• 10. The ubiquitousness of smartphones and tablets means that JEP can be read anywhere on any screen. And today, unlike 20 years ago, we could depend on our work looking good on all browsers and all screens.
  • 9. We would have been able to count on searches bringing up JEP articles.
  • 8. We wouldn’t be pioneers, but we also wouldn’t have made some of the mistakes we made–like when we spammed our readers and would-be readers because the listserv software went crazy, or the time we sent our heavily commented article to an author instead of cleaning it up first.
  • 7. We wouldn’t have published all those articles on whether a university press should have a digital publishing program, and could have gotten right into the articles that helped presses start and convert their backlists.
  • 6. We wouldn’t have to explain to librarians that they couldn’t get JEP as part of a bulk purchase from a purchasing consortium because we were free.
  • 5. We wouldn’t have to send manuscripts back and forth by e-mail, keeping track of versions by the time we sent them or the cryptic names we assigned them so we knew who had them and who was doing what, and who should make sure to check every change (marked by hand with <!—change note—>) and approve or discuss it (marked by hand with <!—change note - agreed/jat—>. We would have had Google Docs or something similar.
  • 4. We would have had people responding to our requests for changes or additions at all hours of the day or night–which fit the way we worked–rather than wait for business hours so they could get to their computers, which were on their desks at their offices.
  • 3. We wouldn’t have to explain that the Journal of Electronic Publishing was not for papers on electronics–especially not the physics of electronics.
  • 2. We wouldn’t have to do the HTML markup by hand (or, later, by BBEdit).
  • 1. We wouldn’t get requests from people saying “where can we send our manuscript?” – they would understand it is the Journal of Electronic Publishing.