other man in the public service, as also the character and probable worth or worthlessness of the Memphis Millitia as at present organized and the oppressive exactions imposed in its name upon the people---and also how odious to the people is the proposed draft made as they believe without the sanction of law---We beseech you, if any doubts remain in your mind, to question him concerning the matters of relief asked for by us in the printed paper which we had the honor to submit to you several days since. . . .''

If Lincoln's endorsement was sent as a letter or order, the original has not been found. It may have been handed to Grierson during the interview.

Order Concerning Waller R. Bulloch [1]

Allow Lieut. Waller R. Bulloch to be paroled and go to his parents in Baltimore, and remain there until well enough to be exchanged.

Feb. 13, 1865 A. LINCOLN.

Annotation

[1]   John M. Bulloch, ``President Lincoln's Visiting Card,'' The Century Magazine, LV (February, 1898), 568. According to the source, Lincoln's order was written on a card and given to John M. Bulloch, whose brother Waller R. Bulloch, was a prisoner on Johnson's Island.

To the Senate and House of Representatives [1]

February 13, 1865

To the Senate and House of Representatives.

I transmit to Congress a copy of a despatch of