A sermon preached at Haddam, June 14, 1797. On the day of the execution of Thomas Starr, condemned for the murder of his kinsman, Samuel Cornwell, by seven wounds given him, by a penknife, in the trunk of his body, July 26th, 1796, of which he languished a few days and died: : with a sketch of the life and character of said Starr.
Huntington, Enoch, 1739-1809.
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LIFE AND CHARACTER OF THOMAS STARR, WHO WAS EXECUTED AT HADDAM, ON WED|NESDAY JUNE 14, 1797, FOR THE MURDER OF SAMUEL CORNWELL.

THOMAS STARR was born in Middle|town, April 23, 1753. His parents and family, and their connections were reputable. His youthful genius was promising. His im|provements under the common advantages of schooling were uncommon. He manifested a taste for books. In writing and penmanship he excelled. In music and psalmody be made laudable proficiency, and was an approved leader in that part of public worship in the place where the Providence of God cast his residence in early manhood. His manners and deportment were conciliating, and attracted the favour|able notice of his acquaintance, whether of elder or younger, or of equal age with himself. Thus promising was the young man, when an unhappy step CHANGED ALL THE COLOUR OF HIS FATE. Connected with a worthy fa|mily, and contracted in matrimonial engage|ments with an amiable and only daughter of it, by ungentlemanly and capricious conduct he lost that affection of which he thought himself, in his vain confidence, too sure, and met with a Page  [unnumbered]〈…〉••om which his after miscon|duct and wretchedness takes its first date. Con|scious, no doubt, of his ill behaviour to the friend of his choice, and feeling the strong ope|ration of that affection his heart bore her, and which before he knew not how properly to esti|mate—stung with shame and remorse—from be|ing sociable and conversible with his friends, he shunned society, especially that society which was once his choice and his honor, sunk by de|grees into the various stages of intemperance and debauchery; and chose for his companions such as were addicted to the same indulgencies, and with them in gloomy retirement, and with a manifest aversion to the company of the vir|tuous and reputable, and especially of those of the fairer sex, he spent most of his social hours, and particularly the Holy Sabbath, and Saturday and Sabbath Evenings. This abandonment of moral virtuous character paved the way, and was very conspicuous immediately previous to his doing, in a most tragical manner, violence to innocent and kindred blood, for which awful Crime, by the Laws of God and his Country, he suffered a violent and untimely Death.