The Algerine captive; or, The life and adventures of Doctor Updike Underhill: six years a prisoner among the Algerines. [Three lines from Shakespeare] : Vol. I[-II]. : Published according to act of Congress.
Tyler, Royall, 1757-1826., Humphreys, David, 1752-1818, dedicatee.
Page  94

CHAP. X.

Was Milton blind, who pierc'd the gloom profound
Of lowest Hades, thro' seven fold night
Of shade, with shade compact, saw the arch fiend
From murky caves, and fathomless abyss,
Collect in close divan, his fierce compeers:
Or, with the mental eye, thro' awful clouds,
And darkness thick, unveil'd the throne of him,
Whose vengeful thunder smote the rebel fiend?
Was Sanderson, who to the seeing crowd
Of wond'ring pupils taught, sightless himself,
The wond'rous structure of the human eye?

AUTHOR's Manuscript Poems.
ARGUMENT.

Anecdotes of the celebrated Doctor Moyes.

MENTIONING the subject of the last chapter, to the celebrated Doc|tor Moyes, who, though blind, delivered a lecture upon optics, and delineated the properties of light and shade, to the Bosto|nians, Page  95 in the year one thousand seven hun|dred and eighty five; he exhibited a more astonishing illustration of the power of the touch. A highly polished plane of steel was presented to him, with a stroke of an etching tool, so minutely engraved upon it, that it was invisible to the naked eye, and only discoverable with a powerful magnifying glass; with his fingers he dis|covered the extent, and measured the length of the line.

This gentleman lost his sight, at three years of age. He informed me, that be|ing overturned, in a stage coach, one dark rainy evening, in England, when the carriage, and four horses, were thrown in|to a ditch, the passengers and driver, with two eyes a piece, were obliged to apply to him, who had none, for assistance, in extricating the horses. As for me, said he, after I had recovered from the aston|ishment of the fall, and discovered that I had escaped unhurt, I was quite at home Page  96 in the dark ditch. The inversion of the order of things was amusing. I, that was obliged to be led like a child, in the glar|ing sun, was now directing eight persons, to pull here, and haul there, with all the dexterity and activity of a man of war's boatswain.