Proceedings of the Congress at New-York.
Stamp Act Congress
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PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONGRESS AT NEW-YORK.

BOSTON, June 1765.

SIR,

_THE House of Representatives of this Province, in the present Ses|sion of the General Court, have unanimously agreed to propose a Meeting, as soon as may be, of COMMITTEES, from the Houses of Representatives or Burgesses of the several British Co|lonies on this Continent▪ to consult together on the present Cir|cumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament for levying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies; and to consider of a general, and united, du|tiful, loyal and humble Representation of their Condition, to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief. The House of Representatives of this Province, have also Voted to propose, That such Meeting be at the City of New-York, in the Province of New-York, on the first Tuesday in October next; and have appointed a Committee of Three of their Members, to attend that Service, with such as the other Houses of Representatives, or Burgesses, in the several Colonies, may think fit to appoint to meet them. And the Committee of the House of Representatives of this Province, are directed to repair to said New-York, on said first Tuesday in October next, accordingly.

Page  2If therefore, your Honourable House should agree to this Proposal, it would be acceptable, that as early Notice of it as possible, might be trans|mitted to the Speaker of the House of Representatives of this Province.

SAMUEL WHITE, Speaker.

In Consequence of the foregoing circular Letter, the following Gentlemen met at New-York, in the Province of New-York, on Monday the Seventh Day of October 1765, viz.

From the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay,

  • JAMES OTIS, Esquire.
  • OLIVER PATRIDGE, Esquire.
  • TIMOTHY RUGGLES, Esquire.
Who produced their Appointment as follows, viz.

To James Otis, Oliver Patridge, and Timothy Ruggles, Esquires.

GENTLEMEN,

THE House of Representatives of this Province, have appointed you a Committee, to meet at New-York, on the first Tuesday of October next▪ such Committees as the other Houses of Representatives, or Burgesses, in the several Colonies on this Continent may think fit to appoint, to con|sult together, on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Dif|ficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the late Acts of Parliament. By this Choice, the House has reposed in you a Trust of singular Importance, and has just Reason to expect you will give your utmost Attention to it. In case you should receive Advice that the Houses of Representatives or Burgesses of the other Colonies, or any of them, agree to send Committees to join you in this Interesting Affair, you are directed to repair to New-York, at the Time appointed▪ and endeavour to unite with them in Sentiment, and agree upon such Representations as may tend to preserve our Rights and Privileges; and it is the Opinion of this House, that no Address or Representation, shall be esteemed the Act of this House, unless it is agreed to, and signed by the major Part of their Committee.

If it should be said that we are in any Manner represented in Parliament▪ you must by no Means concede to it, as it is an Opinion, which this House cannot see the least Reason to adopt; further, the House think that such a Representation of the Colonies, as British Subjects are entitled to, and enjoy, would be attended with the greatest Difficulty, if it is not absolutely impracticable, and therefore you are not to urge or consent to any Proposal for a Representation, if such be made in the Congress.

It is the Expectation of the House, that a most loyal and dutiful Address to his Majesty and his Parliament will be prepared by the Congress, pray|ing as well for the Removal of the Grievances the Colonies labour under at present, as for the preventing Others for the future, which Petitions, if Page  3 drawn up, as far as you shall be able to Judge agreeable to the Mind of this House, you are impowered to sign and forward, and you are to lay a Copy of the same before this House, and make Report of your Proceedings upon your Return.

It is the hearty Prayer of this House, that the Congress may be endued with that Wisdom, which is from above; and that their Councils and De|terminations may be attended with the Divine Blessing.

SAMUEL WHITE, Speaker.

From the Colony of Rhode-Island, and Providence Plantations.

  • METCALF BOWLER, Esquire.
  • HENRY WARD, Esquire.
Who produced the following Appointment, viz.

[illustration]
By the Honourable SAMUEL WARD, Esq Governor, Captain-General, and Commander in Chief, of, and over the English Colony of Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations, in New-England, in America.

To Metcalf Bowler, and Henry Ward, Esquires. Greeting.

WHEREAS the General Assembly of this Colony, have nominated and appointed you, the said Metcalf Bowler, and Henry Ward, to be Commissioners in behalf of this Colony, to meet such Commissioners as are or shall be appointed, by the other British Governments in North-Ame|rica, to meet at New-York, on the first Tuesday of October next:

I DO THEREFORE hereby Authorize, Impower, and Commissionate you, the said Metcalf Bowler and Henry Ward, forthwith to repair to New-York, and there, in behalf of this Colony, to meet and join with the other Commissioners, in consulting together on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Act of Parliament, for levying Duties and Taxes upon the Colonies, and to consider of a general, and united, dutiful, loyal, and humble Representation to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to im|plore Relief. And you are also hereby impowered to conclude and agree with the other Commissioners, upon such Measures as you shall think ne|cessary and proper, for obtaining Redress of the Grievances of the Colonies, agreeable to the Instructions given you by the General Assembly of this Colony. Given under my Hand, and the Seal of the said Colony, this Sixteenth Day of September, 1765, and in the Fifth Year of his Majesty's Reign.

SAMUEL WARD.

By his Honour's Command. HENRY WARD, Secry.

Page  4

From the Colony of Connecticut,

  • ELIPHALET DYER, Esquire.
  • DAVID ROWLAND, Esquire.
  • WILLIAM SAMUEL JOHNSON, Esquire.
Who produced the following Appointment, viz.

At a General Assembly of the Governor and Company of the Colony of Connec|ticut, holden at Hartford, (by Special Order of his Honour the Governor, of said Colony) on the 19th Day of September, Anno Domini 1765.

WHEREAS it has been proposed, that a Congress be attended by Commissioners from the several Governments on this Continent, to confer upon a general, and united, humble, loyal, and dutiful Repre|sentation to his Majesty and the Parliament, of the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament, for laying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to implore Relief, &c.

RESOLVED by this Assembly, that Eliphalet Dyer, William Samuel Johnson, and David Rowland, Esquires, or any Two of them, be, and hereby are ap|pointed Commissioners on behalf of this Colony, to repair to New-York, to attend the proposed Congress in the Matters above referred to, and his Ho|nour is hereby desired to Commissionate them accordingly.

A true Copy, Examined by

GEORGE WYLLYS, Secry.

At a General Assembly of the Governor and Company of the Colony of Connec|ticut, holden at Hartford, (by Special Order of his Honour the Governor, of said Colony) on the 19th Day of September, Anno Domini 1765.

INSTRUCTIONS to the Commissioners of this Colony, appointed to meet Commissioners from the other Colonies, at New-York, on the first Tuesday of October next.

GENTLEMEN,

YOU are to repair to the said City of New-York, at said Time, or at the Time which according to the Intelligence you may receive of the Convening of the other Commissioners, it may appear to you seasonable and best, to consult together with them on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament for laying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to consider of, and propose, a general, and united, duti|ful, loyal, and humble Representation of their Condition, to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief.

In your Proceedings you are to take Care, that you form no such Junc|tion with the other Commissioners, as will subject you to the major Vote of the Commissioners present.

Page  5You are to inform the Governor and General Assembly, at the Session in October next, of all such Proceedings as shall appear to you needful and convenient, to be communicated for Consideration, and to observe all such further Instructions as you may receive.

And you are to Report your Doings, with the Doings of the Commissioners, at such Meeting, to the General Assembly of this Colony, for Acceptance and Approbation.

A true Copy, Examined by

GEORGE WYLLYS, Secry.

[illustration]
THOMAS FITCH, Esq Governor, Commander in Chief of his Majesty's Colony of Connecticut, in New-England, in America.

To Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland, and William Samuel Johnson, Esquires. Greeting.

WHEREAS the General Assembly of the said Colony of Connecticut, at their Sessions holden at Hartford, on the Nineteenth Day of this Instant September, nominated and appointed you, or any Two of you, to be Commissioners on behalf of this Colony, to repair to New-York, to attend a Congress, proposed to be held there by Commissioners from the several Governments on this Continent, to confer upon a general, and united, hum|ble, loyal, and dutiful Representation to his Majesty and the Parliament, of the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament for levying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to implore Relief, &c. and have desired me to Commission you accordingly.

I do therefore, reposing especial Trust and Confidence in your Loyalty, Ability, and good Conduct, hereby Constitute, Authorize, and Commission you, the said Eliphalet Dyer, David Rowland, and William Samuel Johnson, Esquires, or any Two of you, for and on Behalf of this Colony, to repair to the said City of New-York, on the first Day of October next, or at the Time, which according to the Intelligence you may receive of the Con|vening of the other Commissioners, may appear to you seasonable and best, to confer and consult with them, or such of them as shall be present, upon and concerning the Matters and Things before mentioned, for the Purposes aforesaid, wherein you are to observe such Instructions as you have received, or shall further receive from the General Assembly of the said Colony of Connecticut, agreeable to the important Trust reposed in you.

Given under my Hand, and the Public Seal of the said Colony of Connecti|cut, within the same, the Twenty-first Day of September, in the Fifth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord GEORGE the Third, of Great-Britain, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c. Annoque Domini One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-five.

THOMAS FITCH.

By his Honour's Command. GEORGE WYLLYS, Secry.

Page  6

From the Colony of New-York,

  • ROBERT R. LIVINGSTON, Esquire,
  • JOHN CROGER, Esquire,
  • PHILIP LIVINGSTON, Esquire,
  • WILLIAM BYARD, Esquire,
  • LEONARD LISPENARD, Esquire,
appeared, and informed the Congress, That since the Receipt of the above Letter from the Speaker of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts-Bay, the General Assembly of New-York have not had an Opportunity of Meeting, but that they confidently expect from the general Sense of the People, and such of the Representatives as they have had an Opportunity of speaking to, that when the Assembly does meet (which will probably be very soon) the Congress will be Approved, and a regular Committee for the Purpose appointed: In the mean Time they think themselves in some Mea|sure authorized to meet the Congress, by the following Votes, viz.

Extract from the VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS of the General Assembly, for the Colony of New-York.

Die Sabbati, 9h. A. M. the4th April 1761.

Mr. Speaker represented to this House, that his Situation in the Country render'd it vastly inconvenient to him alone, to correspond with the Agent of this Colony at the Court of Great-Britain, and more especially to during the Recess of the House.

ORDERED, That the Members of the City of New-York, or the major Part of them, be a Committee of Correspondence, to correspond with the Agent of this Colony, at the Court of Great-Britain, during the Recess of the House, concerning the Public Affairs of this Colony, and that they lay before the House, Copies of all such Letters as they may write to him, and also all such Letters and Advices as they may receive from him, respecting the same.

Die Jovis, 9h. A. M. the9th December 1762.

Alderman Livingston from the Committee appointed to correspond with the Agent of this Colony, at the Court of Great-Britain, acquainted the House, that the Committee conceived it expedient, that one or more Mem|bers should be added to the said Committee, to correspond with the said Agent, about the Affairs of this Colony.

ORDERED, That Robert R. Livingston, Esq be added to, and made one of the said Committee of Correspondence.

Die Jovis, 9h. A. M. the18th October 1764.

ORDERED, That the said Committee appointed to correspond with the said Agent, be also a Committee during the Recess of the House, to write Page  7 to, and correspond with, the several Assemblies, or Committees of Assem|blies on this Continent▪ on the subject Matter of the Act, commonly called the Sugar Act, of the Act restraining Paper Bills of Credit in the Colonies from being a legal Tender, and of the several other Acts of Parliament lately passed, with Relation to the Trade of the Northern Colonies; and also on the Subject of the impending Dangers, which threaten the Colonies of being taxed by Laws to be passed in Great-Britain.

Extracted from, Compared and Examined with, the Records of the Pro|ceedings of the General Assembly for the Colony of New-York, by ABRAHAM LOTT, Clerk.

From the Colony of New-Jersey,

  • ROBERT OGDEN, Esquire.
  • HENDRICK FISHER, Esquire.
  • JOSEPH BORDEN, Esquire.
Who produced the following Appointment, viz.

At a Meeting of a large Number of the Representatives of the Colony of New-Jersey, at the House of Robert Sprowl, October the 3d. 1765,

At the Desire of the Speaker of the House of Representatives as afore|said, and at the earnest Request of many of our Constituents, to consider of some Method for humbly, loyally, and dutifully joining in a Petition to his Majesty, that he would be graciously pleased to recommend it to the Parliament of Great-Britain, to redress our Grievances, by repealing several of the late Acts of Parliament affecting the Northern Colonies, particularly that called the STAMP-ACT;

Robert Ogden, Esq Hendrick Fisher▪ Esq and Joseph Borden, Esq were desired to attend at the Congress, now met at New-York, and join in the Measures there to be concluded on for the Purposes aforesaid, and to make Report of their Proceedings therein, at the next Meeting of General As|sembly.

Signed by Order, JOHN LAWRANCE

From the Province of Pennsylvania.

  • JOHN DICKENSON, Esquire.
  • JOHN MORTON, Esquire.
  • GEORGE BRYAN, Esquire.
Who produced the following Appointment in Assembly, September 11st. 1765. A. M.

The House resumed the Consideration of their Resolution of Yesterday to appoint a Committee of Three or more of their Members, to attend the General Congress of Committees, from the several Assemblies on this Con|tinent, to be held at New-York, on the first of October next: And after some Time spent therein.

Page  8 RESOLVED, That Mr. Speaker, Mr. Dickenson, Mr. Bryan, and Mr. Morton, be, and they are hereby nominated and appointed to that Service. A true Extract from the Journals, CHARLES MOORE, Clerk of Assembly.

Extracts from the Journals of the House of Representatives for the Province of Pennsylvania.

WEDNESDAY, September 11th 1765, A. M.

The Committee appointed to prepare Instructions for the Deputies nomi|nated by this House to attend the proposed Congress, at New-York, on the first of next Month, reported an Essay for that Purpose, which they pre|sented to the Chair, and the same being read and agreed to by the House, follows in these Words, viz.

INSTRUCTIONS to the Committee appointed to meet the Com|mittees of the other British Continental Colonies at New-York.

It is Directed by the House, That you shall, with the Committees that have been, or shall be appointed by the several British Colonies on this Continent, to meet at New-York, consult together on the present Cir|cumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties they are, and must be reduced to, by the late Acts of Parliament for levying Duties and Taxes upon them, and join with the said Committees, in loyal and dutiful Ad|dresses to the King and the Two Houses of Parliament, humbly repre|senting the Condition of these Colonies, and imploring Relief, by a Re|peal of the said Acts; and you are strictly required to take Care, that such Addresses in which you join, are drawn up in the most decent and respectful Terms, so as to avoid every Expression that can give the least occasion of Offence to his Majesty or to either House of Parliament.

You are also directed to make a Report of your Proceedings herein, to the succeeding Assembly.

A true Extract from the Journals,

September 26th 1765. CHARLES MOORE, Clerk of Assembly.

From the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware,

  • CAESAR RODNEY, Esquire.
  • THOMAS M'KEAN, Esquire.
Whose Appointments are as follows, viz.

Caesar Rodney, and Thomas M'Kean, Esquires, appeared from the Govern|ment of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, and inform'd this Congress, That the Representatives of the said Government, could not meet in General Assembly after the above Letter was wrote, and before the first Day of this Instant, that the said Assembly consists of 〈◊〉 Eighteen Members, Fifteen of whom have appointed the other Three to attend here, &c. by Three several Instruments of Writing which are in these Words, viz.

Page  9 To all to whom these Presents shall 〈◊〉.

KNOW YE, That we the Subscribers, Five of the Representatives of the Freemen of the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, sensible of the weighty and oppressive Taxes im|posed upon the good People of this Government, by divers late Acts of Parliament, and of the great Infringement of the Liberties and just and established Rights of all his Majesty's Colonies on this Continent, occasioned by the late Measures in England, and being of Opinion, that the Method proposed by the Honourable House of Assembly of the Province of Mas|sachusetts-Bay, is the most likely to obtain a Redress of these Grievances; and taking into Consideration the Misfortune we at present labour under, in not having it in our Power to convene as a House, and in a regular Man|ner to appoint a Committee; yet zealous for the Happiness of our Consti|tuents, think it our Duty in this Way to serve them, as much as in us lies, (assured of the hearty Approbation of any future House of Assembly of this Government) and therefore do hereby Nominate and Appoint Jacob Kollock, Thomas McKean, and Caesar Rodney, Esquires, Three of the Re|presentatives of the same Government, a Committee, to repair to the City of New-York, on the First Day of October next, and there to join with the Committees sent by the other Provinces, in One united and loyal Peti|tion to his Majesty, and Remonstrance to the Honourable House of Com|mons of Great-Britain, against the aforesaid Acts of Parliament, therein dutifully, yet most firmly, asserting the Colonies Right of Exclusion from Parliamentary Taxation, and praying that they may not in any Instance, be stripped of the antient and most valuable Privilege of a Trial by their Peers, and most humbly imploring Relief.

In Testimony whereof, we have hereunto set our Hands, at New-Castle, the Twenty-first Day of September, Annoque Domini 1765.

  • EVAN RICE,
  • THOMAS COOCH,
  • WILLIAM ARMSTRONG,
  • GEORGE MONRO,
  • JOHN EVANS.

Kent County, to wit. WE whose Names are hereunder written, Members of the General Assembly of the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, for the said County of Kent, tho' sensible of the Impropriety of assuming the Functions of Assembly-Men, during the Recess of our House, yet zealous to concur in any Mea|sure which may be productive of Advantage to this Government, and the other British Colonies on the Continent of America, in general, have Ap|pointed, and as much as in us lies do Appoint, Jacob Kollock, Esq Caesar Rodney, Esq and Thomas McKean, Esq Members of said Assembly, to be a Committee, to meet with the other Committees already appointed, or to be appointed, by the several and respective Assemblies of the said other Colonies, at the City of New-York, on the First Tuesday in October next, in Conjunction with the said other Committees, to consider of the Page  10 present distressful Circumstances of the said Colonies, occasioned in some Measure, as we apprehend, by several late Acts of Parliament, and to join with them in an humble Address to his most Gracious Majesty and the Parliament of Great-Britain, for Redress of our Grievances, or in any other expedient that shall be agreed on by the said Committees, which may tend to promote the Utility and Welfare of the British Dominions in America.

September 13th 1765.

  • JOHN VINING,
  • JOHN CATON,
  • JOHN BARNES,
  • WILLIAM KILLEN,
  • VINCENT LOCKERMAN.

Sussex County, to wit. WE whose Names are hereunder written, Members of the General Assembly of the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, for the said County of Sussex, tho' sensible of the Impropriety of assuming the Functions of As|sembly-Men, during the Recess of our House, yet zealous to concur in any Measure which may be productive of Advantage to this Government, and the other British Colonies on the Continent of America, in general, have Appointed, and as much as in us lies do Appoint, Jacob Kollock, Esq Caesar Rodney, Esq and Thomas McKean, Esq Members of the said As|sembly, to be a Committee, to meet with the other Committees already appointed, or to be appointed, by the several and respective Assemblies of the said other Colonies, at the City of New-York, on the First Tuesday in October next, in Conjunction with the said other Committees, to consider of the present distressful Circumstances of the said Colonies, occasioned in some Measure, as we apprehend, by several late Acts of Parliament, and to join with them, in an humble Address to his most Gracious Majesty and the Parliament of Great-Britain, for Redress of our Grievances, or in any other Expedient that shall be agreed on by the said Committees, which may tend to promote the Utility and Welfare of the British Dominions in America.

September 17th 1765.

  • DAVID HALL,
  • BENJAMIN BURTON,
  • LEVIN CRAPPER,
  • THOMAS ROBINSON,
  • JACOB KOLLOCK, junr.

From the Province of Maryland,

  • WILLIAM MURDOCK, Esquire.
  • EDWARD TILGHMAN, Esquire.
  • THOMAS RINGGOLD, Esquire.

INSTRUCTIONS from the Honourable the Lower House of Assembly, of the Province of Maryland, to William Murdock, Edward Tilghman, and Thomas Ringgold, Esquires, a Committee appointed to join the several Com|mittees, from the several Colonies in America, at New-York.

Page  11GENTLEMEN,

You are to repair immediately to the City of New-York, in the Province of New-York, and there join with the Committees from the Houses of Representatives of the other Colonies, in a general and united, dutiful, loyal, and humble Representation to his Majesty, and the British Parliament, of the Circumstances and Condition of the British Colonies and Plantations, and to pray Relief from the Burthens and Restraints lately laid on their Trade and Commerce, and especially from the Taxes imposed by an Act of the last Sessions of Parliament, granting and applying certain Stamp Du|ties, and other Duties, in the British Colonies and Plantations in America, whereby they are deprived, in some Instances, of that invaluable Privilege of Englishmen, and British Subjects, Trials by Juries. That you take Care that such Representation shall, humbly and decently, but expressly, contain an Assertion of the Rights of the Colonists, to be exempt from all and every Taxations and Impositions upon their Persons and Properties, to which they do not consent in a Legislative Way, either by themselves or their Representatives, by them freely chosen and appointed.

Signed by Order of the House, ROBERT LLOYD, Speaker.

From the Province of South-Carolina,

  • THOMAS LYNCH, Esquire.
  • CHRISTOPHER GADSDEN, Esquire.
  • JOHN RUTLEDGE, Esquire.
Who produced the following Appointment.

THURSDAY, July 25, 1765.

The House (according to Order) took into Consideration, the Letter from the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Massachusetts-Bay, laid before them on Friday last, and a Debate arising thereon, and some Time spent therein, ORDERED, That the said Letter be referr'd to a Committee of the following Gentlemen, viz. Capt. Gadsden, Mr. Wright, Mr. Galliard, Mr. Wragg, Mr. Parsons, Mr. Pinckney, Col. Laurence, Mr. Rutledge, Mr. Manigault, Mr. Drayton.

FRIDAY, July 26, 1765.

Capt. Gadsden Reported from the Committee appointed to consider of the Letter sent from the Speaker of the House of Representatives, of the Pro|vince of the Massachusetts-Bay, to the Speaker of this House, and to report their Opinion thereupon, of the Expediency and Utility of the Measures therein proposed, and the best Means to effect the Relief therein mentioned:

That they are of Opinion, the Measure therein proposed, is prudent and necessary, and therefore recommend to the House, to send a Committee, to meet the Committees from the Houses of Representatives, or Burgesses, of the several British Colonies on this Continent, at New-York, the First Tues|day in October next.

Page  12That the said Committee be ordered to consult there, with those other Committees, on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Dif|ficulties which they are, and must be reduced to, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament, for levying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to consider of a general, united, dutiful, loyal, and humble Representation of their Condition, to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief.

That the Result of their Consultation, shall, at their Return, be imme|diately laid before the House, to be confirm'd or not, as the House may think proper.

And the said Report being delivered in at the Clerk's Table, and Read a second Time, the Question was severally put, That the House do agree to the First, Second, and Third Paragraphs of the said Report. It was Re|solved in the Affirmative.

FRIDAY, August 2, 1765.

Motion being made, RESOLVED, That this House will provide a Sum sufficient to defray the Charges and Expences of a Committee of Three Gentlemen, on Account of their going to, continuing at, and returning from, the Meeting of the several Committees proposed to assemble at New-York, on the First Tuesday in October next, to consult there with those other Committees, on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties which they are, and must be reduced to, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament, for levying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to consider of a general, united, loyal, dutiful, and humble Repre|sentation of their Condition to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief.

ORDERED, That the Public Treasurer do advance out of any Monies in his Hands, to the said Committee, a Sum not exceeding Six Hundred Pounds Sterling, for the Purposes aforesaid.

RESOLVED, That this House will reimburse the Treasurer the said Sum.

ORDERED, That the following Gentlemen be appointed a Committee, for the Purposes aforesaid, viz.

Mr. Thomas Lynch, Mr. Christopher Gadsden, Mr. John Rutledge.

THURSDAY, August 8, 1765.

ORDERED, That the Speaker do inform Thomas Lynch, Christopher Gads|den, and John Rutledge, Esquires, that they are appointed a Committee, to meet the Committees of the several other Colonies on this Continent, on the first Tuesday in October next, at New-York, and that he do acquaint them, it is the desire of the House, that they repair to New-York, on the said First Tuesday in October next, for the Purposes mentioned in the Re|port of the Committee, as agreed to by this House, on Friday the 26th Day of July last.

Page  13ORDERED, That Three Copies of the Proceedings of this House, rela|tive to the said Matter, be made out, and Signed by the Speaker, and that he deliver One of the said Copies to each of the said Gentlemen.

RAW. L••••DES, Speaker.

Then the said Committees proceeded to chuse a Chairman by Ballot, and Timothy Ruggles, Esq on sorting and counting the Votes, appeared to have a Majority, and thereupon was placed in the Chair.

RESOLVED, Nomine Contradicente, That Mr. John Cotton be 〈◊〉 to this Congress, during the Continuance thereof.

Then the Congress took into Consideration the several Appointments of the Committees from New-York, New-Jersey, and the Government of the Lower Counties on Delaware, and

RESOLVED, Nomine Contradicente, That the same are sufficient to qualify the Gentlemen therein named, to sit in this Congress

RESOLVED ALSO, That the Committee of each Colony, shall have One Voice only, in determining any Questions that shall arise in this Congress.

Then the Congress Adjourned till To-Morrow Morning at IX o'Clock.

TUESDDAY, October 8, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

Upon Motion, Voted, That the Provinces be called every Morning at the Time that it is Adjourned to.

Voted, That Mr. Justice Livingston, Mr. McKean, and Mr. Rutledge, be a Committee to inspect the Proceedings and Minutes, and Correct the same.

Then the Congress took into Consideration the Rights and Privileges of the British American Colonists, with the several Inconveniencies and Hard|ships to which they are, and must be subjected, by the Operation of several late Acts of Parliament, particularly the Act called the STAMP-ACT; and after some Time spent therein, the same was postponed for further Con|sideration.

Then the Congress Adjourned to To-Morrow XI o'Clock.

WEDNESDAY, October 9, 1765, A. M.

Then the Congress met according to Adjournment.

The Congress resumed the Consideration of the Rights and Privileges of the British American Colonists, &c. the same was referr'd after sundry De|bates, for further Consideration.

Then the Congress Adjourned until To-Morrow Morning XI o'Clock.

Page  14

THURSDAY, October 10, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to X o'Clock To-Morrow Morning.

FRIDAY, October 11, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to X o'Clock To-Morrow Morning.

SATURDAY, October 12, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to Monday Mornining next X o'Clock.

MONDAY, October 14, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as on Saturday last,

And then Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

TUESDAY, October 15, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

WEDNESDAY, October 16, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

THURSDAY, October 17, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

And then Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

Page  15

FRIDAY, October 18, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment; and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday,

Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

SATURDAY, October 19, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment, and Resumed, &c. as Yesterday. And upon mature Deliberation, agreed to the following Decla|rations of the Rights and Grievances of the Colonists, in America, which were Ordered to be inserted.

The Members of this Congress, sincerely devoted, with the warmest Sen|timents of Affection and Duty to his Majesty's Person and Government, inviolably attached to the present happy Establishment of the Protestant Succession, and with Minds deeply impressed by a Sense of the present and impending Misfortunes of the British Colonies on this Continent; having considered as maturely as Time will permit, the Circumstances of the said Colonies, esteem it our indispensable Duty, to make the following Decla|rations of our humble Opinion, respecting the most Essential Rights and Liberties of the Colonists, and of the Grievances under which they labour, by Reason of several late Acts of Parliament.

I. That his Majesty's Subjects in these Colonies, owe the same Al|legiance to the Crown of Great-Britain, that is owing from his Subjects born within the Realm, and all due Subordination to that August Body the Parliament of Great-Britain.

II. That his Majesty's Liege Subjects in these Colonies, are entitled to all the inherent Rights and Liberties of his Natural born Subjects, within the Kingdom of Great-Britain.

III. That it is inseparably essential to the Freedom of a People, and the undoubted Right of Englishmen, that no Taxes be imposed on them, but with their own Consent, given personally, or by their Representatives.

IV. That the People of these Colonies are not, and from their local Cir|cumstances cannot be, Represented in the House of Commons in Great-Britain.

V. That the only Representatives of the People of these Colonies, are Per|sons chosen therein by themselves, and that no Taxes ever have been, or can be Constitutionally imposed on them, but by their respective Legislature.

VI. That all Supplies to the Crown, being free Gifts of the People, it is unreasonable and inconsistent with the Principles and Spirit of the British Constitution, for the People of Great-Britain, to grant to his Majesty the Property of the Colonists.

VII. That Trial by Jury, is the inherent and invaluable Right of every British Subject in these Colonies.

Page  16VIII. That the late Act of Parliament, entitled, An Act for granting and applying certain Stamp Duties, and other Duties, in the British Colonies and Plantations in America, &c. by imposing Taxes on the Inhabitants of these Colonies, and the said Act, and several other Acts, by extending the Ju|risdiction of the Courts of Admiralty beyond its ancient Limits, have a manifest Tendency to subvert the Rights and Liberties of the Colonists.

IX. That the Duties imposed by several late Acts of Parliament, from the peculiar Circumstances of these Colonies, will be extremely Burthen|some and Grievous; and from the scarcity of Specie, the Payment of them absolutely impracticable.

X. That as the Profits of the Trade of these Colonies ultimately center in Great-Britain, to pay for the Manufactures which they are obliged to take from thence, they eventually contribute very largely to all Supplies granted there to the Crown.

XI. That the Restrictions imposed by several late Acts of Parliament, on the Trade of these Colonies, will render them unable to purchase the Ma|nufactures of Great-Britain.

XII. That the Increase, Prosperity, and Happiness of these Colonies, depend on the full and free Enjoyment of their Rights and Liberties, and an Intercourse with Great-Britain mutually Affectionate and Advantageous.

XIII. That it is the Right of the British Subjects in these Colonies, to Petition the King, or either House of Parliament.

Lastly, That it is the indispensable Duty of these Colonies, to the best of Sovereigns, to the Mother Country, and to themselves, to endeavour by a loyal and dutiful Address to his Majesty, and humble Applications to both Houses of Parliament, to procure the Repeal of the Act for granting and applying certain Stamp Duties, of all Clauses of any other Acts of Parlia|ment, whereby the Jurisdiction of the Admiralty is extended as aforesaid, and of the other late Acts for the Restriction of American Commerce.

Upon Motion, Voted, That Robert R. Livingston, William Samuel Johnson, and William Murdock, Esquires, be a Committee to prepare an Address to his Majesty, and lay the same before the Congress on Monday next.

Voted also, That John Rutledge, Edward Tilghman, and Philip Livingston, Esquires, be a Committee to prepare a Memorial and Petition to the Lords in Parliament, and lay the same before the Congress on Monday next.

Voted also, That Thomas Lynch, James Otis, and Thomas McKean, Es|quires, be a Committee to prepare a Petition to the House of Commons of Great-Britain, and lay the same before the Congress on Monday next.

Then the Congress Adjourned to Monday next at XII o'Clock.

Page  17

MONDAY, October1, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

The Committee appointed to prepare and bring in an Address to his Ma|jesty, did Report, That they had essayed a Draught for that Purpose, which they laid on the Table, and humbly submitted to the Correction of the Congress.

The said Address was Read, and after sundry Amendments, the same was approved of by the Congress, and ordered to be Ingrossed.

The Committee appointed to prepare and bring in a Memorial and Peti|tion to the Lords in Parliament, did Report, That they had essayed a Draught for that Purpose, which they laid on the Table, and humbly sub|mitted to the Correction of the Congress.

The said Address was Read, and after sundry Amendments, the same was approved of by the Congress, and ordered to be Ingrossed.

The Committee appointed to prepare and bring in a Petition to the House of Commons of Great-Britain, did Report, That they had essayed a Draught for that Purpose, which they laid on the Table, and humbly submitted to the Correction of the Congress.

The said Address was Read, and after sundry Amendments, the same was approved of by the Congress, and ordered to be Ingrossed.

The Congress Adjourn to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

TUESDAY, October 22, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

The Address to his Majesty being Ingrossed, was Read and Compared, and is as follows, viz.

To the King's most Excellent Maiesty.

The PETITION of the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of the Mas|sachusetts-Bay, Rhode-Island, and Providence Plantations, _____ , _____ , New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, Province of Maryland,

Most humbly Sheweth,

THAT the Inhabitants of these Colonies, Unanimously devoted with the warmest Sentiments of Duty and Affection to your Majesty's Sa|cred Person and Government, Inviolably attached to the present Happy Establishment of the Protestant Succession in your Illustrious House, and deeply sensible of your Royal Attention to their Prosperity and Happiness, Page  18 humbly beg Leave to approach the Throne, by representing to your Ma|jesty, That these Colonies were Originally Planted by Subjects of the British Crown, who, animated with the Spirit of Liberty, encouraged by your Majesty's Royal Predecessors, and confiding in the Public Faith for the En|joyment of all the Rights and Liberties essential to Freedom, emigrated from their Native Country to this Continent, and by their successful Per|severance in the midst of innumerable Dangers and Difficulties, together with a Profusion of their Blood and Treasure, have happily added these vast and valuable Dominions to the Empire of Great-Britain. That for the Enjoyment of these Rights and Liberties, several Governments were early formed in the said Colonies, with full Power of Legislation, agreeable to the Principles of the English Constitution.

That under those Governments, these Liberties, thus vested in their An|cestors, and transmitted to their Posterity, have been exercised and enjoyed, and by the inestimable Blessings thereof (under the Favour of Almighty GOD), the inhospitable Desarts of America have been converted into Flourishing Countries; Science, Humanity, and the Knowledge of Divine Truths, diffused through Remote Regions of Ignorance, Infidelity, and Barbarism; the Number of British Subjects wonderfully Increased, and the Wealth and Power of Great-Britain proportionably Augmented.

That by Means of these Settlements, and the unparallelled Success of your Majesty's Arms, a Foundation is now laid for rendering the British Empire the most Extensive and Powerful of any Recorded in History. Our Connection with this Empire, we esteem our greatest Happiness and Secu|rity, and humbly conceive it may now be so established by your Royal Wis|dom, as to endure to the latest Period of Time; This, with most humble Submission to your Majesty, we apprehend will be most effectually Accom|plished, by fixing the Pillars thereof on Liberty and Justice, and securing the inherent Rights and Liberties of your Subjects here, upon the Principles of the English Constitution. To this Constitution these Two Principles are essential, the Right of your faithful Subjects, freely to grant to your Ma|jesty, such Aids as are required for the Support of your Government over them, and other Public Exigencies, and Trials by their Peers: By the One they are secured from unreasonable Impositions; and by the Other from Ar|bitrary Decisions of the executive Power.

The Continuation of these Liberties to the Inhabitants of America we ardently Implore, as absolutely necessary to Unite the several Parts of your wide extended Dominions, in that Harmony so Essential to the Preservation and Happiness of the Whole. Protected in these Liberties, the Emolu|ments Great-Britain receives from us, however great at present, are incon|siderable, compared with those she has the fairest Prospect of acquiring. By this Protection she will for ever secure to herself the Advantage of con|veying to all Europe, the Merchandises which America furnishes, and of Supplying through the same Channel, whatever is wanted from thence. Here opens a boundless Source of Wealth and Naval Strength; yet these immense Advantages, by the Abridgment of those invaluable Rights and Liberties, by which our Growth has been Nourished, are in Danger of Page  19 being for ever Lost; and our subordinate Legislatures, in Effect, rendered useless, by the late Acts of Parliament imposing Duties and Taxes on these Colonies, and extending the Jurisdiction of the Courts of Admiralty here, beyond its antient Limits: Statutes by which your Majesty's Commons in Britain undertake, absolutely to dispose of the Property of their Fellow Subjects in America, without their Consent, and for the enforcing whereof, they are subjected to the Determination of a single Judge in a Court un|restrained by the wise Rules of the Common Law, the Birthright of Eng|lishmen, and the Safeguard of their Persons and Properties.

The invaluable Rights of Taxing ourselves, and Trial by our Peers, of which we implore your Majesty's Protection, are not, we most humbly conceive Unconstitutional; but confirmed by the Great CHARTER of English Liberty. On the First of these Rights the Honourable the House of Com|mons Found their Practice of Originating Money Bills, a Right enjoyed by the Kingdom of Ireland, by the Clergy of England, until relinquished by themselves, a Right, in fine, which all other your Majesty's English Subjects, both within, and without the Realm, have hitherto enjoyed.

With Hearts therefore impressed with the most indelible Characters of Gratitude to your Majesty, and to the Memory of the Kings of your Illustrious House, whose Reigns have been Signally distinguished by their Auspicious Influence on the Prosperity of the British Dominions, and convinced by the most affecting Proofs of your Majesty's Paternal Love to all your People, however distant, and your unceasing and benevolent Desires to promote their Happiness, We most humbly beseech your Majesty, that you will be gra|ciously pleased to take into your Royal Consideration, the Distresses of your faithful Subjects on this Continent, and to lay the same before your Ma|jesty's Parliament, and to afford them such Relief, as in your Royal Wis|dom their unhappy Circumstances shall be judged to require.

And your Petitioners as in Duty bound will pray.

The Memorial to the Lords in Parliament, was Read and Compared, and is as follows, viz.

To the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual, and Temporal of Great-Britain, in Parliament assembled.

The MEMORIAL of the Freeholders and other Inhabitants of the Mas|sachusetts-Bay, Rhode-Island, and Providence Plantations, _____ , _____ , New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, Province of Maryland,

Most humbly Sheweth,

THAT his Majesty's Liege Subjects in his American Colonies, tho' they acknowledge a due Subordination to that August Body the BritishPage  20 Parliament, are entitled, in the Opinion of your Memorialists, to all the inherent Rights and Liberties of the Natives of Great-Britain, and have ever since the Settlement of the said Colonies, exercised those Rights and Liberties, as far as their local Circumstances would permit.

That your Memorialists humbly conceive one of the most essential Rights of these Colonies, which they have ever, till lately, uninterruptedly en|joyed, to be Trial by Jury.

That your Memorialists also humbly conceive another of these essential Rights to be the Exemption from all Taxes, but such as are imposed on the People by the several Legislatures in these Colonies, which Right also they have, till of late, freely enjoyed.

But your Memorialists humbly beg Leave to represent to your Lordships, That the Act for granting certain Stamp Duties in the British Colonies in America, &c. fills his Majesty's American Subjects with the deepest Concern, as it tends to deprive them of the Two fundamental and invaluable Rights and Liberties above mentioned, and that several other late Acts of Parlia|ment, which extend the Jurisdiction and Powers of Courts of Admiralty in the Plantations, beyond their Limits in Great-Britain, thereby make an unnecessary and unhappy Distinction as to the Modes of Trial, between us and our Fellow Subjects there, by whom we never have been excelled in Duty and Loyalty to our Sovereign.

That from the natural Connection between Great-Britain and America, the perpetual Continuance of which your Memorialists most ardently de|sire, they conceive that nothing can Conduce more to the Interest of both, than the Colonists free Enjoyment of their Rights and Liberties, and an affectionate Intercourse between Great-Britain and them. But your Me|morialists (not waving their Claim to these Rights, of which with the most becoming Veneration and Deference to the Wisdom and Justice of your Lordships, they apprehend they cannot Reasonably be deprived) humbly Represent, That from the peculiar Circumstances of these Colonies, the Duties imposed by the aforesaid Act, and several other late Acts of Parlia|ment, are extremely Grievous and Burthensome, and the Payment of the said Duties will very soon, for want of Specie, become absolutely impracti|cable; and that the Restrictions on Trade by the said Acts, will not only greatly distress the Colonies, but must be extremely detrimental to the Trade and true Interest of Great-Britain.

Your Memorialists therefore, impressed with a just Sense of the unfor|tunate Circumstances of the Colonies, and the impending destructive Con|sequences which must necessarily ensue from the Execution of those Acts, animated with the warmest Sentiments of filial Affection for their Mother Country, most earnestly and humbly entreat, That your Lordships will be pleased to Hear their Counsel in Support of this Memorial, and take the Premisses into your most serious Consideration, and that your Lordships will also be thereupon pleased to pursue such Measures for Restoring the just Rights and Liberties of the Colonies, and preserving them for ever inviolate▪ Page  21 for redressing their present, and preventing future Grievances, thereby pro|moting the 〈◊〉 Interest of Great-Britain and America, as to your Lord|ships in your great Wisdom shall seem most Conducive and Effectual to that important End.

And your Memorialists as in Duty bound will ever pray.

WEDNESDAY, October 23, 1765, A. M.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

The Petition to the House of Commons being Ingrossed, was Read and Compared, and is as follows, viz.

To the Honourable the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of Great-Britain, in Parliament assembled.

The PETITION of his Majesty's dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Free|holders and other Inhabitants of the Colonies of the Massachusetts-Bay, Rhode-Island, and Providence Plantations, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, Maryland,

Most humbly Sheweth,

THAT the several late Acts of Parliament imposing divers Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and laying the Trade and Commerce thereof under very Burthensome Restrictions, but above all the Act for granting and applying certain Stamp Duties, &c. in America, have fill'd them with the deepest Concern and Surprize'; and they humbly conceive the Execution of them will be attended with Consequences very Injurious to the Commercial Interest of Great-Britain and her Colonies, and must terminate in the eventual Ruin of the latter.

Your Petitioners therefore most ardently implore the Attention of the Honourable House, to the united and dutiful Representation of their Cir|cumstances, and to their earnest Supplications for Relief, from those Regu|lations which have already involv'd this Continent in Anxiety, Confusion, and Distress.

We most sincerely recognize our Allegiance to the Crown, and acknow|ledge all due Subordination to the Parliament of Great-Britain, and shall always retain the most grateful Sense of their Assistance and Protection. It is from and under the English Constitution, we derive all our Civil and Religious Rights and Liberties: We Glory in being Subjects of the best of Kings, and having been Born under the most perfect Form of Government; but it is with most ineffable and humiliating Sorrow, that we find ourselves, of late, deprived of the Right of Granting our own Property for his Ma|jesty's Page  22 Service, to which our Lives and Fortunes are entirely devoted, and to which, on his Royal Requisitions, we leave ever been ready to contribute to the utmost of our Abilities.

We have also the Misfortune to find, that all the Penalties and Forfei|tures mentioned in the Stamp Act, and in divers late Acts of Trade extend|ing to the Plantations, are, at the Election of the Informer, Recoverable in any Court of Admiralty in America. This, as the newly erected Court of Admiralty has a general Jurisdiction over all British America, renders his Majesty's Subjects in these Colonies, liable to be carried, at an immense Expence, from one End of the Continent, to the other.

It gives us also great Pain, to see a manifest Distinction made therein, between the Subjects of our Mother Country, and those in the Colonies, in that the like Penalties and Forfeitures recoverable there only in his Ma|jesty's Courts of Record, are made cognizable here by a Court of Admiralty: By these Means we seem to be, in Effect, unhappily deprived of Two Pri|vileges essential to Freedom, and which all Englishmen have ever considered as their best Birthrights, that of being free from all Taxes but such as they have consented to in Person, or by their Representatives, and of Trial by their Peers.

Your Petitioners further shew, That the remote Situation, and other Circumstances of the Colonies, render it impracticable that they should be Represented, but in their respective subordinate Legislature; and they hum|bly conceive, that the Parliament, adhering strictly to the Principles of the Constitution, have never hitherto Tax'd any, but those who were actually therein Represented; for this Reason, we humbly apprehend, they never have Tax'd Ireland, or any other of the Subjects without the Realm.

But were it ever so clear, that the Colonies might in Law, be reasonably deem'd to be Represented in the Honourable House of Commons, yet we conceive, that very good Reasons, from Inconvenience, from the Principles of true Policy, and from the Spirit of the British Constitution, may be ad|duced to shew, that it would be for the real Interest of Great-Britain, as well as her Colonies, that the late Regulations should be rescinded, and the several Acts of Parliament imposing Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and extending the Jurisdiction of the Courts of Admiralty here, beyond their ancient Limits, should be Repeal'd.

We shall not Attempt a minute Detail of all the Reasons which the Wis|dom of the Honourable House may suggest, on this Occasion, but would humbly submit the following Particulars to their Consideration.

That Money is already become very scarce in these Colonies, and is still decreasing by the necessary Exportation of Specie from the Continent, for the Discharge of our Debts to British Merchants.

That immensely heavy Debt is yet due from the Colonies for British Manufactures, and that they are still heavily burthen'd with 〈◊◊〉 dis|charge the Arrearages due for Aide granted by them in the late War.

Page  23That the Balance of Trade will ever be much against the Colonies, and in 〈◊〉 of Great-Britain, whilst we consume her Manufactures, the De|mand for which must ever Increase in Proportion to the Number of Inha|bitants settled here, with the Means of Purchasing them. We therefore humbly conceive it to be the Interest of Great-Britain, to increase, rather that diminish, those Means, as the Profits of all the Trade of the Colonies ultimately center there to pay for her Manufactures, as we are not allowed to purchase elsewhere; and by the Consumption of which, at the advanced Prices the British Taxes oblige the Makers and Venders to set on them, we eventually contribute very largely to the Revenue of the Crown.

That from the Nature of American Business, the Multiplicity of Suits and Papers used in Matters of small Value, in a Country where Freeholds are so minutely divided, and Property so frequently transferr'd, a Stamp Duty must ever be very Burthensome and Unequal.

That it is extremely improbable that the Honourable House of Commons, shou'd at all Times, be thoroughly acquainted with our Condition, and all Facts requisite to a just and equal Taxation of the Colonies.

It is also humbly submitted, Whether there be not a material Distinction in Reason and sound Policy, at least, between the necessary Exercise of Par|liamentary Jurisdiction in general Acts, for the Amendment of the Common Law, and the Regulation of Trade and Commerce through the whole Em|pire, and the Exercise of that Jurisdiction, by imposing Taxes on the Colonies.

That the several subordinate Provincial Legislatures have been moulded into Forms, as nearly resembling that of their Mother Country, as by his Majesty's Royal Predecessors was thought convenient; and their Legislatures seem to have been wisely and graciously established, that the Subjects in the Colonies might, under the due Administration thereof, enjoy the happy Fruits of the British Government, which in their present Circumstances, they cannot be so fully and clearly availed of, any other Way under these Forms of Government we and our Ancestors have been Born or Settled, and have had our Lives, Liberties, and Properties, protected. The People here, as every where else, retain a great Fondness for their old Customs and Usages, and we trust that his Majesty's Service, and the Interest of the Na|tion, so far from being obstructed, have been vastly promoted by the Pro|vincial Legislatures.

That we esteem our Connections with, and Dependance on Great-Britain, as one of our greatest Blessings, and apprehend the latter will appear to be sufficiently secure, when it is considered, that the Inhabitants in the Colo|nies have the most unbounded Affection for his Majesty's Person, Family, and Government, as well as for the Mother Country, and that their Subor|dination to the Parliament, is universally acknowledged.

We therefore most humbly entreat, That the Honourable House would be pleased to hear our Counsel in Support of this Petition, and take our distressed and deplorable Case into their serious Consideration, and that the Page  24 Acts and Clauses of Acts, so grievously restraining our Trade and Commerce, imposing Duties and Taxes on our Property, and extending the Jurisdiction of the Court of Admiralty beyond its ancient Limits, may be repeal'd; or that the Honourable House would otherwise relieve your Petitioners, as in your great Wisdom and Goodness shall seem meet.

And your Petitioners as in Duty bound shall ever pray.

Then the Congress Adjourned till To-Morrow Morning X o'Clock.

THURSDAY, October 24, 1765.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

The Congress took into Consideration, the Manner in which their several Petitions should be preferred and sollicited in Great-Britain, and came to the following Determination, viz.

It is recommended by the Congress, to the several Colonies, to appoint special Agents for solliciting Relief from their great Grievances, and unite their utmost Interest and Endeavours for that Purpose.

Voted Unanimously, That the Clerk of this Congress Sign the Minutes of their Proceedings, and deliver a Copy for the Use of each Colony and Province.

By Order of the Congress, JOHN COTTON, Clerk.

Savannah, in GEORGIA, September 6, 1765.

SIR,

(COPY.) YOUR Letter dated in June last, acquainting me, that the House of Representatives of your Province, had Unani|mously agreed to propose a Meeting at the City of New-York, of Com|mittees, from the Houses of Representatives of the several British Colonies on this Continent, on the First Tuesday in October next, to consult together on the present Circumstances of the Colonies, and the Difficulties to which they are, and must be reduced, by the Operation of the Acts of Parliament for laying Duties and Taxes on the Colonies, and to consider of an humble Representation of their Condition to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief, came to Hand at an unlucky Season, it being in the Re|cess of the General Assembly of this Province; nevertheless, immediately upon the Receipt of your Letter, I dispatch'd Expresses to the several Re|presentatives of this Province, acquainting them with the Purport thereof, and requesting them to meet at this Place without delay, and accordingly they met here on Monday last, to the Number of Sixteen, being a large Majority of the Representatives of this Province, the Whole consisting of Twenty-five Persons; but his Excellency our Governor being applied to, did not think it expedient to call them together on the Occasion, which is the Reason of their not sending a Committee, as proposed by your House, Page  25 for you may be assured, Sir, that no Representatives on this Continent, can more sincerely concur in the Measures proposed, than do the Representatives of this Province now met together, neither can any People, as Individuals, more warmly Espouse the Common Cause of the Colonies, than do the People of this Province.

The Gentlemen now present, request it as a Favour, you'll be pleased to send me a Copy of such Representation as may be agreed upon by the se|veral Committees at New-York, and acquaint me how, and in what Man|ner, the same is to be lain before the King and Parliament, whether by any Person particularly authorized for that Purpose, or by the Colony Agents. The General Assembly of this Province stands Prorogued to the 22d Day of October next, which is the Time it generally meets for the Dispatch of the Ordinary Business of the Province; and I doubt not, the Representatives of this Province, will then, in their Legislative Capacity, take under Con|sideration, the Grievances so justly complain'd of, and transmit their Sense of the same to Great-Britain, in such Way, as may seem best calculated to obtain Redress, and so as to convince the Sister Colonies of their inviolable Attachment to the Common Cause. I am, SIR,

Your most obedient, And most humble Servant ALEXANDER WILLY.

New-Hampshire.

To SAMUEL WHITE, Esq Speaker of the House of Re|presentatives of Massachu|setts, &c.

Mr. Speaker laid before the House, a Letter from the Honourable Speaker of the Honourable House of Representatives of the Province of the Mas|sachusetts-Bay, to the Speaker of this Assembly, proposing a Meeting, of Committees, from the several Assemblies of the British Colonies on the Continent, at New-York, to consider of a general, united, dutiful, loyal, and humble Representation of our Circumstances, and for imploring his Majesty and the Parliament for Relief: Which being Read,

RESOLVED, That notwithstanding we are Sensible such Representation ought to be made, and approve of the proposed Method for obtaining there|of, yet the present Situation of our Governmental Affairs will not permit us to appoint a Committee, to attend such Meeting, but shall be ready to join in any Address to his Majesty and the Parliament we may be honoured with the Knowledge of, probable to answer the 〈…〉.

〈…〉, Clerk.

The Two foregoing Letters, are true Copies from the Original. Attest. JOHN COTTON, Clerk.

Adjourned to To-Morrow Morning IX o'Clock.

Page  26

FRIDAY, October 25, 1765.

The Congress met according to Adjournment.

Time not permitting the Clerk to make Copies at large, of the Proceed|ings of the Congress, for all the Colonies they think it proper shou'd be furnished therewith;

RESOLVED, That the Gentlemen from the Massachusetts-Bay, be requested to send a Copy thereof to the Colony of New-Hampshire, the Gentlemen of Maryland to Virginia: and the Gentlemen of South-Carolina to Georgia, and North-Carolina.

Signed per Order, J. COTTON, Clerk.

An Account of the Disposition of the £ 500 Granted by Ordi|nance, and received of the Treasurer, by William Murdock, Edward Tilghman, and Thomas Ringgold.

To Cash paid the whole Expences of the Committee to New York, there and back again.£ 1314 1
To Cash paid Express to New York, to give Notice of our coming.15 
To paid for Express, to send a Copy of our Proceedings to the Speaker of Virginia.1〈◊〉
To paid for a Bill of Exchange, to remit to Charles Garth, Esq with the Address and Petition 150. Ster|ling, at 65 per Cent Exchange,410
Cash remaining in Hand 127 〈◊〉, and 〈◊〉,1727
 £ 5751 9
By Cash received of the Treasurer, in Gold, 〈…〉:£ 500 
09 〈…〉 27.£ 5323
Half 〈◊〉, at 9••6.147 ••
4 〈…〉, at 266.36
1 〈◊〉,23 6
ditto.11 9
 £ 57519

October 26, 1765.

SIR,

WE had the Honour to be appointed by the House of Representatives of the Province of Maryland, a Committee, to meet Committees of the Members of Assembly of the other Colonies, on this Continent, at New-York, the First of this Instant, to join in a general, and united, duti|ful, loyal, and humble Representation of the Condition of those Colonies, to his Majesty and the Parliament, and to implore Relief from the grievous Burthens lately laid upon our Trade, and the Taxes and Duties lately im|posed on us, especially by the STAMP-ACT.

Accordingly Members from Nine Colonies met, to wit, from the Mas|sachusetts-Bay, Connecticut, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations▪ New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Government of the Counties of New-Castle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware, Maryland, and South-Carolina, but Page  27 as you'll find the Address, &c. Signed only by Members from Six of those Colonies, it may be proper to acquaint you with the Reasons why they did not all Sign, tho' they all concurr'd with the Proceedings.

The Lieutenant Governor of New-York Prorogued their Assembly from Time to Time, so that their House had not an Opportunity of appointing Members with full Powers to join, and Sign the Address, &c. Yet the Assembly of New-York, having at their last Meeting, appointed Five of their Members as a Committee, not only to Correspond with their Agent at Home, but also during the Recess of the House, to write to, and corres|pond with, the several Assemblies, or Committees of Assemblies on this Continent, on the subject Matter of the several late Acts of Parliament, so Grievous and Dangerous to their Colonies, it was thought proper to admit this Committee to join in the Conferences, and they agreed to what was done, and promised to use their Endeavours with their Assembly to concur also whenever they should be permitted to meet.

The South-Carolina Assembly, not rightly viewing the Proposal (which Originally came from the Assembly of the Government of the Massachusetts-Bay,) as it was intended that the several Committees, when met, should Frame and Sign an Address to his Majesty, and Memorial and Petition to the Parliament, to be immediately Dispatch'd by the Congress, Instructed their Members (Messrs. Lynch, Rutledge, and Gadsden,) to return their Pro|ceedings to them, for Approbation. The Connecticut Assembly made the same Restrictions in their Instructions. The Assembly also of New-Hamp|shire wrote, that they had Resolved, That notwithstanding they were Sensi|ble such a Representation ought to be made, and approved of the proposed Method for obtaining thereof, yet the present Situation of their Govern|mental Affairs, wou'd not permit them to appoint a Committee to attend such Meeting, but shou'd be ready to join in any Address to his Majesty and the Parliament they might be honoured with the Knowledge of, probable to answer the proposed End: And the Speaker of the Assembly of Georgia wrote, that a Majority of their Members had applied to the Governor to call their Assembly, and he did not think it Expedient, which was the Rea|son they did not send a Committee as proposed, but requested us to transmit a Copy of our Proceedings to them (which will be done) and that their Assembly wou'd meet about this Time, and he did not doubt but they shou'd Act so as to convince the Sister Colonies of their inviolable Attach|ment to the Common Cause: We also understood the North-Carolina, and we know the Virginia Assembly, was Prorogued, whereby they cou'd not have the Opportunity of joining us; so that we doubt not but the Colonies who have not Signed, will very speedily transmit similar Addresses, &c. if their Assemblies should not be hindered from Meeting: And to this Pur|pose, we hope you'll soon hear from the Assembly of South-Carolina. By the Gentlemen of that Colony we were favoured with a Sight of your late Letters, and inform'd of your careful and spirited Conduct with Regard to the Interests of that Colony, and that, together with your Declaration, which we find in those Letters, that you enjoy an independant Seat in the British Parliament, induced us (as we have no established Agent at present. for this Province, nor have yet been able to obtain a Law to Tax ourselves Page  28 for that Purpose) to trouble you with our Request, that you will Present the inclosed Address to his Majesty, and Memorial and Petition to the Houses of Parliament, and exert your utmost Interest and Abilities in behalf of this poor distress'd Country, and of this Province in particular.

We hope as there is a Change in the Ministry, and as the Gentlemen in the House of Commons, may at their next Meeting, take a more enlarged View of the true Interest of Great-Britain, and her Colonies, they will find it to be in supporting the Rights and encouraging the Trade of the lat|ter, and that the Happiness of the Mother Country and her Colonies must be inseparable, and that we shall obtain Relief.

The several Committees agreed to recommend it to their respective Colo|nies to appoint Special Agents on this Occasion, and to instruct them to unite their utmost Interest and Endeavours for that Purpose. One Ad|dress, &c. was transmitted by the Gentlemen of the Massachusetts Govern|ment, immediately to their Agent (Mr. Jackson we understood) and we expect the other Colonies will have Duplicates sent to their Agents, and we hope will all unite in Expence and Instructions, to have able Counsel before both the Lords and Commons, as our Petitions pray.

We were intrusted with the Disposition of some Money upon this Occa|sion, and inclose you a Bill of Exchange, on Messrs. Capel and Osgood Han|bury, for One Hundred and Fifty Pounds Sterling, as a Compensation for your Trouble and Expence in this Affair. We doubt not our Assembly will approve of what we do in this Matter; and as they are to meet the last of this Month, we shall lay our Proceedings before them, and 'tis probable they will write you more fully, and furnish you with such further Instruc|tions and Arguments, as may appear to them to be proper to be given and urged on this Occasion, in Behalf of the Colonies.

We are, Your most obedient Servants.

ANNAPOLIS: Printed by Ionas Green, Printer to the Province. MDCCLXVI.