The compleat housewife: or, Accomplish'd gentlewoman's companion: being a collection of several hundred of the most approved receipts, in cookery, pastry, confectionary, preserving, pickles, cakes, creams, jellies, made wines, cordials. And also bills of fare for every month in the year. : To which is added, a collection of near two hundred family receipts of medicines; viz. drinks, syrups, salves, ointments, and many other things of sovereign and approved efficacy in most distempers, pains, aches, wounds, sores, &c. never before made publick in these parts; fit either for private families, or such publick-spirited gentlewomen as would be beneficent to their poor neighbors.
Smith, E. (Eliza), d. ca. 1732.
Page  [unnumbered]

THE Compleat Housewife: OR, The Accomplish'd Gentlewoman's COMPANION.

COOKERY, &c.

To make a Soop.

_TAKE a Leg of Beef, and boil it down with some Salt, a Bundle of sweet Herbs, an Onion, a few Cloves, a bit of Nut|meg; boil three Gallons of Water to one; then take two or three Pounds of lean Beef cut in thin Slices; then put in your Stew-pan a Piece of Butter, as big as an Egg, and flour it, and let the Pan be hot, and shake it 'til the Butter be brown; then lay your Beef in your Pan over a pretty quick Fire, cover it close, give it a Turn now and then, and strain in your strong Brth, with an Anchovy or two, and a Handfl of Spinge and Endive boil'd green, and drained and shred goss; then have Pallets ready boiled, and cut in Pieces, and Toasts Page  2 fry'd and cut like Dice, and forc'd meat Balls s••'d: Take out the fry'd Beef, and put all the rest 〈◊〉 with a little Pepper, and let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, and serve it up with a Knuckle of Veal, or a Fowl boil|ed, in the Middle.

Another Gravy Soop.

TAKE a Leg of Beef, and a Piece of the Neck, and boil it 'til you have all the Goodness out of it; then strain it from the Meat; then take Half a Pound of fresh Butter, and put it in a Stew-pan, and brown it; then put in an Onion, stuck with Cloves, some Endive, Sellary, and Spinnage, and your strong Broth, and sea|son it to your Palate with Salt, Pepper, and Spices; and let it boil together; and put in Chips of French Bread dried by the Fire; and serve it up with a French Roll toasted, in the Middle.

A Fasting-Day Soop.

TAKE Spinnage, Sorrel, Chervil, and Lettuce, and chop them a little; then brown some Butter, and put in your Herbs, keep them stirring that they do not burn; then have boiling Water over the Fire, and put to it a very little Pepper, some Salt, a whole Onion stuck with Cloves, and a French Roll cut in Slices, and dried very hard, and some Pistachia Kernels blanched and shred fine, and let all boil together; then beat up the Yolks of eight Eggs with a little White-wine and the Juice of a Lemon, and mix it with your Broth, and toast a whole French Roll, and put in the Middle of your Dish, and pour your Soop over it; garnish your Dish with ten or twelve poached Eggs and scalded Spinnage.

Savoury Balls.

TAKE part of a Leg of Lamb or Veal, and scrape it fine, with the same Quantity of minc'd Beef-suet, a little lean Bacon, sweet Herbs, a Shallot, and Ancho|vies, Page  3 beat it in a Mortar 'til it is as smooth as Wax; sea|son it with savoury Spice, and make it into little Balls.

A Caudle for Sweet Pyes.

TAKE Sack and White wine alike in Quantity, a little Verjuice and Sugar, boil it, and brew it with two or three Eggs, as butter'd Ale; when the Pyes are baked, pour it in at the Funnel, and shake it together.

A Lear for Savoury Pyes.

TAKE Claret, Gravy, Oyster-Liquor, two or three Anchovies, a Faggot of sweet Herbs, and an Oni|on; boil it up and thicken it with brown Butter, then pour it into your savoury Pyes when called for.

A Ragoo for made Dishes.

TAKE Claret, Gravy, sweet Herbs, and savoury Spice, toss up in it Lamb-stones, Cox-combs, boil|ed, blanched, and sliced, with sliced Sweet-Meats, Oys|ters, Mushrooms, Truffles, and Murrels; thicken these with brown Butter, use it when called for.

To make Plumb Porridge.

TAKE a Leg and Shin of Beef to ten Gallons of Water, boil it very tender, and when the Broth is strong, strain it out, wipe the Pot, and put in the Broth again; slice six Penny-loaves thin, cutting off the Top and Bottom; put some of the Liquor to it, cover it up, and let it stand a Quarter of an Hour, and then put it in your Pot; let it boil a Quarter of an Hour, then put in five Pounds of Currants, let them boil a little, and put in five Pounds of Raisins, and two Pounds of Prunes, and let them boil 'til they swell; then put in three Quarters of an Ounce of Mace, Half an Ounce of Cloves, two Nutmegs, all of them beat fine, and mix it with a little Liquor cold, and put them in a very little while, and Page  4 take off the Pot, and put in three Pounds of Sugar, a lit|tle Salt, a Quart of Sack, and a Quart of Clret, the Juice of two or three Lemons; you may thicken with Sagoe instead of Bread, if you please; pour them into Earthen Pans, and keep them for Use.

A Soop or Pottage.

TAKE several Knuckles of Mutton, a Knuckle of Veal, a Shin of Beef, and put to these twelve Quarts of Water, cover the Pot close, and set it on the Fire; let it not boil too fast; scum it well, and let it stand on the Fire twenty four Hours; then strain it through a Colan|der, and when it is cold take off the Fat, and set it on the Fire again, and season it with Salt, a few Cloves, Pepper, a Blade of Mace, a Nutmeg quarter'd, a Bunch of sweet Herbs, and a Pint of Gravy; let all these boil up for Half an Hour, and then strain it; put Spinnage, Sorrel, green Peas, Asparagus, or Artichoke bottoms, ac|cording to the Time of Year; then thicken it with the Yolks of three or four Eggs; have in Readiness some Sheeps Tongues, Cox combs, and Sweetbreads, sliced thin, and fried, and put them in, and some Mushrooms, and French Bread dried and cut in little Bits, some forc'd-meat Balls, and some very thin Slices of Bacon, make all these very hot, and garnish the Dish with Colworts and Spinnage scalded green.

To make Peas-Pottage.

TAKE a Quart of white Peas, a Piece of Neck|beef, and four Quarts of fair Water, and boil them 'til they are all to Pieces, then strain them through a Co|lander; then take a Handful or two of Spinnage, a Top or two of young Colworts, and a very small Leek; shred the Herbs a little, and put them into a Frying pan, or Stew pan, with three Quarters of a Pound of fresh But|ter, but the Butter must be very hot before you put in your Herbs; let them fry a little while, then put in your Liquor, and two or three Anchovies, some Salt and Pep|per, Page  5 to your Taste, a Sprig of Mint rubb'd in small, and let all boil together 'til you think it is thick enough; then have in Readiness some forc'd Meat, and make three or four score Balls, about the Bigness of large Peas, fry them brown, and put them in the Dish you serve it in, and fry some thin Slices of Bacon, put some in the Dish, and some on the Brim of the Dish, with scalded Spinnage; fry some Toasts after the Balls brown and hard, and break them into the Dish; then pour your Pottage over all, and serve to the Table.

To make strong Broth to keep for Use.

TAKE part of a Leg of Beef, and the scrag End of a Neck of Mutton, and break the Bones in Pie|ces, and put it to as much Water as will cover it, and a little Salt; and when it boils, scum it clean, and put in|to it a whole Onion stuck with Cloves, a Bunch of sweet Herbs, some Pepper, a Nutmeg quartered; let these boil 'til the Meat is boiled in Pieces, and the Strength boiled out of it; then put to it two or three Anchovies, and when they are dissolved, strain it out; and keep it for any sort of Hash or Fricasy.

To make Forc'd Meat.

TAKE part of a Leg of Mutton, Veal, or Beef, and pick off the Skins and Fat and to every Pound of Meat put two Pounds of Beef-sue; shred them together very fine, then season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Sage; then put al' into a stone Mortar, and to every two Pounds of Meat put Half a Pint of Oysters and six Eggs well beaten; then mix them all together, and beat it very well; then keep it in an Earthen Pot for your Use; put a little Flour on the Top, and when you roll them up, flour your Hands.

Page  6

A Lamb Pye.

CUT a hind Quarter of Lamb into thin Slices, sea|son it with sweet Spices, and lay it in the Pye, mix'd with Half a Pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, Half a Pound of Currants, two or three Spanish Potatoes boil|ed, blanched, and sliced; or an Artichoke Bottom or two, with Prunellas, Damsons, Gooseberries, Grapes, Citron and Lemon Chips: Lay on Butter, and close the Pye; when 'tis baked, make a Caudle for it.

A Chicken Pye.

TAKE six small Chichens, roll up a Piece of But|ter in sweet Spice, and put it into them; then sea|son them, and lay them in the Pye, with the Marrow of two Bones, with Fruit and Preserves, as the Lamb Pye, with a Caudle.

A Lumber Pye.

TAKE a Pound and Half of a Fillet of Veal, and mince it with the same Quantity of Beef suet; sea|son it with sweet Spice, five Pippins, an handful of Spin|nage, and an hard Lettuce, Thyme and Parsley. Mix it with a Penny grated white Loaf, the Yolks of Eggs, Sack and Orange-flower Water, a Pound and an Half of Cur|rants and Preserves, as the Lamb Pye, with a Caudle. An Humble Pye is made the same way.

A Mutton Pye.

SEASON your Mutton-steaks with savoury Spice; fill the Pye, lay on the Butter, and close the Pye: When it is baked, toss up a Handful of chopp'd Capers, Cucumbers, and Oysters, in Gravy, an Anchovy, and drawn Butter.

Page  7

A Pigeon Pye.

TRUSS and season your Pigeons with savoury Spice, lard them with Bacon, and stuff them with Forc'd|meat, and lay them in the Pye with the Ingredients for savoury Pyes, with Butter, and close the Pye. A Lear, a Chicken or Capon Pye, is made the same Way.

A Neats-Tongue Pye.

HALF boil the Tongues, blanch and slice them; season them with savoury Spice, with Blls, sliced Lemon and Butter, and close the Pye. When it is bak'd, pour into it a Ragoo.

To pickle Oysters.

TAKE a Quart of Oysters, and wash them in their own Liquor very well, till all the Grittiness is out; put them in a Sauce-pan or Stew pan, and 〈◊〉 in the Liquor over them, set them on the Fire, and scu them; then put in three or four Blades of Mace, a Spoonful of whole Pepper-cors; when you think they are boiled e|nough, throw in a Glass of white Wine; let them have a thorough Scald; then tak them up, and when they are cold, put them in a Pot, and pour the Liquor over them, and keep them for Use. Take them out with a Spoon.

To Collar Eels.

TAKE your Eel and cut it open; take out the Bones, and cut off the Head and Tail, and lay the Eel flt on a Dresser, and ••red Sage s fine as possible, and mix it with black Pepper beat, Nutmeg grated, and Salt, and lay it all over the Eel, and roll it up hard in little Cloths, and tie it up tight at een End; then set over some Water with Pepper and Salt, five or six Cloves, three or four Blades of Mace, and a Bay-leaf or two; boil it and the Bones and Head and Tail well together; then Page  8 take out the Head and Tail, and put it away, and put in your Eels, and let them boil till they are tender; then take them out of the Liquor, and boil the Liquor longer; then take it off, and when 'tis cold, put it to your Eels, but do not take off the little Cloths till you use them.

Hung Beef.

MAKE a strong Brine with Bay-Salt, and Petre-Salt, and Pump Water, and steep therein a Rib of Beef for nine Days; then hang it up in a Chimney where Wood or Saw-Dust is burnt; when 'tis a little dry, wash the Out-side with Blood two or three Times, to make it look black, and when 'tis dryed enough, boil it for Use.

To make Collar'd Beef.

TAKE a Flank of Beef, salt it with white Salt, and let it lie forty eight Hours; then wash it, and hang it in the Wind to dry twenty four Hours; then take Pep|per, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmegs, and Saltpetre, all beaten fine, and mix them together, and rub it all over the In-side, and roll it up hard, and tye it Bay-leaves, and four Pounds of Butter, and cover the Pot with Rye Paste, and bake it with Houshold Bread.

To stew Oysters in French Rolls.

TAKE 1 Quart of large Oysters, wash them in their own Liquor, and strain it, and put them in it with a little Salt, some Pepper, Mace, and sliced Nutmeg; let the Oysters stew a little with all these Things, and thicken them up with a great deal of Butter; then take six French Rolls, cut a Piece off the Top, and take out the Crumb, and take your Oysters boiling hot, and fill the Rolls full, and set them near the Fire on a Chafing-Dish of Coals, and let them be hot through, and as the Liquor soaks in, fill them up with more, if you have 'em, or some hot Gravy: So serve them up instead of a Pud|ding.

Page  9

A Veal Pye.

RAISE an high Pye, then cut a Fillet of Veal into three or four Fillets, season it with savoury Spice, a little minc'd Sage and sweet Herbs; lay it in the Pye, with Slices of Bacon at the Bottom, and betwixt each Piece, lay on Butter, and close the Pye.

A Turkey Pye.

BONE the Turkey, season it with savoury Spice, and lay it in the Pye with two Capons, or two wild Ducks, cut in Pieces to fill up the Corners; lay on Butter, and close the Pye.

A Florendine of a Kidney of Veal.

SHRED the Kidney, Fat and all, with a little Spin|nage, Parsley, and Lettuce, three Pippins and O|range-peel; season it with sweet Spice and Sugar, and a good Handful of Currants, two or three grated Biskets, Sack, and Orange-flower Water, two or three Eggs; mix it into a Body, and put it into a Dish, being coverd with Puff Paste, lay on a cut Lid, and garnish the Brim.

A Marrow-Pudding.

BOIL a Quart of Cream or Milk, with a stick of Cinnamon, a quarter'd Nutmeg and large Mace; then mix it with eight Eggs well beat, a little Salt, Sugar, Sack, and Orange-flower Water; strain it, then put to it three grated Biskets, an Handful of Currants, as mny Raisins of the Sun, the Marrow of two Bones, all in four large Pieces, then gather it to a Body over the Fire; then put it into a Dish, having the B••m threo' garnished with Puff Paste, and raised in the Oven; then ly on the four Pieces of Marrow, Knots, and Pastes, sliced Citron, and Lemon peel.

Page  10

A Calves-Feet Pudding.

TAKE Calves Feet, shred them very fine, and mix them with a Penny Loaf grated, and scalded, with a Point of Cream; put to it half a Pound of shred Beef-suet, eight Eggs, and a Handful of plump'd Currants; season it with sweet Spice and Sugar, a little Sack and Orange-flower Water, the Marrow of two Bones; then put it in a Veal Caul, being wash'd over with the Batter of Eggs, then wet a Cloth and put it therein, tie it close up; when the Pot boils, put it in; boil it about two Hours; then turn it in a Dish, and stick on it sliced Almonds and Cit|ron; let the Sauce be Sack and Orange flower Water, with Lemon-juice, Sugar, and drawn Butter.

To stuff a Shoulder or Leg of Mutton with Oysters.

TAKE a little grated Bread, some Beef-suet, Yolks of hard Eggs, three Anchovies, a Bit of an Onion, Salt and Pepper, Thyme and Winter-savoury, twelve Oysters, some Nutmeg grated; mix all these together, and shred them very fine, and work them up with raw Eggs like a Paste, and stuff your Mutton under the Skin in the thickest Place, or where you please, and roast it; and for Sauce, take some of the Oyster-liquor, some Cla|ret, two or three Anchovies, a little Nutmeg, a Bit of an Onion, the rest of the Oysters: Stew all these together, then take out the Onion, and put it under the Mutton.

To boil a Pike.

CUT open a living Pike, gut it, and scour the Out|side and In side very well with Salt, then wash it clean, and have in Readiness a Pickle to boil it in, Water, Venegar, Mace, whole Pepper, a Bunch of sweet Herbs, and a small Onion; there must be Liquor enough to cover it; when the Liquor boils, put in the Pike, and make it boil soon, (half an Hour will boil a very large Page  11 Pike;) make your Sauce with White wine, a little of the Liquor, two Anchovies, some Shrimps, or Lobsters, or Crab; beat and mix with it grated Nutmeg, and Butter flower'd to thicken it; pour your Sauce over the Fish, garnish'd with Horse-raddish and slic'd Lemon.

To roast a Pike.

TAKE a large Pike, gut it and clean it, and lard it with Eel and Bacon, as you lard a Fowl; then take Thyme and Savory, Salt, Mace, and Nutmeg, some Crumbs of Bread, Beef-suet and Parsley; shred all very fine, and mix it up with raw Eggs; make it in a long Pudding, and put it in the Belly of your Pike, skewer up the Belly, and dissolve Anchovies in Butter, and baste it with it; put two Splints on each Side the Pike, and tie it to the Spit; melt Butter thick for the Sauce, or, if you please, Oyster sauce, and buie the Pudding in it. Gar|nish with Lemon.

A Ragoo of Sweet-breads.

TAKE your Sweet breads and skin them, and put some Butter in the Frying pan, and brown it with Flour, and put the Sweet breads in; stir them a little and turn them; then put in some strong Broth and Mushrooms, some Pepper and Salt, Cloves and Mce; let them stew half an Hour; then put in some Forc'd meat Balls, some Artichoke-bottoms cut small and thin; make it thick, and serve it up with sliced Lemon.

A Ragoo of Oysters.

PUT into your Stew pan a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, let it boil; then take a Quart of Oysters, strain them from their Liquor, and put them to the But|ter; let them stew with a Bit of Eschalot shred very fine, and some grated Nutmeg, and a little Salt; then beat the Yolks of three or four Eggs with the Oyster-liquor and half a Pound of Butter, and shake all very well together Page  12 till 'tis thick, and serve it up with Sippets; and garnish with sliced Lemon.

To stew Mushrooms.

TAKE some strong Broth, and season it if with a Bunch of Sweet herbs, some Spice and Anchovies, and set it over the Fire till 'tis hot; then put in your Mushrooms, and just let them boil up; then take some Yolks of Eggs, with a little minced Thyme and Parsley, and some grated Nutmeg, and stir it over the Fire till 'tis thick. Serve it up with sliced Lemon.

To Collar a Calf's Head.

TAKE a Calf's Head with the Skin and Hair upon it; then scald it, to fetch off the Hair; then parboil it, but not too much; then get it clean from the Bones while it is hot; you must stir it on the Fore part, season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Sweet-herbs, shred small, and all mix'd together with the Yolks of three or four Eggs, and spread it over the Head, and roll it up hard. Boil it gently for three Hours, in just as much Water as will cover it; when 'tis tender 'tis boiled enough. If you do the Tongue, first boil it and peel it, and slice it in thin Slices, and likewise the Palate, and put them and the yes in the In-side of the Head before you roll it up. When the Head is taken out, season the Pickle with Salt, Pepper, and Spice, and give it a Boil, adding to it a Point of White wine, and as much Vine|gar. When 'tis cold, put in the Collar; and when you use it, cut it in Slices.

To Collar Cow-Heels.

TAKE five or six Cow-Heels or Feet, and bone them while they are hot, and ly them one upon another, strewing some Salt between; then roll them up in a coarse Clot, and squeeze in both Ends, and tie them up very hard; boil it an Hour and a half; then take it out, and Page  13 when it's cold put it into common Souce-drink for Brawn. Cut off a little at each End, it looks better. Serve it in Slices, or in the Collar, as you please.

A Tansy.

BOIL a Quart of Cream or Milk, with a Stick of Cinnamon, quarter'd Nutmeg, and large Mace; when half cold, mix it with twenty Yolks of Eggs, and ten Whites; strain it, then put to it four grated Biskets, half a Pound of Butter, a Pint of Spinnage-juice, and a little Tansy, Sack, and Orange-flower Water, Sugar, and a lit|tle Salt; then gather it to a Body over the Fire, and pour it into your Dish, being well butter'd: When it is bak'd, turn it on a Pye-plate; squeeze on it an Orange, grate on Sugar, and garnish it with slic'd Orange and a little Tan|sy. Made in a Dish; cut as you please.

To stew a Rump of Beef.

SEASON your Rump of Beef with two Nutmegs, some Pepper and Salt, and lay the fat Side downward in your Stew-pan; put to it a quarter of a Pint of Vine|gar, a Pint of Claret, three Pints of Water, three whole Onions stuck with a few Cloves, and a Bunch of Sweet-herbs; cover it close, and let it stew over a gentle Fire four or five Hours; scum off the Fat from the Liquor. Lay your Meat on Sippets, and pour your Liquor over it. Garnish your Dish with scalded Greens.

To make a Pale Fricasy.

TAKE Lamb, Chicken, or Rabbets, cut in Pieces, wash it well from the Blood, then put it in a broad Pan or Stew-pan; put in as much fair Water as will cover it; put in Salt, a Bunch of Sweet herbs, some Pepper, an Onion, two Anchovies, and stew it till 'tis enough; then mix in a Poringer six Yolks of Eggs, a Glass of White-wine, a Nutmeg grated, a little chopp'd Parsley, a Piece of fresh Butter, and three or four Spoonfuls of Cream; Page  14 beat all these together, and put it into your Stew-pan, and shake it together till 'tis thick. Dish it on Sippets, and garnish with sliced Lemon.

To hash a Calf's Head.

BOIL your Calf's Head almost enough, and when 'tis cold, cut the Meat in thin Slices clean from the Bone, and put it into a Stew pan, with some strong Broth, a Glass of White-wine, some Oysters and their Liquor, a Bunch of Sweet-herbs, two or three Eschalots, a Nut|meg quarter'd, and let these stew on a slow Fire till they are enough; then put in two or three Anchovies, the Yolks of four Eggs well beaten, and a Piece of Butter, and thicken it up; then have ready fry'd some thin Slips of Bacon, some Forc'd-meat Balls, some large Oysters dipp'd in Butter; the Brains first boiled, and then fried, some Sweet-breads cut in Slices, some Lamb-stones cut in Rounds; then put your Hash in your Dish, and the other things, some round and some on it. Garnish the Dish with sliced Lemon.

To make Scotch-Collops.

CUT thin Slices out of a Leg of Veal, as many as you think will serve for a Dish, and hack them, and lard some with Bacon, and fry them in Butter, then take them out of the Pan, and keep them warm, and clean the Pan, and put into it half a Pint of Oysters, with their Li|quor, and some strong Broth, one or two Eschalots, a Glass of White-wine, two or three Anchovies minc'd, some grated Nutmeg; let these have a Boil up, and thicken it with four or five Eggs and a Piece of Butter, and then put in your Collops, and shake them together till 'tis thick; put dried Sippets on the Bottom of the Dish, and put your Collops in, and so many as you please of the things in your Hash.

Page  15

A Fricasy of Chickens.

AFTER you have drawn and wash'd your Chickens, half boil them; then take them up and cut them in Pieces, and put them into a Frying-pan, and fry them in Butter; then take them out of the Pan and clean it, and put in some strong Broth, some White-wine, some grated Nutmeg, a little Pepper and Salt, a Bunch of Sweet-herbs, and an Eschalot or two; let these, with two or three Anchovies, stew on a slow Fire and boil up; then beat it up with Butter and Eggs till 'tis thick, and put your Chickens in, and toss them well together; lay Sippets in the Dish, and serve it up with sliced Lemon and fried Parsley.

Gravy to keep for Use.

TAKE a Piece of coarse Beef, cover it with Water; when it has boiled some time, take out the Meat, beat it very well, and cut it in Pieces to let out the Gra|vy; then put it in again, with a Bunch of Sweet-herbs, an Onion stuck with Cloves, a little Salt, some whole Pepper; let it stew, but not boil; when 'tis of a brown Colour 'tis enough; take it up, put it in an Earthen Pot, and let it stand to cool; when 'tis cold scum off the Fat; it will keep a Week unless the Weather be very hot. If for a brown Fricasy, put some Butter in your Frying-pan, and shake in a little Flour as it boils, and put in some Gravy, with a Glass of Claret, and shake up the Fricasy in it: If for a white Fricasy, then melt your Butter in the Gravy, with a little White wine, Spoonful or two of Cream, and the Yolks of Eggs.

An Amulet of Eggs, the Savoury Way.

TAKE a Dozen of Eggs, beat them very well, and season them with Salt, and a little Pepper; then have your Frying-pan ready, with a good deal of fresh Butter in it, and let it be thoroughly hot; then put in Page  16 your Eggs with four Spoonfuls of strong Gravy; and have ready Parsley, and a few Chieves cut, and throw them over it, and when 'tis enough turn it; and when done, dish it, and squeeze Orange or Lemon over it.

A Fricasy of double Tripe.

CUT your Tripe in Slices two Inches long, and put it into a Stew pan; put to it a quarter of a Pound of Capers, as much Samphire shred, half a Pint of strong Broth, as much White-wine, a Bunch of Sweet herbs, a Lemon shred small; stew all these together till 'tis tender; then take it off the Fire, and thicken up the Liquor with the Yolks of three or four Eggs, a little Parsley boil'd green and chopp'd, some grated Nutmeg and Salt; shake it well together. Serve it on Sippets. Garnish with Lemon.

To boil Mullet, or any Sort of Fish.

SCALE your Fish and wash them, saving their Li|ver, or Tripes, Rowses, or Spawn; boil them in Wa|ter that is seasoned with Salt, White-wine Vinegar, White-wine, a Bunch of Sweet-herbs, a sliced Lemon, one or two Onions, some Horse-raddish; and when it boils up, put in your Fish, and for Sauce, a Pint of Oysters with their Liquor, a Looster bruised or minced, or Shrimps, some White-wine, two or three Anchovies, some large Mace, a quarter'd Nutmeg, a whole Onion. Let these have a Boil up, and thicken it with Butter and the Yolks of two or three Eggs. Serve it on Sippets, and garnish with Lemon.

To butter Crabs or Lobsters.

YOUR Crabs or Lobsters being boiled and cold, take all the Meat out of the Shells and Body, break the Claws, and take out all their Meat, mince it small, and put it all together, and add to it two or three Spoonfuls of Claret, a very little Vinegar, a Nutmeg grated; then Page  17 let it boil up till 'tis thorough hot; then put in some Butter melted, with some Anchovies and Gravy, and thicken it up with the Yolks of an Egg or two; and when 'tis very hot, put it in the large Shell, and stick is with Toasts.

To stew a Carp.

TAKE two Carps, scale and rub them well with Sl; then cut them in the Nape of the Neck and round the Tail, to make them bleed. Cut up the Belly, take out the Liver and Guts, and if you please to cut each Carp in three Pieces, they will eat the firmer; then put them in a Stew-pan, with their Blood, a Quart of Cla|ret, a Bunch of Sweet-herbs, an Onion, one or two Escha|lors, a Nutmeg, a few Cloves, Mace, whole Pepper; co|ver them close, and let them stew till they be half enough; then turn them, and put in half Pound of fresh Butter, four Anchovies, the Liver and Guts, taking out the Gall, and let them stew till they are enough; then beat the Ylks of five or six Eggs, with a little Verjuice, and by Degrees mix it with the Liquor the Carp was stewed in. Just give it a Scald to thicken it; then put your Carp in a Dish, and pour this over it. Garnish the Dish with sliced Lemon.

To Collar Venison.

TAKE a Side of Venison, and bone it, and take a|wy all the Sinews, and cut it into square Collars, of what Bignes you please: It will make two or three Collars; lard it with fat clear Bacon, cut your Lard as big as the Top of your Finger, and as long as your little Finger; then season your Venison with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg: Roll up your Collars, and tie them close with coarse ••p; then put them into deep Pots; put Seasoning at the Bottom of the Pot, and some fresh Butter, and three or four Bay-leaves; then put in your Venison, and some Seasoning, and some Butter on the Top, and over that some Beef-suet, finely shred and bea|ten; Page  18 then cover up your Pot with coarse Paste; they will ask four or five Hours baking; then take them out of the Oven, and let it stand a little; then take out your Venison, and let it drain well from the Gravy. Take off all the Fat from the Gravy, and add more Butter to that Fat, and set it over a gentle Fire to clarify; then take it off, and let it stand a little, and scum it well; then make your Pots clean, or have Pots fit for each Collar; put a little Seasoning at the Bottom, and some of your clarify'd But|ter; then put in your Venison, and fill up your Pots with clarify'd Butter; and be sure your Butter be an Inch above the Meat; and when 'tis thorough cold, tie it down with double Paper, and lay a Tile on the Top; they will keep six or eight Months: You may, if you please, when you use a Pot, put the Pot in boiling Water a Minute, and it will come whole out: Let it stand till 'tis cold, and stick it round with Bay-leaves, and one Sprig on the Top.

To pot Neats-Tongues.

TAKE Neats-Tongues, and rub them very well with Salt and Water (Bay Salt is best;) then take Pump-water, with a good deal of Salt-petre, and some white Salt, and some Cloves and Mace, and boil it well, and scum it, and when 'tis cold, put your Tongues in, and let them lie in it six Days; then wash them out of that Liquor, and put them in a Pot, and bake them with Bread till they are very tender; and when they are taken out of the Oven, pull off their Skins, put them in the Pot you intend to keep them in, and cover them over with clarify'd Butter: They will keep four or five Months.

To Collar a Breast of Veal.

TAKE a Breast of Veal and bone it, and wash it, and dry it in a clean Cloth; then shred Thyme, Winter-savoury, and Parsley, very small, and mix it with Salt, Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg; then strew it on the la••de of your Meat, and roll it up hard, begin|ning Page  19 at the Neck End; tie it up with Tape, and put it in a Pot fit to boil it in, standing upright: You must boil it in Water and Salt, and a bunch of Sweet herbs; when 'tis boiled enough, take it off the Fire, and put it in an earthen Pot, and when the Liquor is cold pour it over it, or else boil Salt and Water strong enough to bear an Egg; and when that is cold, pour it on your Veal: When you serve it to the Table, cut it in round Slices. Garnish with Laurel or Fennel.

To Collar a Pig.

CUT off the Head of your Pig; then cut the Body asunder; bone it, and cut two Collars off each Side; then lay it in Water to take out the Blood; then take Sage and Parsley, and shred them very small, and mix them with Pepper, Salt, and Nutmeg, and strew some on every Side or Collar, and roll it up and tie it with coarse Tape; so boil them in fair Water and Salt till they are very tender: Put two or three Blades of Mace in the Kettle, and when they are enough, take them up, and lay them in something to cool; strain out some of the Li|quor, and add to it some Vinegar and Salt, a little White-wine, and three or four Bay-leaves; give it a Boil up, and when 'tis cold, put it to the Collars, and keep them for Use.

To pot Beef.

TAKE a good Buttock of Beef, and cut out the Bone, and lay it flat, and slash it in several Places; then salt it well, and let it lie in the Salt three Days; then take it out, and let it lie in running Water with a Hand|ful of Salt three Days longer; then take it out, dry it with a Cloth, and season it with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, Cloves, Mace, and two Ounces of Salt petre, finely bea|ten; then shred two or three Pounds of Beef suet, and one Pound in Lumps, and three Pounds of Butter, put some in the Bottom of the Pot you bake it in; then put in your Beef and the rest of the Butter and Suet on the Page  20 Top; cover your ot over with coarse Paste, and set it in all Night with eu old bread; in the Morning draw it, and pour off. ll the ••t into a Pot, and drain out all the Gravy; pull the Meat all to Pieces, Fat and Lean, and work it into your Pots that you keep it in while it is hot, or it will not close so well; then cover it with the clear Fat you poured off; pper it when 'tis cold, it will keep good a Month or six Weeks.

Chickens sorc'd with Oysters.

LARD and truss them; mke Forcig with Oysters, Sweet breads, Parsley, T••••les, Mushrooms, and O|nions; chop these together and season it; mix it with a Piece of Butter and the Yolk of an Egg; then tie them at both Ends and ost them; then make for them a Ragoo, and garnish them with sliced Lemon.

A Ragoo of a Breast of Veal.

BONE a Breast of Veal, cut a handsome square Piece, then cut the other Part into small Pieces, brown it in Butter, then stew and toss it up in your Ragoo for Made-dishes; thicken it with brown butter; put then the Ragoo in the Dish, lay on the square Piece dic'd, with Lemon, Sweet-breads, Sippets, and Bacon fry'd in the Batter of Eggs, and garnish it with sliced Orange.

To recover Venison when it stinks.

TAKE as much cold Water in a Tub as will cover it a Handful over, and put in good Store of Salt, and let it lie three or four Hours; then take your Venison out, and let it lie in as much hot Water and Salt, and let it lie as long as before; then have your C••st in readiness, and take it out, and dry it very well, and eson it with Pepper and Salt pretty high, and put it in your Pasty. Do not use the Bones of your Venison for Gravy, but get fresh Beef or other Bones.

Page  21

How to force a Fowl.

TAKE a good Fowl, kill, pull, and draw it; then slit the Skin down the Back, and take off the Flesh from the Bones, and mince it very small, and mix it with one Pound of Beef-suet shred, and a Pint of large Oysters chopp'd, two Anchovies, an Eschalot, a little grated Bread, some Sweet-herbs; shred all these very well, and mix them, and make it up with Yolks of Eggs; so put all these Ingredients on the Bones again, and draw the Skin over again; sew up the Back, and put the Fowl in a Blad|der; so boil it an Hour and a Quarter; then stew some more Oysters in Gravy, and bruise in a little of your Forc'd-meat, and beat it up with fresh Butter; put the Fowl in the Middle; pour on the Sauce, and garnish with sliced Lemon.

To force a Leg of Veal, Mutton, or Lamb.

TAKE out all the Meat, and leave the Skin whole; then take the Lean of it and make it into Forc'd-meat thus: To two Pounds of your lean Meat, three Pounds of Beef-suet; take away all Skins from the Meat and Suet; then shred both very fine, and beat it with a Rolling-pin, till you know not the Meat from the Suet; then mix with it four Spoonfuls of grated Bread, half an Ounce of Cloves and Mace beaten, as much Pepper, some Salt, a few Sweet-herbs shred small; mix all these toge|ther with six raw Eggs, and put it into the Skin again, and sew it up. If you roast it, serve it with Anchovie-sauce; if you boil it, lay Colliflower or French beans under it. Garnish with Pickles, or stew Oysters and put under it, with Forc'd-meat Balls, or Sausages fried in Butter.

Page  22

To fry Oysters.

BEAT Eggs, with a little Salt, grated Nutmeg, and thicken it like thick Batter, with grated white read and fine Flour; then dip the Oysters in it, and fry them brown with Beef-dripping.

Beef A-la-mode.

TAKE a good Bttck of Beef, interlrded with gret Lard, roll'd up in s••••ry Spice, and Sweet-herbs; put i in a great Sauce-pan, and cover it close, and let it in the Oven all Night. This is fit to eat cold.

A Goose, Turkey, or Leg of Mutton, A-la-daube.

LARD it with Bacon, and half roast it; then take it off the Spit, and put it in as small a Pot as will boil it, put to it a Quart of White wine, strong Broth, a Pint of Vinegar, whole Spice, Bay-leaves, Sweet marjram, Winter-savoury, and green Onions. When it is ready, lay it in the Dish, make Sauce with some of the Liquor, Mushrooms, dic'd Lemon, two or three Anchovies; thicken it with brown Butter, and garnish it with sliced Lemon.

A Leg of Mutton A-la-royal.

LARD your Mutton and Slices of Veal with Bacon roll'd in Spice and Sweet-herbs, then, bringing them to a Brown with melted Lard, boil the Leg of Mutton in strong Broth, with all sort of Sweet herbs, and an O|nion stuck with Cloves; when it is ready, lay in on the Dish, lay round the Collops; then pour on it a Ragoo, and garnish with Lemon and Orange.

Page  23

A brown Fricasy of Chickens or Rabbets.

CUT them in Pieces, and fry them in Butter, then having hot a Pint of Gravy, a little Claet and White-wine, and strong Broth tw Anchovies, two shiverd Pa|lates, a Faggt of Seet herbs, savoury Balls and Spice, thicken it with brown Butter, and squeeze on it a Lemon.

A while Fricasy of the same.

CUT them in Pieces, and wash them from the Blood, and fry them on a ••ft Fire; then put them in a Tos|sing pan, with a 〈◊〉 strong Broth; season them, and toss them up with Mushrooms and Oysters; when almost enough, pt to them a Pint of Cream, and thicken it with a bit of Butter roll'd up in lur.

A Fricasy of Lamb.

CUT an hind Quarter of Lamb into thin Slices, season it with sav•••y 〈◊〉, Sweet herbs, and a Shalot; then fry them, and toss them up in strong Broth, White-wine, Oysters, B•••, and Palates, a little brown Butter to thicken it, or a bit of Butter roll'd up in Flour.

To fry Cucumbers for Mutton Sauce.

YOU must brown some Butter in a Pan, and cut the Cucumbers in thin Slices; drain them from the Wa|ter, then sling them into the Pan, and when they are fried brown, put in a little Pepper and Salt, a Bit of an Onion and Gravy, and let them stew together, and squeeze in some Juice of Lemon; shake them well, and put them under your Mutton.

Page  24

To make a savoury Dish of Veal.

CUT large Collops out of a Leg of Veal; spread them abroad on a Dresser; hack them with the Back of a Knife, and dip them in the Yolks of Eggs, and sea|son them with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Salt, Pepper; then make Forc'd meat with some of your Veal, and Beef suet, and Oysters chopt, Sweet herbs shred fine, and the afore|said Spice, and strew all these over your Collops; roll and tie them up, and put them on Skewers, and tie them to a Spit and roast them; and to the rest of your Forc'd-meat add the Yolk of an Egg or two, and mke it up in Balls, and fry them, and put them in the Dish with your Meat when roasted, and make the Sauce with strong Broth, an Anchovy, and an Eschalot, and a little White-wine and Spice; let it stew, and thicken it up with Butter.

To Collar Beef.

LAY your Flnk of Beef in Ham-brine eight or ten Days; then dry it in a Cloth, and take out all the Leather and the Skin; scotch it cross and cross, season it with savoury Spice, two or three Anchovies, a Handful or two of Thyme, Sweet-marjoram, Winter-savory, and Onions; strew it on the Met, and roll it in a hard Col|lar in a Cloth; sew it close, and tie it at both Ends, and put it in a Collar Cloth, with a Pint of Claret, and Co|chineel, and two Qarts of Pump-water, and bake it all Night; then tke it out hot, and tie it close at both Ends; then set it upon one End, and pt a Weight upon it, and let it stand till 'tis cold; then take it out of the Cloth, and keep it dry.

To Collar Pig.

SLIT the Pig down the Back, take out all the Bones, wash the Blood in three or four Waters, wipe it dry, and season it with savoury Spice, Thyme, Parsley, and Page  25 Salt, and roll it in a hard Collar; tie it close in a Cloth, and boil it with the Bones in three Pints of Water, a Handful of Salt, a Quart of Vinegar, a Faggot of Sweet-herbs, whole Spice, a Penny-worth of Ising glass; when it is boil'd tender, take it off; and when cold, take it out of the Cloth, and keep it in this Pickle.

To pot a Swan.

BONE and skin your Swan, and beat the Flesh in a Mortar, taking out the Strings as you beat it; then take some clear fat Bacon, and beat with the Swan, and when 'tis of a light Flesh Colour, there is Bacon enough in it; and when 'tis beaten till 'tis like Dough, 'tis e|nough; then season it with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg, all beaten fine; mix it well with your Flesh, and give it a Beat or two all together; then put it in an Earthen Pot, with a little Claret and fair Water, and at the Top two Pounds of fresh Butter spread over it; cover it with coarse Paste, and bake it with Bread; then turn it out into a Dish, and squeeze it gently to get out the Moisture; then put it in a Pot fit for it; and when 'tis cold, cover it over with clarify'd Butter; the next Day paper it up. In this Manner you may do Goose, Duck, or Beef, or Hare's flesh.

To make Westphalia Bacon.

MAKE a Pickle as followeth▪ Take a Gallon of Pump-water, a quarter of a Peck of Bay salt, as much White slt, a Pound of Petre salt, and a quarter of a Pound of Salt-petre, a Pound of coarse Sugar▪ nd an Ounce of Socho tied up in a Rag; boil all these together very well, and let it stand till 'tis cold; then put in the Pork, and let it lie in this Pickle a Fortnight; then take it out and dry it over Saw-dust. This Pickle will do Tongues, but you must first let the Tongues lie six or eight Hours in Pump water, to take out the Sliminess▪ and when they have lain in the Pickle, dry them as your Pork.

Page  26

To salt and dry a Ham of Bacon.

TAKE English Bay-salt, and put it into a Vessel of Water suitable to the Quantity of Hams you do; make your Pickle strong enough to bear an Egg with your Bay-salt; then boil and scum it very well; then let the Pickle be thoroughly cold, and put into it so much Red|saunders as will make it of the Colour of Claret; then let your Pickle stand three Days before you put your Hams into it. The Hams must lie in the Pickle three Weeks; then carefully dry them where Wood is burnt.

To dry Tongues.

TAKE to every two Ounces of Salt-petre a Pint of Petre-salt, and rub it well, after it is finely beaten, over your Tongue, and then beat a Pint of Bay-salt, and rub that on over it, and every three Days turn it; and when it has lain nine or ten Days, hang it in Wood-smoke to dry. Do a Hog's head this way. For a Ham of Pork or Mutton, have a Quart of Bay-salt, half a Pound of Petre-salt, a quarter of a Pound of Salt-petre, a quarter of a Pound of brown Sugar, all beaten very fine, mix'd together, and rubbed well over it; let it lie a Fortnight; urn it often, and then hang it up a Day to drain, and dry it in Wood Smoke.

To salt Hams or Tongues.

TAKE three or four Gallons of Water, put to it four Pounds of Bay-salt, four Pounds of White-salt, a Pound of Petre-salt, a quarter of a Pound of Salt petre, two Ounces of Prunella-salt, a Pound of brown Sugar; let it boil a quarter of an Hour; scum it well, and when it is cold, sever it from the Bottom into the Vessel you keep it in.

Let Hams lie in this Pickle four or five Weeks.

A Clod of Dutch-Beef as long.

Tongues a Fortnight.

Page  27Collar'd Beef eight or ten Days.

Dry them in a Stove, or with Wood in a Chimney.

To make Dutch-Beef.

TAKE the lean Part of a Buttock of Beef raw, rub it well with brown Sugar all over, and let it lie in a Pan or Tray two or three Hours, turning it three or four Times; then salt it well with common Salt and Salt-pe|tre, and let it lie a Fortnight, turning it every Day; then roll it very strait in a coarse Cloth, and put it in a Cheese-Press a Day and a Night, and hang it to dry in a Chim|ney. When you boil it, you must put it in a Cloth: When 'tis cold, it will cut out in Shivers as Dutch Beef.

To salt Bacon.

CUT your Flitches of Bacon very smooth, make no Holes in it: To about threescore Pounds of Bacon, ten Pounds of Salt; dry your Salt very well, and make it hot, then rub it hard over the Out-side or skinny Part, but on the In side lay it all over, without rubbing, only light|ly on, about half an Inch thick. Let it lie on a flat Board, that the Brine may run from it, nine Days; then mix with a Quart of hot Salt, four Penny worth of Salt-petre, and strew it all over your Bacon; then heat the rest of your Salt and put over it, and let it lie nine Days longer; then hang it up a Day, and put it in a Chimney where Wood is burnt, and there let it hang three Weeks or more, as you see Occasion.

To stew Pigeons.

SEASON your Pigeons with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, and Mace, and some Sweet-herbs; wrap this Season|ing up in a Bit of Butter, and put it in their Bellies; then tie up the Neck and Vent, and half roast them; then put them in a Stew-pan, with a Quart of good Gravy, a little White-wine, some pickled Mushrooms, a few Pepper-corns, three or four Blades of Mace, a Bit of Lemon-peel, Page  28 a Bunch of Sweet herbs, a Bit of an Onion, some Oy|ster-pickle: Let them stew till they are enough; then thicken it up with Butter and Yolks of Eggs. Garnish with Lemon. Do Ducks the sme Way. You may put Forc'd-meat in their Bellies, or shred Thyme wrapp'd up in Butter. Put Forc'd meat Balls in both.

To make a Poloe.

TAKE a Pint of Rice, boil it in as much Water as will cover it; when your Rice is half boiled, put in your Fowl, with a small Onion, a Blade or two of Mace, some whle Pepper, and some Salt; when 'tis enough, put the Fowl in a Dish, and pour the Rice over it.

To stew Cucumbers.

PARE twelve Cucumbers, and slice them as for eat|ing, and put them to drain, and then lay them in a coarse Cloth till they are dry; flour them, and fry them brown in Butter; then put to them some Claret, a little Gravy, some Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, and let them stew a little; then roll a Bit of Butter in Flour, and toss them up; put them under Mutton or Lamb roasted.

To pot Goose and Turkey.

TAKE a fat Goose, and a fat Turkey; cut them down the Rump, and take out all the Bones; lay them flat, open and seson them very well with white Pepper, Nutmeg, and Salt, allowing three Nutmegs, with the like Proportion of Pepper, and as much Salt as both the Spices; when you have seasoned them all over, let your Turkey be within the Goose, and keep them in Sea|son two Nights and a Day; then roll them up as collar'd Beef very tight, and as short as you can, and bind it very fast with strong Tape. Bake it in a long Pot, with good store of Butter, till 'tis very tender, as you may feel by the End; let it lie in the hot Liquor an Hour, then take it out, and let it stand till next Day; then unbind it, and Page  29 place it in your Pot, and melt Butter and pour over it. Keep it for Use, and slice it out thin.

To make a Fricasy of Eggs.

BOIL your Eggs hard, and take out a good many of the Yolks whole, then cut the rest in Quarters, Yolks and Whites together. Set on some Gravy, with a little shred Thyme and Parsley in it, give it a Boil or two; then put in your Eggs, with a little grated Nutmeg; shake it up with a Bit of Butter, till it be as thick as ano|ther Fricasy; then fry Artichoke Bottoms in thin Slices, and serve it up. Garnish with Eggs shred small.

To stew a Turkey.

TAKE a fine young Turkey, kill'd, pull'd, and drawn; fill the Skin on the Breast with Forc'd-meat, and lard it on the Sides with Bacon; Put into the Belly half an Eschlot, two Anchovies, and a little Thyme shred small; brown it in a Pan with a little Butter; when 'tis very brown, put it in a Stew pan, with strong Gravy, some White wine, or Claret, two or three Anchovies, some Mace, Sweet herbs, a little Pepper, and let it stew till 'tis thoroughly enough; then thicken the Liquor with Butter and Eggs; fry some French Loaves dipp'd in Cream, af|ter the Top and the Crumb is tken out; then fill them with stew'd Oysters or Shrimps, or Cockles, and with them garnish the Dish, or with sliced Lemon. A Hen, Goose, or Duck, does well this way.

To bake a Rump of Beef.

BONE a Rump of Beef, beat it very well with a Rol|ling pin; cut off the Sinew, and lard it with large Pieces of Bcon; roll yur Lards in Seasonig, whic is Pepper, Salt, and Cloves. Lard thwart the Met that it my cut handsomely; then season 〈◊〉 over the M••t with Ppper and S••t prett thick; then 〈◊〉 it with P••••|thred cross and cross, and p•• the Top under the Bottom, Page  30 and tie it up tight, ad put it in an earthen Pot; break all the Bones, and put in the Sides and over, to keep it fast that it cannot stir; then put in half a Pound of But|ter, and some Bay leaves, and whole Pepper, an Eschalot or two, and some Sweet herbs; cover the Top of the Pot with coarse Paste; put it in the Oven, and let it stand eight Hours Serve it up with its own Liquor, and some dried Sippets.

To make Veal Cutlets.

CUT your Veal Steaks thin; hack them, and season them with Pepper and Salt, and Sweet herbs; wash them over with Egg, and strew over them some Forc'd-meat; put two Steaks together and lard them with Bacon; wash them over with melted Butter, and wrap them in white Papers butter'd. Roast them on a Lark-spit, or bake them; when they are enough, unpaper them, and serve them with good Gravy and sliced Lemon.

To dress a Calf's Head.

SCALD the Hair off, and take out the Bones; then have in Readiness Palates boiled tender, Yolks of hard Eggs, Oysters calded, and Forc'd meat; stuff all this into your Head, and ew it up close in a Cloth; boil it three Hours; make a strong Gravy for Sauce, and gar|nish with fried Bacon.

To bake Herrings.

TAKE thirty Herrings, scale them, cut off their Heads and pull out their Roes, and wash them ve|ry clean, and la them to drain four or five Hours, and roll them in a dry Cloth; season them with Pepper and Salt, and lay them in a long Venison Pot at full Length; when you have laid one Row, shred a large Onion very small, and mx with it a little Cloves, Mace, and Ginger cut 〈◊〉, and stew it all over the Herrings; and then another Row of Herrigs and Seasoning, and so do till all is in the Pot; let it stand season'd an Hour before 'tis Page  31 put in the Oven; then put in a Quart of Claret, and tie it over with Paper, and bake it with Houshold-bread.

To make Green Peas Soop.

TAKE half a Bushel of the youngest Peas, divide the great from the small; boil the smallest in two Quarts of Water, and the Biggest in one Quart; when they are well boiled, bruise the Biggest, and when the thin is drained from it, boil the Thick in as much cold Water as will cover it; then rub away the Skins, and take a little Spinnage, Mint, Sorrel, Lettuce, and Parsley, and a good Quantity of Marigolds; wash, shred, and boil these in half a Pound of Butter, and drain the small Peas; save the Water, and mingle all together, and a Spoonful of Pepper whole; then melt a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and shake a little Flour into it, and let it boil; put the Liquor to the Butter, and mingle all well toge|ther, and let them boil up; so serve it with dry'd Bread.

To keep green Peas till Christmas.

SHELL what Quantity you please of young Peas; put them in the Pot when the Water boils; let them have four or five Walms; then first pour them into a Co|lander, and then spread a Cloth on a Table, and put them on that, and dry them well in it: Have Bottles ready dry'd, and fill them to the Necks, and pour over them melted Mutton-fat, and cork them down very close, that no Air come to them: Set them in your Cellar, and when you use them, put them into boiling Water, with a Spoonful of fine Sugar, and a good Piece of Butter; and when they are enough, drain and butter them.

To make Asparagus Soop.

TAKE twelve Pounds of lean Beef, cut in Slices; then put a Quarter of a Pound of Butter in a Stew-pan over the Fire, and put your Beef in; let it boil up quick till it begins to brown; then put in a Pint of brown Page  32 Ale, and a Gallon of Water, and cover it close, and let it stew gently for an Hour and a Half; put in what Spice you like in the Stewing, and strain out the Liquor, and scum off all the Fat; then put in some Vermicelly, and some Sallery wash'd and cut small, half a Hundred of Asparagus cut small, and Palates boiled tender and cut; put all these in, and let them boil gently till tender. Just as 'tis going up, fry a Handful of Spinnage in Butter, and throw in a French Roll.

Very fine Sausages.

TAKE a Leg of Pork or Veal; pick it clean from Skin or Fat, and to every Pound of lean Meat put two Pounds of Beef suet, pick'd from the Skins; shred the Meat and Suet severally very fine; then mix them very well together, and add a large Handful of green Sage shred very small, season it with grated Nutmeg, Salt, and Pepper; mix it well, and press it down hard in an earthen Pot, and keep it for Use. When you use them, roll them up with as much Egg as will make them roll smooth, but use no Flour: In rolling them up, make them the Length of your Finger, and as thick as two Fingers; fry them in clarify'd Suet, which must be boiling hot before you put them in. Keep them rolling about in the Pan; when they are fried through they are enough.

A Pickle for either Tongues or Hams.

TAKE what Quantity of Water you please, and with Bay salt and common Salt make it strong enough to bear an Egg; then to every Gallon of this Pickle add half a Pound of Petre-salt, a Pound of coarse Sugar, and two or three Ounces of Salt-petre beat fine; boil it and scum it, and when 'tis thorough cold, put in your Hams or Tongues; turn them often; the Hams may lie in the Pickle about a Month, the Tongues three Weeks; then hang them up to dry.

Page  33

To stew Pigeons.

STUFF your Pigeons with Sweet-herbs chopp'd small, some Bacon minced small, grated Bread, Spice, But|ter, and Yolk of Egg; sew them up Top and Bottom, and stew them in strong Broth, with half a Pint of White-wine to fix Pigeons, and as much Broth as will cover them well, with Nutmeg, whole Pepper, Mace, Salt, a little Bundle of Sweet-herbs, and a Bit of Lemon-peel, and an Onion; when they are almost done, put in some Artichoke bottoms ready boiled, and fried in brown But|ter, or Asparagus Tops ready boiled; thicken up the Li|quor with the Stuffing out of the Pigeons, and a Bit of Butter rolled in Flour: Take out the Lemon-peel, Bunch of Herbs, and Onion. Garnish the Dish with sliced Le|mon, and very thin Bits of Bacon toasted before the Fire.

Strong Broth.

TAKE twelve Quarts of Water, two Knuckles of Veal, a Leg or two Shins of Beef, two Pair of Calves Feet, a Chicken, a Rabbet, two Onions, Cloves, Mace, Pepper, Salt, a Bunch of Sweet-herbs; cover it close, and let it boil till six Quarts are consum'd: Strain it out, and keep it for Use.

To pickle Mackrel.

SLIT your Mackrel in halves, take out the Roes, gut and clean them, and strew Salt over them, and lay one on another, the Back of one to the In side of the o|ther, so let them lie two or three Hours; then wipe e|very Piece clean from the Salt, and strew them over with Pepper beaten, and grated Nutmeg, so let them lie two or three Hours longer; then fry them well, take them out of the Pan and lay them on coarse Cloths to drain, when cold put them in a Pan, and cover them over with a Pickle of Vinegar boiled with Spice, when 'tis cold.

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To jug a Hare.

CUT a Hair in Pieces, but do not wash it; season it with half an Onion shred very fine, a Sprig of Thyme, and a little Parsley all shred, and beaten Pep|per and Salt, as much as will lie on a Shilling, half a Nutmeg, and a little Lemon-peel; strew all these over your Hare, and slice half a Pound of Bacon into thin Sli|ces; then put your Hare into a Jug, a Layer of Hare, and the Slices of Bacon on it; so do till all is in the Jug; stop the Jug close that not any Steam can go out; then put it in a Pot of cold Water, lay a Tile on the Top, and let it boil three Hours; take the Jug out of the Kettle, and put half a Pound of Butter in it, and shake it together till the Butter is melted; then pour it in your Dish. Gar|nish with Lemon.

To make Pockets.

CUT three Slices out of a Leg of Veal, the Length of a Finger, the Breadth of three Fingers, the Thickness of a Thumb, with a sharp Penknife; give it a Slit through the Middle, leaving the Bottom and each Side whole, the Thickness of a Straw; then lard the Top with small fine Lards of Bacon; then make a Forc'd meat of Marrow, Sweet-breads, and Lamb-stones just boiled, and make it up, after 'tis seasoned and beaten together, with the Yolks of two Eggs, and put it into your Pockets as if you were filling a Pincushion; then sew up the Top with fine Thread, flour them, and pour melted Butter on them, and bake them; roast three Sweet-breads to put between, and serve them with Gravy-sauce.

To make a Summer Cream-Cheese.

TAKE three Pints of Milk just from the Cow, and five Pints of good sweet Cream, which you must boil free from Smoke; then put it to your Milk; cool 〈◊〉 'tis but blood warm, and then put in a Spoonful of Run|net; Page  35 when 'tis well come, take a large Strainer, lay it in a great Cheese-fat; then put the Curd in gently upon the Strainer, and when all the Curd is in, lay on the Cheese|board, and a Weight of two Pound. Let it so drain three Hours, till the Wey be well drained from it; then lay a Cheese cloth in your lesser Cheese-fat, and put in the Curd, laying the Cloth smooth over it as before, and the Board on the Top of that, and a four Pound Weight on it; turn it every two Hours into dry Cloths before Night, and be careful not to break it next Morning; salt it, and keep it in the Fat till the next Day; then put it into a wet Cloth, which you must shift every Day till 'tis ripe.

To make a Runnet-Bag.

LET the Calf suck as much as he will just before he is killed; then take the Bag out of the Calf, and let it lie twelve Hours, covered over in stinging Nettles till 'tis very red; then take out your Curd, and wash your Bag clean, and salt it within side and without, and let it lie sprinkled with Salt twenty four Hours, and wash your Curd in warm new Milk, and pick it, and put away all that is yellow and hallow, and keep what is white and close, and wash it well, and sprinkle it with Salt, and when the Bag has lain twenty four Hours, put it into the Bag again, and put to it three Spoonfuls of the Stroakings of a Cow, beat up with the Yolk of an Egg or two, twelve Cloves, and two Blades of Mace, and put a Skewer thro' it, and hang it in a Pot; then make the Runnet-water thus:

Take half a Pint of fair Water, a little Salt, and fix Tops of the Reddish of black Thorn, and as many Sprigs of Burnet, and two of Sweet marjoram; boil these in the Water, and strain it out, and when 'tis cold, put one half in the Bag, and let the Bg lie in the other half, and take it out as you use it, and when you want, make more Runnet, which you may do six or seven Times; three Spoonfuls of this Runnet will make a large Cheshire or Chedder Cheese, and half as much to a common Cheese.

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To make a Chedder-Cheese.

TAKE the new Milk of twelve Cows in the Morning, and the Evening Cream of twelves Cows, and put to it three Spoonfuls of Runnet; and when 'tis come, break it, and whey it; and when 'tis well wheyed, break it again, and work into the Curd three Pounds of fresh Butter, and put it in your Press, and turn it in the Press very often for an Hour or more, and change the Cloths, and wash them every Time you change them; you ay put wet Cloths at first to them, but towards the last, put two or three fine dry Cloths to them; let it lie thirty or forty Hours in the Press, according to the Thickness of the Cheese: Then take it out, wash it in Whey, and lay it in a dry Cloth till 'tis dry; then lay it on your Shelf, and turn it often.

To make Butter.

AS soon as you have milked, strain your Milk into a Pot, and stir it often for half an Hour; then put it in your Pans or Trays; when 'tis cream'd, skim it ex|ceeding clean from the Milk, and put your Cream into an earthen Pot, and if you do not churn immediately for Butter, shift your Cream once in twelve Hours into ano|ther clean scalded Pot, and if you find any Milk at the Bottom of the Pot, put it away; and when you have churned, wash your Butter in three or four Waters, and then salt it as you will have it, and beat it well, but not wash it after 'tis salted; let it stand in a Wedge, if it be to pot, till the next Morning, and beat it again, and make your Layers the Thickness of three Fingers, and then strew a little Salt on it, and so do till your Pot is full.

A Cream Cheese.

TAKE six Quarts of new Milk, warm from the Cow, and put to it three Quarts of good Cream; then Runnet it, and when it comes, put a Cloth in the Cheese|mold, Page  37 and with your Flitting dish take it out in thin Slices, and lay it on your Mold by Degrees, 'til it is all in; then let it stand with a Cheese board upon it 'til it is enough to turn, which will be at Night; then salt it on both Sides a little, and let it stand with a two Pound weight on it all Night; then take it out, and put it into a dry Cloth, and so do 'til it is dry; ripen it with laying it on Nettles; shift the Nettles every Day.

All Sorts of PICKLES.

To make Melon Mangoes.

TAKE small Melons not quite ripe, cut a Slip down the Side, and take out the Inside very clean; beat Mustard-seeds, and shred Garlick and mix with the Seeds, and put in your Man|goes; put the Pieces you cut out into their Places again, and tie them up, and put them into your Pot, and boil some Vinegar, (as much as you think will cover them) with whole Pepper, and some Salt, and Jamaica Pepper, and pour in scalding hot over your Mangoes, and cover them close to keep in the Steam; and so do every Day for nine Times together, and when they are cold cover them with Leather.

To pickle Walnuts.

TAKE Walnuts about Midsummer, when a Pin will pass through them, and put them in a deep Pot, and cover them over with ordinary Vinegar; change them in|to fresh Vinegar once in fourteen Days, 'til six Weeks be past; then take two Gallons of the best Vinegar, and put into it Corander seeds, Carraway seeds, and Dll seeds, of each an Ounce, grosly bruis'd, Ginger sliced three Page  38 Ounces, whole Mace one Ounce, Nutmeg bruised two Ounces, Pepper bruised two Ounces, give all a Boil or two over the Fire, and have your Nuts ready in a Pot, and pour the Liquor boiling hot over them; so do for nine Times.

To pickle Samphire.

PICK your Samphire from dean or withered Bran|ches; ly it in a Bell metal or Brass Pot; then put in a pint of Water and a pint of Vinegar; so do till your Pickle is an inch above your Samphire; have a lid fit for the Pot, and paste it close down, that no steam may go out; keep it boiling an Hour, take it off, and cover it with old Sacks, or any old Cloths, under, over, and all about the Pot; when it is cold, put it up in Tubs or Pots; the best by itself; the great Stalks lay upmost in boiling; it will keep the cooler and better. The Vinegar you use must be the best.

To mango Cucumbers.

CUT out a little Slip out of the Side of the Cucum|ber, and take out the Seeds, but as little of the Meat as you can; then put in the Inside Mustard-seed bruised, a Clove of Garlick, some Slices of Ginger, and some Bin of Horse-radish; tie the Piece in again, and make a Pickle of Vinegar, Salt, whole Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and boil it, and pour it on the Mangoes; and so do for nine Days together; when cold, cover them with Leather.

An excellent Way to pickle Mushrooms.

PUT your Mushrooms into Water, and wash them clean with a Spunge, throw them into Water as you do them; then put in Water and a little Salt, and when it boils put in your Mushrooms; when they boil up scum them clean, and put them into cold Water, and a little Salt: Let them stand 24 Hours, and put them into White-wine Vinegar, and let them stand a Week; then Page  39 take your Pickle from them, and boil it very well with whole Pepper, Cloves, Mace, and a little All-spice; when your Pickle is cold, put it to your Mushrooms in the Glass or Pot you keep them in; keep them close, and tied down with a Bladder; the Air will hurt them; if your Pickle mothers, boil it again: You may make your Pickle half White-wine, and half White-wine Vinegar.

To pickle Oysters.

WASH your Oysters in their own Liquor, squeezing them between your Fingers, that there be no Gra|vel in them; strain the Liquor, and wash the Oysters in it again; put as much Water as the Liquor, and set it on the Fire, and as it boils scum it clean; then put a pretty deal of whole Pepper, boil it a little, then put in some Blades of Mace, and your Oysters, stirring them a|pace, and when they are firm in the Middle part, take them off, pour them quick into an earthen Pot, and co|ver them very close; put in a few Bay-leaves; be sure your Oysters are all under the Liquor; the next Day put them for Use, cover them very close: When you dish them to eat, put a little White-wine or Vinegar on the Plate with them.

To pickle Pods of Radishes.

GAther the youngest Pods, and put them in Water and Salt twenty-four Hours; then make a Pickle for them of Vinegar, Cloves, Mace, whole Pepper; boil this, and drain the Pods from the Salt and Water, and pour the Liquor on them boiling hot; put to them a Clove of Garlick a little bruised.

To pickle Cucumbers.

WIPE your Cucumbers very clean with a Cloth, then get so many Quarts of Vinegar as you have Hundreds of Cucumbers, and take Dill and Fennel, and cut it small, and put it to the Vinegar, and set it over the Page  40 Fire in a Copper Kettle, and let it boil, and then put in your Cucumbers 'til they are warm through, but not boil while they are in; when they are warm through, pour all out into a deep earthen Pot, and cover it up very close 'til the next Day; then do the same again; but the third Day season the Liquor before you set it over the Fire; put in Salt 'til it is blackish, some sliced Ginger, whole Pepper, and whole Mace; then set it over the Fire again; and when it boils, put in your Cucumbers: When they are hot through, pour them into the Pot, co|vering it close; when they are cold put them in Glasses, and strain the Liquor over them; pick out the Spice, and put to them; cover them with Leather.

To pickle French Beans.

TAKE young slender French Beans; take off Top and Tail; then make a Brine with cold Water and Salt, strong enough to bear an Egg; put in your Beans in|to that Brine, and let them lie fourteen Days; then take them out and wash them in fair Water, and set them o|ver the Fire in cold Water, without Salt, and let them boil 'til they are so tender as to eat; and when they are cold, drain them from their Water, and make a Pickle for them: To a Peck of French Beans, you must have a Ga••on of White-wine Vinegar; boil it with some Cloves, Mace, whole Pepper, and sliced Ginger, and when it is cold, put it and your Beans in a Glass; so keep them for Use.

To pickle red Cabbage.

TAKE your close-leaved red Cabbage, and cut it in Quarters, and when your Liquor boils put in your Cabbage, and give it a Dozen Walms; then make the Pickle of White wine Vinegar and Claret: You may put to it Beet-root, boil them first, and Turnips half boiled; 'tis very good for the garnishing Dishes, or to garnish a Salade.

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To pickle Barberries.

TAKE of White wine Vinegar, and fair Water, an equal Quantity, and to every Pint of this Liquor, put a Pound of Six penny Sugar; set it over the Fire, and bruise some of the Barberries and put in it, and a lit|tle Salt; let it boil near half an Hour; then take it off the Fire, and strain it, and when it is pretty cold, pour it into a Glass over your Barberries; boil a Piece of la|n in the Liquor and put over them, and cover the Glass with Leather.

To make English Katchup.

TAKE a wide mouth'd Bottle, put therein a Pint of the best White-wine Vinegar; then put in ten or twelve Cloves of Eschalot, peeled and just bruised; then take a quarter of a Pint of the best Langoon White-wine; boil it a little, and put to it twelve or fourteen Ancho|vies washed and shred, and dissolve them in the Wine, and when cold put them in the Bottle; then take a quar|ter of a Pint more of White-wine, and put in it Mace, Ginger sliced, a few Cloves, a Spoonful o whole Pepper just bruised; let them boil all a little; when near c••d, slice in almost a whole Nutmeg, and ••me Lemon peel, and likewise put in two or three Spoonfuls of Ho•• ra|dish; then stop it close, and for a Week shake it once or twice a Day, then use it; 'tis good to put into Fish Sauce, or any savoury Dish or Meat; you may add to it the clear Liquor that comes from Mushrooms.

To pickle small Onions.

TAKE young white unset Onions, as big as the Tip of your Finger; lay them in Water and Salt two Days; shift them once, then drain them in a Cloth; boil the best Vinegar with Spice, according to your Taste, and when it is cold, keep them in it covered with a wet bl••dr.

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To distil Vinegar for Mushrooms.

TO a Gallon of Vinegar put an Ounce and half of Ginger sliced, an Ounce of Nutmegs bruised, half an Ounce of Mace, half an Ounce of white Pepper, as much Jamaica Pepper, both bruised, a few Cloves; dis|til this. Take care it does not burn in the Still.

To make the Mushroom Powder.

TAKE a Peck of Mushrooms, wash and rub them clean with a Flannel Rag, cutting out all the Worms; but do not peel off the Skins; put to them sixteen Blades of Mace, forty Cloves, six Bay leaves, twice as much bea|ten Pepper as will lie on a half Crown; a good Handful of Salt, a Dozen Onions, a Piece of Butter as big as an Egg, and half a Pint of Vinegar: Stew these as fast as you can; keep the Liquor for Use, and dry the Mush|rooms first on a broad Pan in the Oven; afterwards put them on Seves, till they are dry enough to pound all to|gether into Powder. This Quantity usually makes half a Pound.

To keep Artichoaks in Pickle, to boil all Winter.

THROW your Artichoaks into Salt and Water half a Day; then make a Pot of Water boil, and put in your Artichoaks, and let them boil till you can just draw off the Leaves from the Bottom; then cut off the Bot|tom very smooth and clean, and put them into a Pot with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, two Bay-leaves, and as much Vinegar as will cover them: Then pour melted Butter over them enough to cover an Inch thick; tie it down close, and keep them for Use When you use them, put them into boiling Water, with a Piece of Butter in the Wa|ter to plump them; then use them for what you please.

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To make Goose-berry Vinegar.

TAKE Gooseberries full ripe, bruise them in a Mor|tar; then measure them, and to every Quart of Gooseberries, put three Quarts of Water, first boiled, and let stand till cold; let it stand twenty four Hours; then strain it through a Canvass, then a Flnnel; and to every Gallon of this Liquor, put one Pound of feeding brown Sugar; stir it well, and barrel it up; at three Quarters of a Year old 'tis fit for Use; but if it stands longer 'tis the better: This Vinegar is likewise good for Pickles.

To distil Verjuice for Pickles.

TAKE three Quarts of the sharpest Verjuice, and put it in a cold Still, and distil it off very softly; the sooner 'tis distill'd in the Spring, the better for use.

Sauce for Fish or Flesh.

TAKE a Quart of Verjuice, and put it into a Jug; then take Jamaica Pepper whole, some sliced Gin|ger, some Mace, a few Cloves, some Lemon peel, Horse|raddish-root sliced, some Sweet herbs, six Eschalots peel|ed, and eight Anchovies, two or three Spoonfuls of shred Capers; put all these into a Linnen-bag, and put the Bag into your Verjuice; stop the Jug close, and keep it for Use; a Spoonful cold or mixed in Sauce for Fish or Flesh.

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All Sorts of Puddings.

To make an Orange Pudding.

TAKE the out-side Rind of three Sevil Oranges, boil them in several Waters till they are tender; then pound them in a Mortar with three Quarters of a Pound of Sugar; then blanch and beat halt a Pound of Almonds very fine, with Rose water to keep them from oiling; then beat sixteen Eggs, but six Whites, and a Pound of fresh Butter; beat all these together very well till 'tis light and hollow; then put it in. Dish, with a Slices of Puff-pste at the Bottom, and bake it with Tarts; scrape Sugar on it, and serve it up hot.

To make a Carrot Pudding.

TAKE raw Carrots, and scrape them clean, grate them with a Grater wthout a Bck. To half a Pound of Carrot, take a Pound of grated Bred, a Nut|meg, a little Cinamon, a very little Salt, hlf a Pound of Sugar, and hlf a Pint of Sack, eight Egs, a Pound of Buer meted, and as much Crem as wll mix it well togte; stir it and beat it well up, and pt it in a Dish to bake; put Puff pste at the Bottom of your Dish.

To make an Almona Pudding.

TAKE a Pound of the best Jordan-Almonds blanch|ed in cld Water, and beat very fie with a little Rose wter; then take a Qurt of Cr••m, boile with whole Spice, and taken out ••g in, and when 'tis cold, mix it with the Almonds, and put to it three Spo〈◊〉 of grated Bread, and one Spoonful of Flour, nine Eggs, but Page  45 three Whites, half a Pond of Sugr, a Nutmeg grated; mix and beat these well together, pu•• me Puff-paste at the Bottom of a Dish; put your Suff in, and here and there stick a Piece of Marrow in it. It must bke an Hour, and when 'tis drawn, scrape Sugar on it, and serve it up.

To make a Marrow Pudding.

TAKE out the Marrow of three or four Bones, and slice it in thin Pieces; and take a Penny Loaf, cut off the Crust, and slice it in as thin Slices as you can, and stone half a Pound of Raisins of the Sun; then lay a Sheet of thin Paste in the Bottom of a Dish; so lay a Row of Marrow, of Bread, and of Raisins, till the Dish is full; then have in Readiness a Quart of Cream boiled, and beat five Eggs, and mix with it; put to it a Nutmeg grated, and a half a Pound of Sugar. When 'tis just go|ing into the Oven, pour in your Cream and Eggs; bake it half an Hour, scrape Sugar on it when 'tis drawn, and serve it up.

A baked Bread Pudding.

TAKE a Penny Loaf, cut it in thin Slices, then boil a Quart of Cream or new Milk, and put in your Bread, and break it very fine; put five Eggs to it, a Nutmeg grated, a Quarter of a Pound of Sugar, and Half a Pound of Butter; stir all these well together; butter a Dish, and bake it an Hour.

A Lemon Pudding.

TAKE Two clear Lemons, grate off the outside rinds; then grate Two Naples biskets, and mix with your grated Peel, and add to it Three Quarters of a Pound of fine Sugar, Twelve Yolks, and Six Whites of Eggs, well beaten, and Three Quarters of a Pound of Butter melted, and half a Pint of thick Cream; mix these well together; put a Sheet of Paste at the Bottom Page  46 of the Dish; and just as the Oven is redy, put your Stuff in the Dish; sift a little double-resin'd Sugar over it before you put it in the Ovn; an Hour will bake it.

To make a Calf's-Foot Pudding.

TAKE two Calf's Feet, finely shred; then take of Bisket grated, and stale Mackaroons broken small, the Quantity of a Penn Loaf; then add a Pound of Beef|suet, very finely shred, half a Pound of Currants, a q••r|ter of a Pound of Sugar; some Cloves, Mace, and Nut|meg, beat fine; a very little Salt, some Sack, and Orange|flower-water, some Citron, and candied Orange peel; work all these well together, with Yolks of Eggs; if you boil it, put it in the Caul of a Breast of Veal, and tie it over with a Cloth; it must boil four Hours. For Sauce, melt Butter, with a little Sack and Sugar. If you bake it, put some Paste in the Bottom of the Dish, but none on the Brim; then melt half a Pound of Butter, and mix with your Stuff, and put it in your Dish, and stick Lumps of Marrow in it; bake it three or four Hours; Scrape Sugar over it, and serve it hot.

A Rice Pudding.

SET a Pint of thick Cream over the Fire, and put in|to it three Spoonfuls of the Flour of Rice; stir it, and when 'tis pretty thick, pour it into a Pan, and put into it a Pound of fresh Butter; stir it till 'tis almost cold; then add to it a grated Nutmeg, a little Salt, some Sugar, a lit|tle Sack, the Yolks of six Eggs; stir it well together; put some Puff paste in the Bottom of the Dish, pour it in; an Hour or less will bake it.

To make a French-Barley Pudding.

TAKE a Qurt of Cream, and put to it six Eggs well beaten, but three of the Whites, then season it with Suar, Nutmeg, a little Slt, Orange flower water, and a Pound of melted Butter; then put to it six Handfuls of Page  47French barley, tht has been boiled tender in Milk; But|ter a Dish and put it in, and bake it. It must stand s long as a Venison Psty, and it will be good.

A good boiled Pudding.

TAKE a Pound and a Quarter of Beef-suet, after 'tis skinned, 〈◊〉 red very fine; then stone three Quarters of a Pound of Raisis, and mix with it, and a grated Nutmeg, a Quarter of a Pound of Sugar, a little Salt, a little Sak, four Eggs, four Spoonfuls of Cream, and about half a Pound of fine Flour; mix these well toge|ther pretty stiff; tie it in a Cloth, and let it boil four Hours. Melt Butter thick for Sauce.

To make a Quaking Pudding.

TAKE a Pint of Cream, and boil it with Nutmeg and Cinamon, and Mace; take out the Spice when 'tis boiled; then take the Yolks of eight Eggs, and four of the Whites; beat them very well, with sme Sack, and mix your Eggs with your Cream, with a little Salt and Sugar, and a stale Half Penny white Loaf, and one Spoon|ful of Flour, and a Quarter of a Pound of Almonds blnch'd and beat fine, with some Roe water; beat all these together, and wet a thick Cloth and flour it, and put it in when the Pot boils. It must boil an Hour at least. Melt Butter, Sack and Sugar for the Sauce; stick blanched Almonds and candied Orange-peel on the Top.

To make a Cow-heel Pudding.

TAKE a large Cow-heel, and cut off all the Meat but the black Tees; put them away, but mince the rest very small, and shred it over again, with three Quarters of a Pound of Beef-suet; put to it a Penny Loaf grated, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Sugar, and a little Salt, some Sack, and Rose-water; mix these well together with six raw Eggs well beaten; butter a Cloth and put it in, and boil it two Hours. For Sauce, melt Butter, Sack, and Sugar.

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To make a Curd Pudding.

TAKE the Curd of a gallon of Milk, and whey it well, and rub it through a Sieve; then take six Eggs, a little thick Cream, three Spoonfuls of Orange. flower water, one Nutmeg grated, grated Bread and Flour, of each three Spoonfuls; a Pound of Currants, and ston'd Raisins; mix all these together; btter a thick Cloth, and tie it up in it; boil it an Hour. For Sauce, melt Butter and Orange f1ower-water, and Sugar.

Very fine Hogs Puddings.

SHRED four Pound f Beef-suet very fi••, mix with it two Pounds of fie Sugar powder'd, two grated Nutmegs, some Mace beat, and a little Salt, and three Pounds of Currants wash'd and pick'd; beat twenty four Yolks, twelve Whites of Eggs, with a little Sack; mix all well together, and fill your Guts, being clean, and steep'd in Orange flower water; cut your Guts Quarter and Half long, fill them half full; tie at each End; and again thus, coco, Boil them as others, and cut them in Balls when ent to the Table.

To make a baked Sack Pudding.

TAKE a Pint of Cream, and turn it to a Curd with Sack; then bruise the Curd very small with a Spoon; then grate in two Naples-biskets, or the In side of a stale Penny Loaf, and mix it well with the Curd, and half a Nutmeg grated; some fine Sugar, and the Yolks of four Eggs, the Whites of Two, beaten with Two Spoonfuls of Sack; then melt half a Pound of fresh Butter, and stir all together 'till the Oven is hot. Butter a Dish, and put it in, and fist some Sugar in it just as it's going into the Oven; half an Hour will bake it.

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To make Pancakes.

TAKE a Pint of Cream, and eight Eggs, Whites and all, a whole Nutmeg grated, and a little Salt; then melt a Pound of rare Dish Butter and a little Sack; before you fry them stir it in. It must be made as thick with three Spoonfuls of Flour, as ordinary Batter, and fry'd with Butter in the Pan, the first Pancake, but no more: Strew Sugar, garnish with Orange, turn it on the Backside of a Plate.

To make a Tansy to bake.

TAKE Twenty Eggs, but Eight Whites, beat the Eggs very well, and strain them into a Quart of thick Cream one Nutmeg, and three Naples-biskets grated, as much Juice of Spinnage, with a Sprig or two of Tansy, as will make it as green as Grass; sweeten it to your Taste; then butter your Dish very well, and set it into an Oven, no hotter than for Custards; watch it, and as soon as 'tis done, take it out of the Oven, and turn it on a Pye|plate; scrape Sugar, and squeeze Orange upon it. Gar|nish the Dish with Orange and Lemon, and serve it up.

To make Apple Fritters.

TAKE the Yolks of eight Eggs, the Whites of four, beat them well together, and strain them into a Pan; then take a Quart of Cream, warm it as hot as you can endure your Finger in it; then put to it a Quarter of a Pint of Sack, three Quarters of a Pint of Ale, and make a Posset of it; when your Posset is cool, put to it your Eggs, beating them well together; then put in Nutmeg, Ginger, Salt, and Flour, to your liking: Your Batter should be pretty thick; then put in Pippins sliced or scra|ped; fry them in good store of hot Lard, with a quick Fire.

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To make a Lemon Tart.

TAKE three clear Lemons, and grate off the out side Rinds; take the Yolks of twelve Eggs, and six Whites; beat them very well, squeeze in the Juice of a Lemon; then put in three Quarters of a Pound of fie powder'd Sugar, and three Quarters of a Pound of fresh Butter molted; stir all well together, put a Shet of Paste at the Bottom, and stir Sugar on the Top; put it in a brisk Oven, three Quarters of an Hour will bake it: So serve it to the Table.

A baked Pudding.

BLANCH half a Pound of Almonds, and beat them fine with sweet Water, Ambergrease, dissolved in O|range flower Water, or in some Cream; then warm a Pint of thick Cream, and melt in it half a Pound of But|ter; then mix it with your beaten Almonds, a little Salt, a grated Nutmeg, and Sugar, and the Yolks of six Eggs; beat it up together, and put it in a Dish with Puff paste, the Oven not too hot; scrape Sugar on it just before it goes into the Oven.

To make a Custard Pudding.

TAKE a Pint of Cream, and mix with it six Egg well beaten, two Spoonfuls of Flour, half a Nutmeg grated, a little Salt, and Sugar to your Taste; butter a Cloth, put it in when the Pot boils; boil it just half an Hour; melt Butter for Sauce.

To make an Almond Tourt.

BLANCH and beat half a Pound of Jordan Almonds very fine; use Orange flower Water in the beating your Almonds; pare the yellow Rind of a Lemon pretty thick; boil it in Water till 'tis very tender: Beat it with half a Pound of Sugar, and mix it with the Almonds, and Page  51 eight Eggs, but fo Water, half a Pound of Butter melt|ed, and lm it cold, and a little thick Cream; mix all together, and bake it in a D•• with Paste at Bottom. This may be made the Day before 'tis used.

To make a Sweet-meat Pudding.

PUT a thin Puff paste at the Bottom of your Di••. then have of candied Orange and Lemon-peel, and 〈◊〉 of each an Ounce; slice them thin, and put them in the B••t••n your Paste; then beat eight Volks of Eggs, and two Whites, near half a Pound of Sugar, and half a Pound of Butter melted; mix and beat all well together, and when the Oven is ready, pour it on your Sweet-meats in the Dish. An Hour or less will bake it.

To make fine Fritters.

TAKE half a Pint of thick sweet Cream; put to it four Eggs well beaten, a little Brandy, some Nut|meg and Ginger; make this into a thick Batter with Flour; your Apples must be Golden-pippins pared and cut in thin Slices, dip them in the Batter, and fry them in Lard. It will take up two Pounds of Lard to fry this Quantity.

To make a fine Bread Pudding.

TAKE three Pints of Milk, and boil it; when 'tis boiled, sweeten it with half a Pound of Sugar, and a small Nutmeg grated, and put in half a Pound of But|ter; when 'tis melted, pour it in a Pan, over eleven Oun|ces of grated Bread; cover it up. The next Day put to it ten Eggs well beaten, stir all together, and when the Oven is hot, put it in your Dish; three Quarters of an Hour will bake it. Boil a Bit of Lemon peel in the Milk, take it out before you put your other Things in.

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All Sorts of PASTRY.

To make a Tureiner.

TAKE a China Pot or Bowl, and fill it as fol|lows: At the Bottom lay some fresh Butter; then put in three or four Beef steaks 〈◊〉 with Bacon; then cut some Veil steaks, from the Leg; hack them, and wash them over with the Yolk of an Egg, and afterwards lay it over with Forc'd meat, and roll it up, and lay it in with young Chickens, Pigeons, and Rabbets, some in Quarters, some in Halves; Sweet|breads, Lamb-stones, Cocks-combs, Palates after they are boiled, peeled, and cut in Slices; Tongues, either Hogs or Calves, sliced, and some larded with Bacon; whole Yolks of hard Eggs, Pistachia Nuts peeled, forc'd Balls, some round, some like an Olive, Lemon sliced, some with the Rind on, Barberries and Oysters; season all these with Pepper, Salt, Nutmeg, and Sweet herbs, mix'd together after they are cut very small, and strew it on every Thing as you put it in your Pot: Then put in a Quart of Gravy, and some Butter on the Top, and cover it close with a Lid of Puff paste, pretty thick. Eight Hours will bake it.

To make an Oyster Pye.

MAKE good Puff paste, and lay a thin Sheet in the Bottom of your Pattipan; then take two Quarts of large Oysters, wash them well in their own Liquor, and take them out of it, and dry them, and season them with Salt and Spice, and a little Pepper, all beaten fine; lay some Butter in the Bottom of your Pattipan, then lay in your Oysters, and the Yolks of twelve hard Eggs whole, two or three Sweet-breads cut in Slices, or Lamb-stones, Page  53 or in Want of these a Dozen of Larks, two Marrow-bones, the Marrow taken out in Lumps, dipped in the Yolks of Eggs, and seasoned as you did your Oysters, and some grated Bread dusted on it, and a few Forc'd meat Balls: When all these are in, put some Butter on the Top, and cover it over with a Sheet of Puff-paste, and bake it: When 'tis drawn out of the Oven, take the Liquor of the Oyster, and boil it and scum it, and beat it up thick with Butter, and the Yolks of two or three Eggs, and pour it hot into your Pye, and shake it well together, and serve it hot.

To make Egg Pyes.

TAKE the Yolks of two Dozen of Eggs boil'd hard, and chopp'd with double the Quantity of Beef suet, and half a Pound of Pippins pared, c••ed, and sliced; then add to it one Pound of Currants walled and dryed, half a Pound of Sugar, a little Salt, some Spice beaten fine, the Juice of a Lemon, and half a Pint of Sack, can|died Orange and Citron cut in Pieces, of each th••e Oun|ces, some Lumps of Marrow on the Top, fill them full; the Oven must not be too hot; three Quarters of an Hour will bake them; put the Marrow only on them that are to be eaten hot.

To make a Sweet-bread Pasty, to fry or bake.

PARBOIL your Sweet breads, and shred them very fine, with an equal Quantity of Marrow; mix with them a little grated Bread, some Nutmeg, Salt the Yolks of two hard Eggs bruised small, and Sugar; then mix up with a little Cream and the Yolk of an Egg: Make Paste with half a Pound of the finest Flour, an Ounce of dou|ble-refin'd Sugar beat and sifted, the Yolks of two Eggs, and White of one, and fair Water; then roll in half a Pound of Butter, and roll it out in little Pasties the Breadth of your Hand; put your Meat in, cl••e tem up well, and fry or bake them. A very pretty Side-dish.

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To make little Pasties to fry.

TAKE the Kidney of a Loin of Veal or Lamb, Fat and all, shred it very small; season it with a little Salt, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, all beaten small, some Su|gar, and the Yolks of two or three hard Eggs, minced very fine. Mix all these together, with a little Sack or Cream; put them in Puff paste, and fry them: Serve them hot.

To make Custards.

TAKE two Quarts of thick sweet Cream, boil it with some Bits of Cinnamon, and a quartered Nut|meg; keep it stirring all the while, and when it has boil|ed a little Time, pour it into a Pan to cool, and stir it 'til it is cool, to keep it from scumming; then beat the Yolks of sixteen Eggs, the whites of but six, and mix your Eggs with the Cream when it is cool, and sweeten it with fine Sugar to your Taste, put in a very little Salt, and some Rose or Orange flower Water; then strain all through a Hair Siere, and fill your Cups or Crust. It must be a pretty quick Oven; when they boil up, they are enough.

To make Cheesecakes.

TAKE a Pint of Cream and warm it, and put to it the Quarts of Milk warm from the Cow; then put Runnet to it; and when it is come, put the Curd in a 〈◊〉 rag or Cloth, and let it drain well from the Whey, but do not squeeze it much; then put it in a Mortar, and break the Curd as fine as Butter; then put to your Curd half a Pound of Almonds blanched, and beaten exceeding fine, (or half a Pound of dry Mackaroons beat very fine,) if you have Almonds, grate in a ••ples ••ket; but if you use Mackaroons, you need not; then add to it the Yolks of Nine Eggs beaten, a whole Nutmeg grated, Two per•••e〈◊〉 dissolved in Rose or Orange-flower Water, half a Pound of fine Sugar, mix all well Page  55 together; then melt a Pound and a quarter of Butter, and stir it well in it, and half a Pound of Currants plump'd; so let it stand to cool 'til you use it.

Then make your Puff paste thus: Take a Pound of fine Flour, and wet it with cold Water, roll it out, and put into it by Degrees a Pound of fresh Butter: Use it just as it is made.

Another Way to make Cheesecakes.

TAKE a Gallon of new Milk, set it as for a Cheese, and gently whey it; then break it in a Mortar, put to it the Yolks of six Eggs, four of the Whites, sweeten it to your Taste; put in a grated Nutmeg, some Rose-Water and Sack; mix these together, and set over the Fire a Quart of Cream, and make it into a Hasty-pud|ding, and mix that with it very well, and fill your Pat|tipans just as they are going into the Oven. Your Oven must be ready, that you may not stay for that; when they rise well up, they are enough. Make your Paste thus:

Take about a Pound of Flour, and strew into it three Spoonfuls of Loaf Sugar beaten and sifted, and rub into it a Pound of Butter, one Egg, and a Spoonful of Rose Water, the rest cold fair Water: Make it into a Paste, roll it very thin, and put it into your Pans, and fill them almost full.

Paste for Pasties.

RUB six Pounds of Butter into fourteen Pounds of Flour; put to it eight Eggs, whip the Whites to Snow, and make it in a pretty stiff Paste with cold Water.

To make Cheesecakes without Runnet.

TAKE a Quart of thick Cream, and set it over a clear Fire, with some quarter'd Nutmeg in it; just as it boils up, put in twelve Eggs well beaten, and a Page  56 quarter of a Pound of fresh Butter; stir it a little while on the Fire, 'til it begins to curdle; then take it off, and gather the Curd as for Cheese; put it in a clean Cloth, tie it together, and hang it up that the Whey may run from it; when it is pretty dry, put it in a Stone Mortar, with a Pound of Butter, a quarter of a Pint of thick Cream, some S••k and Orange flower Water, and half a Pound of fine Sugar; then beat and grind all these very well together for an Hour or more, 'til it is very fine; then pass it through a Hair Steve, and fill your Pattipans but half full. You may put Currants in half the Quan|tity, if you please: A little more than a Quarter of an Hour will bake them. Take the Nutmeg out of the Cream when it is boiled.

To make Orange or Lemon Tarts.

TAKE six large Lemons, and rub them very well with Salt, and put them in Water for two Days, with a handful of Salt in it; then change them into fresh Water without Salt, every other Day for a Fortnight; then boil them for two or three Hours 'til they are ten|der; then cut them in half Quarters, and then cut them thus as thin as you can; then take Pippins pared, cored and quartered, and a Pint of fair Water, let them boil 'til the Pippins break; put the Liquor to your O|range or Lemon, and half the Pippins well broken, and a Pound of Sugar, boil these together quarter of an Hour; then put it in a Gallipot, and squeeze an Orange in it, if it be Lemon; or a Lemon, if it is Orange; two Spoonfuls is enough for a Tart: Your Pattipans must be small and shallow; put fine Puff-paste, and very thin; a little while will bake it. Just as your Tarts are going into the Oven, with a Feather or Brush do them over with melted Butter, and then sift double refined Sugar •• them, and this is a pretty Icing on them.

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To make Puff-paste for Tarts.

RUB a quarter of a Pound of Butter into a Pound of fire Flour; then whip the Whites of two Eggs to Snow, and with cold Water and one Yolk make it into a Paste, then roll it broad, and put in by Degrees a Pound of Butter, flouring it over the Butter every Time, and roll it up, and roll it out again, and put in more Butter: So do for six or seven Times, 'til it has taken up all the Pound of Butter. This Paste is good for Tarts, or any small Things.

Apple Pasties to fry.

PARE and quarter Apples, and boil them in Sugar and Water, and a Stick of Cinnamon, and when ten|der, put in a little White-wine, the Juice of a Lemon, a Piece of fresh Butter, and a little Ambergrease or O|range-flower Water; stir all together, and when 'tis cold, put it in Puff-paste, and fry them.

To season and bake a Venison Pasty.

BONE your Hanch or Side of Venison, and take out all the Sinews and Skin; then proportion it for your Pasty, by taking away from one Part, and adding to ano|ther, 'til 'tis of an equal Thickness; then season it with Pepper and Salt, about an Ounce of Pepper; save a lit|tle of it whole, and beat the rest, and mix with twice as much Salt, and rub it all over your Venison, and let it lie 'til your Paste is ready. Make your Paste thus: A Peck of fine Flour, 6 Pounds of Butter, a Dozen of Eggs; rub your Butter in your Flour, beat your Eggs, and with them and cold Water make up your Paste very stiff; then drive it forth for your Pasty; let it be the Thickness of a Man's Thumb; put under it two or three Sheets of Cp|peper well floured: Then have two Pounds of Beef suet, shred exceeding fine; proportion it on the Bottom to the Breadth of your Venison, and leave a Verge round your Page  58 Venison three Fig•• broad, wsh that Verge over with a Bnch of Feathers or Brush dipped in an Egg beaten, and then lay a Borde of your Paste on the Place you washed, and lay your Venison on the Suet; put a little of your Seasoning on the Top, and a few Corns of whole Pepper, and two Pounds of very good fresh Butter; then turn over your other Sheet of Paste, so close your Pasty. Garnish it on the Top as you think fit; vent it in the Middle, and set it in the Oven It will take 5 or 6 Hours baking: Then break all the Bones, wash them and add to them more Bones or Knuckles; season them with Pep|per and Salt, and put them with a Quart of Water, and half a Pound of Butter, in a Pan or earthen Pot; cover it over with coarse Paste, and set it in with your Pasty; and when your Pasty is drawn and dished, fill it up with the Gravy that came from the Bones.

A fine Potato Pye, for Lent.

FIRST make your Forc'd-meat, about two Dozen of small Oysters just scalded, and when cold chop small, a stale Roll grated, and six Yolks of Eggs boiled hard, and bruised small with the Back of a Spoon; season with a little Salt, Pepper, and Nutmeg, some Thyme and Parsley, both shred small: Mix these together well, and pound them a little, and make it up in a stiff Paste, with half a Pound of Butter and an Egg work'd in it, just flour it to keep it from sticking, and lay it by 'til your Pye •• fit, and put a very thin Paste in your Dish, Bottom and Sides; then put your Forc'd meat, of an equal Thick|ness, about two Fingers broad, about the Sides of your Dish, as you would do a Pudding Crust, dust a little Flour on it, and put it down close; then fill your Pye, a Dozen of Potatos, about the Bignels of a small Egg, finely pared just boiled a Walm or two, a Dozen Yolks of Eggs boiled hard, a quarter of a Hundred large Oysters just sealded i their own Liquor and cold, 6 Morels, 4 or 5 Blades of Mace, some whole Pepper, and a little 〈◊〉 Butter on the Bottom and Top; then lid your Pye, and bake it an Hour when 'tis drawn, pour in a Caudle made with half a Pi••Page  59 of your Oyster Liquor, 3 or 4 Spoonfuls of White wine, and thicken'd up with Butter and Egg; pour it in hot at the Hose on the Top, and shake it together, and serve it.

Potato, or Lemon Cheesecakes.

TAKE six Ounces of Potatoes, four Ounces of Le|mon-peel, four Ounces of Sugar, four Ounces of Butter; boil the Lemon peel till tender; pure and scrape the Potatoes, and boil them tender, and bruise them; beat the Lemon peel with the Sugar, then beat all together very well, and melt the Butter in a little thick Cream, and mix all together very well, and let it lie till cold: Put Crust in your P••tipans, and fill them little more than half full: Bake them in a quick Oven half an Hour, sift some double refin'd Sugar on them as they go in the Oven; this Quantity will make a Dozen small Pattipans.

Sauce for Fish in Lent, or at any Time.

TAKE a little Thyme, Horse radish, a Bit of Onion, Lemon peel and whole Pepper; boil them a little in fair Water; then put in two Anchovies, and four Spoon|fuls of White-wine; then strain them out, and put the Liquor into the same Pan again, with a Pound of fresh Butter; and when 'tis melted, take it off the Fire, and stir in the Yolks of two Eggs well beaten, with three Spoon|fuls of White wine; let it on the Fire again, and keep it stirring till 'tis the Thickness of Cream, and pour it hot over your Fish: Garnish with Lemon and Horse radish.

To make a savoury Lamb Pye.

SEASON your Lamb with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg; so put it into your Coffin with a few Limb stones, and Sweet breads, seasoned as your Lamb, also some large Oysters, and savoury Forc'd meat Balls, hard Yolks of Eggs, and the Tops of Asparagus two Inches long, first boiled green; then put Butter all over the Pye, and lid it, and set it in a quick Oven an Page  60 Hour and a half; then make the Liquor with Oyster-Liquor, as much Gravy, a little Claret, with one Anchovy in it, and a grated Nutmeg. Let these have a Boil; thick|en it with the Yolks of two or three Eggs; and when the Pye is drawn, pour it in hot.

To make a sweet Lamb Pye.

CUT your Lamb into small Pieces, and season it with a little Salt, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg; your Pye being made, put in your Lamb or Veal; strew on it some stoned Raisins and Currants, and some Sugar; then lay on it some Forc'd meat Balls made sweet, and in the Summer some Artichoke Bottoms boiled, and scalded Grapes in the Winter. Boil Spanish Potatoes cut in Pie|ces; candied Citron, candied Orange and Lemon peel, and 3 or 4 large Blades of Mace; put Butter on the Top, close up your Pye, and bake it. Make the Caudle of White-wine, Juice of Lemon and Sugar: Thicken it with the Yolks of two or three Eggs and a Bit of Butter; and when your Pye is baked, pour in your Caudle as hot as you can, and shake it well in the Pye, and serve it up.

A sweet Chicken Pye.

TAKE five or six small Chickens, pick, draw, and truss them for baking; season them with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, and a little Salt; wrap up some of the Seasoning in Butter, and put it in their Bel|lies; and your Coffin being made, put them in; put over and between them Pieces of Marrow, Spanish Potatoes, and Chesnuts, both boiled, peeled, and cut, a Handful of Berberries stript, a Lemon sliced, some Butter on the Top; so close up the Pye and bake it, and have in Rea|diness a Caudle made of White wine, Sugar, Nutmeg; beat it up with Yolks of Eggs and Butter; have a care it does not curdle; pour the Caudle in, shake it well toge|ther, and serve it up hot.

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Another Chicken Pye.

SEason your Chickens with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, a little shred Parsley and Thyme, mixed with the other Seasoning; wrap up some in Butter, and put in the Bellies of the Chickens, and lay them in your Pye; strew over them Lemon cut like Dice, a handful of scald|ed Grapes, Artichoak-bottoms in Quarters: So put But|ter on it, and close it up; when 'tis baked, put in a Lear of Gravy, with a little White-wine, a grated Nutmeg, thicken it up with Butter, and two or three Eggs, shake it well together; serve it up hot.

To make an Olie Pye.

MAKE your Pye ready; then take the thin Collops of the But-end of a Leg of Veal, as many as you think will fill your Pye; hack them with the Back of a Knife, and season them with Pepper, Salt, Cloves, and Mace; wash over your Collops with a Bunch of Feathers dipped in Eggs, and have in Readiness a good Handful of Sweet-herbs shred small; the Herbs must be Thyme, Parsley, and Spinage; and the Yolks of eight hard Eggs minced, and a few Oysters parboiled and chopt; some Beef-suet shred very fine. Mix these together, and strew them over your Collops, and sprinkel a little Orange-flower Water on them, and roll the Collops up very close, and lay them in your Pye, strew the Seasoning that is left over them; put Butter on the Top, and close up your Pye; when 'tis drawn, put in Gravy, and one An|chovy dissolved in it, and pour it in very hot: And you may put in Artichoak bottoms and Chesnuts, if you please, or sliced Lemon, or Grapes scalded, or what else is in Season; but if you will make it a right savoury Pye, leave them out.

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To make a Florendine of Veal.

TAKE the Kidney of a Loin of Veal, fat and all, and mince it very fine; then chop a few Herbs and put to it, and add a few Currants; season it with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and a little Salt; and put in some Yolks of Eggs, and a handful of grated Bread, a Pippin or two chopt, some candied Lemon peel minced small, some Sack, Sugar, and Orange-flower Water. Put a Sheet of Puff-paste at the Bottom of your Dish; put this in, and cover it with another; close it up, and when it is baked, scrape Sugar on it; serve it hot.

Another made Dish.

TAKE half a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them very fine; put to them a little Rose or Orange-flower Water in the beating; then take a Quart of sweet thick Cream, and boil it with whole Cinamon and Mace, and quartered Dates; sweeten your Cream with Sugar to your Taste, and mix it with your Almonds, and stir it well together, and strain it out thro' a Sieve. Let your Cream cool, and thicken it with the Yolks of six Eggs; then garnish the deep Dish, and lay Paste at the Bottom, and then put in sliced Artichoke-bottoms, being first boil|ed, and upon that a Layer of Marrow, sliced Citron, and candied Orange; so do 'til your Dish is near full; then pour in your Cream, so bake it without a Lid; when 'tis baked, scrape Sugar on it, and serve it up hot. Half an Hour will bake it.

To make an Artichoke Pye.

BOIL the Bottoms of eight or ten Artichokes, scrape and make them clean from the Core; cut each of them into six Parts; season them with Cinamon, Nut|meg, Sugar, and a little Salt; then lay your Artichokes in your Pye. Take the Marrow of four or five Bones, dip your Marrow in Yolks of Eggs, and grated Bread, Page  63 and season it as you did your Artichokes, and lay it on the Top and between your Artichokes; then lay on sli|ced Lemon, Barberries, and large Mace; put Butter on the Top, and close up your Pye; then make your Lear of White-wine, Sck, and Sugar; thicken it with Yolks of Eggs, and a bit of Butter; when your Pye is drawn, pour it in, shake it together, and serve it hot.

To make a Chervil or Spinage Tart.

SHRED a Gallon of Spinage or Chervil very small; put to it half a Pound of melted Butter, the Meat of three Lemons picked from the Skins or Seeds; the Rind of two Lemons grated, a Pound of Sugar; put this in a Dish or Pattipan with Puff-paste on the Bottom and Top, and so bake it; when 'tis baked, cut off the Lid, and put Cream or Custard over it as you do Codlin Tarts. Scrape Sugar over it; serve it cold. This is good among other Tarts in the Winter for Variety.

To make Lemon Cheesecakes.

TAKE the Peel of two large Lemons, boil it very tender; then pound it well in a Mortar, with a quarter of a Pound or more of Loaf Sugar, the Yolks of six Eggs, and half a Pound of fresh Butter; pound and mix all well together, and fill the Pattipans but half full: Orange Cheese-cakes are done the same way; only you must boil the Peel in two or three Waters to take out the Bitterness.

A Fish Pye.

TAKE of Soles or thick Flounders, gut and wash them, and just put them in scalding Water to get off the black Skin; then cut them in Scollops or indent|ed, so that they will join and lie in the Pye, as if they were whole. Have your Pattipan in Readiness with Puff paste in the Bottom, and a Layer of Butter on it; then season your Fish with a little Pepper and Salt, Page  64 Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg, and lay it in your Pattipan, joining the Pieces together, as if the Fish had not been cut; then put in Forc'd-balls made with Fish, Slices of Lemon with the Rind on, whole Oysters, whole Yolks of hard Eggs, and pickled Barberries; then lid your Pye and bake it; when 'tis drawn, make a Caudle of Oyster-liquor and White wine, thicken'd up with Yolks of Eggs, and a Bit of Butter: Serve it hot.

To make Marrow Pasties.

MAKE your little Pasties the length of your Finger, and as broad as two Fingers; put in large Pieces of Marrow, dipped in Eggs, and seasoned with Sugar, Cloves, Mace, and Nutmeg; strew a few Currants on the Marrow. Bake or fry them.

To make Mince-pyes of Veal.

FROM a Leg of Veal cut off four Pounds of the fleshy Part in thick Pieces, and put them in scalding Water, and let it just boil; then cut the Meat in small thin Pieces, and skin it: It must be four Pounds after it is scalded and skinned; to this Quantity put nine Pounds of Beef-suet well skinned, and shred them very well and fine with eight Pippins pared and cored, and four Pounds of Raisins of the Sun stoned; when 'tis shred very fine, put it in a large Pan or on a Table to mix, and put to it 1 Ounce of Nutmegs grated, half an Ounce of Coves, as much Mace, a large Spoonful of Salt, above a Pound of Sugar, the Peel of a Lemon shred exceeding fine; when you have seasoned it to your Palate, put in seven Pounds of Currants, and two Pounds of Raisins of the Sun stoned and shred. When you fill your Pies, put into every one some shred Lemon with its Juice, some candied Lemon-peel and Citron in Slices, and just as the Pies go into the Oven, put into every one a Spoonful of Sack and a Spoonful of Claret, so bake them.

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To make Cheesecakes without Curd.

BEAT two Eggs very well, then put as much Flour as will make them thick; then beat three Eggs more very well, and put to the other, with a Pint of Cream, and half a Pound of Butter. Set it over the Fire, and when it boils put in your two Eggs and Flour, and stir them well, and let them boil 'til they be pretty thick; then take it off the Fire, and season it with Sugar, a lit|tle Salt, and Nutmeg; put in Currants, and bake them in Pattipans, as you do others.

To make a Cabbage-Lettuce Pye.

TAKE some of the largest and hardest Cabbage-Let|tuce you can get; boil them in Salt and Water 'til they are tender; then lay them in a Colander to drain dry; then have your Paste laid in your Pattipan ready, and lay Butter on the Bottom; then lay in your Lettuce and some Artichoke bottoms, and some large Pieces of Mar|row, and the Yolks of eight hard Eggs, and some scalded Sorrel; bake it, and when it comes out of the Oven, cut open the Lid, and pour in a Caudle made with White-wine and Sugar, and thicken it with Eggs; so serve it hot.

To make the light Wigs.

TAKE a Pound and half of Flour, and half a Pint of Milk made warm; mix these together, and co|ver it up, and let it lie by the Fire half an Hour; then take half a Pound of Sugar, and half a Pound of Butter; then work these in the Paste, and make it into Wigs, with as little Flour as possible. Let the Oven be pretty quick, and they will rise very much.

To make little Plumb-Cakes.

TAKE two Pounds of Flour dried in the Oven, and half a Pound of Sugar finely powdered, four Yolks Page  66 of Eggs, two Whites, half a Pound of Butter washed with Rose water, 6 Spoonfuls of Cream warmed, a Pound and half of Currants unwashed, but picked and rubbed very clean in a Cloth; mix all together, and make them up in Cakes, and bake them up in an Oven almost as hot as for Manchet. Let them stand half an Hour 'til they be coloured on both Sides; then take down the Oven-lid, and let them stand a little to soak.

To make Puff-Paste.

TO a Peck of Flour, you must have three quarters the Weight in Butter; dry your Flour well, and lay it on a Table; make a Hole, and put in a Dozen Whites of Eggs well beaten, but first break into it a third Part of your Butter; then with Water make up your Paste; then roll it out, and by Degrees put in the rest of your Butter.

To make a Hare Pye.

SKIN your Hare, wash her, and dry her, and bone her; season the Flesh with Pepper, Salt, and Spice, and beat it fine in a Stone Mortar. Do a young Pig at the same Time, and in the same Manner; then make your Pye, and lay a Layer of Pig, and a Layer of Hare, 'til 'tis full; put Butter at the Bottom and on the Top. Bake it three Hours; 'tis good hot or cold.

To ice Tarts.

TAKE a little Yolk of Egg, and melted Butter, beat it very well together, and with a Feather wash over your Tarts, and silt Sugar on them just as you put them in the Oven.

To make an Olio Pye.

TAKE a Fillet of Veal, cut it in large thin Slices, and beat it with a Rolling pin. Have ready some Forc'd-meat, made with Veal and Suet, grated Bread, Page  67 grated Lemon-peel, some Nutmeg, the Yolks of two or three hard Eggs; spread the Forc'd meat all over your Collops, and roll them up, and place them in your Pye with Yolks of hard Eggs, Lumps of Marrow, and some Water: So lid it and bake it; and when it is baked, put in a Caudle of strong Gravy, White-wine, and Butter.

To make very good Wigs.

TAKE a Quarter of a Peck of the finest Flour, rub into it 3 quarters of a Pound of fresh Butter, 'til it is like grated Bread; something more than half a Pound of Sugar, half a Nutmeg, and half a Race of Ginger grated; three Eggs, Yolks and Whites beaten very well, and put to them half a Pint of thick Ale-yeast, and 3 or 4 Spoonfuls of Sack. Make a Hole in your Flour, and pour in your Yeast and Eggs, and as much Milk just warm, as will make it into a light Paste. Let it stand before the Fire to rise, half an Hour; then make it into a Dozen and Half of Wigs; wash them over with Eggs, just as they go into the Oven; a quick Oven, and half an Hour, will bake them.

To make Almond Cheese-cakes.

TAKE a good Handful or more of Almonds; blanch them in warm Water, and throw them into cold; pound them fine, and in the pounding put a little Sack or Orange-flower Water to keep them from Oiling; then put to your Almonds the Yolks of two hard Eggs, and beat them together: Beat the Yolks of six Eggs, the Whites of three, and mix with your Almonds, and half a Pound of Butter melted, and Sugar to your Taste; mix all well together, and use it as other Cheese-cake Stuff.

To make a Lumber Pye.

PARBOIL the Umbles of a Deer, clear all the Fat from them, and put more than their Weight in Beef-suet, Page  68 and shred it together very small; then put to it half a Pound of Sugar, and season with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Salt to your Taste; and put in a Pint of Sack, and half as much Claret, and two Pounds of Currants, washed and picked; mix all well together, and bake it in Puff or other Paste.

To make Lemon Cheesecakes.

TAKE two large Lemons, grate off the Peel of both, and squeeze out the Juice of one; add to it half a Pound of fine Sugar; twelve Yolks of Eggs, eight Whites well beaten; then melt half a Pound of Butter in four or five Spoonfuls of Cream; then stir it all together, and set it over the Fire, stirring it 'til it begins to be pretty thick; then take it off, and when 'tis cold, fill your Pattipans little more than half full; put a fine Paste very thin at the Bottom of the Pattipans; half an Hour, with a quick Oven, will bake them.

To make Cream Cheese with old Cheshire.

TAKE a Pound and half of old Cheshire Cheese, shave it all very thin, then put it in a Mortar, and add to it a quarter of an ounce of Mace beaten fine and fisted, half a Pound of fresh Butter, and a Glass of Sack; mix and heat all these together 'til they are perfectly in|corporated; then put it in a Pot, what Thickness you please, and cut it out in Slices for Cream Cheese, and serve it with the Desert.

Page  69

All Sorts of CAKES.

To make a rich great Cake.

TAKE a Peck of Flour well dried, an Ounce of Cloves and Mace, half an Ounce of Nutmegs, as much Cinamon, beat the Spice well, and mix them with your Flour, and a Pound and half of Sugar, and a little Salt, and thirteen Pounds of Currants well washed, picked, and dried, and three Pounds of Raisins stoned and cut into small Pieces; mix all these well together; then make five Pints of Cream almost scalding hot, and put into it four Pounds of fresh Butter; then beat the Yolks of twenty Eggs, three Pints of good Ale-yeast, a Pint of Sack, a quarter of a Pint of Orange-flower Water, three Grains of Musk, and six Grains of Ambergrease: Mix these together, and stir them into your Cream and Butter; then mix all in the Cake, and set it an Hour before the Fire to rise, before you put it into your Hoop; mix your Sweetmeats in it, two Pounds of Citron, and one Pound of candied Orange and Lemon|peel cut in small Pieces: You must bake it in a deep Hoop, butter the Sides, and put two Papers at the Bot|tom, and flour it and put in your Cake; it must have a quick Oven; four Hours will bake it: When 'tis drawn, ice it over the Top and Sides. Take two Pounds of dou|ble refin'd Sugar, beat and sifted, and the Whites of six Eggs beaten to a Froth, with three or four Spoonfuls of Orange-flower Water, and three Grains of Musk and Am|bergrese together; put all these in a Stone Mortar, and beat them with a wooden Pestle, 'til 'tis as white as Snow, and with a Brush or Bunch of Feathers, spread it all over Page  70 the Cake, and put in the Oven to dry; but take Care the Oven does not discolour it; when 'tis cold paper it; it will keep good five or six Weeks.

A Plumb-Cake.

TAKE six Pounds of Currants, five Pounds of Flour, an Ounce of Cloves and Mace, a little Cinamon, half an Ounce of Nutmegs, half a Pound of pounded and blanched Almonds, half a Pound of Sugar, three quarters of a Pound of sliced Citron, Lemon and Orange peel, half a Pint of Sack, a little Honey-water, and a Quart of Ale-yeast, a Quart of Cream, a Pound and half of Butter melted and poured into the middle thereof; then strew a little Flour thereon, and let it lie to rise; then work it well together and lay it before the Fire to rise, then work it up 'til 'tis very smooth; then put it in an Hoop with a Paper floured at the Bottom.

A good Seed Cake.

TAKE five Pounds of fine Flour well dried, and four Pounds of single refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; mix the Sugar and Flour together, and sift them through a Hair Sieve; then wash four Pounds of Butter in eight Spoonfuls of Rose or Orange-flower Water; you must work the Butter with your Hand, 'til 'tis like Cream; beat twenty Eggs, half the Whites, and put to them six Spoonfuls of Sack; then put in your Flour a little at a Time, keeping stirring with your Hand all the Time; you must not begin mixing it 'til the Oven is almost hot; you must let it lie a little while before you put your Cake into the Hoop; when you are ready to put it into the O|ven, put into it eight Ounces of candied Orange-peel sli|ced, and as much Citron, and a Pound and half of Car|raway-comfits; mix all well together, and put it in the Hoop, which must be prepared at Bottom, and buttered; the Oven must be quick; it will take two or three Hours baking. You may ice it if you please.

Page  71

Another Seed Cake.

TAKE seven Pounds of fine Flour well dried, and mix with it a Pound of Sugar beaten and sifted, and three Nutmegs grated, and rub three Pounds of Butter into the Flour; then beat the Yolks of eight Eggs, the Whites of but four, and mix with them a little Rose wa|ter, and a Quart of Cream blood warm, and a Quart of Ale-yeast, and a little Salt; strain all into your Flour, and put a Pint of Sack in with it, and make up your Cake, and put it into a butter'd Cloth, and lay it half an Hour before the Fire to rise; the mean while fit your Pa|per, and butter your Hoop; then take a Pound and three Quarters of Bisket comfit, and a Pound and a half of Ci|tron cut in small Pieces, and mix these in your Cake, and put it into your Hoop, run a Knife cross down to the Bot|tom; a quick Oven, and near three Hours, will bake it.

A Plumb Cake.

TAKE five Pounds of fine Flour, and put to it half a Pound of Sugar; and of Nutmegs, Cloves, and Mace finely beaten, of each half an Ounce, and a little Salt, mix these well together; then take a Quart of Cream, let it boil, and take it off, and cut into it three Pounds of fresh Butter, let it stand till 'tis melted, and when 'tis blood warm mix with it a Quart of Ale-yeast, and a Pint of Sack, and twenty Eggs, ten Whites well beaten; put six Pounds of Currants to your Flour, and make a Hole in the Middle, and pour in the Milk and other Things, and make up your Cake, mixing it well with your Hands; cover it warm, and set it before the Fire to rise for half an Hour; then put it in the Hoop; if the O|ven be hot, two Hours will bake it; the Oven must be quick; you may perfume it with Ambergrease, or put Sweetmeats in it, if you please. Ice it when cold, and paper it up.

Page  72

An ordinary Cake, to eat with Butter.

TAKE two Pounds of Flour, and rub into it half a Pound of Butter; then put in some Spice, a little Salt, a Quarter and half of Sugar, and half a Pound of Raisins stoned, and half a Pound of Currants; make these into a Cake, with half a Pint of Ale-yeast, and four Eggs, and as much warm Milk as you see convenient; mix it well together; an Hour and a half will bake it. This Cake is good to eat with Butter for Breakfasts.

A French Cake, to eat hot.

TAKE a Dozen of Eggs, and a Quart of Cream, and as much Flour as will make it into a thick Batter; put to it a Pound of melted Butter, half a Pint of Sack, one Nutmeg grated, mix it well, and let it stand three or four Hours; then bake it in a quick Oven, and when you take it out, slit it in two, and pour a Pound of Butter on it melted, with Rose-water; cover it with the other half, and serve it up hot.

To make Portugal Cakes.

TAKE a Pound and Quarter of fine Flour well dried, and break a Pound of Butter into the Flour and rub it in, add a Pound of Loaf Sugar beaten and sifted, a Nut|meg grated, four perfumed Plumbs, or some Ambergrease, mix these well together, and beat seven Eggs, but four Whites, with three Spoonfuls of Orange flower Water; mix all these together, and beat them up an Hour; but|ter your little Pans, and just as they are going into the Oven, fill them half full, and search some fine Sugar over them; little more than a Quarter of an Hour will bake them. You may put a Handful of Currants into some of them; take them out of the Pans as soon as they are drawn, keep them dry, they will keep good three Months.

Page  73

To make Jumbals.

TAKE the Whites of three Eggs, beat them well, and take off the Froth; then take a little Milk, and a little Flour, near a Pound, as much Sugar sifted, and a few Carraway-seeds beaten very fine; work all these in a very stiff Paste, and make them into what Form you please: Bake them on white Paper.

To make March-pane.

TAKE a Pound of Jordan Almonds, blanch and beat them in a Marble Mortar very fine; then put to them three Quarters of a Pound of double-refin'd Su|gar, and beat with them a few Drops of Orange-flower Water; beat all together till 'tis a very good Paste, then roll it into what Shape you please; dust a little fine Su|gar under it as you roll it to keep it from sticking. To ice it, searce double-refin'd Sugar as fine as Flour, wet it with Rose-water, and mix it well together; and with a Brush or Bunch of Feathers spread it over your March|pane: Bake them in an Oven that is not too hot; put Wafer-paper at the Bottom, and white Paper under that, so keep them for Use.

To make Almond Puffs.

TAKE half a Pound of Jordan Almonds, blanch and beat them very fine with three or four Spoonfuls of Rose-water; then take half an Ounce of the finest Gum dragnt steeped in Rose-water three or four Days before you use it, then put it to the Almonds, and beat it together; then take three Quarters of a Pound of dou|ble refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted, and a little fine Flour, and put to it; roll it in what Shape you please; lay them on white Paper, and put them in an Oven gently hot, and when they are baked enough, take them off the Papers, and put them on a Sieve to dry in the Oven, when 'tis almost cold.

Page  74

To make little hollow Biskets.

BEAT six Eggs very well with a Spoonful of Rose-water, then put in a Pound and two Ounces of Loaf-Sugar, beaten and sifted; stir it together till 'tis well mix|ed in the Eggs; then put in as much Flour as will make it thick enough to lay out in Drops upon Sheets of white Paper; stir it well together till you are ready to drop it on your Paper; then beat a little very fine Sugar and put into a Lawn Sieve, and sift some on them just as they are going into the Oven; so bake them, the Oven must not be too hot; and as soon as they are baked, whilst they are hot, pull off the Papers from them, and put them in a Sieve, and set them in the Oven to dry; keep them in Boxes with Papers between.

To make Wigs.

TAKE two Pounds of Flour, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, as much Sugar, a Nutmeg grated, a little Cloves and Mace, and a Quarter of an Ounce of Carraway-seeds, Cream and Yeast as much as will make it up into a pretty light Paste; make them up, and set them by the Fire to rise till the Oven be ready; they will quickly be baked.

To make Ginger-bread.

TAKE a Pound and half of London Treacle, two Eggs beaten, half a Pound of brown Sugar, one Ounce of Ginger beaten and sifted; of Cloves, Mace, and Nutmegs all together half an Ounce beaten very fine; Coriander-seeds, and Carraway-seeds of each half an Ounce, two Pounds of Butter melted; mix all these to|gether, with as much Flour as will knead it into a pretty stiff Paste; then roll it out, and cut it into what Form you please; bake it in a quick Oven on Tin-plates; a little Time will bake it.

Page  75

Another sort of Ginger-bread.

TAKE half a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them till they have done thining; beat them with a Spoonful or two of Orange-flower Water, put in half an Ounce of beaten Ginger, and a quarter of an Ounce of Cinamon powdered; work it to a Paste with double refined Sugar beaten and sifted; then roll it out, and lay it on Papers to dry in an Oven, after Pyes are drawn.

To make Dutch Ginger-bread.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, and mix with it two Ounces and a half of beaten Ginger; then rub in a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and add to it two Ounces of Carraway seeds, two Ounces of Orange-peel dried and rubb'd to Powder, a few Coriander-seeds bruised, two Eggs: Then mix all up in a stiff Paste, with two Pounds and a quarter of Treacle; beat it very well with a Rol|ling-pin, and make it up into thirty Cakes; put in a can|died Citron; prick them with a Fork: Butter Papers three double, one white and two brown; wash them over with the white of an Egg; put them into an Oven, not too hot, for three quarters of an Hour.

To make Buns.

TAKE two Pounds of fine Flour, a Pint of Ale-yeast; put a little Sack in the Yeast, and three Eggs beaten; knead all these together with a little warm Milk, a little Nutmeg, and a little Salt; then lay it before the Fire till it rise very light; then knead in a Pound of fresh But|ter, and a Pound of round Carraway-comsits; and bake them in a quick Oven, on floured Papers, in what Shape you please.

Page  76

To make French Bread.

TAKE half a Peck of fine Flour; put to it fix Yolks of Eggs, and four whites, a little Salt, a Pint of good Ale-yeast, and as much new Milk made a little warm, as will make it a thin light Paste; stir it about with your Hand, but by no Means knead it; then have ready fix wooden Quart Dishes, and fill them with Dough; let them stand a quarter of an Hour to heave, and then turn them out into the Oven; and when they are baked, rasp them. The Oven must be quick.

To make Wigs.

TAKE three Pounds and a half of Flour, and three quarters of a Pound of Butter, and rub it into the Flour till none of it be seen; then take a Pint or more of new Milk, and make it very warm, and half a Pint of new Ale yeast; then make it into a light Paste. Put in Carraway seeds, and what Spice you please; then make it up, and lay it before the Fire to rise; then work in three quarters of a Pound of Sugar, and then roll them into what Form you please pretty thin, and put them on Tin-plates, and hold them before the Oven to rise again. Before you set them in, your Oven must be pretty quick.

To make Ginger-bread.

TAKE three Pounds of fine Flour, and the Rind of a Lemon dried and beaten to Powder, half a Pound of Sugar, or more, as you like it, and an Ounce and a half of beaten Ginger: Mix all these well together, and wet it pretty stiff with nothing but Treacle; make it into long Rolls, or Cakes, as you please. You may put can|••ed Orange-peel and Citron in it. Butter your Paper you take it on, and let it be baked hard.

Page  77

To make Shrewsbury-Cakes.

TAKE to one Pound of Sugar, three Pounds of the finest Flour, a Nutmeg grated, some beaten Cina|mon; the Sugar and Spice must be sifted into the Flour, and wet it with three Eggs, and as much melted Butter as will make it of a good Thickness to roll into a Paste; mould it well and roll it, and cut it into what Shape you please. Persume them, and prick them before they go into the Oven.

To make Almond Cakes.

TAKE a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them exceeding fine with a little Rose or Orange flower Water; then beat three Eggs, but two Whites, and put to them a Pound of Sugar sifted, and then put in your Al|monds, and beat all together very well; butter Sheets of white Paper, and lay the Cakes in what Form you please, and bake them. You may persume them, if you like it; bake them in a cool Oven.

To make Drop Bisket.

TAKE eight Eggs, and one Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten fine, and twelve Ounces of fine Flour well dried. Beat your Eggs very well; then put in your Sugar and beat it, and then your Flour by Degrees, and beat it all very well together for an Hour without ceasing. Your Oven must be as hot as for half-penny Bread; then flour some Sheets of Tin, and drop your Bisket what Big|ness you please, and put them in the Oven as fast as you can; and when you see them rise, watch them, and if they begin to colour take them out again and put in more, and if the first is not enough, put them in again; if they are right done they will have a white Ice on them. You may put in Carraway seeds if you please; when they are all baked, put them all in the Oven again till they are very 〈◊〉, and keep them in your Stove.

Page  78

To make little Cracknels.

TAKE three Pounds of Flour finely dried, three Ounces of Lemon and Orange peel dried and beaten to a Powder, and an Ounce of Coriander seeds beaten and fearced, and three Pounds of double refin'd Sugar beaten fine and fearced; mix these together with fifteen Eggs, half of the Whites taken out, a quarter of a Pint of Rose-water, as much Orange flower Water. Beat the Eggs and Water well together; then put in your Orange-peel and Coriander-seeds, and beat it again very well with two Spoons, one in each Hand; then beat your Sugar in by a little and little, then your Flour by a little at a Time, so beat with both Spoons an Hour longer; then strew Sugar on Papers, and drop them the Bigness of a Walnut, and set them in the Oven; the Oven must be hotter than when Pyes are drawn. Do not touch them with your Fingers before they are baked. Let the Oven be ready for them against they are done; be careful the Oven does not colour them.

To make the thin Dutch Bisket.

TAKE five Pounds of Flour, and two Ounces of Carraway seeds, half a Pound of Sugar, and some|thing more than a Pint of Milk. Warm the Milk, and put into it three quarters of a Pound of Butter; then make a Hole in the middle of your Flour, and put in a full Pint of good Ale yeast; then pour in the Butter and Milk, and make these into a Paste, and let it stand a quarter of an Hour by the Fire to rise; then mould it, and roll it in Cakes pretty thin; prick them all over pret|ty much, or they will blister; so bake them a quarter of an Hour.

To make an ordinary Seed-Cake.

TAKE six Pounds of fine Flour, rub into it a Thim|blef Caraway-seeds finely beaten, and a Nut|megs grated, and Mace beaten; then heat a Quart of Page  79 Cream, hot enough to melt a Pound of Butter in it, and when 'tis no more than Blood-warm, mix your Cream and Butter with a Pint of good Ale yeast▪ and then wet your Flour with it; make it pretty thin; just before it goes into the Oven, put in a Pound of rough Carraways, and some Citron sliced thin. Three quarters of an Hour, in a quick Oven, will bake it.

To make ordinary Wigs.

TAKE three Pounds and an half of fine Flour, and three quarters of a Pound of Butter, rub it into the Flour 'til none of it be seen; then take a Pint or more of new Milk, and make it very warm, and three quar|ters of a Pint of Ale-yeast; and with these make it into a light Paste; and put in Carraway-seeds, or what Spice you please; then set it before the Fire to rise; then mix in it three quarters of a Pound of Sugar; then roll them out pretty thin, and then put on Tin-plates and hold them before the Fire to rise again, or before the Oven. Let your Oven be pretty quick, and they will soon be baked.

A good Seed-cake.

TAKE two Pounds of the finest Flour well dried, two Pounds of fresh Butter rubbed well in; ten Eggs, leave out five Whites; three Spoonfuls of Cream, four Spoonfuls of good Yeast; mix all well together, and set it to the Fire, not too near; when 'tis well risen, put in a Pound of Carraway-comfits. An Hour and a quar|ter will bake it.

To make the Marlborough Cake.

TAKE eight Eggs, Yolks and Whites, beat and strain them, and put to them a Pound of Sugar beaten and sifted; beat it three Quarters of an Hour to|gether; then put in three Quarters of a Pound of Flour well dried, and two Ounces of Carraway seeds; beat it all well together, and bake it in a quick Oven in 〈◊〉 Tin Pans.

Page  80

Another Sort of little Cakes.

TAKE a Pound of Flour and a Pound of Butter. Rub the Butter into the Flour, two Spoonfuls of Yeast, and two Eggs. Make it into a Paste, slick white Paper, roll your Paste out the Thickness of a Crown, cut them out with the Top of a Tin Canister; sift fine Sugar over them, and lay them on the flicked Paper. Bake them after Tarts an Hour.

To make the White Cake.

TAKE three Quarts of the finest Flour, a Pound and half of Butter, a Pint of thick Cream, half a Pint of Ale yeast, half a quarter of a Pint of Rose water and Sack together, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, nine Eggs, abating four Whites. beat them well; five Ounces of dou|ble-refin'd Sugar; mix the Sugar and Spice, and a very little Salt with your dry Flour, and keep out half a Pint of the Flour to strew over the Cake; when 'tis all mix'd, melt the Butter in the Cream when 'tis a little cool, strain the Eggs into it, Yeast, &c. Make a Hole in the midst of the Flour, and pour all the Wetting in, stirring it round with your Hand all one Way, 'til well mixed. Strew on the Flour that was saved out, and set it before the Fire to rise, covered over with a Cloth; let it stand so a quarter of an Hour. You must have in Readiness three Pounds and half of Currants walled and picked, and well dried in a Cloth; mingle them in the Paste without kneading; put it in a Tin hoop; set it in a quick Oven, or it will not rise; it must stand an Hour and half in the Oven.

To make another Sort of Gingerbread.

TAKE a Pound and half of London Treacle, 2 Eggs beaten, a Pound of Butter melted, half a Pound of brown Sugar, an Ounce of beaten Ginger; and of cloves, Mace, Corian••r seeds, and Carraway seeds, of each half an Ounce; mix all these together, with as much Flour as Page  81 will knead it into a Paste; roll it out, and cut it into what Form you please. Bake it in a quick Oven on Tin-plates; a little Time will bake it.

To make Biskets.

TO a Quart of Flour, take a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, 1 Egg, and what Carraway seeds you please, wet the Milk as stiff as you can; then roll them out very thin; cut them with a Glass Bake them on Tin plates, your Oven must be slick. Prick them very well just as you set them in, and keep them dry when baked.

To make brown French Loaves.

TAKE a Peck of coarse Flour, and as much of the Raspings of Bread, beaten and sifted, as will make it look brown; then wet it with a Pint of good Yeast, and as much Milk and Water warm as will wet it pretty stiff; mix it well, and set it before the Fire to rise; make it into six Loaves; make it up as light as you can, and bake it well in a quick Oven.

To make the hard Bisket.

TAKE half a Peck of fine Flour, one Ounce of Car|raway-seeds, the Whites of two Eggs, a quarter of a Pint of Ale-yeast, and as much warm Water as will make it into a stiff Paste; then make it in long Rolls Bake it an Hour; the next Day pare it round; then slice it in thin Slices about an Inch thick; dry it in the Oven; then draw it and turn it, and dry the other Side; they will keep the whole Year.

To make Whetstone Cakes.

TAKE half a Pound of fine Flour, and half a Pound of Loaf-sugar searced, a Spoonful of Carraway-seeds dried, the Yolk of one Egg, the Whites of three, a little Page  82 Rose-water, with Ambergrease dissolved in it; mix it to|gether, and roll it out as thin as a Wafer; cut them with a Glass; lay on them flour'd Paper, and bake them in a slow Oven.

To make a good Plumb-cake.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, put to it half a Pound of Loaf sugar beaten and sifted, of Mace and Nut|megs half an Ounce beaten fine, a little Salt. Beat the Yolk of thirty Eggs, the Whites of fifteen, a Pint and half of Ale-yeast, three Quarters of a Pint of Sack, with two Grains of Ambergrease, and two of Musk steeped in it 5 or 6 Hours; then take a large Pint of thick Cream, set it on the Fire, and put in two Pounds of Butter to melt, but not boil; then put your Flour in a Bowl, make a Hole in the midst, and pour in your Yeast, Sack, Cream, and Eggs. Mix it well with your Hands, make it up, not too stiff, set it to the Fire a quarter of an Hour to rise; then put in seven Pounds of Currants picked and washed in warm Water, then dried in a coarse Cloth, and kept warm 'til you put them into your Cake, which mix in as fast as you can, and put candied Lemon, Orange, and Citron in it; put it in your Hoop, which must be ready buttered and fixed; set it in a quick Oven; bake it two Hours or more, when 'tis near cold, ice it.

Another Plumb-cake.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, four Pounds of Cur|rants, and twelve Eggs, half the Whites taken out, near a Pint of Yeast, a Pound and half of Butter, a good half Pint of Cream; three quarters of a Pound of Loaf-sugar, beaten Mace, Nutmegs, and Cinamon, half an Ounce beaten fine; mingle the Spices and Sugar with the Flour; beat the Eggs well, and put to them a quarter of a Pint of Rose-water, that had a little Musk and Amber|grease dissolved in it; put the Butter and Cream into a Jug, and put it in a Pot of boiling Water to melt; when you have mixed the Cake, strew a little Flour over it. Page  83 Cover it with a very hot Napkin, and set it before the Fire to rise; butter and Flour your Hoop, and just as your Oven is ready, put your Currants into boiling Water to plump. Dry them in a hot Cloth, and mix them in your Cake. You may put in half a Pound of candied Orange, Lemon, and •••ron; let not your Oven be too hot, two Hours will take it, three it 'tis double the Quan|tity. Mix it with a broad Pudding-stick, not with your Hands; when your Cake is just drawn, pour all over it a Gill of Brandy or Sack; then ice it.

Another Plumb-cake with Almonds.

TAKE four Pounds of fine Flour dried well, five Pounds of Currants well picked and rubbed, but not washed; five Pounds of Butter washed and beaten in O|range flower Water and Sack; two Pounds of Almonds beaten very fine four Pounds of Eggs weighed, half the Whites taken out; three Pounds of double refin'd Sugar, three Nutmegs grated, a little Ginger, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, as much Cloves finely beaten, a quarter of a Pint of the best Brandy: The Butter must be beaten to Cream; then put in your Flour, and all the rest of your Things, beating it 'til you put it in the Oven; 4 Hours will bake it, the Oven must be very quick; put in Orange, Lemon-peel candied, and Citron, as you like.

A rich Seed-cake, called the Nun's Cake,

TAKE four Pounds of your first Flour, and three Pounds of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; mix them together, and dry them by the Fire 'till you prepare your other Materials.

Take four Pounds of Butter, beat it in your Hands till 'tis very soft like Cream; then beat thirty five Eggs, leave out sixteen Whites, and strain out the Trd••els of the rest, and heat them and the Butter together till all appears like Butter, put in four or five Spoonfuls of Rose or Orange-flower Water, and beat it again; then take your Flour and Sugar, with six Ounces of Carraway-seeds, and strew Page  84 it in by Degrees, beating it up all the Time for 2 Hours together; you may put in as much Tincture of Cinamon or Ambergrease as you please; butter your Hoop, and let it stand three Hours in a moderate Oven.

To ice a great Cake.

TAKE two Pounds of the finest double-refin'd Sugar, beat and sift it very fine, and likewise beat and sift a little Starch and mix with it; then beat six Whites of Eggs to a Froth, and put to it some Gum-water, the Gum must be steeped in Orange-flower Water; then mix and beat all these together two Hours, and put it on your Cake; when 'tis baked, set it in the Oven a quarter of an Hour.

Another Seed-cake.

TAKE a Pound of Flour, dry it by the Fire, add to it a Pound of fine Sugar beaten and sifted; then take a Pound and a Quarter of Butter and work it in your Hand till 'tis like Cream; beat the Yolks of ten Eggs, the Whites of six; mix all these together with an Ounce and half of Carraway-seeds, and a quarter of a Pint of Brandy; it must not stand to rise.

CREAMS and JELLIES.

Lemon Cream.

TAKE five large Lemons, and squeeze out the Juice, and the Whites of six Eggs well beaten, ten Ounces of double refin'd Sugar beaten very fine, and twenty Spoonfuls of Spring water; mix all together, and strain it through a Jelly-bag; set it over a gentle Fire, scum it very well, when 'tis as hot Page  85 as you can bear your Finger in it, take it off, and pour it into Glasses; put Shreds of Lemon-peel into some of the Glasses.

Another Lemon Cream.

TAKE the Juice of four large Lemons, and half a Pint of Water, and a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten fine, and the Whites of seven Eggs, and the Yolk of one beaten very well; mix all together, and strain it, and set it on a gentle Fire, stirring it all the while, and scum it clean; put into it the Peel of one Lemon, when 'tis very hot, but not boil; take out the Lemon-peel, and pour it into China Dishes.

To make Orange Cream.

TAKE a Pint of the Juice of Sevil Oranges, put to it the Yolks of six Eggs, the Whites of four; beat the Eggs very well, and strain them and the Juice toge|ther; add to it a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; set all these together on a soft Fire, and put the Peel of half an Orange into it, keep it stirring all the while, and when 'tis almost ready to boil, take out the Orange-peel, and pour out the Cream into Glasses or China Dishes.

To make Gooseberry Cream.

TAKE two Quarts of Gooseberries, put to them as much Water as will cover them; let them boil all to mash, then run them through a Seive with a Spoon; to a Quart of the Pulp, you must have six Eggs well beaten, and when the Pulp is hot, put in an Ounce of fresh Butter, sweeten it to your Taste, and put in your Eggs, and stir them over a gentle Fire 'til they grow thick; then set it by, and when 'tis almost cold, put into it two Spoonfuls of the Juice of Spinage, and a Spoonful of O|range-flower Water or Sack, stir it well together, and put it into your Basons; when 'tis cold, serve it to the Table.

Page  86Some love the Gooseberries only mashed, not pulped through a Sieve, and put the Butter, and Eggs, and Su|gar, as the other, but no Juice of Spinage.

To make Barley Cream.

TAKE a small Quantity of Pearl-Barley, and boil it in Milk and Water 'til 'tis tender; then strain the Liquor from it, and put your Barley into a Quart of Cream, and let it boil a little; then take the Whites of five Eggs, and the Yolk of one beaten with a Spoonful of fine Flour, and two Spoonfuls of Orange-flower Wa|ter; then take the Cream off the Fire, and mix the Eggs in by Degrees, and set it over the Fire again to thicken; sweeten it to your Taste, pour it into Basons; and when 'tis cold, serve it up.

To make Steeple Cream.

TAKE five Ounces of Hart's-horn, and two Ounces of Ivory, and put them into a Stone Bottle, and fill it with fair Water to the Neck, and put in a small Quan|tity of Gum-arabick, and Gum-dragant; then tie up the Bottle very close, and set it into a Pot of Water with Hay at the Bottom; let it boil 6 Hours, then take it out, and let it stand an Hour before you open it, lest it fly in your Face; then strain it in, and it will be a strong Jelly; then take a Pound of blanched Almonds, and beat them very fine, and mix it with a Pint of thick Cream, and let it stand a little; then strain it out, and mix it with a Pound of Jelly; set it over the Fire 'til 'tis scalding hot, sweeten it to your Taste with double-refin'd Sugar; then take it off, and put in a little Amber, and pour it out into small high Gallipots like a Sugar-loaf at Top; when 'tis cold turn them out, and lay whipt-Cream about them in Heaps.

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To make Blanch'd Cream.

TAKE a Quart of the thickest sweet Cream you can get, season it with fine Sugar and Orange-flower Water; then boil it; then beat the Whites of twenty Eggs with a little cold Cream, take out the Treddles, and when the Cream is on the Fire, and boils, pour in your Eggs, stirring it very well 'til it comes to a thick Curd; then take it up and pass it through a Hair Steve; then beat it very well with a Spoon 'til 'tis cold, and put it in Dishes for Use.

To make Quince Cream.

TAKE Quinces, scald them 'til they are soft; pare them, and mash the clear Part of them, and pulp it through a Sieve; take an equal Weight of Quince, and double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted, and the Whites of Eggs; and beat it 'til it is as white Snow, then put it in Dishes.

To make Almond Cream.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, boil it with Nutmeg, Mace, and a bit of Lemon-peel, and sweeten it to your Taste; then blanch some Almonds, and beat them very fine; then take nine Whites of Eggs well beaten, and strain them to your Almonds, and rub them very well through a thin Strainer; so thicken your Cream; just give it one boil, and pour it into China Dishes; and when 'tis cold, serve it up.

To make Ratafia Cream.

TAKE six large Laurel-leaves, and boil them in a Quart of thick Cream; when 'tis boiled, throw a|way the Leaves, and beat the Yolks of five Eggs with a little cold Cream, and Sugar to your Taste; then thicken your Cream with your Eggs, and set it over the Fire a|gain, Page  88 but let it hot boil; keep it stirring all the while and pour it into China Dishes; when 'tis cold, 'tis fit for Use.

To make Sack Cream.

TAKE the Yolks of two Eggs, and three Spoonfuls of fine Sugar, and a quarter of a Pint of Sack; mix them together, and stir them into a Pint of Cream; then set them over the Fire 'til 'tis scalding hot, but let it not boil. You may toast some thin Slices of white Bread, and dip them in Sack or Orange-flower Water, and pour your Cream over them.

To make Rice Cream.

TAKE three Spoonfuls of the Flour of Rice, as much Sugar, the Yolks of two Eggs, two Spoonfuls of Sack, or Rose or Orange flower Water; mix all these to|gether, and put them to a Pint of Cream, stir it over the Fire 'til 'tis thick, then pour it into China Dishes.

To make Hart's-horn Jelly.

TAKE a large Gallipot and fill it full of Hart's horn, and then fill it full with Spring water, and tie a dou|ble Paper over the Gallipot, and set it in the Baker's O|ven with Houshold Bread; in the Morning take it out, and run it through a Jelly-bag, and season it with Juice of Lemons, and double-refin'd Sugar, and the Whites of eight Eggs well beaten; let it have a boil, and run it thro' the Jelly-bag again into your Jelly-glasses; put a bit of Lemon-peel in the Bag.

To make Calf's-foot Jelly.

TO four Calf's feet take a Gallon of fair Water, cut them in Pieces, and put them in a Pipkin close co|vered, and boil them softly 'til almost half be consumed; then run it through a Sieve, and let it stand 'til 'tis cold; then with a Knife take off the Fat, and Top and Bottom, Page  89 and the fine Part of the Jelly melt in a Preserving-pan or Skillet, and put in a Pint of Rhenish wine, the Juice of four or five Lemons, double-refin'd Sugar to your Taste, the Whites of eight Eggs beaten to a froth; stir and boil all these together near half an Hour; then strain it thro' a Sieve into a Jelly bag; put into your Jelly-bag a Sprig of Rosemary, and a Piece of Lemon-peel; pass it through the Bag till 'tis as clear as Water. You may cut some Lemon-peel like Threads, and put in half the Glasses.

To make whipt Cream.

TAKE a Quart of thick Cream, and the Whites of eight Eggs beaten with half a Pint of Sack; mix it together, and sweeten it to your Taste with double refin'd Sugar: You may perfume it if you please with some Musk or Ambergrease tied in a Rag, and steeped a little in the Cream; whip it up with a Whisk, and a bit of Lemon-peel tied in the middle, of the Whisk; take the Froth with a Spoon, and lay it in your Glasses or Basons.

To make whipt Syllabubs.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, not to thick, and a Pint of Sack, and the Juice of two Lemons; sweeten it to your Palte, and put it into a broad earthen Pan, and with a Whisk whip it, and as the Froth rises, take it off with a Spoon, and lay it in your Syllabub glasses; but first you must sweeten some Clare, or Sack, or White-wine, and strain it, and put seven or eight Spoonfuls of the Wine into your Glasses, and then gently lay in your Froth. Set them by. Do not make them long before you use them.

To make a fresh Cheese.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, and set it over the Fire 'tl 'tis ready to boil, then beat nine Eggs. Yolks and Wh••es very well; when you are 〈…〉 hm put to them as much Salt as will lie on a small Kne's Point; Page  90 put them to the Cream, and some Nutmeg quartered, and tied up in a Rag; so let them boil till the Whey is clear; then take it off the Fire, and put it in a Pan, and gather it as you do Cheese; then put it in a Cloth, and drain it between two; then put it in a Stone Mortar, and grind it, and season it with a little Sack, and Orange-flower Water, and Sugar, and then put it in a little earthen Co|lande, and let it stand two Hours to drain out the Whey; then put it in the Middle of a China Dish, and pour thick Cream about it: So serve it to the Table.

To make Almond Butter.

TAKE a Pound of the best Jordan Almonds, blanch|ed in cold Water, and as you blanch them throw them into fair Water; then beat them in a Marble Mor|ar very fine, with some Rose or Orange-flower Water, to keep them from oiling; then take a Pound of Butter out of the Churn before 'tis salted, but it must be very well wash'd, and mix it with your Almonds, with near a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; when 'tis very mixed, set it by to cool; when you are going to use it, put it into a Colander, and pass it through with the Back of a Spoon into the Dish you serve it in. Hold your Hand high, and let it be heaped up.

To make Ribbon Jelly.

TAKE out the great Bones of four Calves-Feet, and put the Feet into a Pot with ten Quarts of Water, three Ounces of Hart's-horn, three Ounces of Ising-glass, a Nutmeg quartered, four Blades of Mace; then boil this till it comes to two Quarts, and strain it through a fine Flannel Bag; let it stand twenty-four Hours; then scrape off all the Fat from the Top very clean; then heat it, and put to it the Whites of sig Eggs beaten to a Froth; boil it a little, and strain it again through a Flannel Bag; then run the Jelly into little high Glasses; run every Co|lour as thick as your Finger; one Colour must be tho|rough cold before you put another on, and that you run on Page  91 must not be blood warm for fear it mixes together; you must colour red with Cochineel, green with Spinage, yellow with Saffron, blue with Syrup of Violets, white with thick Cream, and sometimes the Jelly by itself.

To make Cream of any preserv'd Fruit.

TAKE half a Pint of the Pulp of any preserv'd Fruit, put it in a large Pan, put to it the Whites of two or three Eggs; beat them together exceeding well for an Hour; then with a Spoon take it off, and lay it heaped up high on the Dish or Salver with other Creams, or put it in the middle Bason: Raspberries will not do this way.

To make a Snow Posset.

TAKE a Quart of new Milk, and boil it with a Stick of Cinamon and quartered Nutmeg; when the Milk is boiled, take out the Spice, and beat the Yolks of sixteen Eggs very well, and by Degrees mix them in the Milk 'til 'tis thick; then beat the Whites of the sixteen Eggs with a little Sack and Sugar into a Snow; then take the Ba|son you design to serve it up in, and put in it a Pint of Sack; sweeten it to your Taste; set it over the Fire, and let one take the Milk, and another the Whites of Eggs, and so pour them together into the Sack in the Bason; keep it stirring all the while 'tis over the Fire; when 'tis thorough warm take it off, cover it up, and let it stand a little before you use it.

To make a Jelly Posset.

TAKE twenty Eggs, leave out half the Whites, and beat them very well; put them into the Bason you serve it in, with near a Pint of Sack and a little strong Ale; sweeten it to your Taste, and set it over a Charcoal Fire, keep it stirring all the while; then have in Readi|ness a Quart of Milk or Cream, boiled with a little Nut|meg and Cinamon, and when your Sack and Eggs is hot enough to scald your Lips, put the Milk to it boiling hot; Page  92 then take it off the Fire, and cover it up half an Hour; strew Sugar on the Brim of the Dish, and serve it to the Table.

To make Flummery Caudle.

TAKE a Pint of fine Oat meal, and put to it two Quarts of fair Water; let it stand all Night, in the Morning stir it, and strain it into a Skillet, with three or four Blades of Mace, and a Nutmeg quartered; set it on the Fire, and keep it stirring, and let it boil a quarter of an Hour; if it is too thick, put in more Water, and let it boil longer; then add a Pint of Rhenish or White-wine, three Spoonfuls of Orange flower Water, the Juice of two Lemons and one Orange, a Bit of Butter, and as much fine Sugar as will sweeten it; let all these have a walm, and thicken it with the Yolks of two or three Eggs. Drink it hot for a Breakfast.

To make Tea Caudle.

MAKE a Quart of strong gren Tea, and pour it out into a Skillet, and set it over the Fire; then beat the Yolks of four Eggs, and mix with them a Pint of White-wine, a grated Nutmeg, Sugar to your Taste, and put all together; stir it over the Fire till 'tis very hot, then drink it in China Dishes as Caudle.

A fine Caudle.

TAKE a Pint of Milk, turn it with Sack; then strain it, and when 'tis cold, put it in a Skillet, with Mace, Nutmeg, and some white Bred sliced; let all these boil, and then beat the Yolks of four or five Eggs, the Whites of two, and thicken your Caudle, stirring it all one way for fear it curdle; let it warm together, then take it off, and sweeten it to your Taste.

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To make Hart's-horn or Calf's-foot Jelly without Lemons.

TAKE a Pair of Calves Feet, boil them with six Qurts of fair Water to mash; it will make three Quarts o Jelly; then strain it off, and let it stand till 'tis cold, take off the Top, and save the Middle, and melt it again and scm it; then take 6 Whites of Eggs beaten to a Froth, half a Pint of Rhenish-wine, and one Lemon juiced, and half a Pound ot fine powdered Sugar; stir all toge|ther, and let it boil, then take it off, and put to it as much Spirit of Vitriol as will sharpen it to your Palate, about one Penny-worth will do, let it not boil after the Vitriol is in; let your Jelly-bag be made of thick Flannel, then run it through till 'tis very clear; you may put the Whites of the Eggs that swim at the Top into the Bag first, and that will thicken the Bag.

To make Oat-meal Caudle.

TAKE two Quarts or Ale, and one of stale Beer, and two Quarts of Water; mix them all together, and add to it two Handfuls of Pot-Oatmeal, twelve Cloves, five or six Blades of Mace, and a Nutmeg quar|tered or bruised; set it over the Fire, and let it boil half an Hour, stirring it all the while; then strain it out through a Sieve, and put in near a Pound of fine Sugar, and a Bit of Lemon-peel; pour it into a Pan and cover it close that it may not scum; warm it as you use it.

To make Salop.

TAKE a Quart of Water, and let it boil a quarter of an Hour; then put in a quarter of an Ounce of Sa|lop finely powdered, and let it boil half an Hour longer, stirring it all the while; then season it with White-wine and Juice of Lemons, and sweeten it to your Taste; drink it in China Cups as Chocolate; 'tis a great Sweetner of the Blood.

Page  94Boil Sago till 'tis tender and jellies, a Spoonful and half to a Quart of Water; then season it as you do your Salop, and drink it in Chocolate-Dishes; or if you please leave out the Wine and Lemon, and put in a Pint of thick Cream and a Stick of Cinamon, and thicken it up with two or three Eggs.

To make Lemon Syllabubs.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, half a Pound of Sugar, a Pint of White-wine, the Juice of two or three Le|mons, the Peel of one grated; mix all these, and put them in an earthen Pot, and milk it up as fast as you can 'til it is thick; then pour it into your Glasses, and let them stand 5 or 6 Hours: You may make them over Night.

To make white Leach.

TAKE half a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them with Rose-water and a little Milk; then strain it out, and put to it a Piece of Ising glass, and let it boil on a Chasing-dish of Coals half an Hour; then strain it into a Bason, and sweeten it, and put a Grain of Musk in it, and let it boil a little longer, and put to it two or three Drops of Oil of Mace or Cinamon, and keep it 'til 'tis cold; eat it with Wine or Cream.

To make White-wine Cream.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, set it on the Fire, and stir it 'til 'tis blood warm; then boil a Pint of White-wine with Sugar 'til it is Syrup: So mingle the Wine and Cream together; put it in a China Bason, and when it is cold, serve it up.

To make Strawberry or Raspberry Fool.

TAKE a Pint of Raspberries, squeeze and strain the Juice with Orange-flower Water; put to the Juice five Ounces of fine Sugar; then set a Pint of Cream over Page  95 the Fire, and let it boil up; then put in the Juice, give it one stir round, and then put it into your Bason; stir it a little in the Bason; and when 'tis cold use it.

To make Sack Cream.

TAKE a Quart of thick Cream, and set it over the Fire, and when it boils take it off; put a Piece of Lemon-peel in it, and sweeten it very well; then take the China Bason you serve it in, and put into the Bason the Juice of half a Lemon, and nine Spoonfuls of Sack; then stir in the Cream into the Bason by a Spoonful at a Time, 'til all the Cream is in, when 'tis little more than blood|warm; set it by till next Day, serve it with Wafers round it.

To make Ratafia Bisket.

TAKE four Ounces of bitter Almonds, blanch and beat them as fine as you can; in beating them, put in the Whites of four Eggs, one at a Time; then mix it up with sifted Sugar to a light Paste; roll them, and lay them on Wafer Paper, and on Tin plates; make the Paste so ••ght that you may take it up with a Spoon. Bake them in a quick Oven.

To make a Hart's-horn Flummery.

TAKE three Ounces of Hart's horn, and put it to •••l with two Quarts of Spring-water; let it simmer over the Fire six or seven Hours 'til half the Water is consumed, or else put it in a Jug, and set it in the Oven with Houshold-bread; then strain it through a Sieve, and beat half a Pound of Almonds very fine, with some O|range-flower Water in the beating; and when they are beat, mix a little of your Jelly with it, and some fine Su|gar; strain it out, and mix it with your Jelly; stir it to|gether 'til 'tis little more than blood-warm; then pour it into half-pint Basons, fill them but half full; when you use them, turn them out of the Dish as you do Flummery; Page  96 if it does not come out clean, hold the Bason a Minute or two in warm Water, eat it with Wine and Sugar.

Put six Ounces of Hart's-horn in a glazed Jug, with a long Neck, and put in three Pints of soft Water; cover the Top of the Jug close, and put a Weight on it to keep it steady; set it in a Pot or Kettle of Water 24 Hours; let it not boil, but be scalding hot; then strain it out and make your Jelly.

A Sack Posset without Eggs.

TAKE a Quart of Cream or new Milk, and grate three Naples-biskets in it, and let them boil in the Cream; grate some Nutmeg in it, and sweeten it to your Taste; let it stand a little to cool, and then put half a Pint of Sack a little warm in your Bason, and pour your Cream to it, holding it up high in the pouring; let it stand a little, and serve it.

A Sack Posset without Cream or Eggs.

TAKE half a Pound of Jordan Almonds, lay them all Night in Water, blanch and beat them in a Stone Mortar very fine, with a Pint of Orange-flower Water, or fair Water, a quarter and half of Sugar, a Two-peny Loaf of Bread grated: So let it boil 'til 'tis thick, conti|nually stirring it, 〈…〉 half a Pint of Sack, and put to it, stir it well together, and put a little Nutmeg and Cinamon in it.

To make a Posset with Ale, King William's Posset.

TAKE a Quart of Cream, and mix with it a Pint of Ale, then beat the Yolks of 10 Eggs, and the Whites of four; when they are well beaten, put them to your Cream and Ale; sweeten it to your Taste, and slice some Nutmeg in it; set it over the Fire, and keep it stirring all the while, and when 'tis thick, and before it boils, take i off, and pour it into the Bason you serve it in to the Table.

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To make the Pope's Posset.

BLANCH and beat three quarters of a Pound of Almonds so fine that they will spread between your Fingers like Butter, put in Water as you beat them to keep them from oiling; then take a Pint of Sack or Sher|ry, and sweeten it very well with double-refin'd Sugar, make it boiling hot, and at the same Time put half a Pint of Water to your Almonds, and make them boil; then take both off the Fire, and mix them very well to|gether with a Spoon; serve it in a China Dish.

To make very fine Syllabubs.

TAKE a Quart and half a Pint of Cream, a Pint of Rhenish, half a Pint of Sack, three Lemons, near a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar; beat and sift the Sugar and put it to your Cream, grate off the yellow Rind of your three Lemons and put that in; squeeze the Juice of the three Lemons into your Wine, and put that to your Cream; then beat all together with a Whisk just half an Hour; then take it up all together with a Spoon, and fill your Glasses: It will keep good nine or ten Days, and is best three or four Days old. These are called The ever|lasting Syllabubs.

To make an Oatmeal Sack Posset.

TAKE a Pint of Milk, and mix in it two Spoonfuls of Flour of Oatmeal, and one of Sugar, put in a Blade of Mace, and let it boil till the Rawness of the Oat|meal is gone off: In the mean Time have in Readiness three Spoonfuls of Sack, and three of Ale, and two of Sugar, se them over the Fire till scalding hot; then put them to your Milk, give one stir, and let it stand on the Fire a Minute or two, and pour it in your Bason; cover your Bason with a Pye plate, and let it stand a little to settle.

Page  98

Preserves, Conserves, and Syrups.

To preserve Oranges whole.

TAKE the best Bermudas Oranges, and pare them with a Penknife very thin, and lay your Oranges in Water three or four Days, shifting them every Day; then put them in a Kettle with fair Water, and put a Board on them to keep them down in the Water, and have a Skillet on the Fire with Water, that may be in Readiness to supply the Kettle with boiling Water; as it wastes it must be filled up three or four Times while the Oranges are doing, for they will take up seven o eight Hours in boiling, for they must be so ten|der that a Wheat-straw may be thrust through them; then take them up and scoop the Seeds out of them, making a lit•• Hole on the Top; then weigh them, and to every Pound of Orange, take a Pound and three Quarters of double-refind Sugar, finely beaten and sited; fill up your Oranges with Sugar, and strew some on them, and let them lie a little hile; then make your Jelly for them th••:

Take two Dozen of Pippins, and sice them into Wa|ter, and when they are boiled tender, strain the Liquor from the Pulp, and to every Pound of Orange, you must have a Pint and half of this Liquor, and put to it three Quarers of the Sugar you left in filling the Oranges; set it on the Fire, and let it boil and scum it well, and put it in a clean earthen Pan till 'tis cold; then put it in your ••illet, and put in your Oranges, and with a small Bod|kin job the Oranges as they are boiling to let the Sy|rp into them; strew on the rest of your Sugar while they Page  99 are boiling, and when they look clear take them up, and put them in your Glasses, but one in a Glass, just fit for them, and boil the Syrup till 'tis almost a Jelly; then fill up your Oranges and Glasses; and when they are cold paper them up, and put them in your Stove.

To preserve whole Quinces white.

TAKE the largest Quinces of the greenest Colour, and scald them till they are pretty soft; then pare them and core them with a Scoop; then weigh your Quinces against so much double refin'd Sugar, and make a Syrup of one half, and put in your Quinces, and boil them as fast as you can; then you must have in Readiness Pippin Liquor; let it be very strong of the Pippins, and when 'tis strained out, put in the other half of your Su|gar, and make it a Jelly; and when your Quinces are clear, put them into the Jelly, and let them simmer a little; they will be very white; so glass them up, and when they are cold, paper them and keep them in a Stove.

To preserve Gooseberries.

TAKE of the best Dutch Gooseberries before they are too ripe, stone them, and put them in a Skillet with so much fair Water as will cover them; set them on a Fire to scald, and when they are tender, take them out of the Liquor and peel off the outer Skin as you do Cod|lins, and throw them into some double-refin'd Sugar, pow|dered and sifted; put a Handful more of Gooseberries in|to that Water, and let them boil a little; then run the Li|quor through a Sieve; take the Weight of your peeled Gooseberries in double refin'd Sugar; break the Sugar in Lumps, and wet the Lumps in the Liquor that the Goose|berries were scalded in, and put your Sugar in a Preser|ving-pan over a clear Fire, and let it boil up and scum it wll; then put in your Gooseberries, and let them boil till they look clear; then place them in your Glasses, and boil the Liquor a little longer, and pour it on your Page  100 Gooseberries in the Glasses; when they are cold, paper them

To preserve Raspberries in Jelly.

TAKE of the largest and best Raspberries, and to a Pound take a Pound and quarter of Sugar made into a Syrup, and boiled candy-high; then put in the Rasp|berries, and set them over a gentle Fire, and as they boil shake them; and when the Sugar boils over them take them off the Fire, and scum them, and set them by a little; then set them on again, and have half a Pint of Juice of Currants by you, and at several Times put in a little as it boils; shake them often as they grow nearer to be enough, which you may know by setting some in a Spoon to try if it will Jelly, for when they jelly they are enough; then lay them in your Glasses, and keep the Jelly to cover them; but before you put it to them pick out all the Seeds; and let the Jelly cover them well.

To preserve Apricocks.

TAKE your Apricocks, stone and pare them, and take their Weight in double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted, and put your Apricocks in a Silver Cup or Tank|ard, and cover them over with the Sugar, and let them stand so all Night; the next Day put them in a Preser|ving-pan, and set them on a gentle Fire, and let them sim|mer a little while; then let them boil till they are tender and clear, taking them off sometimes to turn and scum; keep them under the Liquor as they are doing, and with a small clean Bodkin or great Needle, job them some|times that the Syrup may penetrate into them; when they are enough take them up, and put them in Glasses. Boil and scum the Syrup, and when it is cold put it on your Apricocks.

Page  101

To preserve Damsons whole.

TAKE some Damsons and cut them in Pieces, and put them in a Skillet over the Fire with as much Water as will cover them; when they are boiled, and the Liquor pretty strong, strain it out; add for every Pound of your whole Damsons wiped clean, a Pound of single re|fin'd Sugar; put the third Part of the Sugar in the Liquor, and set it over the Fire, and when it simmers put in your Damsons. Let them have one good Boil, and take them off for half an Hour, covered up close; then set them on again, and let them simmer over the Fire, often turning them; then take them out and put them into a Bason, and strew all the Sugar that was left on them, and pour the hot Liquor over them, and cover them up, and let them stand till the next Day; then boil them up again till they are enough; take them up, and put them in Pots; boil the Liquor till it jellies, and pour it on them when 'tis almost cold, so paper them up

To parh Almonds.

TAKE a Pound of Sugar, make it into a Syrup, and boil it candy-high; then put in three quarters of a Pound of Jordan Almonds blanched; keep them stirring all the while till they are dry and crisp; then put them in a Box and keep them dry.

To dry Apricocks.

TAKE to a Pound of Apricocks & Pound of double-refin'd Sugar; then stone them and pare them, and put them into cold Water, and when they are all ready; put them into a Skillet of hot Water and scald them ill they are tender; then drain them very well from the Wa|ter, and put them into a Silver Bson: and have in Rea|diness your Sugar boiled to Sugar again, and pour that Sugar over your Apricocks, and cover them with a Silver Plat, and let them stand all Night; the next Day set Page  102 them over a gentle Fire, and let them be scalding hot, turning them often; you must do them twice a Day, till you see them begin to candy; then take them out and set them in your Stove or Glasses to dry, heating your Stove every Day till they are dry.

To preserve green Plumbs.

TAKE green Plumbs grown to their full Bigness, but before they begin to ripen; let them be carefully ga|thered with their Stalks and Leaves; put them into cold Spring-water over the Fire, and let them boil very gent|ly; when they will peel take off the Skins; then put the Plumbs into other cold Water, and let them stand over a very gentle Fire till they are soft; put two Pounds of double-refin'd Sugar to every Pound of Plumbs, and make the Sugar with some Water into a thick Syrup before the Plumbs are put in; the Stones of the Plumbs are not to be grown so hard, but that you may thrust a Pin through them: After the same Manner do green Apricocks.

To make Sugar Plates.

TAKE a Pound of double refin'd Sugar beaten and scarced, and blanch and beat some Almonds and mix with it, and beat them together in a Mortar, with Gum dragant dissolved in Rose-water, till 'tis a Paste; roll it out and strew Sugar on the Papers or Plate, and bake it after Manchet; gild it if you please, and serve Sweetmeats on it.

To clear Sugar.

TAKE two or three Whites of Eggs, and put them into a Bason of Water, and with a very clean Hand lather that as you do Soap; take nothing but the Froth, and when your Syrup boils, with a Ladle cover it with it; do this till your Syrup is clear, making still more Froth, and covering the Syrup with it; it will make the worst Sugar as clear as any, and fit to preserve any Fruit.

Page  103

To preserve green Plumbs.

THE Plumbs that will be greenest are the white Plumbs that are ripe in Wheat Harvest; gather them about the Middle of July whilst they are green; when gathered lay them in Water twelve Hours; then scald them in two several Waters, let not the first be too hot, but the second must boil before you put the Plumbs in, and when they begin to shrivel, peel off the Skin as you do Codlins, keep them whole, and let a third Water be made hot, and when it boils put in your Plumbs, and give them two or three walms; then take them off the Fire and cover them close for half a quarter of an Hour, till you perceive them to look greenish and tender; then take them out and weigh them with double-refind Sugar equal Weight; wet a quarter of a Pound of your Sugar in four Spoonfuls of Water; set it on the Fire, and when it be|gins to boil take it off, and put in your Plumbs one by one, and strew the rest of your Sugar upon them, only saving a little to put in with your Perfume, Musk, or Ambergrease, which must be put in a little before they are done: Let them boil softly on a moderate Fire half an Hour or more till they are green and the Syrup thickish; put your Plumbs in a Pot or Glasses; let the Syrup have two or three walms more and put it to them, when they are cold paper them up.

To preserve black Pear Plumbs, or any black Plumb.

TAKE a Pound of Plumbs, give them a little Slit in the Seam; then take some of your worst Plumbs, and put them in a Gallipot close covered, and set them in a Pot of boiling Water, and as they yield Liquor still pour it out. To a Pint of this Liquor, take a Pound and quarter of Sugar; put them together, and give them a boil and a scum, after which take it off to cool a little; then take your Pound of Plumbs, and as you put them in, give every one of them a prick or two with a Needle, so Page  104 set them again on a soft Fire a pretty while; then take them off, and let them stand 'til the next Day, that they may drink up the Syrup without breaking the Skin; the next Day warm them again once or twice 'til you see the Syrup grow thick, and the Plumbs look of the right black, still scumming them, and when they will endure a boil, give them 2 or 3 walins, and scum them well, and put them in your Glasses. Be sure you keep some of the Sy|rup in a Glass, that when your Plumbs are settled and cold you may cover them with it. The next Day paper them up, and keep them for use.

To make white Jelly of Quinces.

PARE your Quinces, and cut them in Halves; then core them, and parboil your Quinces; when they are soft, take them up, and crush them through a Strainer, but not too hard, only the clear Juice. Take the Weight of the Juice in fine Sugar; boil the Sugar candy-height, and put in your Juice, and let it scald a while, but not boil, and if any Froth arise, scum it off, and when you take it up, have ready a white preserved Quince cut in small Slices, and lay them in the Bottom of your Glasses, and pour your Jelly to them, it will candy on the Top and keep moist on the Bottom a long Time.

To make clear Cakes of the Jelly of any Fruit.

TO half a Pound of Jelly, take six Ounces of Sugar; wet your Sugar with a little Water, and boil it can|dy-height; then put in your Jelly; let it boil very fast 'til it Jelly; then put it into Glasses, and when 'tis dried enough on one Side, turn it into Glass Plates. Set them in a Stove to dry leisurely; let your Stove be hot against your Cakes be turned.

Page  105

To make clear Cakes of any Fruit.

TAKE your Gooseberries, or other Fruit, and put them in an earthen Pot stopt very close, and put them in a Kettle of Water, and let them boil 'til they break; then take them out, and run them through a Cloth; take the Weight of the Liquor in Sugar; boil the Sugar can|dy-height; then put in your Juice, and let it stand over a few Embers to dry 'til 'tis thick like Jelly; if you fear it will change Colour, put in 3 or 4 Drops of Juice of Le|mon; pour it out into clear Cake Glasses, and dry them with a little Fire.

To make brown Sugar.

TAKE Gum arabick, and dissolve it in Water 'til 'tis pretty thick; then take as much double-refin'd Sugar finely sifted and persumed as will make the Gum into a stiff Paste; roll it out like Jumballs, and set in an Oven exactly heated that it may raise them and not boil; for if it boils 'tis spoiled; you may colour some of them.

To make Pastils.

TAKE double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted as fine as Flour; perfume it with Musk and Ambergrease; then have ready steeped some Gum arabick in Orange-flower Water, and with that make the Sugar into a stiff Paste; drop into some of it 3 or 4 Drops of Oil of Mint, or Oil of Cloves, or Oil of Cinamon, or of what Oil you like, and let some only have the Perfume; then roll them up in your Hand like little Pellets, and squeeze them flat with a Seal. Dry them in the Sun.

To fricasy Almonds.

TAKE a Pound of Jordan Almonds; do not blanch them, or but one Half of them; beat the White of an Egg very well, and pour it on your Almonds, and wet Page  106 them all over; then take half a Pound of double refin'd Sugar, and boil it to Sugar again; and put your Al|monds in, and stir them 'til as much Sugar hangs on them as will; then set them on Plates, and put them into the Oven to dry after Bread is drawn, and let them stay in all Night. They will keep the Year round if you keep them dry, and are a pretty Sweetmeat.

To make Almond Cakes.

BOIL a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar up to a thin Candy; then have in Readiness half a Pound of Al|monds blanched, and finely beaten with some Rose or O|range-flower Water, the Juice of one Lemon, the Peels of two grated into the Juice, put all these together, stir them over a gentle Fire 'til all the Sugar is well melted, but be sure it does not boil after the Lemon is in; then put it into your clear Cake Glasses; perfume them, and when they are a little dry, cut them into what Shape you please.

To make Orange Cakes.

PARE your Oranges very thin, and take off the white Rinds in quarters; boil the white Rinds very tender, and when they are enough, take them up, and scrape the Black off, and squeeze them between two Trenchers; beat them in a Stone Mortar to a fine Pulp with a little Sugar, pick the Meat out of the Oranges from the Skins and Seeds, and mix the Pulp and Meat together, and take the Weight and half of Sugar; boil the Sugar to a candy-height, and put in the Oranges, stir them well together, and when 'tis cold, drop them on a Pye-plate, and set them in a Stove. You may perfume them. To the Rinds of 6 Oranges put the Meat of 9 Lemons. Cakes are made the same Way, only as many Rinds as Meat, and twice the Weight of Sugar.

Page  107

To make March-pane unboiled.

TAKE a Pound of Almonds, blanch them and beat them in Rose water; when they are finely beaten, put to them half a Pound of Sugar. beat and scarced, and work it to a Paste; spread some on Wafers, and dry it in the Oven; when 'tis cold, have ready the White of an Egg beaten with Rose-water and double refin'd Sugar. Let it be as thick as Butter, then draw your March-pane through it, and put it in the Oven: It will ice in a little Time, then keep them for Use.

If you have a mind to have your March-pane large, cut it when 'tis rolled out by a Pewter plate, and edge it a|bout the Top like a Tart, and bottom with Wafer-paper, and set it in the Oven, and ice it as aforesaid; when the Icing rises, take it out and strew colour'd Comfits on it, or serve Sweetmeats on it.

To preserve Cherries.

PICK and stone your Cherries, and weigh them, and take their Weight in single refin'd Sugar beaten fine, mix three parts of the Sugar with Juice of Currants, and put it in your Preserving pan, and give it a boil and a scum, and then put in your Cherries; let them boil very fast, now and then strewing in some of the Sugar that was left 'til all is in, scum it well, and when they are enough, which you may know by trying some in a Spoon, and when it jellies, take it off, and fill your Glasses, and when they are cold, paper them up.

To preserve Currants in Jelly.

TAKE your Currants and strip them, and put them in an earthen Pot; tie them close down, and set them in a Kettle of boiling Water, and let them stand 3 Hours, keeping the Water boiling; then take a clean flaxen Cloth, and strain out the Juice, and when it has settled, take a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and Page  108 sifted, and put to a Pint of the clear Juice: Have in Rea|diness some whole Currants stoned, and when the Juice boils, put in your Currants, and boil them 'til your Syrup jellies, which you may know by taking some in a Spoon; then put it in your Glasses. This way make Jelly of Cur|rants, only leaving out the whole Currants; when it is cold, paper them up.

To preserve Barberries.

TAKE the largest Barberries you can get, and stone them, and to every Pound of Barberries take three Pounds of Sugar, and boil it 'til 'tis candy-high; then put in the Barberries, and let them boil 'til the Sugar boils over them all; then take them off, scum them, and set them on again, and give them another boil, and put them in an earthen Pan, cover them with Paper, and set them by 'til the next Day; then put them in Pots, and pour the Syrup over them; cover them with Paper, and keep them in a Stove. If the Syrup grows thin, you may make a little Jelly of Pippins, and put them in when 'tis rea|dy, and give them one walm, and pour them again into Glasses.

To preserve whole Pippins.

TAKE Kentish Pippins, or Apple-Johns, pare them and slice them into fair Water; set them on a clear Fire, and when they are boiled to mash, let the Liquor run through a Hair Sieve. Boil as many Apples thus, till you have the Quantity of Liquor you would have. To a Pint of this Liquor you must have a Pound of dou|ble refin'd Sugar in great Lumps; wet the Lumps of Su|gar with the Pippin Liquor, and set over a gentle Fire, and let it boil, and scum it well, and while you are mak|ing the Jelly, you must have your whole Pippins boiling at the same Time; they must be the fairest and best Pip|pins you can get; scoop out the Cores, and pare them neatly, and put them into fair Water as you do them. You must likewise make a Syrup ready to put them into the Page  109 Quantity as you think will boil them in clear; you must make that Syrup with double-refin'd Sugar and Water; tie up your whole Pippins in a Piece of fine Muslin se|verally, and when your Sugar and Water boils put them in; let them boil very fast; so fast, that the Syrup al|ways boils over them; sometimes take them off, and then set them on again, and let them boil 'til they are tender; then take off the Tiffney or Muslin they were tied up in, and put them into Glasses that will hold but 1 in a Glass; then see if your Jelly of Apple Johns be boiled to Jelly enough; if it be, squeeze in the Juice of two Lemons, and put Musk and Ambergrease in a Rag, and let it have a boil; then strain it through a Jelly-bag into the Glas|ses your Pippins were in: You must be sure to drain your Pippins well from the Syrup they were boiled in; before you put them in your Glasses, you may, if you please, boil Lemon-peel in little Pieces in Water 'til they are tender, and then boil them in the Syrup your Pippins were boiled in; then take them out, and lay them about the Pippins before the Jelly is put in; when they are cold, paper them up.

To make Pippin Jelly.

TAKE fifteen Pippins, pared, cored, and sliced, and put them into a Pint and half of Water, and let them boil 'til they are tender; then put them in a Strainer, and let the thin run from them, as much as it will; and to a Pint of Liquor, take a Pound of double refin'd Sugar, wet your Sugar, and boil it to Sugar again; then cut some Chips of candied Orange or Lemon peel, and cut it as fine as Threads, and put it into your Sugar, and then your Liquor, and let it boil 'til 'tis a Jelly, which will be quickly; you may perfume it with Ambergrease, if you please; pour the Jelly into shallow Glasses: When 'tis cold, paper it up, and keep it in your Stove.

Page  110

To candy Angelica.

TAKE Angelica that is young, and cut it in fit Lengths, and boil it 'til 'tis pretty tender, keeping it close covered; then take it up and peel off all the Strings; then put it in again, and let it simmer and scald 'til 'tis very green; then take it up and dry it in a Cloth, and weigh it, and to every Pound of Angelica take a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; put your Angelica in an earthen Pan, and strew the Sugar o|ver it, and let it stand two Days; then boil it 'til it looks very clear, put it in a Colander to drain the Syrup from it, and take a little double-refin'd Sugar and boil it to Sugar again; then throw in your Angelica, and take it out in a little Time, and put it on glass Plates. It will dry in your Stove, or in an Oven, after Pyes are drawn.

To make Jelly of white Currants.

TAKE your largest Currants, and strip them into a Bason, and bruise and strain them, and to every Pint of Juice a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar; just wet your Sugar with a little fair Water, and set it on a slow Fire 'til it melts; then make it boil, and at the same Time let your Juice boil in another Thing; scum them both very well, and when they have boiled a pretty while, take off your Sugar and strain the Juice into it through a Muslin; then set it on the Fire, and let it boil, and if you please, you may stone some white Currants and put them in, and let them boil 'til they are clear; have a Care you do not boil them too high; let them stand a|while, then put them in Glasses.

If you would make clear Cakes of white Currants, boil the Juice just as this is; but this observe, that when you put your Juice and Sugar together, they must stand but so long on the Fire, 'til they are warm and well mixed; they must not boil together; and when 'tis cold, put it in flat Glasses, and into your Stove to dry them; turn them often.

Page  111

To make white Marmalade.

TAKE your Quinces and scald them, and pare them, and scrape the Pulp clean from the Cores, and to e|very Pound of Pulp put a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar; put a little Water to your Sugar to dissolve it, and boil it candy-high; then put in the Quince Pulp, and set it on the Fire 'til it comes to a Body; let it boil very fast, when 'tis enough, put it in Gallipots.

To make red Quince Marmalade.

PARE, core, and quarter your Quinces, then weigh them, and to a Pound of Quince allow a Pound of single-refin'd Sugar beaten small; and to every Pound of Quince a Pint of Liquor; make your Liquor thus: Put your Parings and Cores, and 3 or 4 Quinces cut in Pie|ces, into a large Skillet, with Water proportionable to the Quantity of Quinces you do; cover it, and set it o|ver the Fire; and let it boil 2 or 3 Hours, then put in a Quart of Barberries, and let them boil an Hour, and strain all out; then put your Quince and Liquor, and a quarter of your Sugar into a Skillet or large Preserving-pan, and let them boil together over a gentle Fire, cover it close, and take care it does not burn; strew in the rest of your Sugar by Degrees, and stir it often from the Bot|tom, but do not break the Quince 'til 'tis near enough; then break it in Lumps as small as you like it; when 'tis of a good Colour and very tender, try some in a Spoon, if it jellies 'tis enough; then take it off, and put it in Gal|lipots; when 'tis cold, paper it up.

To make Marmalade of Cherries.

TAKE four Pounds of Cherries, stone them, and put them in a Preserving-pan, with a Quart of Juice of Currants; set them on a Charcoal Fire, and let the Fire dry away most of the Juice; break or mash them, and boil 3 Pounds of Sugar candy-high, and put Page  112 the Cherries to it, and set it on the Fire again, and boil it 'til it comes to a Body; so put it in Glasses, and when 'tis cold, paper it up.

To make white Quince Paste.

SCALD the Quinces tender to the Core, and pare them, and scrape the Pulp clean from the Core, beat it in a Mortar, and pulp it through a Colander; take to a Pound of Pulp a Pound and two Ounces of Sugar, boil the Sugar 'til 'tis candy-high; then put in your Pulp, stir it about constantly 'til you see it come clear from the Bottom of the Preserving-pan; then take it off, and lay it on Plates pretty thin: You may cut it in what Shape you please, or make Quince Chips of it; you must dust it with Sugar when you put it into the Stove, and turn it on Paper in a Sieve, and dust the other Side; when they are dry, put them in Boxes with Papers between. You may make red Quince Paste the same Way as this, only colour the Quince with Cochineel.

To dry Pears or Apples.

TAKE poppering Pears, and thrust a piked Stick in|to the Head of them beyond the Core, then scald them, but not too tender; then pare them the long Way; put them in Water, and take the Weight of them in Su|gar, and clarify it with Water, a Pint of Water to a Pound of Sugar, strain the Syrup and put in the Pears; set them on the Fire, and boil them pretty fast for half an Hour; cover them with Paper, and set them by till the next Day; then boil them again, and set them by till the next Day; then take them out of the Syrup, and boil it till 'tis thick and ropy; then put the Pears in your Preserving-pan, and put the Syrup to them, and if it will not cover them, add some Sugar to them, set them over the Fire and let them boil up; then cover them with Paper, and set 'em in a Stove twenty four Hours; then take 'em out and lay them on Sieves to dry; then lay them on Plates, and dust them with Sugar, and set them into your Stove to dry; Page  113 and when one Side is dry, lay them on Papers, and turn them, and dust the other Side with Sugar; squeeze the Pears flat by Degrees; if 'tis Apples squeeze the Eye to the Stalk; when they are quite dry put them in Boxes with Papers between.

To dry Pears or Pippins without Sugar.

TAKE your Pears or Apples and wipe them clean, and take a Bodkin and run it in at the Head and out at the Stalk, and put them in a flat earthen Pot and bake them, but not too much; you must put a Quart of strong new Ale to half a Peck of Pears, tie white Papers over the Pot that they may not be scorched in baking, and when they are baked let them stand to be cold; and take them out to drain, squeeze the Pears flat, and the Apples the Eye to the Stalk, and lay them on Sieves with wide Holes to dry, either in a Stove or an Oven that is not too hot.

To candy any sort of Flower.

TAKE your Flowers and pick them from the white Part; then take fine Sugar and boil it candy-high; boil as much as you think will receive the Quantity of Flowers you do; then put in the Flowers, and stir them about till you perceive the Sugar to candy well about them; then take them off from the Fire, and keep them stirring till they are cold in the Pan you candied them in; then sift the loose Sugar from them, and keep them in Boxes very dry.

To make Syrup of any Flower.

CLIP your Flowers, and take their Weight in Sugar; then take a high Gallipot, and put a row of Flowers, and a strewing of Sugar, till the Pot is full; then put in two or three Spoonfuls of the same Syrup or still'd Water; tie a Cloth on the Top of the Pot, and put a Tile on that, and set your Gallipot in a Kettle of Water over a gentle Page  114 Fire, and let it infuse till the Strength is out of the Flow|ers, which will be in four or five Hours; then strain it thro' a Flannel, and when 'tis cold bottle it up.

To candy any sort of Fruit.

AFTER you have preserv'd your Fruit, dip them suddenly into warm Water to take off the Syrup; then sift on them double-refin'd Sugar till they look white; then set them on a Sieve in a warm Oven, taking them out to turn two or three Times; let them not be cold till they be dry, and they will look clear as Diamonds. So keep them dry.

To preserve Gooseberries in Hops.

TAKE the largest Dutch Gooseberries, and with a Knife cut them a cross at the Head and half way down, and with a Bodkin put out the Seeds clean, and do not break them; then take fine long Thorns, scrape them, and then put on your Gooseberries, putting the Leaf of the one to the Cut of the other, and so till your Thorn is full; and when they are full, put them in a new Pipkin with a close Cover, and cover them with Water, and let 'em stand scalding till they are green; then take them up, and lay them upon a Sieve to drain from the Water; be sure they do not boil in the Greening, for if they have but one walm they are spoiled, and while they are greening make a Syrup for them. Take whole green Gooseberries, and boil them in Water till they all break, then strain the Wa|ter through a Sieve, and weigh your Hops, and to a Pound of Hops put a Pound and a half of double-refin'd Sugar, put the Sugar and Hops into the Liquor, and boil them open till they are clear and green; then take them up and lay them upon Pye-plates, and boil your Syrup longer; lay your Hops in a pretty deep Gallipot, and when the Sy|rup is cold, pour it on them; cover them with Paper, and keep them in a Stove.

Page  115

To preserve Gooseberries whole, without stoning.

TAKE the largest preserving Gooseberries and pick off the black Eye, but not the Stalk; then set them over the Fire in a Pot of Water to scald, cover them very close, and let them scald, but not boil or break; and when they are tender take them up into cold Water; then take a Pound and half of double fin'd Sugar to a Pound of Gooseberries, clarify the Sugar with Water, a Pint to a Pound of Sugar, and when the Syrup is cold, put your Gooseberries single into your Preserving pan, and put the Syrup to them, and set them on a gentle Fire and let them boil, but not too fast, lest they break; and when they are boiled, and you perceive the Sugar has enter'd them, take them off, cover them with white Paper, and set them by till the next Day; then take them out of the Syrup, and boil the Syrup till it begins to be ropy, scum it, and put it to them again, and set them on a gentle Fire, and let them preserve gently till you percieve the Syrup will rope; then take them off and set them by till they are cold, co|vering them with Paper; then boil some Gooseberries in fair Water, and when the Liquor is strong enough strain it out, let it stand to settle; and to every Pint take a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar and make a Jelly of it, and put the Gooseberries in Glasses, and when they are cold cover them with the Jelly; the next Day paper them; wet, and then half dry the Paper that goes in the In-side, it closes down better, and then put on other Papers, and put them in your Stove.

To make Conserve of red Roses, or any other Flowers.

TAKE Rose-buds, and pick them, and cut off the white Part from the red, and put the red Flowers, and sift them through a Sieve to take out the Seeds; then weigh them, and to every Pound of Flowers take two Pounds and half of Loaf-Sugar, beat the Flowers pretty fine in a Stone Mortar; then by Degrees put the Sugar to Page  116 them, and beat it very well 'til 'tis well incorporated to|gether; then put it into Gallipots, and tie it over with Paper, and over that Leather, and it will keep 7 Years.

To stew Apples.

TAKE to a Quart of Water a Pound of double-re|fin'd Sugar beaten fine, boil and scum it, and put into it a Pound of the largest and clearest Pippins, pared, and cut in Halves, and cored. Let them boil, covered with a continual Froth 'til they be as tender and clear as you would have them; then put in the Juice of two Le|mons, and a little Peel cut like Threads. Let them have 5 or 6 walms after the Lemon is in; then put them in the China Dish or Slver you serve them in; they should be done two Hours before used.

To make Sugar of Roses.

CLIP off all the Whites from the Red rose Buds, and dry the Red in the Sun; and to one Ounce of that finely powdered, you must have a Pound of Loaf Sugar; wet the Sugar in Rose water, (but if in the Season, Juice of Roses;) boil it to a candy-height; then put in your Powder of Roses, and the Juice of a Lemon; mix it well together; then pour it on a Pye-plate, and cut it into Lo|zenges, or what Form you please.

To preserve small Cucumbers green.

TAKE small Cucumbers, boil them, but not very tender; when you take 'em out of the Water, make a Hole thro' every one with a large Needle; then pare and weigh them, and to every Pound allow a Pound of Sugar, which make in a Syrup, with a Pint of Water to every Pound of Sugar; you must green them before you put them into the Sugar; then let them boil, keeping them close covered, then put them by, and for 3 or 4. Days boil them a little every Day put into the Syrup the Peel of a fresh Lemon. Then make a fresh Syrup Page  117 with double-refin'd Sugar; you must have three quarters of a Pound to a Pound of Cucumbers, and a quarter of a Pint of fair Water, the Juice of a Lemon, and a little Amber-grease boiled in it; so do them up for Use; paper them when cold.

To preserve Mulberries whole.

SET some Mulberries over the Fire in a Skillet, and draw from them a Pint of Juice, when 'tis strained. Then take three Pounds of Sugar, beaten very fine; wet the Sugar with the Pint of Juice, boil up your Sugar, and scum it, and put in two Pounds of ripe Mulberries, and let them stand in the Syrup 'til they are thoroughly warm; then set them on the Fire, and let them boil very gently; do them but half enough, so put them by in the Syrup 'til next Day; then boil them gently again, and when the Syrup is pretty thick, and will stand in a round Drop when 'tis cold, they are enough; so put all together in a Gallipot for Use.

To make Rose Drops.

THE Roses and Sugar must be beat separately into a very fine Powder, and both sifted; to a Pound of Sugar, an Ounce of red Roses; they must be mixed to|gether, and then wet with as much Juice of Lemon as will make it into a stiff Paste. Set it on a slow Fire in a Silver Porringer, and stir it well; and when 'tis scald|ing hot quite through, take it off, and drop it on Paper. Set them near the Fire next Day; they'll come off.

A fine way to preserve Raspberries.

TAKE the Juice of red and white Raspberries and Codlin Jelly; to a Pint and half, two Pounds of double refin'd Sugar; boil it, and scum it, and then put in three quarters of a Pound of large pick'd Raspberries; let them boil very fast 'til they jelly, and are clear; don't take them off the Fire, that will make them hard, a quar|ter Page  118 of an Hour will do them when they begin to boil; then put your Raspberries in the Glass first, and strain the Seeds from the Jelly, and put it to them, and when they begin to cool, stir them gently, that they may not all lye on the Top of the Glass, and when cold, lay Pa|pers close on them, first wet the Papers, and dry them in a Cloth.

To make a strong Apple Jelly.

LET your Water boil in the Pan you make it in, and when the Apples are pared and quartered, put them into your boiling Water; let there be no more Water than will just cover them, and let it boil as fast as possible, and when the Apples are all to Pieces, put in about a Quart of Water more, and let it boil half an Hour longer, then run it through a Jelly-bag, and use it as Occasion for any Sort of Sweetmeat; in the Summer Codlins are best, in the Winter Golden Runnets or Winter Pippins.

To preserve Raspberries whole.

TAKE the full Weight of your Raspberries in dou|ble refin'd Sugar, beaten and sifted; lay your Rasp|berries single in the Bottom of your Preserving-pan, and put all your Sugar over them; set them on a slow Fire, 'til there is some Syrup in the Bottom of the Pan; then set them on a quick Fire 'til all the Sugar be thoroughly melted, give them 2 or 3 walms, scum them, and take them up, and put them in Glasses.

To make Bisket.

TAKE the Whites of four Eggs, the Yolks of ten, beat them a quarter of an Hour with four Spoonfuls of Orange-flower Water; then add to it one Pound of Loaf Sugar beaten and sifted; then beat them together an Hour longer; then stir in half a Pound of dry Flour, and the Peel of a Lemon grated off; mix it well together, then butter the Pans and fill them, searce some Sugar over them Page  119 as you put them in the Oven; when they are risen in the Oven, take them out and lay them on a clean Cloth, and when the Oven is pretty cool, put them in again on Sieves, and let them stand 'til they are dry, and will snap in break|ing.

To make Chocolate Almonds.

TAKE a Pound of Chocolate finely grated, and a Pound and half of the best Sugar finely sifted; then soak Gum dragant in Orange flower Water, and work them into what Form you please. The Paste must be stiff, dry them in a Stove.

To make Lemon Puffs.

TAKE a Pound and a quarter of double-refin'd Su|gar beaten and sifted, and grate the Rinds of two Lemons, and mix well with the Sugar; then beat the Whites of three new laid Eggs very well, and mix it well with your Sugar and Lemon peel; beat them together an Hour and quarter, then make it up in what Form you please; be quick to set them in a moderate Oven, don't take them off the Papers 'til cold.

To make Almond Loaves.

BLANCH your Almonds in hot Water, and throw them into cold; then take their Weight in double-re|fin'd Sugar finely searc'd, beat them together till they come to a Paste; then make them up into little Loaves; then ice them over with some white of Egg and Sugar; bake them on Paper: If you please you may throw your Almonds into Orange-flower Water instead of cold Water.

To make Lemon Bisket.

TAKE six yellow Rinds well beat, with a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar, and Whites of four Eggs, till come to a Paste; lay them on Wafer-paper, so bake them on Time.

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To make Orange-Chips crisp.

PARE your Oranges very thin, leaving as little White on the Peel as possible, throw the Rinds into fair Wa|ter as you pare them off; then boil them therein very fast till they are tender, still filling up the Pan with boiling Water as it wastes away; then make a thin Syrup with Part of the Water they were boil'd in, and put the Rinds therein and just let them boil; then take them off, and let them lie in the Syrup three or four Days; then boil them again till you find the Syrup begins to draw between your Fingers; then take them off from the Fire, and let them drain between a Colander; take out but a few at a Time, because if they cool too fast it will be difficult to get the Syrup from them, which must be done by pas|sing every Piece of Peel through your Fingers, and lay|ing them single on a Sieve with the Rind uppermost: The Sieves may be set in a Stove, or before the Fire, but in Summer the Sun is hot enough to dry them. Three Pounds of Sugar will make Syrup to do the Peels of twen|ty five Oranges.

To make Syrup of Orange-peel.

TO every Pint of Water in which the Orange-peels were steep'd, put a Pound of Sugar, boil it, and when it has boil'd a little, squeeze in some Juice of Le|mon, and make it more or less sharp to your Taste; filter the Lemon-juice through Cap paper, as it boils, scum it clear; and when boiled enough to keep take it off the Fire, and when cold bottle it. When your Orange-peels are dried on one Side, turn the other, and so do till they are crisp; brush the Sugar from them, then take a Cloth dipp'd in warm Water and wipe off all that remains of Sugar on the Rind Side; then lay them on the Sieve a|gain, and in an Hour they will be dry enough to put in|to your Boxes to keep.

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To make Orange Marmalade.

TAKE the best Sevil Oranges and weigh a Pound of them, then pare off all the yellow Rind very thin, quarter the Peel and put 'em in Water; cover 'em down close, and shift the Water six or seven Times as it boils to take the Bitterness out, and that they may look clear, and be tender; then take them out, dry them in a Cloth, take out all the Strings, and cut 'em thin as Pal|lets; then take a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten, and boil it with a little Water to a candy-height, scum it clean and put in your Peels; let them boil near half an Hour; have in readiness your Orange-meat all pick'd from the Skins and Seeds, and the Juice of two large Le|mons, and put it into the Peels, and boil all together a quarter of an Hour longer; so glass it up, and paper it when cold.

To make Orange Cakes.

CUT your Oranges, pick out all your Meat and Juice free from the Strings and Seeds, and set it by; then boil it and shift the Water till your Peels are tender, dry them in a Cloth and mince them small, and put them to the Juice; to a Pound of that weigh a Pound and half of double refin'd Sugar; dip your Lumps of Sugar in Wa|ter and boil it to a candy-height; take it off the Fire and put in your Juice and Peel, stir it well, and when 'tis almost cold put it in a Bason and set it in a Stove; then lay it thin on earthen Plates to dry, and as it can|dies fashion it with your Knife; and as they dry lay them on Glass; when your Plate is empty, put more out of your Bason.

To make Lemon Cakes.

GRATE off the yellow Rind of your Lemon, and squeeze your Juice to that Peel; take two Apples to every Lemon, pare and core them, and boil them Page  122 clear, then put them to your Lemon; to a Pound of this put two Pound of double-refin'd Sugar, then order it as the Orange.

To make clear Candy.

TAKE six Ounces of Water and four Ounces of fine Sugar, searc'd, set it on a slow Fire to melt without stirring, let it boil till it comes to a strong Can|dy; then have ready your Peel or Fruit scalded hot in the Syrup they were kept in, drain them very well from it, and put them into your Candy, which you must rub on the sides of your Bason with the back of your Spoon till you see the Candy pretty white; take out the Fruit with a Fork, touch it not with your Fingers: If right, the Candy will shine on your Fruit, and dry in three or four Hours in an indifferent hot Stove: Lay your Fruit on Sieves.

To keep Fruit in Syrup to Candy.

IF you candy Orange or Lemon-peels, you must first rub them with Salt; then cut in what Fashion you please, and keep them in Water two Days; then boil them tender, shifting the Water you boil them in two or three Times; you must have a Syrup ready, a Pint of Wa|ter to a Pound of Sugar, scald your Peels in it till they look clear. Fruit is done the same way, but not boil'd till you put them in your Syrup; you must heat your Sy|rup once a Week, taking out your Fruit, and put them in again while the Syrup is hot; they will keep all the Year.

To dry Apricocks like Prunello's.

TAKE a Pound of Apricocks, being cut in halves or quarters, let them boil till they be very tender in a thin Syrup; let them stand a Day or two in the Stove; then take them out of the Syrup, and lay them drying till they be as dry as Prunello's, then box them: You Page  123 may make your Syrup red with the Juice of red Plumbs; if you please you may pare them.

To preserve green Cucumbers.

TAKE Gerkins, rub them clean, then green them in hot Water; then take their Weight in double-re|fin'd Sugar, boil it to a thick Syrup with a quarter of a Pint of Spring-water to every Pound of Sugar; then put in your Cucumbers and set them over the Fire, but not to boil fast; so do two or three Days. The last Day boil them till they are tender and clear, so glass them up.

To make clear Cakes of Gooseberries.

TAKE your white Dutch Gooseberries when they are thorough ripe, break them with your Fingers and squeeze out all the Pulp into a fine Piece of Cam|brick or thick Muslin to run thro' clear; then weigh the Juice and Sugar one against the other; then boil the Juice a little while, then put in your Sugar and let it dissolve, but not boil; scum it and put it into Glasses, and stove it in a warm Stove.

To preserve Cherries.

GATHER your Cherries of a bright red, not too ripe; weigh them, and to every Pound of Cherries put three quarters of a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar bea|ten fine; stone them, and strew some Sugar on them, as you stone them; to keep their Colour, wet your Sugar with fair Water near half a Pint, and boil and scum it, then put in three small Spoonfuls of the juice of Currants, that was infused with a little Water; give it another boil, and scum, and put in your Cherries; boil them till they are tender, then pour them into a China Bason, cover them with Paper, and set them by twenty four Hours, then put them in your Preserving-pan, and boil them till they look clear; put them in your Glass clear from the Syrup, and put the Syrup on them strain'd through Muslin.

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To preserve green Apricocks.

BEFORE the Stones are hard, wet them and lay them in a course Cloth and put to them two or three Handfuls of Salt, and rub them till the Roughness is off, then put them in scalding Water, and set them over the Fire till almost boil'd, then set them off till almost cold; do this two or three Times; after this let them be close cover'd, and when they look to be green, let them boil till they begin to be tender; weigh them and take their Weight in double-refin'd Sugar, to a Pound of Sugar half a Pint of Water; make the Syrup, and when almost cold put in your Apricocks, boil them well till clear, warm the Syrup two or three Times till thick, or put them in cold Jelly, or dry them as you use them.

To Candy Orange Chips.

PARE your Oranges and soak the Peelings in Water two Days, and shift the Water twice; but if you love them bitter soak them not: Tie your Peels up in a Cloth, and when your Water boils, put them in, and let them boil till they are tender; then take what double-refin'd Sugar will do, and break it small and wet it with a little Water, and let it boil till 'tis near candy-high, then cut your Peels of what Length you please, and put 'em into the Syrup; set 'em on the Fire and let 'em heat well thro', then let them stand a while, heat them twice a Day, but not boil: Let them be so done till they begin to candy, then take them out and put them on Plates to dry, and when they are dry, keep them near the Fire.

To scald Fruit for present Use.

PUT your Fruit into boiling Water, as much as will almost cover them, set them over a slow Fire, keep it in a scald till tender, turning the Fruit where the Wa|ter does not cover; when tender, lay a Plate close on it, let it stand till cold; to a Pound of Fruit, put half a Page  125 Pound of Sugar; let it boil, but not fast, till it looks clear; all Fruit done whole but Pippins, and they in halves, with Orange or Lemon peel and Juice of Lemon; cut your Peel very thin, like Threads, and strew them on your Pippins.

To make Marmalade of Apricocks.

GATHER your Apricocks just turn'd from the green of a very pale yellow, pare them thin, and weigh them, three quarters of a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar to a Pound of Apricocks; then cut them in halves, take out the Stones and slice them thin; beat your Sugar and put it in your Preserving pan with your sliced Apricocks, and three or four Spoonfuls of Water: Boil and scum them, and when they are tender put them in Glasses.

To make a Gooseberry Gam.

GATHER your Gooseberries full ripe, but green; top and tail them, and weigh them; a Pound of Fruit to three quarters of a Pound of double refin'd Sugar, and half a Pint of Water; boil them till clear and tender, then put it in Pots.

To make white Quince Marmalade.

SCALD your Quinces tender, tke off the Skin and pulp them from the Core very fine, and to every Pound of Quince hve a Pound and half or double-refin'd Sugar in Lumps, and half a Pint of Water, dip your Sugar in the Water, and boil and scum it till 'tis a thick Syrup; then put in your Quince, boil and scum it on a quick Fire a quarter of an Hour, so put it in your Pots.

To make red Quince Marmalade.

PARE and core a Pound of Quince, beat the Parings and Cores and ome of your worst Quinces, and strain out the Juice; and to every Pound of Quince, take ten or Page  126 twelve Spoonfuls of that Juice, and three quarters of a Pound of Loaf-sugar, put all into your Preserving-pan, cover it close, and let it stew over a gentle Fire two Hours; when 'tis of an Orange-red, uncover and boil it up as fast as you can; when of a good Colour, break it as you like it, give it a boil, and pot it up.

To make Syrup of Marsh-mallows.

TAKE of Marsh-mallow-Roots four Ounces, Grass-Roots Asparagus-Roots, Liquorish, stoned Raisins, of each half an Ounce, the Tops of Marsh-mallows, Pel|litory, Pimpernel, Saxifrage, Plantan, Maiden hair white and black, of each a Handful, red Sifers one Ounce; the four greater and four lesser cold Seeds of each three Drachms; bruise and boil all these in three Quarts of Wa|ter till it comes to two; then put to it four Pounds of white Sugar till it comes to a Syrup; put to every Pint the White of an Egg to clarify it.

To make Syrup of Saffron.

TAKE a Pint of the best Canary, and as much Balm|water, and half an Ounce of English Saffron, open and pull the Saffron very well, and put it into the Liquor to infuse; let it stand close covered (so as to be hot, but not boil) twelve Hours, then strain it out as hot as you can, and add to it three Pounds of double refin'd Sugar; boil it till it is well incorporated, and when 'tis cold bottle it, and take one Spoonful in a little Sack or small Cordial, as Occasion serves.

A Syrup for a Cough or Asthma.

TAKE of Hyssop and Pennyroyal Water of each a quarter of a Pint, slice into it a small Stick of Li|quorish and a few Raisins of the Sun stoned; let it simmer together a quarter of an Hour, and then make it into a Syrup with brown Sugar candy, boil it a little, and then put in four or five Spoonfuls of Snail water; give it a Page  127 walm, and when 'tis cold bottle it: Take one Spoonful Morning and Night, with three Drops of Balsam of Sul|phur in it: Yu may take a little of the Syrup without the Drops once or twice a Day. If the Party is short|breath'd a Blister is very good.

To make Syrup of Balsam for a Cough.

TAKE one Ounce of Balsam of Tolu, and put to it Quart of Spring water; let them boil together two Hours, then put in a Pound of white Sugar candy finely beaten, and let it boil half an Hour longer; take out the Balsam, and strain the Syrup through a Flannel bag twice; when 'tis cold put it in a Bottle. This Syrup is excellent for a Cough; take a Spoonful of it as you lie down in your Bed, and a little at any Time. When your Cough trou|bles you, you may add to it two Ounces of the Syrup of red Poppies, and as much of Raspberry Syrup.

A Syrup for a Cough.

TAKE a Handful of Oak Lungs, a Handful of French Moss, a Handful of Maiden hair; boil all these in three Pints of Spring-water till it comes to a Quart; then strain it out and put to it six Pennyworth of Saffron tied up in a Rag, and two Pounds of brown Sugar-candy; boil it up to a Syrup, and when 'tis cold bottle it: Take a Spoonful of it as often as your Cough troubles you.

For a Cough.

TAKE three Quarts of Spring-water, and put it in a large Pipkin, with a Calf's foot, and four Spoon|fuls of Barley, and a Handful of dried Poppies; boil it together till one Quart be consumed, then strain it out and add a little Cinamon and a Pint of Milk, and sweeten it to your Taste with Loaf-sugar; warm it a little and drink half a Pint as often as you please.

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To make Conserve of Hips.

GATHER the Hips before they grow soft, cut off the Heads and Stalks, slit them in halves and take out all the Seed and White that is in them very clean; then put them in an earthen Pan, and stir them every Day, else they will grow mouldy; let them stand till they are soft enough to rub through a coarse Hair sieve; as the Pulp comes, take it off the Sieve; they are a dry Berry, and will require Pains to rub it through; then add its Weight in Sugar, and mix it well together without boil|ing; keep it in deep Gallipots for Use.

To preserve Apricocks ripe.

GATHER your Apricocks of a fine Colour, but not too ripe; weigh them, and to every Pound of Apricocks put a Pound of double refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; stone and pare your Apricocks, as you pare them put them into the Pn you do them in, with Sugar strew'd over and under them; let them not touch one a|nother, but put Sugar between, cover them up, and let them lie till the next Day; then stir them gently till the Sugar is melted; then put them on a quick Fire, and let them boil half an Hour, scumming exceeding well all the while; then take it off, and cover it till 'tis quite cold, or till the next Day; then boil it again, scumming it very well till 'tis enough, so put it in Pots.

To make Jelly of Currants.

STRIP your Currants, put them in a Jug, and insafe in Water, strain out the Juice upon Sugar, sweeten to your Taste, boil it a great while till it jellies, scumming all the while, and then put it in your Glasses.

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To make Apricock Chips.

PARE your Apricocks, and part them in the Mid|dle; take out the Stone, and cut them cross ways pretty thin, as you cut them strew a very little Sugar o|ver them, beaten and sifted; then set them on the Fire, and let them stew gently a quarter of an Hour, then take them off, cover them up, and set them by 'til the next Day; then set them on the Fire as long as before, take them out one by one and lay them on a Sieve, strew Su|gar on the Steve and over them; dry them in the Sun, or cool Oven, turn them often; when dry put them in Boxes.

To make a sweet Bag for Linen.

TAKE a Pound of Orris-roots, a Pound of sweet Calamus, a Pound of Cypress-roots, a Pound of dried Lemon-peel, a Pound of dried Orange-peel, a Peck of dried Roses, make all these into a gross Powder; Co|riander-seeds four Ounces, Nutmegs one Ounce and half, an Ounce of Cloves; make all these into fine Powder, and mix with the other; add Musk and Ambergrease; then take four large Handfuls of Lavender-flowers dried and rub'd, a Handful of Sweet-marjoram, a Handful of Orange-leaves, a Handful of young Walnut leaves, all dry'd and rub'd; mix all together with some bits of Cot|ton perfum'd with Essences, and put it up into silk Bags to lay with your Linen.

To make the burning Perfume.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of Damask-rose Leaves, beat them by themselves, one Ounce of Orris-root sliced very thin, and steeped in Rose-water. Beat them well together, and put to it 2 Grains of Musk, as much Civet, two Ounces of Benjamin, finely powdered; mix all together, and add a little powder'd Sugar, and make them up in little round Cakes, and lay them singly on Page  130 Papers to dry; set them in a Window where the Sun comes, they will dry in two or three Days; make them in June.

All Sorts of Made Wines.

To make Apricock Wine.

TAKE three Pounds of Sugar, and three Quarts of Water, let them boil together and scum it well; then put in six Pounds of Apricocks pared and stoned, and let them boil 'til they are ten|der; then take them up, and when the Liquor is cold, bottle it up. You may, if you please, after you have ta|ken out the Apricocks, let the Liquor have one boil with a Sprig of flower'd Clary in it; the Apricocks make Mar|malade, and is very good for present Spending.

To make Damson Wine.

GATHER your Damsons, dry and weigh them, and bruise them with your Hand, put them into an earthen Stean that hath a Fosset; put a Wreath of Straw before the Fosset; to every 8 Pound of Fruit a Gallon of Water; boil the Water, and scum it, and put it to your Fruit scalding hot, and let it stand two whole Days; then draw it off, and put it into a Vessel fit for it, and to eve|ry Gallon of Liquor put two Pound and half of fine Su|gar: Let the Vessel be full, and stop it close, the longer it stands the better; it will keep a Year in the Vessel; bottle it out; the small Damson is the best; you may put a very small Lump of double-refin'd Sugar in every Bottle.

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To make Gooseberry Wine.

TAKE to every four Pound of Gooseberries a Pound and a quarter of Sugar, and a Quart of fair Water; bruise the Berries and steep them 24 Hours in the Water, stirring them often; then press the Liquor from them, and put your Sugar to your Liquor; then put it in a Ves|sel fit for it, and when it has done working, stop it up, and let it stand a Month, then rack it off into another Vessel, and let it stand 5 or 6 Weeks longer; then bot|tle it out, putting a small Lump of Sugar into every Bot|tle; cork your Bottles well, and at 3 Months end it will be fit to drink. In the same manner is Currant and Rasp|berry Wine made; but Cherry Wine differs, for the Cher|ries are not to be bruised, but stoned, and put the Sugar and Water together, and give it a boil and a scum, and then put in your Fruit, and let it stew with a gentle Fire a quarter of an Hour; then let it run through a Sieve, without pressing; and when 'tis cold put it in a Vessel, and order it as your Gooseberry or Currant Wine. The only Cherries for Wine are the great Bearers, Murrey Cherries, Morellos, black Flanders, or the John Tredus|kin Cherries.

Pearl Gooseberry Wine.

TAKE as many as you please of the best Pearl Goose|berries, and bruise 'em, and let them stand all Night; the next Morning press or squeeze them out, and let the Liquor stand to settle 7 or 8 Hours; then pour off the Clear from the Settling, and measure it as you put it in|to your Vessel; and to every three Pints of Liquor put a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar; break your Sugar in small Lumpe, and put it in the Vessel with a bit of Ising glass, and stop it up, and at 3 Months end bottle it out, putting into every Bottle a Lump of double-refin'd Sugar; this is the fine Gooseberry Wine.

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To make Cherry Brandy.

TAKE six Dozen Pounds of Cherries, half red and half black, and mash or squeeze them with your Hands to Pieces, and put to them three Gallons of Bran|dy, and let them stand steeping 24 Hours; then put the mash'd Cherries and Liquor a little at a Time into a Canvas Bag, and press it as long as any Juice will run; sweeten it to your Taste, and put it into a Vessel fit for it, and let it stand a Month, and bottle it out; put a Lump of Loaf Sugar into every Bottle.

To make Cherry Wine.

PULL the Stalks off the Cherries, and mash them without breaking the Stones; then press them hard through a hair Bag, and to every Gallon of Liquor put a Pound and half of Six-penny Sugar; the Vessel must be full, and let it work as long as it makes a Noise in the Vessel; then stop it up close for a Moth or 6 Weeks; when 'tis fine, draw it into Bottles, put a Lump of Loaf Sugar into every Bottle; and if any of them fly, open them all for a Moment, and cork them well again; 'twill not be fit to drink in a quarter of a Year.

To make Currant Wine.

TAKE four Gallons of Currants, not too ripe, and strip them into an earthen Stean that has a Cover to it; then take two Gallons and half of Water, and five Pounds and a half of double-refin'd Sugar, boil the Su|gar and Water together, and scum it, and pour it boil|ing hot on the Currants, and let it stand forty eight Hours, then strain it through a flannel Bag into the Stean again, and let it stand a Fortnight to settle, and bot|tle it out.

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To make strong Mead.

TAKE of Spring-water what Quantity you please, and make it more than Blood warm, and dissolve Honey in it till 'tis strong enough to bear an Egg, the breadth of a Shilling; then boil it gently near an Hour, taking off the Scum as it rises; then put to about nine or ten Gallons, seven or eight large Blades of Mace, three Nutmegs quartered, twenty Cloves, three or four Sticks of Cinnamon, two or three Roots of Ginger and a quar|ter of an Ounce of Jamaica Pepper; put these Spices into the Kettle to the Honey and Water, a whole Lemon, with a Sprig of Sweet briar, and a Sprig of Rosemary; tie the Briar and Rosemary together, and when they have boiled a little while, take them out and throw them a|way; but let your Liquor stand on the Spice in a clean earthen Pot till the next Day; then strain it into a Vessel that is fit for it; put the Spice in a Bag, and hang it in the Vessel, stop it, and at three Months draw it into Bot|tles. Be sure that 'tis fine when 'tis bottled; after 'tis bottled six Weeks 'tis fit to drink.

To make small White Mead.

TAKE three Gallons of Spring-water and make it hot, and dissolve it in three Quarts of Honey and a Pound of Loaf sugar; then let it boil about half an Hour, and scum it as long as any rises; then pour it into a Tub, and squeeze in the Juice of 〈◊〉 Lemons; put in the Rinds of but two; twenty Cloves, two Races of Ginger, a Top of Sweet briar, and a Top of Rosemary. Let it stand in a Tub till 'tis but Blood warm; then make a brown Toast and spread it with two or three Spoonfuls of Ale yeast, put it into a Vessel fit for it; let it stand four or five Days, then bottle it out

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To make Raisin Wine.

TAKE two Gallons of Spring-water, and let it boil half an Hour; then put it into a Stean-pot two Pounds of Raisins stoned, two Pounds of Sugar, the Rind of two Lemons the Juice of four Lemons; then pour the boiling Water on the Things in the Stean, and let it stand covered four or five Days, strain it out and bottle it up: In fifteen or sixteen Days it will be fit to drink. 'Tis a very cool and pleasant drink in hot Weather.

To make Shrub.

TAKE two Quarts of Brandy, and put it in a large Bottle, and put into it the Juice of five Lemons, the Peels of two, half a Nutmeg, stop it up, and let it stand three Days, and add to it three Pints of White-wine, a Pound and half of Sugar; mix it, and strain it twice thro' a Flannel, and bottle it up; 'tis a pretty Wine and a Cordial.

To make Orange Wine.

PUT twelve Pounds of fine Sugar, and the Whites of eight Eggs well beaten into six Gallons of Spring wa|ter; let it boil an Hour, scumming it all the Time; take it off, and when 'tis pretty cool, put in the Juice and Rinds of fifty Sevil Oranges, and six Spoonfuls of good Ale-yeast, and let it stand two Days; then put it into your Vessel with two Quarts of Rhenish-wine, and the Juice of twelve Lemons. You must let the Juice of Le|mons and Wine, and two Pounds of double refin'd Su|gar stand close cover'd ten or twelve Hours before you put it in the Vessel to your Orange Wine, and scum off the Seeds before you put it in. The Lemon-peels must be put in with the Oranges, half the Rinds must be put into the Vessel; it must stand ten or twelve Days before 'tis fit to bottle.

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To make Birch Wine.

IN March bore a Hole in a Tree, and put in a Faucet, and it will run two or three Days together without hurting the Tree; then put in a Pin to stop it, and the next Year you may draw as much from the same Hole; put to every Gallon of the Liquor a Quart of good Ho|ney and stir it well together; boil it an Hour, scum it well, and put in a few Cloves and a piece of Lemon-peel; when 'tis almost cold, put to it so much Ale yeast as will make it work like new Ale, and when the Yeast begins to settle, put it in a Runlet that will just hold it: So let it stand six Weeks or longer if you please; then bottle it, and in a Month you may drink it. It will keep a Year or two. You may make it with Sugar, two Pounds to a Gallon, or something more, if you keep it long. This is admirably wholesome as well as pleasant, an Opener of Obstructions, good against the Pothisick, and good a|gainst the Spleen and Scurvy, a Remedy for the Stone; it will abate Heat in a Fever or Thrush, and has been given with good Success.

To make Sage Wine.

BOIL Twenty-six Quarts of Spring-water a quarter of an Hour, and when 'tis Blood warm, put Twen|ty five Pounds of Malaga Raisins pick'd, rubb'd, and shred into it, with almost half a Bushel of red Sage shred, and a Poringer of Ale-yeast; stir all well toge|ther, and let it stand in a Tub covered warm six or se|ven Days, stirring it once a Day; then strain it out, and put it in a Runlet. Let it work three or four Days, stop it up; when it has stood six or seven Days, put in a Quart or 2 of Malaga Sack, and when 'tis fine bottle it.

To make Raspberry Wine.

TAKE your Quantity of Raspberries and bruise them, put them in an open Pot 24 Hours; then squeeze Page  136 out the Juice, and to every Gallon put three Pounds of fine Sugar, and two Quarts of Canary, put it into a Stean or Vessel, and when it hath done working, stop it close; when 'tis fine bottle it. It must stand two Months before you drink it.

To make Raspberry Wine another Way.

POUND your Fruit, and strain them through a Cloth; then boil as much Water as Juice of Rasp|berries, and when 'tis cold put it to your Squeezings: Let it stand together five Hours; then strain it and mix it with the Juice, and to every Gallon of this Liquor put two Pounds and half of fine Sugar: Let it stand in an earthen Vessel close covered a Week; then put it in a Vessel fit for it, and let it stand a Month, or till 'tis fine; bottle it off.

To make Morella Cherry Wine.

LET your Cherries be very ripe, pick off the Stalks, and bruise your Fruit without breaking the Stones; put them in an open Vessel together; let them stand twen|ty four Hours, then Press 'em, and to every Gallon put two Pounds of fine Sugar: then put it up in your Cask, and when it has done working, stop it close, let it stand three or four Months, and bottle it; it will be fit to drink in two Months.

To make Quince Wine.

TAKE your Quinces when they are thorough ripe, wipe off the For-very clean; then take out the Cores and bruise them as you do Apples for Cyder, and press them, and to every Gallon of Juice put two Pounds and a half of fine Sugar, stir it together till 'tis dissolv'd; then put it in your Cask, and when it has done working stop it close; let it stand till March before you bottle it. You may keep it two or three Years, it will be better.

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To make Lemon Wine.

TAKE six large Lemons, pare off the Rind and cut the Lemons and squeeze out the Juice, and in the Juice steep the Rind, and put it to a Quart of Brandy, and let it stand in an earthen Pot close stopt three Days, and then squeeze six more, and mix with two Quarts of Spring-water, and as much Sugar as will sweeten the whole, and boil the Water and Lemons and Sugar toge|ther, and let it stand till 'tis cool; then add a Quart of White-wine and the other Lemon and Brandy, and mix them together, and run it thro' a Flannel Bag into some Vessel. Let it stand three Months, and bottle it off. Cork your Bottles very well and keep it cool, it will be fit to drink in a Month or six Weeks.

To make Elder Wine.

TAKE Twenty-five Pounds of Malaga Raisins, rub them and shred them small, then take five Gallons of fair Water, boil it an Hour, and let it stand till it is but Blood-warm, then put it in an earthen Crock or Tub with your Raisins; let them steep ten Days, stirring them once or twice a Day, then pass the Liquor through a hair Sieve, and have in readiness five Pints of the Juice of Elderberries drawn off as you do for Jelly of Currants; then mix it cold with the Liquor and stir it well together, and put it in a Vessel, and let it stand in a warm Place; and when it has done working stop it close. Bottle it a|bout Candlemas.

To make Barley Water

TAKE of Pearl-barley four Ounces, put it in a large Pipkin and cover it with Water; when the Barley is thick and tender, put it in more Water and boil it up again, and so do till 'tis of a good Thickness to Drink; then put in a Blade or two of Mace, or a Stick of Cin|namon. Let it have a warm or two and strain it out, and Page  138 squeeze in the Juice of two or three Lemons, and a bit of the Peel, and sweeten it to your Taste with fine Sugar; let it stand till 'tis cold, and then run it thro' a Bag and bottle it out, it will keep three or four Days.

To make Barley Wine.

TAKE half a Pound of French Barley, and boil it in three Waters, and save three Pints of the last Water, and mix it with a Quart of White wine, half a Pint of Borage Water, and as much Clary-water, and a little red Rose-water; the Juice of five or six Lemons, three quarters of a Pound of fine Sugar, the thin yellow Rind of a Lemmon; brew all these quick together, run it through a Strainer, and bottle it up; 'tis pleasant in hot Weather, and very good in Fevers.

To make Plumb Wine.

TAKE twenty Pounds of Malaga Raisins, pick, rub, and shred them, and put them into a Tub; then take four Gallons of fair Water and boil it an Hour, and let it stand till 'tis blood warm; then put it to your Rais|ins; let it stand nine or ten Days, stirring it once or twice a Day, strain out your Liquor, and mix it with two Quarts of Damson Juice, put it in a Vessel, and when it has done working, stop it close; at four or five Months bottle it.

To make Ebulum.

TO a Hogshead of strong Ale, take a heap'd Busbel of Elder-berries, and half a Pound of Jeniper-berries beaten; put in all the berries when you put in the Hops, and let them boil together till the Berries break in Pieces; then work it up as you do Ale; when it has done work|ing, add to it half a Pound of Ginger, half an Ounce of Cloves, as much Mace, an Ounce of Nutmegs, and as much Cinamon grosly beaten, half a Pound of Citron, as much Ering-to, and likewise of candied Orange peel; Page  139 let the Sweetmeats be cut in Pieces very thin, and put with the Spice into a Bag, and hang it in the Vessel when you stop it up. So let it stard till 'tis fine, then bottle it up, and drink it with Lumps of double refin'd Sugar in the Glass.

To make fine Milk Punch.

TAKE two Quarts of Water, one Quart of Milk, half a Pint of Lemon Juice, and one Quart of Bran|dy, Sugar to your Taste; put the Milk and Water toge|ther a little warm, then the Sugar, then the Lemon Juice, stir it well together, then the Brandy, stir it again and run it through a flannel Bag till 'tis very fine, then bottle it; it will keep a Fortnight, or more.

To make Clary Wine.

TAKE twenty four Pounds of Malaga Raisins, pick them and chop them very small, put them in a Tub, and to each Pound a Quart of Water; let them steep ten or eleven Days, stirring it twice every Day; you must keep it covered close all the while; then strain it off, and put it into a Vessel, and about half a Peck of the Tops of Clary when 'tis in Blssom; stop it close for six Weeks, and then bottle it off; in two or three Months 'tis fit to drink. 'Tis apt to have a gret Settlement at Bottom, therefore 'tis best to draw it off by Plugs, or tap it pretty high.

To recover Wine that is turn'd sharp.

RACK off your Wine into another Vessel, and to ten Gallons put the following Powder; take Oyster|shells, scrape and wash off the brown dirty Out side of the Shell, then dry them in an Oven till they will pow|der, a Pound of this Powder to every nine or ten Gallons of your Wine; stir it well together, and stop it up, and let it stnd to settle two or three Days, or till 'tis fine; as soon as 'tis fine bottle it off, and cork it well.

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To fine Wine the Lisbon way.

TO every twenty Gallons of Wine take the Whites of ten Eggs, and a small Handful of Salt, beat it to|gether to a Froth, and mix it well with a Quart or more of the Wine, then pour it in the Vessel, and in a few Days it will be fine.

To clear Wine.

TAKE half a Pound of Hartshorn, and dissolve it in Cyder, if it be for Cyder; or Rhenish-wine for any Liquor: This is enough for a Hogshead.

To make Cyder.

PULL your Fruit before 'tis too ripe, and let it lie but one or two Days to have one good Sweat; your Apples must be Pippins, Pearmains, or Harveys, (if you mix Winter and Summer Fruit together 'tis never good;) grind your Apples and press it, and when your Fruit is all press'd, put it immediately into a Hogshead where it may have some Room to work; but no Vent, but a little Hole near the Hoops, but close bung'd; put 3 or 4 Pounds of Raisins into a Hogshead, and two Pounds of Sugar, it will make it work better; often racking it off is the best Way to fine it, and always rack it into small Vessels, keep|ing them close bung'd, and only a small Vent-hole; if it should work after racking, put into your Vessel some Raisins for it to feed on, and bottle it in March.

To make the fine Clary Wine.

TO ten Gallons of Water, put twenty five Pounds of Sugar, and the Whites of twelve Eggs well beaten; set it over the Fire, and let it boil gently near an Hour, scum it clean and put it in a Tub, and when 'tis near cold, then put into the Vessel you keep it in about half a Strike of Clary in the Blossom, stript from the Stalks, Flowers Page  141 and little Leaves togethe, and a Pint of new Ale-yeast; then put in the Liquor and stir it two or three Times a Day for three Days; when it has done working stop it up, and bottle it at three or four Months old, if 'tis clear.

To make Currant Wine.

GATHER your Currants full ripe, strip 'em and bruise 'em in a Mortar, and to every Gallon of the Pulp put two Quarts of Water, fist boil'd and cold; you may put in some Rasps if you please; let it stand in a Tub twenty four Hours to fermnt; then let it run through a hair Sieve. Let no Hnd touch it; let it take its Time to run; and to every Gallon of this Liquor put two Pounds and a half of white Sugar; stir it well, and put it in your Vssel, and to every six Gallons put in a Quart of the best rectified Spirit of Wine; let it stand six Weeks and bot|tle it; if 'tis not very fine, empty it into other Bottles; or at fi••t draw it into lrge Bottles, and then after it has stood a Fortnight, rack it off into smaller.

Lemon Wine, or what may pass for Citron-Water.

TAKE two Quarts of Brandy, and one Quart of Spring water, half a Pound of double-refin'd Su|gar, and the Rinds of sixteen Lemons; put them toge|ther in an earthen Pot, and pour into it twelve Spoonfuls of Milk boiling hot, stir it together, and let it stand 3 Days; then take off the Top, and pass the other two or three Times through a Jelly-bag; bottle it. 'Tis fit to drink, or will keep a Year or two.

To make strong Beer.

TO a Barrel of Beer take two Bushels of Malt and half a Bushel of Wheat just crack'd in the Mill, and some of the Flour sisted out of it; when your Water is scalding hot, put it in your Mashing-fat; there let it stand 'til you can see your Face in it; then put your Malt Page  142 upon it, then put your Wheat upon that, and do not stir it; let it stand two Hours and a half; then let it run in|to a Tub that has 2 Pounds of Hops in it, and a Hand|ful of Rosemary-flowers; and when 'tis all run put it in your Copper and boil it two Hours; then strain it off, setting it a cooling very thin, and set it a working very cool; clear it very well before you put it a working, put a little Yeast to it; when the Yeast begins to fall, put it into your Vessel, and when it has done working in the Vessel, put in a Pint of whole Wheat and six Eggs; then stop it up, let it stand a Year, and then bottle it. Then mash again, stir the Malt very well in, and let it stand two Hours, and let that run, and mash again, and stir it as before; be sure you cover your Mashing-fat well up, mix the first and second Running together, it will make good Houshold Beer.

To make Elder Ale.

TAKE ten Bushels of Malt to a Hogshead, then put two Bushels of Elder-berries pick'd from the Stalks, into a Pot or earthen Pan, and set it in a Pot of boiling Water 'til the Berries swell; then strain it out, and put the Juice into the Guile-fat, and beat it often in, and so order it as the common way of Brewing.

All Sorts of Cordial Waters.

Plague Water.

TAKE Rosa-solis, Agrimony, Betony, Scabious, Century-tops, Scordium, Balm, Rue, Worm|wood, Mugwort, Celandine, Rosemary, Mari|gold-leaves, brown Sage, Burnet, Carduus, and Dragons, of each a large Handful; and Angelica-roots, Page  143 Peony roots, Turmentil-roots, Elecampane-roots, and Li|quorish, of each one Ounce; cut the Herbs, and slice the Roots, and put them all into an earthen Pot, and put to them a Gallon of White wine, and a Quart of Brandy, and let them steep two Days close covered; then distil it in an ordinary Still with a gentle Fire: You may sweet|en it, but not much.

Dr. Steven's Water.

TAKE a Gallon of the best Gascoigne Wine or Sack; tehn take of Ginger, Galengar, Cinamon, Nutmets, Cloves, Mace, Anniseeds, Carraway-seeds, Coriander-seeds, of every of these one Drachm; then take Sge, Mint, red Rose-leaves, Thyme, Pellitory of the Wall, Pot|marjoram, Rosemary, Pennyroyal, wild Thyme, common Lavender, of each of these one Handful; bruise the Spice and Seeds, and stamp the Herbs, and put them all into the Wine, and let it stand close covered twelve Hours, stirring it often; then still it in an Alembick, and mix it as your please.

To make Aqua Mirabilis.

TAKE Cubebs, Cardamums, Galengal, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, Cinamon, of each two Drachms, bruised small; then take of the Juice of Celandine one Pint, the Juice of Spearmint half a Pint, the Juice of Balm half a Pint, Melilot flowers, Cowslip flowers, Rosemary flowers, Borage, and Buglos-flowers, and Marigold flowers, of each three Drachms; Fennel-seed, Coriander seed, and Carra|way-seed, of each two Drachms, two Quarts of the best Sack; one Quart of White wine, one Pint of Brandy, one Pint of the strongest Angelica water, and one Pint of red Rose-water; bruise the Spices and Seeds, and steep them with the Herbs, Flowers, Juices, Waters, Sack, White|wine and Brandy all Night; in the Morning distil it in a common Still, pasted up; from this Quantity draw off a Gallon at least, sweeten it to the Taste with Sugar-candy; bottle it up and keep it in Sand, or very cool.

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To make Orange or Lemon Water.

TO one Hundred Oranges or Lemons, you must have three Gallons of Brandy and two Quarts of Sack. Pare off the outer Rinds very thin, and steep them in the Brandy one Night; the next Day distil them in a cold Still, a Gallon with the Proprotion of Peels is enough for one Still, and of that you may draw off between three and four Quarts; draw it off 'til you taste it begin to be fourish; sweeten it to your Taste with double refin'd Sugar; mix first, second, and third Running together; if 'tis Lemon water it should be persum'd; put 2 Grains of Ambergrease and one of Musk ground fine, tie it in a Rag, and let it hang 5 or 6 Days in a Bottle, and then put it in another, and so for a great many, if you please, or else you may put 3 or 4 Drops of Tincture of Amber|grease in it; cork it very well; the Orange is an excel|lent Water for the Stomach, and the Lemon is a fine en|tertaining Water.

King Charles II's Surfeit Water.

TAKE a Gallon of the best Aqua-vitae and a Quart of Brandy, and a Quart of Annieed water, a Pint of Poppy-water, and a Pint of Damask Rose-water; put these in a large glass Jar, and put to it a Pound of fine powder'd Sugar, a Pound and half of Risins stoned, a quarter of a Pound of aes stoned and sliced, one Ounce of Cinamon bruised; Cloves one Ounce, four Nutmegs bruised, one Stick of Lqurish scrap'd and she'd; let all thse st••d 9 Days close covered, stirring it 3 or 4 Times a Day; then add to it three Pounds of fresh Poppies, or three Handfuls of dried Poppies, a Sprig of Angelica, two or three of Balm; so let it stand a Week lnger, then strain it out and bottle it.

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A Cordial-water that may be made in Winter.

TAKE three Quarts of Brandy, or Sack, put two Handfuls of Rosemary and two Handfuls of Balm to it, chopt pre••y small, one Ounce of Cloves, 2 Ounces of Nutmegs, 3 Ounces of Cinamon; beat all the Spices grosly, and steep them with the Herbs in the Wine, then put it in a Still pasted up close; save near a Quart of the first Running, and so of the second, and of the third; when 'tis distill'd mix it all together, and dissolve about about a Pound of double-refin'd Sugar in it, and when 'tis settled bottle it up.

The Golden Cordial.

TAKE two Gallons of Brandy, two Drachms and a half of double perfum'd Alkermes, a quarter of a Drachm of Oil of Cloves, one Ounce of Spirit of Saffron, three Pounds of double-refin'd Sugar powder'd, a Book of Leaf-Gold. First put your Brandy into a large new Bot|tle, then put three or four Spoonfuls of Brandy into a China Cup, mix your Alkermes in it, then put in your Oil of Cloves and mix that, and do the like to the Spirit of Saffron, then pour all into your Bottle of Brandy, then put in your Sugar and cork the Bottle, and tie it down close; shake it well together, and so do every Day for two or three Days and let it stand about a Fortnight; you must set the Bottle so that when 'tis rack'd off int other Bottles it must only be gently tilted; put into every Bottle two Leaves of Gold cut small; you may put one or two Quarts to the Dregs, and it will be good, tho' not so good as the first.

The Fever Water.

TAKE of Virginia Snake-root six Ounces, Carduus seeds four Ounces, and Mrigold flowers four Oun|ces, twenty green Walnuts, Carduus Water still'd two Quarts, as much hot Poppy-water, two Ounces of Hartihorn; Page  146 slice the Walnuts and steep all in the Waters a Fortnight; then add to it an Ounce of London T••cle, and distil it all in an Alembick pasted up; three Drops of Spirit of Amber in three Spoonfuls of this Water will deliver a Woman of a dead Child.

To make th best Liquid Laudanum.

TAKE a Quart of Sack, and half a Pint of Spirit of Wine, and four Ounces of Opium, two Ounces of Saffron; slice the Opium, and pull the Saffron, and put it in a Bottle with the Sack, and Spirit of Wine, and one Ounce of Salt of Tartar, and of Cinamon, Cloves, and Mace, of each a Drachm; cork and tie down the Bottle, and set it in the Sun or by the Fire twenty Days, pour it off the Dregs, and 'tis fit to use; ten, fifteen, twenty, or twenty five Drops.

A fine Cordial Water.

BEAT two Pounds of double refin'd Sugar very well, and put to it a Gallon of the best Brandy, stirring it a good while all one way; then put Confection of Al|kermes one Drachm, Oil of Cloves one Drachm, Spirit of Saffron one Ounce, then stir it one Way for a quarter of an Hour, then add three Sheets of Leaf Gold and bottle it up, it will keep as long as you please.

To cure the Spleen or Vapours.

TAKE an Ounce of the Filings of Steel, two Drachms of Gentian sliced, half an Ounce of Carduus seeds bruised, half a Hndful of Centaury-tops, in••se all these in a Quart of White-wine four Days, and drink four Spoonfuls of the clear every Morning, fasting two Hours after it, and walking about; if it birds too much, take once or twice a Week some little purging Thing to carry it off.

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Hysterical Water.

TAKE Zedory, Roots of Lovge, Seeds of wild Parsnips, of each two Ounces, Roots of single Piony 4 Ounces, of Misletoe of the Ok 3 Ounces, Myrrh a 〈◊〉 of an Ounce, Castor half an Ounce; beat all these 〈◊〉, and add to them a quarter of a Pound of dried Milli•••es, pour on these three Quarts of Mugwort water, and 〈◊〉 Quarts of Brandy. Let them stand in a close Vessel eight Days, then distil it in a cold Still pasted up; you may draw off nine Pints of Water, sweeten it to your Taste, and mix all together: This is an excellent Water to 〈◊〉 Fits, or to be taken in Faintings.

A Stone Water.

TAKE Beans in Pod, and cut them in small Pieces, fill good Part of an ordinary Still with them, and put to them two good Handfuls of Yarrow, and distil them together in a cold Still; let the Party drink a Glass when in Pain, and at the Changes of the Moon.

To make Cherry Brandy.

TO every 4 Quarts of Brandy, put 4 Pounds of red Cherries, two Pounds of black, and one Quart of Raspberries, a few Cloves, a Stick of Cinamon, and a bit of Orange-peel; let these stand a Month close stop|ped, then bottle it off, and put a Lump of Sugar into e|very Bottle.

To make Citron Water.

TO a Gallon of Brandy tke ten Citrons, pare the out|side Rinds of the Citrons, dry the Rinds very well, then beat the remaining Part of the Citrons all to mash in a Mortar; then put it into the Brandy, stop it close, and let it stand nine Days; then distil it, then take the Rinds that are dry and beat them to Powder, and insure Page  148 them nine Days in the Spirit, and distil it over again; sweeten it to your Taste with double-refin'd Sugar, let it stand in a large Jug for three Week; then rack it off into Bottles. This is the true hados Receipt for Citron Water.

Stitch Water.

TAKE a Gallon of new Ale-wort, and put to it as much Stone-horse Dung from the Horse as will make it pretty thick, add to this a Pound of London Treacle, two Penny-worth of Ginger sliced, and six Penny worth of Saffron; mix these together, and distil it off in a cold Still. Take three or four Spoonfuls at a Time.

To make Carraway Brandy.

STEEP an Ounce of Carraway-seeds, and six Ounces of Sugar in a Quart of Brandy, let it steep nine Days, and clear it off: 'tis a good Cordial.

The Saffron Cordial.

FILL a large Still with Marigold Flowers, and strew on it an Ounce of Case Nutmegs, that is, the Nut|megs that have the Mace on them; beat them grosly, and take an Ounce of the best English Saffron, pull it, and mix it with the Flowers; then take three Pints of Musca|dine or Tent, or Malaga Sack, and with a Sprig of Rose|mary dash it on the Flowers; then distil it off with a slow Fire, and let it drop on white Sugar candy; draw it off till it begins to be sour, save a Pint of the fist Running to mix with other Waters on an extraordinary Occasion; mix the rest together to drink by itself. This Cordial is excellent in fainting, and for the Small pox or Ague; take five or six Spoonfuls at a Time.

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Black Cherry Water for Children.

TAKE six Pounds of black Cherries, and bruise them small; then put to them the Tops of Rosemary, Sweet marjoram, Spearmint, Angelica, Balm, Marigold-flowers, of each a Handful; dried Violets one Ounce; Anniseeds and sweet Fennel-seeds, of each half an Ounce bruised. Cut the Herbs small, and mix altogether, and distl them off in a cold Still. This Water is excellent for Children, giving them two or three Spoonfuls at a Time.

To make Gripe Water.

TAKE two dozen Bunches of Penny royal, shred grosly, then take Coriander seeds Anniseeds, sweet Fennel-seeds, Carraway-seeds; bruise them all, and put them to the Herbs in an earthen Pot; mix them together, and sprinkle on them a Quart of Brandy; let them stand all Night; the next Day distil it off, and take six seven, or eight Sponfuls of this Water sweeten'd with Syrup of Gllflowers. Drink it warm, and go Bed; cover very warm, to sweat if you can; and drink some of it as long as the Gripes continue.

To make the Dropsy Water.

TAKE a Bushel of pick'd Elderberries, put them in a large Tub; put in as much Water or strong Beer as will cover them, and put in a Quart of Ale yeast, and a Piece of Leaven as big as a Penny Loaf; break it to Pieces, and stir it together once or twice a Day, for eight Days together; then put them in a Pot, and distil it off in an Almbick: Draw off a Gallon of Water from this Quantity. It must be drank three Times a Day; in the Morning fasting, before Dinner, and last at Night, till you have drank up the Quantity.

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To make Vertigo Water.

TAKE the Leaves of red Sage, Cinquefoil, San|dine and Wood Betony, of each a good Handful; boil them in a Gallon of Spring-water, till it comes to a Quart; when 'tis cold, put into it a Penny-worth of Roch-Allum, then bottle it up. When you use it, put a little of it in a Spoon, or in the Palm of your Hand, and snuff it up. Go not into the Air presently; it must be made between the first and tenth of May.

Dr. Burgess's Antidote against the Plague.

TAKE three Pints of Muscadine, and boil therein one handful of Sage, as much Rue, Angelica Room one Ounce, Zedoary roots one Ounce, Virgina Snake|root half an Ounce, Sffron twenty Grains. Let all these boil till a Pint be consumed; then strain it, and set it o|ver the Fire again, and put therein two Penny-worth of long Pepper, half an Ounce of Ginger, as much Nut|megs. Beat all the Spices, and let them boil together a little, and put thereto a quarter of an Ounce of Mithti|date, and as much Venice-Treacle, and a quarter of a Pint of the best Angelica water: Take it warm both Morning and Evening, two Spoonfuls if already infected; if not infected, one Spoonful is enough for a Day: Half a Spoonful in the Morning and as much at Night. This had great Success, under God, in the Plague; 'tis good likewise against the Small-pox, or any other pestilential Disease.

The Lady Onslow's Water for the Stone.

TAKE as much Saxifrage, as being distill'd will yield two Quarts of Water; then take a Peck of Hogs haws, and bruise them well; then take Filipen|dula and Parsley, of each three Handfuls, Parsley of Breakstone and Mother thyme, of each two Handfuls; Marshmallow roots, Parsley roots, of each one Handful; 4 Page  151 large Horse radish-roots, red Nettle-seed, and Burdck-seed, of each one Ounce; bruise the Seeds, cut the Hrbs, and slice the Roots, and mix 'em well together with three Quarts of White-wine, and as much new Milk from the Cow. So distil them and the Saxifrage water together in a cold Stil, and draw it off as long as any Water will come; the Saxifrage must be distill'd in May, and the other Water the latter end of September or October, when the Haws are ripe. Let the Person when the Fit of the Stone cometh, take three or four Spoonfuls of White-wine, and as much of this Water mix'd together; if the Distemper abate not, take six Spoonfuls of this Water once in two Hours till 'tis remov'd; you may if you please, sweeten it with Syrup of Marshmallows.

To make Hiera-picra.

TAKE a Drachm of Hiera-picra, and a Drachm of Co|chineal, and two Drams of Anniseeds, beat them all very fine; then put them into a Bottle with a Pint of the best Sack, and a Pint of Brandy; shake them well together five or six Days; then let it stand to settle 12 Hours, to pour it off into another Bottle clear from the Dregs, and keep it for use. Tis' very good against the Cholic or Stomach ach, and removes any thing that of|fends the Stomach; take four Spoonfuls of it fasting, and fast two Hours after it. You must take it constantly three Weeks or a Month, and 'tis well to drink the following Drink after it.

Take new lay'd Eggs and break them; save the Shells, and pull off the Skin that is in the Inside; dry the Shells and beat 'em to Powder; sif them, and put six Spoon|fuls of this Powder into a Quart of these Waers, half a Pint of Fenel water, half a Pint of Parsley-water, half a Pint of Mint water, hlf a pint of black Cherry water. Take a quarter of a Pint at a time, shaking the Glass when you pour it out. Take this three times a Day, at eleven in the Morning, at three in the Afternoon, at eight at Night; and you should take it as long as you take the Hiera-piera.

Page  152

To make Lime Water.

TAKE a Pound of unslack'd Lime, and put it into an earthen Jug well glazed, and put to it a Gallon of Spring water boiling hot; cover it close till 'tis cold; then scum it clean, nd let it stand two Days; then pour it clear off into Glass Bottles, and keep it for Use. The older the better; the Virtues are as follows.

For a Sore, warm some of the Water and wash Sore well with it for half an Hour; then lay a Pl••ster on the Sore of some gentle Thing, and lay a Cloth over the Plaister four or five Doubles, wet with this Water, and as it dries wet it again, and it will Heal it.

For a Flx or Looseness, take two Spoonfuls of it cold in the Morning, and two at Night, as you go to Bed; do this seven or eight Days together, for a Man or Wo|man, but if for a Child one Spoonful at a Time is e|nough, and if very Young half a Spoonful at a Time. It will keep Twenty Years, and no one who has not ex|perienced it, knows the Virtues of it.

A Milk-water for a Cancerous Breast.

TAKE six Quarts of new Milk, and four Handfuls of Cranes-ill, that Sort of it that has little Buds on it, and is long in the Stalk, and four Hundred of Wood|lice, Dstil this in a cold Still with a gentle Fire. Then take one Ounce of Crabs Eyes, and half an Ounce of White Sugar-Candy both in fine Powder; mix them to|gether, and take a Drchm of the Powder in a quarter of a Pint of the Milk-water in the Morning, at Twelve at Noon, and at Night. Continue taking this three or four Months, 'tis an excellent Medicine.

Cock-water for a Consumption.

TAKE an old Red Cock from a Barn-Door, pull him alive, then Kill him and Quarter hm, and with clean Cloths wipe the Blood from him; then put Page  153 the Quarters into a Cold Still, and part of a Leg of Veal, and put t them two Quarts of old Malaga Sack, Handful of Thyme, as much Sweet-marjoram and Rosemary, two Handfuls of Pimpernel, four of Dates stoned and slice, one Pound of Currants, as many Rai|sins of the Sun ••oned, a Pound of Sugar-candy finely beaten; when all is in, paste up the Still. Let it stand all Night, the next Morning still it, and mix the Water together, and sweeten it to your Taste with white Sugar-candy. Drink three or four Spoonfuls an Hour before Dinner and Supper. Distil this Water in May.

Another Water against a Consumption.

TAKE a Pound of Currants, and of Harts-Tongue, Liver wort, and Speedwell, of each a large Hand|ful; then take a Peck of Snails, lay them all Night in Hysop, the next Morning rub and bruise them, and Dis|til all in a Gallon of new Milk; sweeten it with white Sugar-Candy, and drink of this Water two or three Times a Day, a quarter of a Pint at a Time. It has done great Good.

A Water to strengthen the Sight.

TAKE Rosemary flowers, Sage, Betony, Rue, and Succory, of each one Handul; infuse these in two Quarts of Sack, and distil them in an Alembick. The Dose is a Spoonful in the Morning fasting, till the Water is done.

Rue-water, good for Fits of the Mother.

TAKE of Rue, green Walnuts, of each a Pound, Figs a Pound and a half; bruise the Rue and Wal|nuts, slice the Figs in thin Slices and lay them between the Rue and Walnuts, and distil it off; bottle it up and keep it for Use. Take a Spoonful or two when their is any Appearance of a Fit.

Page  154

An opening Drink.

TAKE Pennyroyal, red Sage, Liver-wort,. Hore|hound, Maiden-hair, Hysop, of each two Hndfuls; Figs one Pound, Raisins stoned one Pound, blue Currants half a Pound, Liquorish, Anniseeds, Coriander-seeds, of each two Ounces; put all these in two Gallons of Spring|water, and let it boil away two or three Quarts; then strain it, and when 'tis cold put it in Bottles. Drink half a Pint in the Morning, and as much in the Afternoon; keep warm, and eat little.

For a Distemper got by an ill Husband.

TAKE two Penny-worth of Gum-dragant, pick and clean it, and put it in an earthen Pot, put to it as much red Rose-water as it will drink up; stir it two or three Times a Day till 'tis all dissolved into a Jelly; then put in three grated Nutmegs, and double refin'd Sugar to your Taste, finely powder'd, and a little Cinamon water, no more than will leave it in a Jelly: Take the Quantity of a Nutmeg in the Morning fasting, and last at Night; but first prepare the Body for it, by taking six Penny|worth of Pulvis Sanctus in Posset-drink, and drink Broth in the Working.

For a Cough settled on the Stomach

TAKE half a Pound of Figs, as many Raisins of the Sun stoned, a Stick of Liquorish scrap'd and sliced, a few Anniseeds, a few sweet ennel-seeds, and some Hy|sop wash'd. Boil all these in a Quart of Spring-water 'til it comes to a Pint, strain it and sweeten it very well with white Sugar candy. Take 2 or 3 Spoonfuls of it Morning and Night, and when you please.

Page  155

To make Hungary Water.

TAKE four Ounces of Rosemary-flowers, and a Pint of Spirits of Wine, infuse it 12 Hours, and draw it off in a Glass Still.

A Drink to preserve the Lungs.

TAKE three Pints of Spring-water, put to it one Ounce of flower of Sulphur, and let it boil on a flow Fire 'til half is consumed; then let it stand to settle, and strain it out, and pour it on one Ounce of Liquorish scra|ped, and a Drachm of Coriander seeds, and as many A|niseeds bruised. Let it stand to settle, and drink a quar|ter of a Pint Morning and Night.

An excellent Snail Water.

TAKE of Comfry and Sccory roots, of each four Ounces, Liquorish three Ounces, the Leave of Harts-Tongue, Plantane, Ground Ivy, red Nettles, Yarrow, Brooklime, Water-Cresss, Dandelion, and Agrimony, of each 2 large Handfuls: Gather these Herbs in dry Wea|ther, and do not wsh them, but wipe them clean with a Cloth; then take 500 of Snails cleansed from their Shells, but not scoured, and of Whites of Eggs beat up to Water one Pint, four Nutmegs grosly beaten, the yellow Rind of one Lemon and one Orange; bruise all the Roots and Herbs, and put them together with the o|ther Ingredients in a Gllon of new Milk, and a Pint of Canary; let them stand close covered 48 Hours, and then distil them in a common Still with a gentle Fire; this Quantity will fill your Still twice; it will keep good a Yer, and is best when made Spring or Fall, but 'tis the best when new; you must not cork up the Bottles in 3 Months, but cover them with Paper: It is immediately fit for Use; and when you use it, take a quarter of a Pint of this Water, and put to it as much Milk warm from the Cow, and drink it in the Morning, and at 4 o'Clock Page  156 in the Afternoon, and fast two Hours after it. To take Powder of Crabs eyes with it, as much as will lie on a Six-pence, mightily assists to sweeten the Blood. When you drink this Water, be very regular in your Diet, and eat nothing salt or sour.

To make Briony-water.

TAKE Orris root sliced two Ounces, white Coppe|ras finely beaten one Ounce, put them in three Pints of running Water, shake it well three or four Days, and then use it; if a watry Eye, you may add a Bit of Bole-Armoniack.

Eye Water.

TAKE twelve Pounds of Briony-root, pound it to mash, then take one Quart of the Juice of Rue, one Quart of the Juice of Mugwort-Leaves, of Savin three Handfuls, sweet Basil two Handfuls, Mother of Thyme, Nepp and Pennyroyal, of each three Handfuls, Dittany of Crete, and dry'd Orange peel, of each four Handfuls, Myrh two Ounces, Castor one Ounce, both powdered, and likewise the Orange-peel; distil this off in an Alem|bick: First cut your Herbs and put them in the Bottom of your Still, then put in your Briony root, then mix your Powders in a China Dish with some Sack, then pour in 6 Quarts of Sack. Close up your Still, and draw it off.

A Water to take after taking Balsam of Tolu.

TAKE a Pint of Whites of Eggs beaten to a Froth, five Nutmegs bruised, two Handfuls of dry'd Spear|mint, tw Hndfuls of unset Hysop, add to these a Gal|lon of new Milk, and distil it off in a cold Still. You may draw off about 3 Pints, take 6 Spoonfuls of this Wa|ter at a Time with Sugar-candy in it.

Page  157

To make the true Daffy's Elixir.

TAKE five Ounces of Anniseeds, three Ounces of Fennel-seeds, four Ounces of Pasley-seeds, six Oun|ces of Spanish Liquorish, five Ounces of Sena, one Ounce of Rhubarb, three Ounces of Elecampane, seven Ounces of Jllap, 21 Drams of Saffron, six Ounces of Manna, two Pounds of Raisins, a quarter of an Ounce of Cochi|neal, two Gallons of Brandy; Stone the Raisins, Slice the Roots, bruise the Jallap, put them altogether, keep them close cover'd 15 Days, then strain it out.

For any Man or Beast bitten by a mad Dog.

TAKE Sage Leaves and Rue, of each a good Hand|ful, two or three Heads of Garlick, four Penny|worth of the best Treacle, a Handful of the smallest Sha|vings of Tin or Pewter, boil all these in a Quart of Strong Ale in a Pipkin, or Stone Crock, close stopp'd and pasted over, and set it to boil in a Kettle of hot Water, and put it over the Fire for two Hours: It will be apt to fly up, therefore put a Pye-plate and Bricks upon the Top of the Paste. Give, or rather pour it into the Par|ty Bitten by five or six Spoonfuls at a Time, according to the Strength of the Party Bitten, whether it be Man of Dog, or other Creature. This must be given three Days before the Full or New Moon next happening after the Party has been Bitten,

Milk Water.

TAKE two good Handfuls of Wormwood, as much Carduus, as much Rue, four Handfuls of Mint, as much Balm, half as much Angelica, cut these a little, put them into a cold Still, and put to them three Quarts, of Milk; let your Fire be quick till your Still drops then a little Slower. You may draw off two Quarts; the first Quart will keep all the Year; this is extraordi|nary good in Fevers, sweeten'd with Sugar or Syrup of Cloves.

Page  158

A Powder to cure a Rupture.

IN the latter End of March get half a Pound of Knots of Scurvy grass before they are quite blown; one Pound of Comfry roots, half a Pound of Fern-roots, one Ounce of Juniper berries, one Ounce of Dragon's blood, half a Pound of the Roots of Solomon-seal, a quarter of an Ounce of Nutmegs, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace; scrape your Roots very clean, and slice them thin, and put every sort by themselves in a clean Paper Bag; lay them on a clean earthen Dish, and let them be put in a slow Oven till they are dry enough to powder: You must do the like to your Scurvy grass, that they may be all finely powdered, and mix'd togther, and kept up clse in a Glass with Pa|per round it. Yu may in any Liquor give as much of this Powder to a young Child as will he on a Six pence, Morning and Night; to one of seven Years, more, to a Man or Woman as much as will lie on a Sillng: Put the Powder in a Spoon and wet it to mix, and take it three Weeks.

A very good Remedy for a hollow aching Tooth.

TAKE of Camphire and crude Opium, of each four Grins; mke them into three Pills, with as much Oil of Cloves as is convenient, roll them in Cotton, ap|ply one of them to the aching Tooth, and repeat if there is Occasion.

A Method to cure the Jaundice, which has been try'd with great Success.

IN the first Place, give the Patient Vomit of the In|fusion of Crous Me••llorum, and Oxmel of Sqls, a••odng to his Constitution; thn take of Aloes and 〈◊〉, of ech two Scruples, of prepar'd Steel one 〈…〉 one Scruple; mke Pills with Syrup of Horehound, of which give four every Night.

Page  159Take of the Roots of Turmerick, half an Ounce, Tops of Centaury the lesser, Roman-Wormwood and Hore|hound, of each a Handful, Roots of the greater Nettle two Ounces; boil them in three Pints of Water, to the Consumption of half; when it is almost boil'd enough, add to it Juniper-berries an Ounce, yellow Sanders and Goose-dung made into a Nodolous, of each three Drachms, Saffron two Scruples, Rhenish-wine a Pint; when it is boil'd enough strain it, and add to it compound Water of Snails and Earth-worms, of each two Ounces. Take three Ounces of it after each Time of taking the following E|lectuary.

Tke of the Conserve of Sea-wormwood, of the out|ward Rind of Orange-peels, of each two Ounces, of Spe|cies of Dracurcumae, and prepar'd Steel, of each three Drachms, of prepar'd Earth-worms and Rhubarb, of each two Drachms, Flowers of Sal-Armoniack and Salt of Amber, of each two Scruples, of Saffron powder'd one Scruple, with a sufficient Quantity of Syrup of Hore|hound; make an Electuary, of which take the Quantity of a large Nutmeg twice a Day, drinking three Ounces of the bitter Tincture after it.

For a Rheumatism, or Pain in the Bones.

TAKE a Quart of Milk, boil it and turn it with three Pints of small Beer, then strain the Posset on seven or nine Globules of Stone horse Dung tied up in a Cloth, and boil it a quarter of an Hour in the Posset drink; when 'tis taken off the Fire, press the Cloth hard, and drink half a Pint of this Morning and Night hot in Bed. If you please you may add White wine to it. This Me|dicine is not good if troubled with the Stone.

To make Treacle-water.

TAKE Juice of green Walnuts four Pounds, and of Rue, Carduus, Marigolds, and Balm, of each three Pounds, Roots of Butter-bur half a Pound, Roots of Bur|dock one Pound, Angelica and Master-wort, of each Page  160 half a Pound, Leaves of Scordium six Handfuls, Venice-Treacle, and Mithridate, of each half a Pound, 〈◊〉 Ca|nary-wine two Pounds, White wine Vinegar six Pounds, Juice of Lemons six Pounds; distill this in an Alembick, and on any Illness take four Spoonfuls going to Bed.

To make Usquebaugh.

TO three Gallons of Brandy put four Ounces of Anni|seeds bruised; the next Day distil it in a cold Still pasted up; then scrape four Ounces of Liquorish, and pound it in a Mortar, dry it in an Iron Pan, do not burn it, put it in the Bottle to your distill'd Water, and let it stand ten Days: Then take out the Liquorish, and to every six Quarts of the Spirits put in Cloves, Mace, Nut|megs, Cinamon, and Ginger, of each a quarter of an Ounce, Dates stoned and sliced four Ounces, Raisins ston|ed half a Pound: Let these infuse ten Days, then strain it out, and tincture it with Saffron, and bottle it and cork it well.

An approv'd Medicine for the Dropsy.

TAKE about three Spoonfuls of the best Mustard|seed, and about a Handful of Bay-berries, the like Quantity of Juniper-berries, one Ounce of Horse-radish, and about half a Handful of Sage of Virtue, as much Wormwood Sage, and a half a Handful of Scurvy-grass, and a quarter of a Handful of stinking Orach, and a little Sprig of Wormwood, a Sprig of green Broom, and half an Ounce of Gentian root; scrape, wipe, and cut all these, and put them into a Bottle that will hold a Gallon; then fill the Bottle with the best strong Beer you can get; then stop it close, and let it stand three or four Days, and drink every Morning fasting half a Pint.

Page  161

A Remedy for Rheumatick Pains.

TAKE of Sena, Hermodacts, Turperhum, and Scam|mony, of each two Drachms; of Zedoary, Ginger, and Cuebs, of ech one Drachm; mix them and let them be powdered; the Dose is from one Drachm to two, in any convenient Vehicle. Let the Parts affected be an|nointed with this Liniment: Take Palm Oil two Ounces, Oil of Turpentine one Ounce, Volatile Salt of Hartshorn two Drachms; afterward lay on a Plaister of Mucilagini|bus. Some that have been very much troubled with Rheumatick Pains, have, by taking of Hartshorn in com|pound Water of Earth worms, found mighty Benefit.

An excellent Medicine for the spotted, and all other malignant Fevers.

TAKE of the best Virginia Snake-Weed, and Root of Contrayerva finely powder'd, of each half a Scru|ple, Goa-stone half a Scruple, Castor and Camphire, of each five Grains; make them into a Bolus, with a Scru|ple of Venice-Treacle, and as much Syrup of Peony as is sufficient; to repeat the Bolus every six Hours, drinking a Draught of the following Julep after it.

Take of Scorzonera roots two Ounces, Butterbur-roots half an Ounce, of Balm and Scordium of each an Hand|ful, of Corander-seeds three Drachms, of Liquorish, Figs, and Raisins, of each an Ounce; let them boil in three Pints of Conduit water to a Quart, then strain it, and add to it compound Peony Water three Ounces, Sy|rup of Raspberries an Ounce and a half. Let the Patient drink of it plentifully.

A specifick Cure for stopping Blood.

TAKE two Ounces of clarified Roch Allum; let it be finely powder'd, and melt it in a Silver Ladle then add to it half an Ounce of Dragon's blood in Pow|der, and mix them well together; then take it off t••Page  162 Fire, keeping it stirr'd till it come to the Consistence of a soft Pste, fit for making up into Pills; make your Pills into the Bigness of a large Pea; and as the Paste cools, warm it again to such a Degree, as the whole Quantity may be made into Pills. This Medicine is proper in all Cases of violent Bleeding, without Exception. The or|dinary or usual Dose is half a Grain; to be taken once in four Hours, till the Bleeding stops; taking a Glass of Water or Ptisan after it, and after every Dose; and ano|ther of the same Liquor a quarter of an Hour after. In violent Cases, give half a Drachm for a Dose.

To make Stoughton's Elixir.

PARE off the Rinds of six Sevil Oranges very thin, and put them in a Quart Bottle, with an Ounce of Gentian scrap'd and slic'd, and six Pennyworth of Cochi|neal; put to it a Pint of the best Brandy; shake it toge|ther two or three Times the first Day, and then let it stand to settle two Days, and clear it off into Bottles for Use. Take a large Tea Spoonful in a Glass of Wine in a Morning, and at four in the Afternoon: Or you may take it in a Dish of Tea.

An Electuary for a Cough.

TAKE Conserve of red Roses two Ounces, Con|serve of Hips one Ounce; Lucatellus's Balsam half an Ounce; Spices of Hiatragacanth frigid one Drachm, Syrup of Balsam three Drachms; mix all together well; take the Quantity of a small Bean three Times a Day.

Excellent Lozenges for a Cough.

TAKE a Pound of brown Sugar-candy, and a Pound of Loaf-sugar; beat and searce them through a fine Sieve. Take an Ounce of the Juice of Liquorish, and dissolve it in three or four Spoonfuls of Hysop water over a gentle Fire; then mix your Sugar and Sugar candy with one Drachm of O••is-powder, one Drachm of the Pow|der Page  163 of Elicampane, o Gum-dragant powder'd half a Drachm; add one Drachm of the Oil of Anniseeds, and one Grain of Musk Mix all these together, and work it into a Paste; and roll them into Lozenges the Bigness of a Barley-corn, or something larger.

For a Burn or Scald.

TAKE Laurel Leaves, chop them in Hog's Grease; strain it, and keep it for Use.

To make Necklaces for Children, in cutting Teeth.

TAKE Roots of Henbane, of Orpin and Vervain; scrape 'em clean with a sharp Knife, cut them in long Beds, and string them green; first Henbane, then Orpin, then Vervain; and so do till 'tis the Bigness of the Child's Neck. Then take as much red Wine as you think the Necklace will suck up, and put into it a Drachm osed Coral, as much single eony root finely powder'd. Soak your Beads in this 28 Hours, and rub the Powder on the Beds. Syrup of Lemon, and Syrup of single Peony, is excellent to rub the Child's Gums with very frequently.

A Medicine for the Cholick, which not only gives Ease in the most violent Fits, but also, being often used, prevents their re|turning.

TAKE of the best Manna, and Oil of sweet Almonds, of each an Ounce and a half; of Camomile flowers boiled in Posset-drink, an Handful; let the Posset drink be strained from the Flowers, and mingled very well with the Oil of Almonds and Manna; let the Patient take it three Days successively, and afterwards every third Day for a Fortnight.

Page  164

A Receipt for a Consumptive Cough.

TAKE of the Syrup of white and red Poppies of each three Ounces, of Barley, Cinamon-water, and red Poppy-water, of ech two Ounces, of Tincture of Saffron one Ounce, Liquid Laud um forty Drops, and s much Spirit of Sulphur as will make it acid. Tke three or four Spoonfuls of it every Night going to Bed; increase or diminish the Dose, according as you find it agrees with you.

To make the Eye Salve.

TAKE of fresh Butter out of the Churn unsalted and unwshed, two Pounds; set it in a glass Jar in the Sun to clarify three Months; then pour very cler off a|bout a quarter of a Pound, and put to it an Ounce of Virgin Wax; when 'tis melted, put it into Rose water to cool, and beat it in the Wter half an Hour, then take it out from the Wter, and mix it with half an Ounce of rectfied Tutty finely pwder'd, and two Scruples of Mas|tick beaten and bruited as well as possible; mix all well together, and put it in Pots for use; take a very little in you. Fingers when in Bed; shut your Eye, and rub it o|ver the Lid and Corner of your Eye.

An excellent Medicine for the Pain in the Stomach.

TAKE of Tinctura Sacra (or Tincture of Savory) one Ounce in the Morning, fasting an Hour, then drink a little warm Ale; do this twice or three Times a Week till you find Relief.

For a Pain in the Stomach.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of blue Currants, wipe them clen and pound them in a Mortar with an Ounce of Anniseeds bruised; before you put them to the〈1 page missing〉

Page  165

A Stay to prevent a sore Throat in the Small-Pox.

TAKE Rue, shred it very fine, and give it a bruise; mix with it Honey and Album Graecum, and work it together; put it over the Fire to heat, sew it up in a Linen Stay, and apply it to the Throat pretty warm: As it dries repeat it.

To prevent Pitting, and to take off Redness.

TAKE Rue and chop it, boil it in Hogs-lard 'til 'tis gren; strain it out and keep it for Use. Warm a little in a Spoon, and with a Feather anoint the Face as they begin to shell off; do it as often as convenient.

An admirable Sear-Cloth.

TAKE a Pound of Frankincense beaten fine, and a Pound of Rosin beaten, a Pound of black Pitch, and four Ounces of Cummin-seeds powder'd, four Penny|worth of Saffron dried and powdered, four Pennyworth of Mace beaten and sifted, four Pennyworth of Cloves beaten fine, an Ounce of Liquid Laudanum, and a Pound of Deer-suet.

Season a new Pipkin: first lay it in cold Water, then boil Water in it, and set it by 'til 'tis cold; then dry it and put in your Deer-suet, and let it melt, shaking it a|bout as you do for melting Butter; then put in your Frankincense, Rosin, Pitch, Cummin seed, Saffron, Mace, Cloves, and set them over the Fire, and let them have a boil or two; then take them off and set it by a little, and then sprinkle in your Liquid Laudanum; let it simmer a little, take it off, and when 'tis fit to spread, spread it on the thickest brown Paper, and use it on Occasion. 'Tis good for Bruises, Aches, Pains, Burns, Scalds, and sore Breasts; wipe the Plaister every Day, and put it on a|gain; one or two Plaisters will do.〈1 page missing〉

Page  166Currants, make this into a Bolus with a little Syrup of Clove-g•••flowers. Tke every Morning the Quanti|ty of a Walnut, and drink Rose mary Tea instead of o|ther Tea for your Breakfast; if the Pain returns, re|peat it.

For a Stitch in the Side.

TAKE Rsin, pound nd sift it, and with Treacle mix it into an Electuary, and lick it up often in the Day or Night.

To cure an intermitting Ague and Fever, with|out returning.

TAKE Jesuits Brk in fine Powder one Ounce, Salt of Steel and Jmaica Pepper, of ech a qarter of an Ounce, Treacle, or Molasses four Ounces, mix these together, and take the Quantity of a Nutmeg three Times a Day whe the Fit is off, and a Draught of warm Ale or White-wine after it.

Dr. Hall's Plaister for an Ague.

TAKE one Pennyworth of black Soap, one Penny|worth of Gun-powder, ore Ounce of Tobacco Snuff, and a Glass of Brandy; mix these in a Mortar very well together, spread Plaisters in Leather for the Wrists, and lay them on an Hour before you expect the Fit.

Excellent for a Burn or Scald.

TAKE of Oil of Olive three Ounces, white Wax two Ounces, Sheeps Suet one Ounce and half, Mimim and Castle soap, of each half an Ounce; Dragon's Blood and Camphire, of each three Drachms, make them into a Salve by melting them together; anoint with Oil to take out the Fire, then put the Plaister on; dress it eve|ry Day.

Page  167

A Recipe for the Cure of the Stone and Gravel, whether in the Kidneys, Ureters, or Blad+der.

TAKE Marsh Mllow Leaves, the Herb Mercury, Sax••rge, and Pelltory of the Wll, of each freh gathered, 3 Hnduls; cut them mll with a pair of Scss••s, and mix them together, and pound them in a clean Stone M••tr, with a Wooden Pestle, till they come to Mll, thn take them out, spred them thin, in a brod glz'd Erten Pan, and let them lie, stirring them abot one a Dy, till they are thoroughly dry, (put not in the Sun) and then tey are r••cy, and will keep god all the Year long. Of some of these Ingredients s dried, make Pe, as you d common Tea, with boiling hot wa|ter, as strong as you like to drink it, but the stronger the better, and drink 3, 4, or more Tea Cups full of it Blood|warm, sweeen'd with coarse Sugar, every Morning and Afternoon, putting into each Cup o it, at lest half a Spoonfl, or rt•• more, of the express'd Oil of Beech-Nuts, 〈◊〉 drwn (w••ch in this ••as has been experi|encd t be vastly preferable to Oil of Almonds, or any other Oil stirring them about together, and o to conti|••e it for as long s you ee Occasion.

This Medicine, how simle ever it may seem to some, is yet a si emoll••nt Remedy, is perfectly agreeable to the •••m •• (a•• is the B••ch Oil be st•••e r racd) and will be foud to hethe nd •••ten the Asperity of the Humo••s in geeral, par••••rly those that gener••e the Gravel and Stone, and will relax and supple the So|lids, at the same Time: And it is well known by all Phy|sicians, that emol••ent Medicines to l••ricte, widen and moisten the Fib••s so s to relax them 〈◊〉 their proper Dimensions without forcing the Parts, whereupon O|structions of the Re••s ••d Urinary Passages are opeed, and by their ••e 〈◊〉•••p••ties, 〈◊〉 is this M•••cne, cleared of all 〈◊〉 of ady Cncretions, Grael, and possible Stones, and made to yield better to the ••|pulsion of whatever may plug or stop them up, and like|wise Page  168 takes away, as this does, ll Heat and Difficulty of Urine and Stranguries, and withal, by 〈◊〉 soft mucilagi|nous Nature, cools and heals the Rein, Kidneys and Bladder, giving present Ease in the Stone Cholick, breaks away Wind, and prevents its Return, as it always keeps the Bowels laxative.

A late modern College Physician of our own, a Man of Learning and Probity, and who for his great Ingenuity and Sincerity, was much esteemed and respected by eve|ry Member of that venerable Body, says, in his Writings about the Stone and Gravel, of one of the Ingredients in this Medicine, that some People have extolled it pro|digiously for its Lithontriptick or Stone breaking Qua|lities; and in Favour of such an Opinion, say, that a certain Person, who had a very large Stone in his Blad|der, which was taken from him by Cutting, made a Cup of it, which he usually drank out of; but as he once had some Beer put into it, which had that Ingredient boiled in it, the Cup fell to Pieces in his Hands, which sudden Dissolution of it was attributed to the said Ingredient. But whether this Relation be real or feigned, or all or either of the Ingredients capable of making frangible or mouldring into Fragments, the Stone bred in human Bo|dies, (as are the Virtues ascribed to them, and to one of them more particularly) or whether it be possible for any Thing in Nature to do it, I shall not undertake to deter|mine; but this is certain, that all the Ingredients that en|ter the Composition of this Medicine are particularly no|ted and prescribed, tho' in different Ways, as Occasions offer, by all ancient and modern Physicians, both in their Writings and Practice, in all Cases of Gravel, Stone, Sran|gury, Stoppage of Urine, &c. with great Success.

Such as know not where to get the TRUE NUT OIL, may have the right Sort, and very good, at Mrs God|dard's, at the Golden-Ball in Burleigh-street, near Exe|ter-Exchange, in the Strand, at One Shilling and Six Pence the Vial.

Page  169

An excellent Vomit.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of clear Allum, beaten and sifted as fine as Flour, divide it into three Parts, the first the biggest; put a quarter of a Pint of Water in a Saucepan, and put in your biggest Paper of Allum, and let it simmer over the Fire, but not boil; take it off, cool it to Blood-warm; drink it off, but take nothing after it; sit still 'til it has work'd once, keep very warm, nor take nothing in the working; but you may walk a|bout after it has work'd once; take it three Mornings to|gether, or more, if there be Occasion, 'til the Stomach is clear. There is no Case where a Vomit is proper, but this is good.

A fine Purge.

TAKE an Ounce of Liquorish, scrape it and slice it thin, and a Spoonful of Coriandr-seeds bruised, put these into a Pint of Water and boil it a little; then strain this Water into an Ounce of Sena, let it stand six Hours; strain it from the Sena, and drink it fasting.

A purging Diet-drink in the Spring.

TAKE 6 Gallons of Ale, 3 Ounces of Rhubrh, 12 Ounces of Sena, 12 Ounces of Mader-roots, 12 Oun|ces of Dock roots, 12 Handfuls of Scabtous, 12 Handfuls of Agrimony, 3 Ounces of Anniseed; slice and cut these, put them in a bag, and let it work in the Ale: Drink of it 3 or 4 Times a Day.

For a sore Mouth in Children.

TAKE half a Pint of Verjuice, strain into it 4 Spoon|fuls of the Juice of Sage, boil this with fine Sugar to a Syrup, and wt a Feather anoint the Mouth often, touch it ••t with a Cloth, or rub it: The Child may lick it down, it will not hurt it.

Page  170

To create a good Appetite, and strengthen the Stomach.

TAKE of the Stomatick pll with Gums, Extractum Rudij, of each a Drachm, Rasin of Jarap half a Scruple, Tartar vitriolated one Scruple, Oil of Anniseeds four Drops; mix with Syrup of Violets, and mke it in|to Pills, of which take 4 or 5 over Nigt; they are of excellent Use in the Megrms and Vertigo, by reason they carry the Humour off from the Stomach, which sumes up into the Head.

A very good Medicine for the Bloody-Flux.

TAKE of the best Rhubarb finely powder'd half an Ounce, of red Sanders two Drachms, •••mon one Drachm, Crocas Martis Astringent 3 Drachms, of Lucatellus's Balsam what suffices; make a Mass of Pills, of which take 3 every Night and Morning for a Fortnight. This has cur'd some that have lost a vst Quantity of Blood, after other Remedies had proved ineffectual.

For red or sore Eyes.

TAKE a quarter of an Ounce of white Copperas, and an Ounce of Bole-Armonack, beat them to a fine Powder, and beat an Ounce of Camphire grosly in an Iron Mortar; set two Quarts of Spring-water on the Fire, when it boils take it off, and let it stand 'til 'tis Luke|warm, then put in your Powders, stirring 'til cold: Drop the clear in the Eye.

For a Pain in the Stomach, or Heaviness of Heart.

TAKE a Pint of Rose-water, put to it some double-refin'd Sugar, and a Pennyworth of Saffron ty'd up in a Piece of Lawn; let it stand 2 or 3 Days, and then at any Time take 3 Spoonfuls.

Page  171

For Fits from Wind or Cold.

TAKE three Drops of Oil of Amber in some burnt Wine, or Mace Ale. If 'tis given in black Cherry|water, 'tis good to forward Labour in Childbed.

To make Elixir Proprietatis.

TAKE of Myrth four Drachms, Aloes four Drachms, Saffron four Drachms, infuse them in a Pint of the best Brandy; first put in the Saffron, and let it stand 12 Hours, then the Myrth and Aloes; set it by the Fire 3 or 4 Days, shaking it very often; then strain it off. Take 60 or 70 Drops, more or less, in a little White wine, in a Morning fasting, for a Week or 10 Days together; 'tis good for any Illness in the Stomach, or in the Bowels. 'Tis the best of Physick for Children.

To cure a Pimpled Face.

TAKE an Ounce of live Brimstone, as much Roch-Allum, as much common Salt; white Sugar candy two Drachms, Sperma-Cete two Drachms; pound and sife all these into a fine Powder, and put it into a Quart Bot|tle; then put to it half a Pint of Brandy, 3 Ounces of whte Lilly-water, and three Ounces of Spring water; shake all these well together, and keep it for Use. When you use it, shake the Bottle and bath the Face well, and when you go to Bed dip Rags in it, and lay it all over the Face, in 10 or 12 Days it will be perfectly cured.

A Purge for Hoarseness, or any Illness on the Lungs.

TAKE four Ounces of the Roots of Sorrel, of Hysop and Maiden hair, of each half a Handful; Raisins a quarter of a Pound stoned, Sena half an Ounce, Barley-water two Quarts; put all these in a Jug, and infuse 'em in a Kettle of Water 2 Hours, strain it out and take a Quarter of a Pint Morning and Night.

Page  172

An Electuary for a Cold, or windy Stomach.

TAKE Gum-Ganicum one Ounce, Cuebs a quarter of an Ounce, Cardamums a quarter of an Ounce, beat and sift all these, and mix it with Syrrup of Gilliflowers into an Electuary. Take Night and Morning the Quantity of a Nutmeg; drink a little warm Ale after it.

An Electuary for a Pain in the Stomach.

TAKE Conserve of Wood-sorrel and Mithridate an equal Quantity, mix it well together, and take Night and Morning the Quantity of a Nutmeg; so do for fifteen Days together.

To make Ink.

GET one Pound of the best Galls, half a Pound of Copperas, a quarter of a Pound of Gum-arabick, a quarter of a Pound of white Sugar-candy; bruise the Galls, and beat your other Ingredients fine, and infuse them all in 3 Quarts of White-wine or Rain-water, and let them stand hot by the Fire 3 or 4 Days; then put all into a new Pipkin, set it on a slow Fire, so as not to boil; keep it frequently stirring, and let it stand 5 or 6 Hours 'til one quarter is consumed, and when cold strain it thro' a clean coarse Piece of Linen; bottle it and keep it for Use.

To wash Gloves.

TAKE the Yolk of an Egg and beat it, and egg the Gloves all over, and lay them on a Table, and with a hard Brush and Water rub them clean; then rinse them, and scrape white Lead in Water pretty thick, and dip the Gloves in; let them dry, and as they begin to dry stretch and rub them 'til they be limber, dry, and smooth; thn gum them with Gum dagant steep'd in sweet Water, and let 'em dry on a mable Stone. If you colour 'em, scrape some of the following Colours amongst the white Lead: Page  173 The dark Colour is Umber; the brick Colour red Lead; for a Jessamy yellow Oaker; for Copper-colour red Oak|er; for Lemon-colour Turmerick.

To make Paste for Hands.

BLANCH and beat a Pound of bitter Almonds, and in the beating put in two Handfuls of stoned Raisins, and beat them together 'til they are very fine; then take 3 or 4 Spounfuls of Sack or Brandy, as much Ox Gall, 3 or 4 Spoonfuls of brown Sugar, the Yolks of 3 Eggs, beat it well together; set it over the Fire and give it 2 or 3 boils; when 'tis almost cold mix it with the Almonds, put it in Gallipots; the next Day cover it close, and keep it cool, and it will be good five or six Months.

MEDICINES and SALVES.

To cure the Rickets.

OPEN a Vein in both Ears between the Junc|tures, mix a little Aqua-vitae with the Blood, and with it anoint the Breast, Sides, and Neck; then take three Ounces of the green Ointment, and warm a little of it in a Spoon and anoint the Wrists and Ancles as hot as it may be endured; do this for nine Nights just before Bed time; shift not the Shirt all the Time. If the Veins do not appear, rub it with a little Lint dipp'd in Aqua vitae, or else cause the Child to cry, and that will make the Veins more visible and bleed the better.

To make the Drink.

Take a Quart of Spring water, of Liver wort 1 Hand|ful, Liquorish, Anniseeds, Coriander-seeds, sweet Fennel|seeds, and Hartshorn, of each an equal Quantity; forty Raisins of the Sun stoned, fourteen Figs; boil all these together 'til one half is consumed; then put in 3 Spoon|ful Page  174 of Honey, and b••l it a little more; let it stand 'til 'tis cold and strain it out, and put in two Spoonfuls of Syrup of Gilliflowers, and bottle it up. Take 2 or 3 Spoonfuls Morning and Evening.

The Green Ointment.

TAKE Rue, Camomile, Hysop, Hog's Fennel, red Fennel, Rosemary, Bays, Lady's Mantle, Paul's Be|tony, Water Betony, Balm, Nepp, Valerian, Mallows, Night-shade, Plantane, Comfry, Adder's-Tongue, Roman Wormwood, common Wormwood, Vervain, Clary, Agri|mony, red Sage, Ground Ivy, Featherfew, Self-heal, Me|lilot, Bramble-tops, Marsh mallows, Sanicle, Rib wort, May-weed, of each of these 2 large Handfuls; pick and chop them, then take 4 Pounds of Butter unwashed, and 3 Pounds of Boar's-grease; melt them together, and put in the Herbs, and let it boil 2 Hours; then strain it out, let it stand a little, and put it in Pots for Use.

To make Charity-Oil.

TAKE Poplar Buds in the Beginning of May one Handful, and put them into a Pint and half of Oil, and half a Pint of Aqua-vitae, and cover them close, and let them stand till the following Herbs are in season; then add to your Buds Betony, Charity, Sanicle, the Tops of St. John's wort, when blown; Adder's Tonge, Comtry, Self heal, Balm, Southern-wood, Pennyroyal, Flowers of red Sage, Parsley, Clown's All heal, Balsm, Knot grass, Sweet marjoram, Lavender Cotton, red Rose buds, Ca|momile, Lavender-tops when blown, of each of these Herbs a small Hndful; but of Poplar-buds, red Rose|bud, and Adder's-Tongue, double the Quantity; gather the Herbs in dry Weather, and wipe them clean with a Cloh; shred them pretty grosly before you put them in, so let them steep in a Stone Pot; when all is in, cover it very close; then set them on the Fire in a Skillet, let them simmer with a slow Fire 5 or 6 Hours, then strain it out. This Oil is good for any green Wound, Bruise, Page  175 Burn, or Ach, and for Bruises inwad, taking a Spoonful in a little warm Sack; and for any outward Swelling warm it, and anoint the Part affected.

An excellent Plaister for any Pain occasion'd by a Cold or Bruise.

TAKE of the Plaister of red Lead and Oxycroceum, of each equal Parts; of the best Theban Opium one Scruple, spread it on Lether, and lay it to the Part that aches, after you have well anointed with this Ointment: Take of Ointment of Marsh-mallows one Ounce, Oil of Exeter half an Ounce, Oil of Spike and Spirit of Harts|horn, of each a Drachm.

For a Dropsy.

TAKE of Horseradish-roots sliced thin, and sweet Fennel seeds bruised, of each two Ounces, Smallage and Fennel roots sliced, of each an Ounce, of the Tops of Thyme, Winter-savory, Sweet marjoram, Water cresses, and Nettles, of each a Handful; bruise the Herbs, and boil them in three Pints of Sack, and three of Water, to the Consumption of half; let it stand close cover'd for three Hours, then strain it, and drink a Draught of it twice in a Day, sweeten'd with Syrup of Fennel, fasting two Hours after it.

For the Gripes.

TAKE a Glass of Sack warmed, and dissolve in it as much Venice-Treacle, or Diascordium as a Hazel-Nut, drink it off going to Bed; cover warm.

To stay a Looseness.

TAKE a very good Nutmeg, and prick it full of Holes, and toast it on the Point of a Knife; then boil it in Milk till much be consum'd; then eat the Milk with the Nutmeg powder'd in it; in a few Times it will top.

Page  176

For the Strangury.

TAKE half a Pint of Plantane water, one Ounce of white Sugar candy, finely powder'd, two Spoonfuls of Sallad Oil, and the Juice of a Lemon; beat all these together very well, and drink it off.

For a Drought in a Fever.

TAKE of Sal-prunella one Ounce, and dissolve it in Spring water, and put as much Sugar to it as will sweeten it; simmer it over the Fire till 'tis a Syrup, and put some into Posser-drink, and take it two or three Times a Day, or when very thirsty.

A Plaister for an Ague.

TAKE right Venice Turpentine, and mix with it the Powder of white Hellebore-roots, till 'tis stiff enough to spread on Leather. It must be laid all over the Wrist, and over the Ball of the Thumb six Hours before the Fit comes.

For a Chin-Cough.

TAKE a Spoonful of Wood-lice and bruise 'em, and mix them with Breast Milk, and take them three or four Mornings, according as you find Benefit. It will cure; but some must take it longer than others.

An admirable Tincture for green Wounds.

BALSAM of Peru one Ounce, Storax Calamita two Ounces, Bejamin three Ounces, Aloes Socatri|na, Myrrh, Electuary pure, and Frankincense, of each half an Ounce, Angelica-roots and Flowers of St. Jhn's w••t, of each half an Ounce, Spirit of Wine one Pint; beat the Drugs, scrape and slce the Roots, and put it in|to a Bottle, stop it well, and let it stand in the Sun July, Page  177 August, and September, and then steam it through a fine Linen Cloth; put it in a Bottle, stop it close, and keep it for Use. Apply it to a green Wound, dip a Feather in it and annoint the Wound; then dip Lint in it, and put on it, and bind it up with a Cloth; but let no Plais|ter touch it; twice a Day wet the Lint with a Feather, but not take it off till 'tis well.

To take off Blackness by a Fall.

RUB it well with a cold Tallow-Candle as soon as 'tis bruised, and this will take off the Blackness.

To break a Boil.

TAKE the Yolk of a new-laid Egg, some Honey and Wheat-flour, and mix it well together, and spread it on a Rag, and lay it on cold.

A Poultice for a hard Swelling.

BOIL the finest Wheat flour in Cream till 'tis pretty thick, then take it off and put in Mallows chopt, stir it, and apply it as hot as can be endured; dress it twice a Day, and make fresh every Time.

To stay Vomiting.

TAKE Ash leaves, and boil them in Vinegar and Water, and apply them hot to the Stomach; do this often.

A Poultice for a sore Breast, Leg, or Arm.

BOIL Wheat-flour in strong Ale very well, and pret|ty thick, then take it off and scrape in some Boar's-Grease; let it not boil after the Grease is in, stir it well, and apply it hot.

Page  178

A Salve for a Blast, Burn, or Scald.

TAKE May Butter fresh out of the Churn, neither wash'd nor salted, and put into it a good Quantity of the green inner Rind of Elder, and put it in a Pipkin, and set that in a Pot of boiling Water; let it infuse a Day or two, then strain it out, and keep it in a Pot for U.e.

An excellent Remedy for Agues, which has been often tried with very great Success.

TAKE of black Soap, Gun-powder, stinking Tobac|co, and Brandy, of each an equal Quantity, mix them well together, and three Hours before the Fit comes apply it to the Patient's Wrist; let this be kept on for a Fortnight.

To cure the Biting of a mad Dog.

TAKE two Quarts of strong Ale, two Pennyworth of Treacle, two Garlick heads, a Handful of Cn|quesol, Sage, and Rue: Boil them altogether to a Quart; strain it, and give the Patient three or four Spoon|fuls twice a Day: Take Dittany, Agrimony, and rusty Bacon, beaten well together, and apply to the Sore to keep it from festering.

For spitting Blood.

TAKE of Cinnaser of Antimony one Ounce, and mix it with two Ounces of Conserve of red Roses, and take as much as a Nutmeg Night and Morning.

To know if a Child has Worms or not.

TAKE a Piece of white Leather, and peck it full of Holes with your Knife, and rub it with Wormwood, and spread Honey on it, and strew the Powder of Ales Socratina on it; lay it on the Child's Navel when he Page  179 goes to Bed, and if he has Worms, the Plaister will stick fast, and if he have not, it will fall.

To stop Vomiting.

TAKE half a Pint of Mint-water, an Ounce of Sy|rup of Viole••, a quarter of an Ounce of Mithrdate, and half an Ounce of Syrup of Roses; mix all these well together, and let the Party take two Spoonfuls first, and then one Spoonful after every Vomiting till 'tis stay'd.

To cure the Tooth-ach.

LET the Prty that is troubled with the Tooth-ach he on the contrary Side, and drop three Drops of the Juce of Rue into the Ear on that Side the Tooth acheth, and let it remain an Hour or two and it will re|move the Pain. If a Needle is run thorough a Wood-loose, and immediately touch the aching Tooth with that Needle, it will cease to ach.

A rare Mouth-Water.

TAKE Rosemary, Rue, Celandine, Plantane, Bram|ble leaves, Woodbine leaves, and Sage, of each an Handful; beat them and steep them in a Quart of the best White-wine Vinegar two Days and Nights, then press it well and strain it, and put to it 6 Ounces of Allum, and as much Honey, and boil them a little together softly till the Allum is consum'd; when 'tis cold keep it for Use.

To make Lozenges for the Heart-burn.

TAKE of white Sugar Candy one Pound, Chalk three Ounces, Bole-armoniac five Scruples, Crabs-Eyes one Ounce, red Coral four Scruples, Nutmegs one Scruple, Pearl two Scruples; let all these be beaten and sitted, and make all into a Paste with a little Spring|water, roll it out and cut your Lozenges out with a Thim|ble, Page  180 lay them to Dry. Eat four or five at a Time as of|ten as you please.

To make Syrup of Garlick.

TAKE two Heads of Garlick, peel it clean and boil it in a Pint of Water a pretty while, then put a|way that Water and put a Pint more to your Garlick, and boil it till the Garlick is tender; then straining it off, add a Pound of double refin'd Sugar to it, and boil it in Silver or Tin till 'tis a thick Syrup; scum it well, and keep it for Use; and take a Spoonful in a Morning lasting, another last at Night, for a short Breath.

To prevent After-Pains.

TAKE nine single Piony seeds powder'd, the same Quantity of Powder of Borax, and a little Nutmeg; mix all these with a little white Anniseed water in a Spoon, and give it the Woman; and a little Anniseed-water after it as soon as possible after she is laid in Bed.

To cure the Tooth-ach.

TAKE half an Ounce of Conserve of Rosemary over Night, and half a Drachm of Extract of Rudium in the Morning; do this three Times together; keep warm.

To cure the Jaundice.

TAKE a live T••ch, slit it down the Belly; take out the Guts, nd clap•• T••ch to the Stomach as fast as possible, and it will cre immediately.

To stop bleeding at Mouth, Nose, or Ears.

IN the Mouth of Man take a clean Linnen Cloth, and wet it in the Sp•••〈…〉 Dy, drying it eve|ry Dy in the Wind; lay up that Cloth, and when you Page  181 have Need, hold it to the Place where the Blood runs, and it will stop.

An excellent Medicine for Shortness of Breath.

TAKE half an Ounce of Flour of Brimstone, a quar|ter of an Ounce of beaten Ginger, and 3 quarters of an Ounce of beaten Sena, and mix all together in 4 Oun|ces of Honey; take the Bigness of a Nutmeg Night and Morning for 5 Days together; then once a Week for some Time; then once a Fortnight.

To cure a pimpled Face, and sweeten the Blood.

TAKE Sena one Ounce, put it in a small Stean Pot, and pour a Quart or more of boiling Water on it; then put as many Prunes as you can get in; cover it with Paper, and set it in the Oven with Houshold bread, and take of this every Day, one, two, or three, or more of the Prunes and Liquor, according as it operates. Continue this always, or at least half a Year.

To cure the Dropsy, Rheumatism, Scurvy, and Cough of the Lungs.

TAKE English Otris-roots, Squills, and Elecampane-roots, each 1 Ounce; Hysop and Horehound leaves, each one Handful, the inner Rind of green lder and dwarf Elder, of each one Handful, Sena one Ounce and half, Agarick two Drachms, Ginger one Drachm; cut the Roots thin and bruise the Leaves, and put them into two Quarts of the best Lisbon Wine; let these boil an Hour and half on a gentle Fire in an earthen Mg very close stpp'd with a Cork, and tid down with a bladder that no Air come to it, and so set it in a large Pot of boiling Water; set it so that no Water get into the Mug, which must hold three Quarts, that all the Ingredients may have room to go in; when 'tis almost cold, strain it out very hard; you must scrape the Elder downwards. Take this for a Week together, if you can, and then miss a Day; Page  182 and if that does not do, go on with your other Bottle of the same; take it in a Morning fasting, ten Spoonfuls at a Time, without any Posset-drink, 'twill both vomit and purge you; 'tis an unpleasant Taste, therefore take a Lump of Sugar after it; when 'tis quite cold, after 'tis strain'd off, let it stand in a Flaggon to settle a Night and a Day; then bottle it up clear and fine for your Use. 'Tis an admirable Medicine.

To stop Bleeding.

TAKE a Pint of Plantane-water, put to it 2 Ounces of Ising-glass, and let it stand 24 Hours to dissolve; pour it from the Dregs, and put in a Pint of good red Port-wine, and add to it 3 or 4 Sticks of Cinamon, and 2 Ounces of double-refin'd Sugar; give it a boil or two, and pour it off; let the Party take 2 or 3 Spoonfuls 2 or 3 Times a Day.

To cure a Cancer.

TAKE a Drachm of the Powder of Crabs-claws fine|ly searced, and made into Paste with Damask Rose-water, and dried in Pellets of Lozenges; powder the Lo|zenges as you use them, and drink the Powder in Whey every Morning fasting, If there be a Sore, and 'tis raw, anoint it with a Salve made of Dock roots and fresh But|ter, make a Seaton or Issue in the Neck; keep a low Diet, keep from any thing that is salt, sour, or strong.

To cure the Joint Evil.

TAKE good store of Elder-leaves, and distil them in a cold Still; let the Person drink every Morning and Evening half a Pint of this Water, and wash the Sores with it Morning and Evening, first warming it a little, and lay fresh Elder-leaves on the Sores, and in a little Time you will find they will dry up; but be sure to follow it exactly, it has cured when all other Reme|des have failed.

Page  183

For the Green Sickness.

TAKE Centaury the less, and Wormwood and Rose|mary-flowers, of each one Handful; Gentian root one Drachm, Coriander seeds two Drachms; boil these in a Quart of Water, sweeten it with Syrup of Steel, and take four or five Spoonfuls in the Morning, and as much in the Afternoon.

To take off Freckles.

TAKE Bean-flower Water, or Elder-flower Water, or May Dew gather'd from Corn, of either the Quantity of 4 Spoonfuls, and add to it 1 Spoonful of Oil of Tartar very new drawn; mix it well together, and often wash the Face with it: Let it dry on.

To make Pomatum.

TAKE almost a Drachm of white Wax, 2 Drachms of Sperma-Cete, one Ounce of Oil of bitter Almonds, slice your Wax very thin, and put it in a Gallipot, and put the Pot in a Skillet of boiling Water; when the Wax is melted, put in your Sperma-Cete, and just stir it to|gether; then put in the Oil of Almonds; after that take it off the Fire, and out of the Skillet, and stir it 'til cld with a Bone Knife; then beat it up in Rose-water 'til 'tis white; keep it in Water, and change the Water once a Day.

A Salve for a Sprain.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of Virgin's Wax, a quarter of a Pound of Frankincense, half a Pound of Burgamy Pitch, melt them well together, stirring them all the while 'til they are melted, then give them a good boil, and strain them into Water; work it well into Rolls, and keep it for Use; the more 'tis work'd the better it is. Spread it on Leather.

Page  184

A rare green Oil for Aches and Bruises.

TAKE a Pottle of Ol of Olives, and put it into a Stone Pot of a Gallon, with a narrow Mouth; then take Southernwood, Wormwood, Sage, and Camomile, of each 4 Handfuls, a quarter of a Peek of red Rose-buds, the White cut from them; shred them together grosly, and put them into the Oil, and once a Day for 9 or 10 Days stir them well, and when the Lavender spike is ripe, put 4 Handfuls of the Tops in, and let it stand 3 or 4 Days longer, and cover'd very close; then boil them an Hour upon a slow Fire, stirring it often; then put to it a quarter of a Pint of the strongest Aqua-vitae, and let it boil an Hour more; then strain it thro' a coarse Cloth, and let it stand 'til 'tis cold, and keep it in Glasses for Use; warm a little in a Spoon or Saucer, and bath the Part affected.

To take out Spots of the Small-Pox.

TAKE half an Ounce of Oil of Tartar, and as much Oil of bitter Almonds, mix it together, and with a fine Rag daub it often on the Face and Hands before the Air has penetrated into the Skin or Flesh.

For the Cholick.

TAKE a Drachm and half of Dr. Holland's Powder, and mix it in a little Sack, and take it and drink a Glass of Sack after it. It gives present Ease.

An approved Remedy against spitting of Blood.

TAKE of the Tops of stinging Nettles, Plantane-leaves, of each a like Quantity; bruise them and strain the Juice out, and keep it close stopp'd in a Bottle, in which tke 3 or 4 Spoonfuls every Morning and Even|ing, sweeten'd with Sugar of Roses. The Juice of Com|fry-roots drank with Wine is also very good; let the Pa|tient Page  185 be blooded at first, and sometimes gently purged. But if there happens to be any inward Soreness, occa|sioned by Straining, this Electuary will be very conve|nient, viz. Take an Ounce of Lucatellus's Balsam, of Conserve of Roses 2 Ounces, 12 Drops of Spirit of Sul|phur, to be made into a soft Electuary with Syrup of white Poppies; the Dose is the Quantity of a Nutmeg e|very Morning and Evening.

For the Scurvy.

TAKE a Pound of Guiacum-bark, and half a Pound of Saffafras, and a quarter of a Pound of Liquorish; boil all these in 3 Quarts of Water 'til it comes to 3 Pints, and when 'tis cold, put it in a Vessel with 2 Gallons of Ale; in 3 or 4 Days 'tis fit to drink; and drink no other Drink for 6 or 12 Months, according to the Violence of the Distemper. It will certainly cure.

For Corns on the Feet.

TAKE the Yeast of Beer (not of Ale) and spread it on a Linen Rag, and apply it to the Part affected renew it once a Day for 3 or 4 Weeks. It will cure.

For Chillblains.

ROAST a Turnip soft, beat it to mash, and ap it as hot as can be endured to the Part affected; it lie on 2 or 3 Days, and repeat it 2 or 3 Times.

To stop Bleeding inwardly.

TAKE two Drachms of Henbane-seed, and the 〈◊〉 of white Poppy-seed, beat them up with Con••• of Roses, and give the Quantity of a Nutmeg at a Time or take 12 Handfuls of Plantane-leaves, and 6 Ounces 〈◊〉 fresh Comfry-roots; beat these and strain out the J••• and add to it some fine Sugar, and drink it off.

Page  186

To kill a Tetter.

TAKE Flour of Brimstone, Ginger, and burnt Allum, a like Quntity; mix it with fresh Butter unsalted, anoint as hot as can be endured at Bed time; in the Morn|ing wash it off with Celndine water heated; while this is continued, the Parry most sometimes take Cordials to keep the Humour from going inward.

An Ointment for a Blast.

TAKE Velvet-leaves and wipe them clean, and chop 'em small, and put 'em to unsalted Butter out of the Churn, and boil 'em gently 'til the Goodness is out of the Leaves, then strain it into a Gallipot, and keep it for Use. Lay Velvet-leaves over the Part after 'tis anointed.

A Poultice to ripen Tumours.

TAKE half a Pound of Figs, two Ounces of white Lilly-roots, two Ounces of Bean Flour or Meal; boil these in Water 'til it comes to a Poultice; spread it thick on a Cloth, apply it warm, and shift it as often as it grows dry.

For the Teeth.

TAKE a Pint of Spring-water, put to t six Spoon|fuls of the best Brandy, wash the Mouth often with it, and in a Morning roll a Bit of Allum a little while in the Mouth.

For a Draught in a Fever.

MAKE Barley water, sweeten it with Syrup of Vio|lets, and tincture it with Spirit of Vitriol; let 'em drink sometimes of this; put Sal prunella in Beer or Pos|set-drink, and sometimes drink of that; and if they are sick or faint, give a Spoonful of Cordial in a Dish of Tea.

Page  187

A Powder that has restored Sight when al|most lost.

TAKE of Betony, Celandine, Saxifrage, Eye-bright, Pennyroyal and Levisticum, of each one Handful; of Anniseeds and Cinamon of each half an Ounce; take also of Grains of Paradice, Ginger, Hysop, Parsley, O|rigany, Osier of the Mountain, of each one Drachm, Ga|lengal and Sugar, of each one Ounce: Make all into a fine Powder, and eat of it every Day with your Meat such a Quantity as you used to eat of Salt, and instead of Salt, Osier, you must have that at the Physick Garden.

For a Cough settled on the Stomach.

TAKE half a Pound of Figs sliced, Raisins of the Sun stoned as many, and a Stick of Liquorish scraped and sliced; •••w Anniseeds and some Hysop wash'd clean: Put all these in a Quart of Spring-water; boil it till it comes to a Pint; then strain it, and sweeten it with white Sugar Candy. Take 2 or 3 Spoonfuls Morn|ing and Night, and when the Cough troubles you.

An excellent Method to cure the Dropsy.

TAKE a good Quantity of Black Snails, stamp them well with Bay Salt, and lay to the Hollow of the Feet, putting resh twice a Day. Take likewise a Hand|ful of Spearmint and Wormwood, bruise them, and put them in a Quart of Cream, which boil till it comes to an Oil, then strain and anoint those Parts which are swelled. Take of the Tops of green Broom, which after you have dried in an Oven, burn upon a clean Hearth to Ashes, which mingle very well with a Quart of White-Wine, set it stand all Night to settle, and in a Morning drink half a Pint of the clearest, at four in the Afternoon, and at Night going to Bed do the same. Continue laying the Poultice to your Feet, and drinking the White-Wine for three Weeks together; this Method has been often used with Success.

Page  188

An experienced Eye-Water to strengthen the Sight, and prevent Cataracts.

TAKE of Eyebright-tops two Handfuls, of Celan|dine, Vervain, Betony, Dill, Ground-pine, Clary, Avens, and Pimpernel, of each an Handful, Rosemary-Flowers an Handful, of Capon's Gall, and Alloes bruised, of each half an Ounce, of long Pepper one Drachm; in|fuse Twenty-four Hours in two Quarts of White-Wine, then draw it off in a Glass Still; drop the Water with a Feather into the Eye often.

For Stuffing in the Lungs.

TAKE white Sugar candy powder'd and sifted two Ounces, China-roots powder'd and sifted 1 Ounce; Flower of Brimstone one Ounce. Mix these with Conserve of Roses, or the Pap of an Apple; and take the Bigness of a Walnut in the Morning, fasting an Hour after it; and the last at Night, an Hour after you have Eaten or Drank.

To give Ease in a violent Fit of the Stone.

TAKE a Quart of Milk, and two Handfuls of dried Sage, a Pennyworth of Hempseed, one Ounce of white Sugar candy: Boil all these together a quarter of an Hour, and then put in half a Pint of Rhenish-wine. When the Curd is taken off, with the Ingredients, put it in a Bag, and apply it to the grieved Part; and of the Liquor drink a good Glass full. Let both be as Hot as can be endured. If there is not Ease the first Time, warm it again, and use it: It seldom fails.

To procure easy Labour.

TAKE half a Pound of Figs, half a Pound of Rai|sins of the Sun stoned, four Ounces of Liquorish scraped and sliced; one Spoonful of Anniseeds bruised; Page  189 boil all these in 2 Quarts of Spring-water 'til one Pint is wasted; then strain it out, and drink a quarter of a Pint of it Morning and Evening 6 Weeks before the Time.

To procure speedy Delivery when the Throws are gone.

TAKE half a Drachm of Borax powder'd, and mix|ed with a Glass of White-wine, some Sugar, and a little Cinamon water; if it does no good the first Time, try it again 2 Hours after, so likewise the third Time.

To bring the After-Birth.

GIVE thirty or thirty five Drops of Oil of Juniper in a good Glass of Sack.

To prevent After Pains.

TAKE half an Ounce of large Nutmegs and toast them before the Fire, and one Ounce of the best Cinamon, and beat them together; then mix it with the Whites of two Eggs, beating it together in a Portinger, and take every Morning in Bed as much as will ie on the Pint of a Knife, and so at Night; and drink after it the following Caudle.

Take a quarter of a Pint of Alicant Wine or Tent, a quarter of a Pint of red Rose-water, and a quarter of a Pint of Plntane water; mingle all three together, and beat three new laid Eggs, Yolks and Whites, and make a Caudle of them; put into it two Ounces of double re|fin'd Sugar, a quarter of an Ounce of Cinamon; you must boil the Cinamon in the Wine and Water before the Eggs are in; and after all is mixed, put to it half a Drachm of the Powder of Knot-grass; take of this six Spoonfuls Morning and Evening after the Electuary.

Page  190

To stop Floodings.

TAKE the White of an Egg, and beat it well with four or five Spoonfuls of red Rose-water, and Drink it off Morning and Night, nine Mornings together; it has cured when all other Things have failed.

Let the Party often take Ising-glass boiled, or dissolved in Warm New milk, a Pint at a Time.

A Plaister for a Weakness in the Back.

TAKE Plantane, Comfry, Knot-grass, Shepherd's-Purse, of each one Handful; Stamp them small, and boil them in a Pound of Oil of Roses, and a little Vinegar; when 'tis well boil'd Strain it, and set it on the Fire again, and put into it four Ounces of Wax, one Ounce of Chalk, Bole-Armoniac one Ounce, and Terra|sigillata one Ounce; boil all well, keeping it still stir|ring, then cool it, and make it into Rolls, and keep it for Use; spread it on Leather when you lay it to the Back.

A Drink for the same.

Take four Roots of Comfry, and of Knot-grass and Clary one Handful, a Sprig of Rosemary, a little Galen|gal, a good Quantity of Cinamon and Nutmeg sliced, the Pith of the Chine of an Ox. Stamp and boil all these in a Quart of Muscadine, then strain it, and put in six Yolks of Eggs; sweeten the Caudle to your Taste with double-refin'd Sugar, and Drink a good Draught Morning and Evening. Take of Crocus Martis and Con|serve of red Roses mixed together three or four Times a Day.

For a Flux.

TAKE a Pint of New-milk, and dissolve in it half a quarter of a Pound of Loaf-Sugar, as much Mithri|date as the bigness of a Walnut; give this for a Clyster moderately warm; repeat it once or twice if their be Oc|casion.

Page  191

For the falling down of the Fundament.

TAKE Ginger and slice it, and put it in a little Pan, heat it by clear well kindled Coals, and put it in a Close stool. Let the Party fit over it, and receive the Fume; cast in the Ginger by little and little, and keep warm.

To increase Milk in Nurses.

MAKE Gruel with Lentils, and let the Party Drink freely of it; or else boil them in Posset drink, which they like best.

A good Purge.

INfuse an Ounce of Sena in a Pint of Water till half be consumed; when 'tis cold, add to it one Ounce of Syrup of Roses, and one Ounce of Syrup of Buckthorn; mix them well together. This Quantity makes 2 strong Purges for either Man or Woman, and 4 for a Child.

To prevent Miscarrying.

TAKE of Dragon's-blood the Weight of a silver Two-pence, and a Drachm of red Coral, the Weight of two Barley-corns of Ambergrease, the Weight of three Barley-corns of East-India Bezoar; make all these into a very fine Powder, and mix them well together, and keep them close in a Box; and if you are frighted, or need it, take as much at a Time as will lie on a Penny, and keep very still and quiet. Take it in a Caudle made with Muscadine or Tent, and the Shucks of Almonds dried and beaten to Powder, and thicken it with Yolks of Eggs. Take it in a Morning fasting, and at Night going to Bed; this do 'til you are out of Danger, and lay the following Plaister to the Back;

Take Venice Turpentine, and mix with it Bole-Armo|niac, and spread it on black brown Paper the Length and Breadth of a Hand, and lay it to the Small of the Back, keeping Bed.

Page  192

To procure a good Colour.

TAKE Germander, Rue, Fumitory, of each a good Handful, one Pennyworth of Saffron tied up in a Rag, half a Pound of blue Currants bruised; stamp the Herbs, and infuse all these Ingredients in 3 Pints of Sack over a gentle Fire 'til half be consumed, drink a quarter of a Pint Morning and Evening, and walk after it; re|peat this Quantity once or twice.

You may add a Spoonful of the following Syrup to e|very Draught. Take 3 Ounces of the Filings of Steel, and put it in a glass Bottle with a Drachm of Mace, and as much Cinamon, pour on them a Quart of the best White-wine, stop it up close, and let it stand 14 Days, shaking the Bottle every Day; then strain it our into a|nother Bottle, and put 2 Pounds of fine Loaf Sugar to it finely beaten; let it stand 'til the Sugar is dissolv'd with|out stirring it; then clear it into another Bottle, and keep it for Use.

A Receipt for the Gout.

THE following Prescription of the celebrated Mes|sieurs Boerhaave and Ostedyke, for the Cure of the Gout, has been tried with so much Success by a Gentle|man who was afflicted with that Distemper from the Age of 15 to upwards of 40, and is now, as he hopes, per|fectly cured of it, and is returning (with all proper Cau|tion) to his usual (temperate) Manner of living; and it has besides done so much Good to several others to whom the Salutary Regimen has been communicated, that he thinks he cannot do a more acceptable Service to the Pub|lick, no make a better Acknowledgment for the Benefit he has received by it, than to publish the same for the general Good of his Fellow Creatures: And tho' he can|not answer for it, that it may have the same happy Ef|fects on every Constitution that it has had with him, yet he doubts not that the Innocence of the Method prescri|bed, and the disinterested Manner in which he offers it to Page  193 the Publick, will be a sufficient Justification of his good Intentions, and a better Recommendation of its Genuine|ness and Efficacy, than any Thing he can ay further on this Subject.

Professors BOERHAAVE and OSTERDYKE's Re|gimen prescrib'd for the Gout.

THEY are of Opinion that the Gout is not to be cured by any other Means but a Milk Diet, which will in twelve Months Time alter the whole Mass of Blood; and in order thereto, the following Directions must be strictly observ'd and follow'd:

  • I. You must not taste any Liquor, only a Mixture of one Third Milk and two Thirds Water, your Milk as new as you can get it, and to drink it as often as you have Occasion for it, without adding any other to it. A little Tea and Coffee is likewise permitted with Milk.
  • II. In a Morning assoon as awake, and the Stomach has made a Digestion, you must drink eight Ounces of Spring-water, and fast two Hours after; then eat Milk and Bread, Milk pottage, or Tea with Milk, with a lit|tle Bread and fresh Butter.
  • III. At Dinner you must not eat any Thing but what is made of Barley, Oats, Rice, or Millet-seds, Carrots, Po|tatoes, Turnips, Spinage, Beans, Peas, &c. You may likewise eat Fruit when full ripe, baked Pears or Apples, Apple-Dumplins; but above all Milk and Bisket is very good, but nothing salt or sour, not even a Sevil Orange.
  • IV. At Supper you must eat nothing but Milk and Bread.
  • V. It is necessary to go to Bed betimes, even before nine o'Clock, to accustom yourself to sleep much, and use yourself to it.
  • VI. Every Morning before you rise, to have your Feet, Legs, Arms, and Hands, well rub'd with Pieces of Wool|len Cloth for half an Hour, and the same going to Bed. This Article must be strictly observed, for by this Means the Humours, Knobs, and Bunches, will be dissipated, and prevent their fixing in the Joints, by which they be|come useless.
  • Page  194VII. You must accustom yourself to Exercise, as ri|ding on Horseback, which is best, or in any Coach, Chaise, &c. the more the better; but take care of the cold Weather, Winds, and Rain.
  • Lastly, In case a Fit of the Gout should return, and be violent, which they are of Opinion will not, then a little Opium or Laudanum may be taken to compose you; but no oftner than Necessity requires. They are of Opi|nion, that your Father or Mother having the Gout, is of no Consequence, if you will resolve to follow the forego|ing Directions strictly.

For the Piles.

TAKE of the Tops of Parsley, of Mullet, and of Elder-buds, of each one Handful; boil in a suffici|ent Quantity of fresh Butter 'til it looks green, and has extracted the Smell of the Herbs; strain, and anoint the Place with it 3 or 4 Times a Day.

A bitter Draught.

TAKE of the Leaves of Roman Wormwood, the Tops of Centaury, and St. John's wort, of each a small Handful, Roots of Gentian sliced two Drachms, Carraway-seeds half an Ounce; infuse these in half a Pint of Rhenish, and 3 Pints of White wine for 4 or 5 Days; take a quarter of a Pint in a Morning, filling up the Bot|tle, and it will serve 2 or 3 Months.

For the Hemorrhoids inflam'd.

LET the Party dip their Finger in Balsam of Sulphur made with Oil of Turpentine, and anoint the Place two or three Times a Day.

For Costiveness.

TAKE Virgin-Honey a quarter of a Pound, and mix with as much Cream of Tartar as will bring it to a Page  195 pretty thick Electuary, of which take the Bigness of a Walnut when you please; and for your Breakfast eat Water-gruel with common Mallows boiled in it, and a good Piece of Butter; the Mallows must be chopt small, and eaten with the Cruel.

To raise a Blister.

THE Seeds of Clemmatis Peregrina being bound hard on any Place, will in an Hour or two raise a Blister, which you must cut and dress with Melilot Plaister, or Colewort Leves, as other Blisters.

Likewise Leaven mixed with a little Verjuice, and a|bout half a Pennyworth of Cantharides Flies, and spread on Leather the Bigness you please, will in 9 or 10 Hours raise a Blister, which dress as usual.

Plaister for the Feet in a Fever.

TAKE of Briony roots one Pound, Tops of Rue an Handful, black Soap 4 Ounces, and Bay-salt 2 Oun|ces; beat all these in a Mash, and out of this spread on a Cloth for both Feet, apply it warm, and few Cloths o|ver them, and let them lie 12 Hours; if there be Occa|sion, renew them 3 Times.

A Drink for a Fever.

TAKE a Quart of Spring-water, and boil in it an Ounce of burnt Hartshorn, a Nutmeg quartered, a Stick of Cinamon; let it boil a quart of an Hour; when 'tis cold, sweeten it to your Taste with Syrup of Lemons or fine Sugar, with as many Drops of Spirit of Vitriol as will just sharpen it. Drink of this when you please.

A Vomit.

TAKE seven or eight Daffodil-roots, and boil them in a Pint of Posset drink, and in the working drink Carduus-water a Gallon or more; your Posset must be Page  196 cold when you drink it, and your Carduus Tea must be blood-warm; if it works too much, put some Salt in a Dish of Posset, and drink it off.

For the Hickup.

TAKE 3 or 4 preserved Damsons in your Mouth a a Time, and swallow them by Degrees.

For the Cramp.

TAKE of Rosemary-leaves and chop them very small, and sew them in fine Linen, and make them into Garters, and wear them Night and Day; lay a Down-pillow on your Legs in the Night.

For Weakness in the Hands after a Palsy.

TAKE of the Tops of Rosemary, bruise it and make it up into a Ball as big as a Walnut, and let the Party roll it up and down in their Hand very often, and grasp it in the Hand 'til 'tis hot; do this very often.

For an old Ach or Strain.

TAKE an Ounce of Lucatellus's Balsam, and mix it with 2 Drachms of Oil of Turpentine, gently heat it, anoint the Place, and put new Flannel on it.

For a Burn.

MIX Lime 〈◊〉 with Linseed Oil; beat it together, and with a Feather anoint the Place, and put on a Plaister to defend it.

To cure a Place that is scalded.

TAKE Linseed Oil, and put to it as much thick Cream; beat them together very well and keep it for Use. Anoint the Place that is scalded twice a Day, Page  197 and it will cure it. Put on it soft Rags, and let nothing press it.

The bitter Draught.

TAKE of Gentian-root three Drachms; of Camomile-flowers one Ounce; of Rosemary-flowers one Ounce; of Tops of Centaury, Tops of Roman Wormwood, Tops of Carduus, of each one Handful. Boil all these in two Quarts of Spring-water, 'til it comes to a Quart. You may add a Pint of White-wine to it. Strain it out, and when 'tis cold, bottle it. Drink a quarter of a Pint in the Morning, and as much at 4 o'Clock in the Afternoon.

To draw out a Thorn.

TAKE the Roots of Comfry, and bruise them in a Mortar with a little Boar's-grease, and use this as a Plaister.

For a scald Head.

TAKE three Spoonfuls of the Juice of Comfry, two Pennyworth of Verdegrease, and half a Pound of Hogs-lard: Melt it together, but let it not boil. Cut off the Hair, and anoint the Place. It will cure it.

For the Falling-Sickness.

TAKE the After-birth of a Woman, and dry it to Powder, and drink half an Ounce thereof in a Glass of White-wine for six Mornings together. If the Patient be a Man, it must be the Afterbirth of a Female Child; if a Woman, the contrary.

For the Trembling at the Heart.

MAKE a Syrup of Damask Roses, and add thereto a small Quantity of red Coral, Pearl, and Amber|grease, all finely beaten and powder'd: Take this so long s your Pain continues, about a Spoonful at a Time.

Page  198

For a Pleurisy, if the Person cannot be blooded.

TAKE of Carduus, the Seeds or Leaves, a large Handful; boil them in a Pint of Beer till half is consum'd; then strain it, and give it the Party warm. They must be fasting when they take it, and fast six Hours after it, or it will do them harm.

To draw a Rheum from the Eyes.

ROAST an Egg hard, then cut out the Yolk, and take a Spoonful of Cummin-seed, and a Hand|ful of Bears-foot; bruise them and put them into the White of the Egg, so lay it hot on to the Npe of the Neck; bind it on with a Cloth, and let it lie 24 Hours, so lay on fresh again. It will cure in a little Time.

To clear the Eyes.

TAKE the White of Hens dung, dry it very well, and beat it to Powder; fits, and blow it into the Eyes when the Party goes to Bed.

For a Pin or Web in the Eye.

TAKE the Gall of a Hare and Honey, of each a like Quantity; mix them together, and take a Fea|ther and put a little into the Eye, and it will cure in two or three Days.

If a Hair or Fish-bone stick in the Throat, immediate|ly swallow the Yolk of a raw Egg, it is a very good Thing.

An extraordinary Ointment for Burns and Scalds.

TAKE of red Dock leaves, and Mallow-leaves, of each a large Handful, two Heds of Houseleek, of green Elder, the Bark being scrap'd from it, a small Page  199 Handful; wash the Herbs and the Elder, which being cut small, boil in a Pint and a half of Cream; boil it till it comes to an Oil, which, as it rises up, take off with a Spoon; afterwards strain, and put to it three Drachms of White Lead powdered fine.

A very good Drink to be used in all Sorts of Fevers.

TAKE two Ounces of burnt Hartshorn, boil it with a Crust of Bread in three Pints of Water to a Quart; strain, and put to it of Barley, Cinamon-water, two Oun|ces, Cochineal half a Drachm; sweeten it with fine Su|gar, and let the Patient, as often as he is thirsty, drink plentifully of it; rub the Cochineal in a Mortar together with the Sugar.

To cure the yellow or black Jaundice.

TAKE a Quart of White-wine, a large red Dock-root, a Bur-root, that which bears the small Bur, two Pennyworth of Turmerick, a little Saffron, a little of the White of Goose-dung that seeds on the Green; boil all these together a little while; then let it run thro' a Strainer: Drink it Morning and Evening three Days.

A Plaister for the Sciatica.

TAKE of yellow Wax a Pound, the Juice of Mar|joram and red Sage, of each six Spoonfuls, Juice of Onions two Spoonfuls; let all these boil together till the Juice is consum'd, and when 'tis half cold, put in two Ounces of Turpentine, and of Nutmegs, Cloves, Mace, Anniseeds, and Frankincense, of each one Pennyworth finely powder'd; stir it well together, and make a Plaister.

A Salve for the King's-Evil.

TAKE a Burdock-root, and a white Lilly root; wash, dry, and scrape them; wrap them in brown Paper, Page  200 and roast them in the Embers; when they are soft take them out, and cut out the Burn or Hard, and beat them in a Mortar with Boar's-grease and Bean-flour; when 'tis almost enough, put in as much of the best Turpentine as will make it smell of it, then put it in a Pot for Use.

The Party must take inwardly two Spoonfuls of Lime-water in the Morning, and fast two Hours after it, and do the same at four o'Clock in the Afternoon. If there be any Swelling of the Evil, they must bathe it with this Water a quarter of an Hour together, a little warmed, and wet a Cloth and bind it on the Place; but if the Skin be broken, only wash it in the Water, and spread a thin Plaister of the Salve and lay on it; shift it once a Day; if very bad, you must dress it twice a Day.

To make the Lime-water. Take a Lime-stone as big as a Man's Head, it must be well burned; put it into six Quarts of boiling Water, cover it close, but sometimes stir it; the next Day when 'tis settled pour off the clear Water, and keep it in Bottles for Use.

To cure Burstenness.

TAKE Hemlock, and bruise it a little, heat it pretty well, and apply it twice a Day, without any Truss, and keep the Party as still as may be. This has cured when many other Things have failed.

A Powder for Burstenness.

TAKE a good Quantity of wild Musk, Roots and all, pick, wash, and dry them, then take of Cur|rant-leaves, Vine-leaves and Strings, an equal Quantity; then take almost a Quart of Hemp-seeds; you must lay the Seeds at the Bottom of a Pot, and the Leaves and Roots on the Top; then put it into an Oven, dry them, rub them to Powder, and sift them together. The Party must take as much of this Powder as will lie on a Six Pence, in a little Ale in the Morning, and at four in the Afternoon, and continue it five or six Weeks: The Pow|der should be made in May if possible.

Page  201

For the Chin-Cough.

TAKE a Spoonful of the Juice of Pennyroyal, mixed with Sugar-candy beaten to Powder. Take this for nine Mornings together.

To cure the Itch without Sulphur.

TAKE a Handful of Elecampane-root, and as much sharp pointed Dock; shred them small, and boil them in two Quarts of Spring-water till it comes to a Pint; strain the Liquor, and with it let the Party wash his Hands and Face two or three Times a Day.

For the Scurvy or Dropsy.

STAMP and strain the Juice of the Leaves of Elder, and to a quarter of a Pint of Juice put so much White-wine; warm it a little and drink it off, and do thus for four or five Mornings together: If it purge you it will certainly do good. Take this in the Spring.

For an Ague.

GIVE as much Virginia Snake root dried and pow|der'd, as will lie upon a Shilling, in a Glass of Sherry or Sack, just before the cold Fit begins; use this two or three Times till the Ague is gone.

The yellow Balsam.

TAKE eight Ounces of Burgamy Pitch, three Ounces and a half of yellow Bees-wax sliced, one Pound of Deers-suet, one Ounce of Venice Turpentine, beaten up in Plantane-water, half a Pint of red Roses, a quarter of a Pint of Vinegar of red Roses, twenty four Cloves of Garlick, and of Salt-petre dried before the Fire half the Quantity of a Nutmeg; bruise the Garlick in a Stone Mortar, and set the Oil, Vinegar, and Garlick in an Page  202 earthen Pipkin over the Fire; let it boil gently half an Hour; then put in the Pitch and Wax, and when that is melted, put in the Suet, and one Ounce of Palm Oil; then let it boil a quarter of an Hour longer; then take it off the Fire, and put in the Turpentine and Salt petre; set it over the Fire again for a little while; then take it off, and let it stand to cool, then pour it gently into your Gallipots; be sure you put in no Dregs; the Vinegar will fall to the Bottom; tie the Gallipots down with Leather. 'Tis an excellent Salve for sore Legs, Boils, Whitlows, sore Breasts, and may safely be used to draw Corruption out of any Sore; put a little of it on Lint, and put a Plaister of the following black Salve over it.

The black Salve.

TAKE a Pint of Oil of Cloves, three quarters of a Pound of yellow Wax, two Ounces of Frankincense finely beaten and searced, two Ounces of the best Mastich, two Ounces of Olibanum, two Ounces of Myrrh, half a Pound of white Lead finely ground, and two Drachms of Camphire: Boil these till they are black; then let it stand a little; oil a Board and pour it on, and oil your Hand, and make it up in Rolls for Use.

For the Falling-Sickness.

TAKE of the Powder of a Man's Scull, of Cinnabar, and Antimony, of each one Drachm, of the Root of Male-Peony, and Frog's Liver dried, of each two Drachms, of the Salt of Amber, half a Drachm, Conserve of Rose|mary, two Ounces, Syrup of Peonies, enough to make it into a soft Electuary, of which give the Quantity of a large Nutmeg every Morning and Evening, drinking af|ter it three Ounces of the Water of the Lillies of the Valley; take it three Days before the New Moon, and three Days before the Full Moon; to bring the Patient quickly out of the Fit, let his Nostrils and Temples be rubb'd with the Oil of Amber.

Page  203

A calcin'd Water to dry up Ulcers and old Sores.

TAKE of the best Roman-Vitriol three Ounces, Cam|phire one Ounce; beat them into fine Powder, put them into the Bottom of a Crucible, and fix it in hot Embers; cover it with white Paper four double, and put a little Tile on it: Let it be well calcin'd, but not too much; when 'tis cold, beat it into fine Powder, and sift it; then add to it three Ounces of Bole-Armoniac, beaten and sifted; mix all together, and to half an Ounce of this Powder put a quart of Spring or Plantane-water, boil the Water, and when 'tis blood-warm, put in your half Ounce of Powder, and stir it together in a Pewter Bason till 'tis quite cold, then put it in a Bottle for Use. When you use it, shake the Bottle, and pour some out, and use it as hot as can be endured, either by Syringe, or washing the Place twice or thrice a Day, and use the following Plaister or Salve.

The Leaden Plaister.

TAKE of white Lead three Ounces, red Lead seven Ounces, of Bole-Armoniac nine Ounces; beat all into fine Powder, and put to them a Pint of the best Oil-olive, incorporate them over the Fire, and let them boil gently half an Hour, putting in one Ounce of Oil of Ex|eter; stir it continually, and when 'tis enough, make it up in Rolls. This is a drying Plaister.

A Green Salve.

TAKE five Handfuls of Clown's All-heal, stamp it and put it in a Pot, and add to it four Ounces of Boar's-grease, half a Pint of Oil-olive, and Wax three Ounces sliced; boil it 'til the Juice is consumed, which is known when the Stuff doth not bubble at all; 'then strain it and put it on the Fire again, adding 2 Ounces of Venice-Tur|pentine; let it boil a little and put it in Gallipots for Page  204 Use. Melt a little in a Spoon, and if the Cut or Wound be deep, dip your Tents in it; if not, dip Lint and put on it, and defend the Place with a Leaden Plaister; dress it once a Day.

A Poultice for a Sore Breast before 'tis broken.

BOIL white Bread and Milk to a Poultice, then put to it Oil of Lillies, and the Yolk of an Egg; set it over the Fire again to heat, and apply it as hot as can be en|dured: Dress it Morning and Night till 'tis broke, then dress it with the Poultice of Raisins.

For a Sore Breast when 'tis Broken.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, and beat them very small; then add to it near as much Honey; and beat it together into a Salve; spread it on a Cloth, and make Tents if Occasion. Dress it once a Day; when 'tis well drawn, use the Yellow Bal|som, and Black or Leaden Plaister.

To disperse Tumours.

TAKE of yellow Wax, Frankincense and Rosin, of each four Ounces; melt them together, strain it out, and when 'tis cool make it in a Roll, and keep it for Use.

To keep a Cancer in the Breast from increasing.

TAKE of Lapis Calaminaris four Ounces all in one Piece, and having made it Red-hot in a Crucible, 9 Times, quench it every Time in a Pint of White wine; then take two Ounces of Lapis Tutty, and having burnt that Red-hot in a Crucible three Times, quench that eve|ry Time in a Pint of Red-rose Water: Then beat the Tut|ty and the Calaminaris Stone together in a Mortar very fine, and put it in a Glass Bottle, and put the Rose-wa|ter and White-wine to it, and shake it three or four Times a Day, for nine Days before you begin to use it. You must Page  205 keep the Wine and the Rose-water close covered when you quench the Stone, that the Steam does not go out. When you use it shake it well, and dip Rags in it, and lay them to the Breast; let the Rags remain on till 'tis dress'd again: It must be dress'd twice a Day, Night and Morn|ing. The clear Water is excellent for weak or sore Eyes.

For a Swelling in the Face.

TAKE a Handful of Damask rose Leaves, boil them in running Water till they are tender; stamp them to a Pulp, and boil white Bread and Milk till 'tis soft; then put in your Pulp with a little Hog's-lard, and thick|en it with the Yolk of an Egg, and apply it warm.

For a sore Throat.

MAKE a Plaister of Paracelsus four Inches broad, and so long as to come from Ear to Ear, and apply it warm to the Throat; then bruise House-leek and press out the Juice, add an equal Quantity of Honey, and a little burnt Allum; mix all together, and let the Party often take some on a Liquorish-stick.

A purging Diet-Drink.

TAKE of Garden Scurvy-grass six Handfuls, Water-cresses and Brooklime, of each four Handfuls, Peach-blossoms four Handfuls, Nettle-tops and Fumitory, of each three Handfuls, Monk's Rhubarb four Ounces, Sena four Ounces, China two Ounces, Sarfparilla three Oun|ces, Rhubarb one Ounce, Coriander and sweet Fennl-seeds, of each half an Ounce; cut the Herbs, slce the Roots, bruise the Seeds, put them in a thin Bag, and hang them in four Gallons of small Ale; after three Days, drink a Pint of it every Morning. Be regular in Det, eat nothing salt or sour.

Page  206

Pills to purge the Head.

TAKE of the Extract of Rudium two Drachms, and Pill-Faetida one Drachm; mix these well together, and make it into 12 Pills; take 2, or if the Constitution be strong, 3 of them at six o'Clock in the Morning; drink warm Gruel, or thin Broth, or Posset-drink, when they work.

For a Canker in the Mouth.

TAKE Celandine, Columbine, Sage, and Fennel, of each one Handful, stamp and strain them, and to the Juice put a Spoonful of Honey, half a Spoonful of burnt Allum, and as much Bole Armoniac beaten fine; mix and beat all these together very well, and wrap a little Flax about a Stick, and rub the Canker with it; if it bleeds, 'tis the better.

A Water for sore or weak Eyes.

TAKE of Ground Ivy, Celandine, and Dasies, of each a like Quantity, stamp'd and strain'd, and add to the Juice a little Sugar and white Rose water; shake this together, and with a Feather drop it into the Eyes; this takes away all Manner of Inflammation, Spots, Itch|ing, Smarting, or Web, and is an excellent Thing for the Eyes.

A Clyster for the Worms.

TAKE of Rue, Wormwood, Lavender-cotton, three or four Sprigs of each, a Spoonful of Anniseeds bruised; boil these in a Pint of Milk till the third Part be consum'd; then strain it out, and add to it as much Aloes finely powder'd, as will lie on a Three-pence; sweeten it with Honey, and give it pretty warm; it should be given three Mornings together; and the best Time is three Days before the New or Full Moon.

Page  207

Lucatellus's Balsam.

TAKE of Venice Turpentine one Pound, the best Oil three Pints, Sack six Spoonfuls, yellow Wax half a Pound, natural Balsam one Ounce, Oil of St. John's-wort one Ounce, red Sanders well powder'd, one Ounce; cut the Wax in thin Slices, and set it over the Fire in a large Skillet, and when 'tis all melted put in the Tur|pentine; first wash it three several Times in red Rose-water, then stir them well together till they boil a little; then take it off from the Fire and let it cool. The next Day take it out of the Skillet and cut it in thin Slices, that all the Water may be got out of it; then set it over the Fire again, and when 'tis melted, stir it well toge|ther; then put in the Oil, and the Oil of St. John's-wort, and the natural Balsam, and the Sack and Sanders, stir|ring them all together very well; then let it boil a little while, and take it off the Fire and stir it two Hours all one way. When 'tis cold, put it in Gallipots and cover them with Leather; it will keep good twenty Years, and the older the better.

A Salve for a Sear-cloth, for Bruises or Aches.

TAKE a Pint of Oil, nine Ounces of red Lead, two Ounces of Bees wax, a Shilling's-worth of Sperma-Cete, two Ounces of Rosin beaten and sifted; set all these on a soft Fire in a Bell Skillet, stirring till it boils, and then try it on a Rag whether it firmly sticks upon it; when it does stick, take it off; and when you have made what Sear cloths you please, pour the rest on an oiled Board, and make it up in Rolls. 'Tis very good for a Cut or green Wound.

An excellent Recipe for the Cure of Colds.

TAKE of Venice-Treacle half a Drachm, Powder of Snake-root twelve Grains, Powder of Saffron six Grains, Volatile Salt of Hartshorn four Grains, Syrup Page  208 of Cloves a sufficient Quantity to make it into a Bolus. To be taken going to Rest, drinking a large Draught of Mountain Whey after it. Those who can't afford Moun|tain Whey, may drink Treacle Posset.

To such Constitutions as can't be provok'd to sweat, opening a Vein, or a gentle Purge will be of great Ser|vice.

An Ointment for a Cold on the Stomach.

TAKE an Ounce and a half of the Oil of Valentia-Scbioa, Oil of Sweet-Almonds a quarter of an Ounce, a quarter of an Ounce of Man's Fat, and 4 Scru|ples of the Oil of Mace; mix these together, and warm a little in a Spoon, and Night and Morning anoint the Stomach. Lay a Piece of black or lawn Paper on it.

To make Gascoigne's Powder.

TAKE of Powder of Pearl, red Coral, Crab's Eyes, white Amber and Hartshorn, of each one Ounce; beat them to a fine Powder and searce them. Then take a Drachm of oriental Bzoar, and a Drachm of Amber|grease, and mix with the Powders; then take off the black Toes of Crab's-Claws, beaten to a fine Powder, as much as of all the rest of the Powders, for this is the Chief; then mix all well together, and make them up in Balls in Jelly of Hartshorn, and in your Jelly infuse a small Quantity of Saffron to give them a Colour; when you have rolled them in Balls as big as a Walnut, lay them on a China or Silver Plate to dry; when they are fully dry and hard, paper them up, and keep them for Use. The Dose you must give at a Time, is, to a Man or Woman 10 or 12 Grains, in Dragon, Carduus, or the Lady Allen's Water; the Party going to Bed and cover'd warm. The Crabs used in this Powder must be caught in May or September, and they must not be boiled.

Page  209

A Water to cure red or pimpled Faces.

TAKE a Pint of strong White-wine Vinegar, and put to it Powder of the Roots of Orris three Drachms, Powder of Brimstone half an Ounce, and Camphire two Drachms, stamp with a few blanched Almonds, four oaken Apples cut in the Middle, and the Juice of four Lemons, and a Handful of Bean-flowers; put all these together in a strong double Glass Bottle, shake them well together, and set it in the Sun for 10 Days; wash the Face with this Water, let it dry on, and don't wipe it off. This cures red or pimpled Faces, Spots, Heat, Morphew, or Sunburn. But you must eat the following Diet for three Weeks or a Month.

Tke Cucumbers and cut them as small as Herbs to the Pot, boil them in a small Pipkin with a Piece of Mutton, and make it into Pottage with Oatmeal: So eat a Mess Morning, Noon, and Night, without Intermission, for three Weeks or a Month. This Diet and the Water has cured when nothing else would do.

A good Thing to wash the Face in.

TAKE a large Piece of Camphire, the Quantity of a Goose-Egg, and break it so that it may go into a Pint Bottle, which fill with Water; when it has stood a Month, put a Spoonful of it in three Spoonfuls of Milk, and wash in it.

Wear a Piece of Lead, beaten exceeding thin, for a Forehead piece, under a Forehead-cloth; it keeps the Forehead smooth and plump.

A Plaister for Worms in Children.

TAKE two Ounces of yellow Wax, and two Ounces of Rsin, boil them half an Hour, stirring them all the while; scum them well and take it off, and put to it three Drachms of Aloes, and two Spoonfuls of Treacle, and boil it up again; rub a Board with fresh Butter, and Page  210 pour the Salve thereon, work it well, and make it up in Rolls; When you make the Plaister, sprinkle it with Saf|fron, and cut a Hole against the Navel.

The Stomach Plaister.

TAKE of Burgamy Pitch, Frankincense, and Bees-Wax, of each one Ounce, melt them together, then put in one Ounce of Venice-Turpentine, and one Ounce of Oil of Mace; melt it together, and spread your Plais|ter on Sheep's Leather; grate on it some Nutmeg when you lay it on the Stomach.

To make a Quilt for the Stomach.

TAKE a fine Rag four Inches square, and spread Cotton thin over it, then take Mint and Sweet mar|joram dried and rubb'd to Powder, and strew it over the Cotton pretty thick; then take Nutmeg, Cloves, and Mace, of each a quarter of an Ounce beaten and sifted, and strew that over the Herbs, and on that strew half an Ounce of Galengal finely powder'd, then a thin Row of Cotton, and another fine Rag, and quilt it together. When you lay it on the Stomach, dip it in hot Sack and lay it on as warm as can be endured. This is very good for a Pain in the Stomach.

A Powder for Convulsion Fits.

TAKE a Drachm and half of single Piony-seed, of Misletoe of the Oak one Drachm, Pearl, white Amber, and Coral, all finely powder'd, of each half a Drachm, Bezoar two Drachms, and five Leaves of Gold; make all these in a fine Powder, and give it in a Spoon|ful of black Cherry-water, or if you please Hysterical Water. You may give it to a Child new born, to pre|vent Fits, as much as will lie on a Three-pence, and like|wise at each Change of the Moon; and to older People as much as they have Strength and Occasion.

Page  211

To prevent Fits in Children.

TAKE Saxifrage, Bean pods, Black-cherry, Ground|sel, and Parsley-waters; mix them together with Syrup of single Piony. Give a Spoonful very often, espe|cially observe to give it at the Changes of the Moon.

For a Hoarseness with a Cold.

TAKE a quarter of a Pint of Hysop-water, make it very sweet with Sugar-candy, set it over the Fire, and when 'tis thorough hot, beat the Yolk of an Egg, and brew it in it, and drink it Morning and Night.

A Remedy for a Cough.

TAKE the Yolk of a new-laid Egg, take the Skin of the Yolk, and add six Spoonfuls of red Rose-wa|ter; beat it well together, and make it very sweet with white Sugar-candy; drink it six Nights going to Bed.

An excellent Remedy for Whooping Coughs.

TAKE dried Colts-foot Leaves a good Handful, cut them small, and boil them in a Pint of Spring wa|ter, 'til half a Pint is boiled away; then take it off the Fire, and when 'tis almost cold, strain it thro' a Cloth, squeezing the Herb as dry as you can; and then throw it away, and dissolve in the Liquor an Ounce of brown Su|gar-candy finely powder'd, and then give the Child (if it be about three or four Years old, and so in Proportion) one Spoonful of it, cold or warm, as the Season proves, three or four Times a Day, or oftner, if the Fits of Cough|ing come frequently, 'til well, which will be in two or three Days, but it will presently almost abate the Fits of Coughing.

This Herb seems to be a Specifick for those Sorts of Coughs, and indeed all others, in Old as well as Young; the Latin Name Tussilago, from Tussis, the Cough, de|notes Page  212 as much; as does also the Latin Word Bechium, from the Greek Word BEKION, a Cough; and are the Names given it by the Ancients, perhaps some Thousand Years ago. It has wonderfully eased them, when nothing else would do it, and greatly helps in Shortness of Breath; and in the Asthma and Phthisick I have not known any Thing exceed it; likewise in Wastings or Consumptions of the Lungs, it has been found of excellent Use, by it smooth, softning, healing Qualities, even where there has been Spitting of Blood, and Rawness and Soreness of the Passages, with Hoarseness, &c. in blunting the acrimo|nious Humours, which in such Cases are almost continu|ally dripping upon them. It is to be questioned, whe|ther for those Purposes there is to be hd in the whole Materia Medica, a Medicine so innocent, so safe, and yet so pleasant and effectual, or tht can afford Relief so soon as this will. Grown People may make it stronger than for Children.

Get the Herb of the same Year's Growth and Drying, that you use it in; and the larger the Leaves, as being the fuller grown, the better.

It is best to be made fresh and fresh, as you want it; and not too much at a Time, especially in warm Weather.

Pills to purge off a Rheum in the Teeth.

TAKE four Drachms of Mastick, ten Drachms of Aloes, three Drachms of Agatick; beat the Mastick and Aloes, and grate the Agarick; searce them and make them into Pills with Syrup of Betony. You may make but a quarter of this Quantity at a Time; and take it all out, one Pill in the Morning, and two at Night. You may eat or drink any thing with these Pills, and go a|broad, keeping yourself warm; and when they work, drink a Draught or two of something warm.

An Ointment to cause Hair to grow.

TAKE two Ounces of Boar's grease, one Drachm of the Ashes of burnt Bees, one Drachm of the Ashes Page  213 of Southernwood, one Drachm of the Juice of a white Dilly root, one Drachm of Oil of sweet Almonds, and six Drachms of pure Musk; and according to Art, make an Ointment of these; and the Day before the full Moon shave the Place, and anoint it every Day with this Oint|ment. It will cause Hair to grow where you'll have it.

Oil of sweet Almonds, or Spirit of Vinegar, is very good to rub the Head with if the Hair grows thin.

To preserve and whiten the Teeth.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of Honey, and boil it with a little Roch Allum; scum it well, and then put in a little Ginger finely beaten; let it boil a while longer, then take it off, and before 'tis cold, put to it as much Dragon's-blood as will make it of a good Colour. Mix it well together, and keep it in a Gallipot for Use. Take a little on a Rag, and rub the Teeth. You may use it often.

To make Lip Salve.

TAKE a quarter of a Pound of Alkermes-root brui|sed, and half a quarter of a Pound of fresh Butter, as much Bees-wax, and a Pint of Claret; boil all these together a pretty while, then strain it, and let it stand 'til 'tis cold; then take the Wax off the Top, and melt it a|gain, and pour it clear from the Dregs into your Gallipots or Boxes. Use it when, and as often as you please.

To clean and soften the Hands.

SET half a Pint of Milk over the Fire, and put into it half a quartern of Almonds blanch'd and beaten very fine; when it boils, take it off, and thicken it with the Yolk of an Egg; then set it on again, stirring it all the while both before and after the Egg is in; then take it off, and stir in a sall Spoonful of sweet Oil; and put it in a Gallipot: It will keep about five or six Days. Take a bit as big as a Walnut, and rub about your Hands, Page  214 and the Dirt or Soil will rub off, and it will make them very soft. Draw on Gloves, just as you have used it.

A Remedy for Pimples.

TAKE half a quarter of a Pound of bitter Almonds, blanch, stamp them, and put them into half a Pint of Spring-water, stir it together, and strain it out: Then put to it half a Pint of the best Brandy, and a Pennyworth of the Flour of Brimstone. Shake it well when you use it, which must be often. Dab it on with a fine Rag.

A Water to wash the Face.

BOIL two Ounces of French Barley in three Pints of Spring water; shift the Water three Times; the last Water use, adding to it a quartern of bitter Almonds blanch'd, beat, and strained out; thn add the Juice of two Lemons, and a Pint of White-wine. Wash with it at Night. Put a bit of Camphire in the Bottle.

To whiten and clean the Hands.

BOIL a quart of new Milk, and turn it with a Pint of Aqua-vitae; then take off the Curd, then put into the Posset a Pint of Rhenish-wine, and that will raise a|nother Curd, which take off; then put in the Whites of six Eggs well beaten, and that will raise another Curd, which you must take off, and mix the three Curds toge|ther very well, and put them into a Gallipot, and put the Posset in a Bottle. Scour your Hands with the Curd, and wash them with the Posset.

A Water for the Scurvy in the Gums.

TAKE two Quarts of Spring water, and one Pound of right Flower-de-luce Root, and a quarter of a Pound of Roch Allum; two Ounces of Cloves, 2 Hand|fuls of red Rose-leaves, two Handfuls of Woodbine leaves, two Handfuls of Columbine-leaves, two Handfuls of Page  215 brown Sage, and one of Rosemary; eight Sevil Oranges, Peel and all, only take out the Seeds. Set these over the Fire, and let them boil a Quart away; then take it off, and strain it, and set it over the Fire again, and put to it three Quarts of Claret, and a Pint of Honey: Let them boil half an Hour; scum it well, and when 'tis cold, bot|tle it for Use. Wash and gargle your Mouth with it two or three Times a Day.

To take away Morphew.

TAKE Briony-roots, and Wake-Robin, stamp them with Brimstone, and make it up in a Lump, wrap it in a fine Linen Rag, and dip it in Vinegar, and rub the Place pretty hard with it, and it will take away the Morphew Spots.

The Italian Wash for the Neck.

TAKE a Quart of Ox-gall, two Ounces of Roch-Allum, two Ounces of white Sugar-candy, two Drachms of Camphire, half an Ounce of Borax; beat all these in a Mortar, and sist them through a fine Sieve; then mix them well in the Quart of Ox-gall; put all to|gether into a three Pint stone Bottle well cork'd; set it to infuse in the Sun, or by the Fire, six Weeks together, stiring it once a Day; then strain it from the Bottom, and put to every quarter of a Pint of this Liquor a Quart of Spring-water, otherwise it will be too thick; set it a little to clarify, and bottle it, put some Powder of Pearl in the Bottle: Wash with it.

For a Cold, Dr. Ratcliff's Receipt.

MAKE some Sack-whey, with Rosemary boil'd in it; mix a little of it in a Spoon, with twenty Grains of Gascoigne Powder; then drink half a Pint of your Sack whey, with twelve Drops of Spirit of Harts|horn in it, go to Bed, and keep warm; do this two or three Nights-together.

Page  216

A Receipt for the Gravel.

PUT two Spoonfuls of Lint-seeds just bruised, into a Quart of Water, and a little Stick of Liquorish; boil it a quarter of an Hour; then strain it through a Sieve, and sweeten it to your Taste with Syrup of Al|thea.

Excellent for Worms in Children.

FEnegrig-seeds, and Wormwood-seeds mix'd, one Pen|nyworth, beat and searced; mix it well in a Halfpen|nyworth of Treacle; let the Child take a small Spoonful in a Morning fasting, and fast two Hours after it; do this three or four Days.

For a Cold.

TAKE Rosemary and sliced Liquorish, and boil it in small Ale, and sweeten it with Treacle, and drink it going to Bed four or five Nights together.

To stop Bleeding in the Stomach.

TAKE Oil of Spike, natural Balsam, Bole-Armoni|ac, hubarb, and Turpentine; mix these together, and take as much as a large Nutmeg three Times a Day.

The Tar-Pills, for a Cough.

TAKE Tar, and drop it on Powder of Liquorish, and make it up into Pills; take two every Niht go|ing to Bed, and in the Morning drink a Glass of fair Water that Liquorish has been three or four Days steeped in. Do this for nine or ten Days together, as you find Good.

Page  217

For a Purge.

TAKE half an Ounce of Sena, boil it in a Pint of Ale till half be consumed; cover it close till the next Day, then boil it again till it comes to two Spoon|fuls; strain it, and add to it two Spoonfuls of Treacle, and drink it warm; drink Gruel, or Posset, or Broth af|ter it; keep your self very warm while 'tis Working. Or else two Ounces of Syrup of Roses, and drink warm Ale after it in the working.

For the Itch.

TAKE Elecampane-roots, or Dock-roots, dried and beaten to Powder, and a little beaten Gnger, both searced very fine; mix it up with fresh Butter, and anoint with it in the Joints.

For a Cough.

TAKE Conserve of Roses two Ounces, Diascordium half an Ounce, Powder of Olibanum half a Drachm, Syrup of Jubebs half an Ounce; mix these, and take the Quantity of a Nutmeg Three times a Day; in the Morn|ing, at Four, and at Night.

To make Cashew Lozenges.

TAKE half an Ounce of Balsam of Tolu, put it in a Silver Tankard, and put to it three quarters of a Pint of Fair Water; cover it very close, and let it sim|mer over a gentle Fire 24 Hours; then take ten Ounces of Loaf Sugar finely Powder'd, and half an Ounce of Ja|pan Earth finely powder'd and sifted, and wet it with two parts of Tolu Water, and one part of Orange flower Water, and boil it together almost to a Candy height; then drop it on Pie plates, but first rub the Plates over with an Al|mond, or wash them over with Orange flower Water. 'Tis best to do but five Ounces at a Time, because it will Page  218 cool before you can drop it; after you have dropp'd 'em, set the Plates a little before the Fire, they will slip off the easier. If you would have them perfum'd, put in Amber|grease.

For Obstructions.

PUT two Ounces of Steel filings into a Quart Bottle of White wine, let it stand three Weeks, shaking it once a Day; then put in a Drachm of Mace, let it stand a Week longer, then put into another Bottle three Quar|ters of a Pound of Loaf sugar in Lumps, and clear off your Steel wine to your Sugar, and when 'tis dissolv'd 'tis fit to use. Give a Spoonful to a young Person, with as much Cream of Tartar as will lie on a Three pence, to one that is older two Spoonfuls; and Cream of Tartar ac|cordingly.

For a Rheumatism.

LET the Party take of the finest glazed Gunpowder, as much as a large Thimble may hold, wet it in a Spoon with Milk from the Cow, and drink a good half Pint of warm Milk after it; be covered warm in Bed and sweat. Give it Fasting about seven in the Morning, and take this nine or ten Mornings together.

The Bruise Ointment.

TAKE of Rosemary, brown Sage, Fennel, Camo|mile, Hysop, Balm, Woodbine leaves, Southern|wood, Parsley, Wormwood, Self-heal, Rue, Elder-leaves, Clowns-all heal, Burdock leaves, of each one Handful; put them into a Pot with very strong Beer, or Spirits e|nough to cover them well, and two Pounds of fresh But|ter out of the Churn; cover it up with Paste, and bake it with Bread, and when 'tis baked strain it out: When 'tis cold, scum off the Butter and melt it, and put it in a Gallipot for Use. The Liquor is very good to dip Flan|nels into, and bathe any green Bruise or Ach, as hot as can be born.

Page  219

A good Vomit.

TAKE two Ounces of the finest white Allum, beat it small, put it into better than half a Pint of New|milk, set it on a slow Fire till the Milk is turn'd clear; let it stand a quarter of an Hour, strain it off and drink it just warm. It will give three or four Vomits, and is ve|ry safe, and an excellent Cure for an Ague, taken half an Hour before the Fit; drink good store of Carduus Tea after it. Or else take half a Drachm of Ipecacnana, and Carduus Tea with it.

An Ointment for a Scald Head.

TAKE one Pound of May Butter without Salt, one of the Churn, a Pint of Ale not too stale, a good Handful of green Wormwood; let the Ale be hot, and put in the Butter to melt, shred the Wormwood, and let them boil together till it turns green; strain it, and when 'tis cold take the Ointment from the Dregs.

To Cure the Piles.

TAKE two Pennyworth of Litharge of Gold, one Ounce of Sallet Oil, one Spoonful of White-wine Vinegar; put all into a new Gallipot, beat it together with a Knife till 'tis as thick as an Ointment: Spread it on a Cloth, and apply it to the Place; if Inward, put it up as far as you can.

To make the Teeth White.

TAKE three Spoonfuls of Celandine, nine Spoon|fuls of Honey, half a Spoonful of burnt Allum; mix these together, and rub the Teeth with it.

A Powder for the Teeth.

HALF an Ounce of Cream of Tartar, and a quar|ter of an Ounce of Powder of Myrrh; rub the Teeth with it two or three Times a Week.

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To make the right Angel-salve.

TAKE of Rsin and Parrsin, of each half a Pound; Virgins Wax and Frakincense, of each a quarter of a Pound; Mastih one Ounce, Deer Suet a quarter of a Pound; melt what is to be melted, and powder what is to be powder'd, and sift it fine; then boil them, and strain them thro' a Cnvas bag into a Pottle of White-wine; then boil the Wine with the Ingredients an Hour with a gentle Fire, and let it st••d till 'tis no hotter than Blood; then put to it two Drachm of Camphire, and two Ounces of Venice Turpentine, and stir it constantly till tis' Cold. Be sure your Stuff be no hotter than Blood when you put in your Camphire nd Turpentine, other|wise 'tis spoil'd; make it up in Rolls, and keep it for Use. 'Tis the best Salve made.

To take out the Redness and Scurf after the Small-pox.

AFTER the first Scabs are well off, anoint the Face going to Bed with the following Ointment. Beat common Allum very fine, and sift it thro' a Lawn Sieve, and mix it with Oil, like a thick Cream, and lay it all over the Face with a Feather; in the Morning, have Bran boiled in Water till 'tis Slippery, then wash it off as hot as you can bear it. So do for a Month, or more, as their is Occasion.

To make Brimstone-Lozenges for a short Breath.

TAKE of Brimstone flour and double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted an equal Quantity; make it in Lozenges with Gum-dragant steep'd in Rose-water; dry them in the Sun, and take three or four a Day.

For a Burn.

TAKE common Allum, beat and sift it, and beat it up with Whites of Eggs to a Curd; then with a Fea|ther Page  221 anoint the Place. It will Cure without any other Thing.

To procure the Menses.

TAKE a quarter of an Ounce of pure Myrrh made into fine Powder; mix it with 3 quarters of an Ounce of Conserve of Bugloss flowers; two Days before your Expectation take this Quantity at four Times, last at Night, and first in the Morning; drink after each Time a Draught of Posset-drink made of Ale, White-wine, and Milk, and boil in it some Pennyroyal, and a few Camo|mile Flowers.

To provoke Urine presently when stopped.

IN a Quart of Beer boil a Handful of the Berries of Eglantine till it comes to a Pint; drink it off Luke|warm.

To draw up the Uvula.

TAKE Ground Ivy and heat it well between two Tiles, and lay it as warm as can be born on the top of the Head.

The Blood of a Hare, dry'd and drank in Red-wine, does stop the Bloody-Flux, or any Lask, tho' never so severe.

For a Thrush in Childrens Mouths.

TAKE a hot Sea-Coal, and quench it in as much Spring water as will cover the Coal; wash it with this five or six times a Day.

For the Worms in Children.

TAKE of Mithridate and Honey, of each a Penny|worth, Oil of Mce Two pennyworth; melt them together, and spread upon Leather, cut in the Shape of Page  222 an Heart; Oil of Savin and Wormwood, of each six Drops, of Aloes and Saffron in Powder, of each one Drachm; rub the Oils, and strew the Powders all over the Plaister; apply it, being warm'd, to the Child's Sto|mach, with the Point upwards.

For a Weakness in the Back or Reins.

TAKE an Ounce of Venice Turpentine, wash it in red Rose-water, work it in the Water till it is white, pour the Water from it, and work it up into Pills with Powder of Turmerick, and one grated Nutmeg; you may put a little Rhubarb, as you see Occasion. Take three in the Morning, and three in the Evening, in a little Syrup of Elder.

An approved Medicine for the Stone.

TAKE six Pounds of black Cherries, stamp them in a Mortar till the Kernels are bruised, then take of the Powder of Amber, and of Coral prepared, of each two Ounces; put them with the Cherries into a Still, and with a gentle Fire draw off the Water; which, if you take for the Stone, mix a Drachm of the Powder of Am|ber with a Spoonful of it, drinking three or four Spoon|fuls after it; if for the Palsy or Convulsion, take four Spoonfuls, without adding any thing in the Morning fasting.

To give Ease in Fits of the Stone, and to cure the Suppression of Urine, which usually at|tend them.

TAKE of Snails Shells and Bees, of each an equal Quantity, dry them in an Oven with a moderate Heat, then beat them to a very fine Powder, of which give s much as will lie-upon a Six pence in a quarter of a Pint of Bean-flower water, every Morning, fasting two Hours after it; continue this for three Days together. This has been often found to break the Stone, and to force a speedy Passage for the Urine.

Page  223

To stop Flooding.

DISSOLVE a quarter of an Ounce of Venice Trea|cle in four Spoonfuls of Water, and drop in it thir|ty or forty of Jones's Drops. Take it when Occasion re|quires, especially in Child-bed.

An approved Remedy for a Cancer in the Breast.

TAKE of the hard Knobs or Warts which grow on the Legs of a Stone-Horse, dry them carefully, and powder them; give from one Scruple to half a Drachm every Morning and Evening in a Glass of Sack. You must continue taking them a Month or six Weeks, or lon|ger, if the Cancer is far gone.

A Receipt for Colds.

TAKE of Venice Treacle half a Drachm; Powder of Snake-root twelve Grains; Powder of Saffron six Grains; Volatile Salt of Hartshorn four Grains; Sy|rup of Cloves, a sufficient Quantity to make it into a Bolus. To be taken going to rest, drinking a large Draught of warm Mountain Whey after it.

N. B. Those who can't afford Mountain Whey, may drink Treacle-Posset.

To such Constitutions as can't be provok'd to sweat, o|pening a Vein, or a gentle Purge, will be of great Service.

An infallible Cure for the Bite of a mad Dog.

OF all the Diseases incident to Mankind, there is none so shocking to our Nature, as the Bite of a mad Dog; and yet, as terrible as it is, we have known Instances of those who chose rather to hazard the worst Effects of it, and to die the worst of Deaths, than to fol|low the Advice of their Physicians, by making use of the known Specifick of dipping in the Sea, or Salt-water. It is for the Sake of People of this unhappy Temper, who may have the Misfortune to be so bit, and of those who Page  224 may have Cattle that are so, that we publish the follow|ing Receipt which has been frequently made use of in a neighbouring County, and (as the Gentleman who com|municated it says) was never known to fail.

Take six Ounces of Rue, clean'd, pick'd, and bruis'd; four Ounces of Garlick, peel'd and bruis'd; four Ounces of Venice Treacle; four Ounces of fil'd Pewter or scrap'd Tin. Boil these in two Quarts of the best Ale, in a Pan cover'd close, over a gentle Fire, for the Space of one Hour; then strain the Ingredients from the Liquor; give eight or nine Spoonfuls of it warm to a Man or Woman three Mornings fasting, and cold to any Beast fasting. Eight or nine Spoonfuls is sufficient for the strongest, a less Quantity to those younger, or of a weak|er Constitution, as you may judge of their Strength; ten or twelve for a Horse or Bullock; three, four, or five for a Sheep, Hog, or Dog.

This must be given within nine Days after the Bite; and it never fails either in Man or Beast. If you can conveniently, bind some of the Ingredients on the Wound.

DIRECTIONS for Painting Rooms or Pales.

The Price of the Materials in London.

 l.s.d.
One Hundred Weight of Red Lead,00180
One Hundred Weight of White Lead,01020
Linseed Oil, by the Gallon,00030
A small Quantity of Oil of Turpentine is sufficient

Page  225

THE Red Lead must be ground with Linseed-Oil, and may be used very Thin, it being the priming or first colouring; when 'tis used, some drying Oil must be put to it.

To prepare the drying Oil.

TAKE two Quarts of Linseed-Oil, put it in a Skil|let or Sauce-pan, and put to it a Pound of burnt Amber; boil it for two Hours gently; prepare this with|out Doors for fear of endangering the House; let it set|tle, and it will be fit for Use; pour the clear off, and use that with the White Lead, the Lees or Dregs being as good to be used with Red Lead.

For the second priming.

TAKE a Hundred Weight of White Lead, with an equal Quantity of Whiting in Bulk, but not in Weight; grind them together with Linseed-Oil pretty stiff; when 'tis used, put to it some of the drying Oil a|bove-mentioned, with a small Quantity of Oil of Tur|pentine. This is not to be laid on till the first priming is very dry.

To prepare the Putty or Paste to stop all Joints in the Pales or Wood, that no Wa|ter may soak in.

TAKE a Quantity of Whiting, and mix it very stiff with Linseed Oil, and drying Oil, of each an equal Quantity; when 'tis so stiff it cannot be wrought by the Hand, more Whiting must be added and beat up with a Mallet 'til 'tis stiffer than Dough; when your second Pri|ming is dry, stop such Places as require with this Putty, and when the Putty is skinn'd over, that is, the Outside dr, then proceed and lay on the last Paint, which is thus to be prepared:

Page  226Take of the best White Lead, grind it very stiff with Linseed Oil, and when 'tis used put to it some of the dry|ing Oil, and some Oil of Turpentine. Thus will the Work be finished to great Satisfaction; for it will be more clean and more durable than it can be performed by a House-painter, without you pay considerably more than the common Rates. Repeat this last Preparation once in five Years, and it will preserve any Outworks that are ex|posed to the Weather, Time out of Mind. But for Rooms or Places within Doors, proceed thus:

The Wainscot Colour for Rooms.

WHEN you mix your last Paint, add to your White Lead a small Quantity of Yellow Oaker, and use it as above directed. 'Tis now the universal Fashion to paint all Rooms of a plain Wainscot Colour; and if it should alter, 'tis but mixing any other Colour with the White Lead instead of Yellow Oaker. There must be bought fix Chamber pots of Earth, and fix Brushes, and keep them to what they belong to.

To make Yellow Varnish.

TAKE one Quart of Spirit of Wine, and seven Oun|ces of Seed Lake, half an Ounce of Sandarack, a quarter of an Ounce of Gum-Anime, and one Drachm of Mastich. Let these infuse 36 or 40 Hours, strain it off, and keep it for Use. 'Tis good for Frames of Chairs or Tables, or any Thing black or brown; do it on with a Brush 3 or 4 Times, 9 Times if you polish it afterwards, and a Day between every doing: Lay it very thin the first and second Time, afterwards something thicker.

To make white Varnish.

TO one Quart of Spirit of Wine take eight Ounces of Sandarack well wash'd in Spirit of Wine, that Spi|rit of Wine will make the Yellow Varnish; then add to it a quarter of an Ounce of Gum-Anime well pick'd, half Page  227 an Ounce of Camphire, and one Drachm of Mastich; steep this as long as the yellow Varnish, then strain it out and keep it for Use.

To boil Plate.

TAKE twelve Gallons of Water, or a Quantity according to your Plate in Largeness or Quantity; there must be Water enough to cover it. Put the Water in a Copper or large Kettle, and when it boils put in half a Pound of red Argil, a Pound of common Salt, an Ounce of Roch-Allum; first put your Plate into a Char|coal Fire, and cover it till 'tis red hot; then throw it in|to your Copper, and let it boil half an Hour; then take it out and wash it in cold fair Water, and set it before the Charcoal Fire till 'tis very dry.

A Receipt for destroying Buggs.

TAKE of the highest rectifi'd Spirit of Wine, viz. (Lamp Spirits) that will brn all away dry, and leave not the lest Moisture behind, half a Pint; nwly dstil'd Oil, or Spirit of Turpentine half a Pint; mix them together and break into it, in small Bits, half an Ounce of Camphire, which will dissolve in it in a few Minutes; shake them well together, and with a Piece of Spunge, or a Brush dip'd in some of it, wet very well the Bed or Furniture wherein those Vermin harbour or breed, and it will infallibly kill and destroy both them and their Nits, although they swarm ever so much: But then the Bed or Furniture must be well and thoroughly wet with it, (the Dust upon them being first brushed and shook off,) by which means it will neither stain, soil, or in the least hurt the finest Silk or Damask Bed that is. The Quantity here ordered of this curious neat white Mixture, (which costs but about a Shilling) will rid any one Bed whatsoever, tho' it swarms with Bugs: Do but touch a live Bug with a Drop of it, and you will find it to die instantly. If any Bug or Bugs should happen to appear after once using it, it will only be for want of well Page  228 wetting the Lacing, &c. of the Bed, or the Foldings of the Linings or Curtains near the Rings, or the Joints or Holes in and about the Bed, Head-board, &c. wherein the Bugs and Nits nestle and breed, and then their being well wet again with more of the same Mixture, which dries in as fast as you use it, pouring some of it into the Joints and Holes where the Spunge or Brush cannot reach, will never fail absolutely to destroy them all. Some Beds that have much Wood work, can hardly be thoroughly cleared, without being first taken down; but others that can be drawn out, or that you can get well behind, to be done as it should be, may.

Note, The Smell this Mixture occasions, will be all gone in two or three Days, which yet is very wholesome, and to many People agreeable. You must remember al|ways to shake the Mixture together very well, whenever you use it, which must be in the Day-time, not by Can|dle-light, let the Subtilty of the Mixture should catch the Flame as you are using it, and occasion Damage.

To take Mildew out of Linen.

TAKE Soap and rub it on very well; then scrape Chalk very fine, and rub that in well, and lay it on the Grass, and as it dries, wet it a little, and at once or twice doing, it will come out.