The compleat housewife: or, Accomplish'd gentlewoman's companion: being a collection of several hundred of the most approved receipts, in cookery, pastry, confectionary, preserving, pickles, cakes, creams, jellies, made wines, cordials. And also bills of fare for every month in the year. : To which is added, a collection of near two hundred family receipts of medicines; viz. drinks, syrups, salves, ointments, and many other things of sovereign and approved efficacy in most distempers, pains, aches, wounds, sores, &c. never before made publick in these parts; fit either for private families, or such publick-spirited gentlewomen as would be beneficent to their poor neighbors.
Smith, E. (Eliza), d. ca. 1732.
Page  69

All Sorts of CAKES.

To make a rich great Cake.

TAKE a Peck of Flour well dried, an Ounce of Cloves and Mace, half an Ounce of Nutmegs, as much Cinamon, beat the Spice well, and mix them with your Flour, and a Pound and half of Sugar, and a little Salt, and thirteen Pounds of Currants well washed, picked, and dried, and three Pounds of Raisins stoned and cut into small Pieces; mix all these well together; then make five Pints of Cream almost scalding hot, and put into it four Pounds of fresh Butter; then beat the Yolks of twenty Eggs, three Pints of good Ale-yeast, a Pint of Sack, a quarter of a Pint of Orange-flower Water, three Grains of Musk, and six Grains of Ambergrease: Mix these together, and stir them into your Cream and Butter; then mix all in the Cake, and set it an Hour before the Fire to rise, before you put it into your Hoop; mix your Sweetmeats in it, two Pounds of Citron, and one Pound of candied Orange and Lemon|peel cut in small Pieces: You must bake it in a deep Hoop, butter the Sides, and put two Papers at the Bot|tom, and flour it and put in your Cake; it must have a quick Oven; four Hours will bake it: When 'tis drawn, ice it over the Top and Sides. Take two Pounds of dou|ble refin'd Sugar, beat and sifted, and the Whites of six Eggs beaten to a Froth, with three or four Spoonfuls of Orange-flower Water, and three Grains of Musk and Am|bergrese together; put all these in a Stone Mortar, and beat them with a wooden Pestle, 'til 'tis as white as Snow, and with a Brush or Bunch of Feathers, spread it all over Page  70 the Cake, and put in the Oven to dry; but take Care the Oven does not discolour it; when 'tis cold paper it; it will keep good five or six Weeks.

A Plumb-Cake.

TAKE six Pounds of Currants, five Pounds of Flour, an Ounce of Cloves and Mace, a little Cinamon, half an Ounce of Nutmegs, half a Pound of pounded and blanched Almonds, half a Pound of Sugar, three quarters of a Pound of sliced Citron, Lemon and Orange peel, half a Pint of Sack, a little Honey-water, and a Quart of Ale-yeast, a Quart of Cream, a Pound and half of Butter melted and poured into the middle thereof; then strew a little Flour thereon, and let it lie to rise; then work it well together and lay it before the Fire to rise, then work it up 'til 'tis very smooth; then put it in an Hoop with a Paper floured at the Bottom.

A good Seed Cake.

TAKE five Pounds of fine Flour well dried, and four Pounds of single refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; mix the Sugar and Flour together, and sift them through a Hair Sieve; then wash four Pounds of Butter in eight Spoonfuls of Rose or Orange-flower Water; you must work the Butter with your Hand, 'til 'tis like Cream; beat twenty Eggs, half the Whites, and put to them six Spoonfuls of Sack; then put in your Flour a little at a Time, keeping stirring with your Hand all the Time; you must not begin mixing it 'til the Oven is almost hot; you must let it lie a little while before you put your Cake into the Hoop; when you are ready to put it into the O|ven, put into it eight Ounces of candied Orange-peel sli|ced, and as much Citron, and a Pound and half of Car|raway-comfits; mix all well together, and put it in the Hoop, which must be prepared at Bottom, and buttered; the Oven must be quick; it will take two or three Hours baking. You may ice it if you please.

Page  71

Another Seed Cake.

TAKE seven Pounds of fine Flour well dried, and mix with it a Pound of Sugar beaten and sifted, and three Nutmegs grated, and rub three Pounds of Butter into the Flour; then beat the Yolks of eight Eggs, the Whites of but four, and mix with them a little Rose wa|ter, and a Quart of Cream blood warm, and a Quart of Ale-yeast, and a little Salt; strain all into your Flour, and put a Pint of Sack in with it, and make up your Cake, and put it into a butter'd Cloth, and lay it half an Hour before the Fire to rise; the mean while fit your Pa|per, and butter your Hoop; then take a Pound and three Quarters of Bisket comfit, and a Pound and a half of Ci|tron cut in small Pieces, and mix these in your Cake, and put it into your Hoop, run a Knife cross down to the Bot|tom; a quick Oven, and near three Hours, will bake it.

A Plumb Cake.

TAKE five Pounds of fine Flour, and put to it half a Pound of Sugar; and of Nutmegs, Cloves, and Mace finely beaten, of each half an Ounce, and a little Salt, mix these well together; then take a Quart of Cream, let it boil, and take it off, and cut into it three Pounds of fresh Butter, let it stand till 'tis melted, and when 'tis blood warm mix with it a Quart of Ale-yeast, and a Pint of Sack, and twenty Eggs, ten Whites well beaten; put six Pounds of Currants to your Flour, and make a Hole in the Middle, and pour in the Milk and other Things, and make up your Cake, mixing it well with your Hands; cover it warm, and set it before the Fire to rise for half an Hour; then put it in the Hoop; if the O|ven be hot, two Hours will bake it; the Oven must be quick; you may perfume it with Ambergrease, or put Sweetmeats in it, if you please. Ice it when cold, and paper it up.

Page  72

An ordinary Cake, to eat with Butter.

TAKE two Pounds of Flour, and rub into it half a Pound of Butter; then put in some Spice, a little Salt, a Quarter and half of Sugar, and half a Pound of Raisins stoned, and half a Pound of Currants; make these into a Cake, with half a Pint of Ale-yeast, and four Eggs, and as much warm Milk as you see convenient; mix it well together; an Hour and a half will bake it. This Cake is good to eat with Butter for Breakfasts.

A French Cake, to eat hot.

TAKE a Dozen of Eggs, and a Quart of Cream, and as much Flour as will make it into a thick Batter; put to it a Pound of melted Butter, half a Pint of Sack, one Nutmeg grated, mix it well, and let it stand three or four Hours; then bake it in a quick Oven, and when you take it out, slit it in two, and pour a Pound of Butter on it melted, with Rose-water; cover it with the other half, and serve it up hot.

To make Portugal Cakes.

TAKE a Pound and Quarter of fine Flour well dried, and break a Pound of Butter into the Flour and rub it in, add a Pound of Loaf Sugar beaten and sifted, a Nut|meg grated, four perfumed Plumbs, or some Ambergrease, mix these well together, and beat seven Eggs, but four Whites, with three Spoonfuls of Orange flower Water; mix all these together, and beat them up an Hour; but|ter your little Pans, and just as they are going into the Oven, fill them half full, and search some fine Sugar over them; little more than a Quarter of an Hour will bake them. You may put a Handful of Currants into some of them; take them out of the Pans as soon as they are drawn, keep them dry, they will keep good three Months.

Page  73

To make Jumbals.

TAKE the Whites of three Eggs, beat them well, and take off the Froth; then take a little Milk, and a little Flour, near a Pound, as much Sugar sifted, and a few Carraway-seeds beaten very fine; work all these in a very stiff Paste, and make them into what Form you please: Bake them on white Paper.

To make March-pane.

TAKE a Pound of Jordan Almonds, blanch and beat them in a Marble Mortar very fine; then put to them three Quarters of a Pound of double-refin'd Su|gar, and beat with them a few Drops of Orange-flower Water; beat all together till 'tis a very good Paste, then roll it into what Shape you please; dust a little fine Su|gar under it as you roll it to keep it from sticking. To ice it, searce double-refin'd Sugar as fine as Flour, wet it with Rose-water, and mix it well together; and with a Brush or Bunch of Feathers spread it over your March|pane: Bake them in an Oven that is not too hot; put Wafer-paper at the Bottom, and white Paper under that, so keep them for Use.

To make Almond Puffs.

TAKE half a Pound of Jordan Almonds, blanch and beat them very fine with three or four Spoonfuls of Rose-water; then take half an Ounce of the finest Gum dragnt steeped in Rose-water three or four Days before you use it, then put it to the Almonds, and beat it together; then take three Quarters of a Pound of dou|ble refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted, and a little fine Flour, and put to it; roll it in what Shape you please; lay them on white Paper, and put them in an Oven gently hot, and when they are baked enough, take them off the Papers, and put them on a Sieve to dry in the Oven, when 'tis almost cold.

Page  74

To make little hollow Biskets.

BEAT six Eggs very well with a Spoonful of Rose-water, then put in a Pound and two Ounces of Loaf-Sugar, beaten and sifted; stir it together till 'tis well mix|ed in the Eggs; then put in as much Flour as will make it thick enough to lay out in Drops upon Sheets of white Paper; stir it well together till you are ready to drop it on your Paper; then beat a little very fine Sugar and put into a Lawn Sieve, and sift some on them just as they are going into the Oven; so bake them, the Oven must not be too hot; and as soon as they are baked, whilst they are hot, pull off the Papers from them, and put them in a Sieve, and set them in the Oven to dry; keep them in Boxes with Papers between.

To make Wigs.

TAKE two Pounds of Flour, and a Quarter of a Pound of Butter, as much Sugar, a Nutmeg grated, a little Cloves and Mace, and a Quarter of an Ounce of Carraway-seeds, Cream and Yeast as much as will make it up into a pretty light Paste; make them up, and set them by the Fire to rise till the Oven be ready; they will quickly be baked.

To make Ginger-bread.

TAKE a Pound and half of London Treacle, two Eggs beaten, half a Pound of brown Sugar, one Ounce of Ginger beaten and sifted; of Cloves, Mace, and Nutmegs all together half an Ounce beaten very fine; Coriander-seeds, and Carraway-seeds of each half an Ounce, two Pounds of Butter melted; mix all these to|gether, with as much Flour as will knead it into a pretty stiff Paste; then roll it out, and cut it into what Form you please; bake it in a quick Oven on Tin-plates; a little Time will bake it.

Page  75

Another sort of Ginger-bread.

TAKE half a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them till they have done thining; beat them with a Spoonful or two of Orange-flower Water, put in half an Ounce of beaten Ginger, and a quarter of an Ounce of Cinamon powdered; work it to a Paste with double refined Sugar beaten and sifted; then roll it out, and lay it on Papers to dry in an Oven, after Pyes are drawn.

To make Dutch Ginger-bread.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, and mix with it two Ounces and a half of beaten Ginger; then rub in a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and add to it two Ounces of Carraway seeds, two Ounces of Orange-peel dried and rubb'd to Powder, a few Coriander-seeds bruised, two Eggs: Then mix all up in a stiff Paste, with two Pounds and a quarter of Treacle; beat it very well with a Rol|ling-pin, and make it up into thirty Cakes; put in a can|died Citron; prick them with a Fork: Butter Papers three double, one white and two brown; wash them over with the white of an Egg; put them into an Oven, not too hot, for three quarters of an Hour.

To make Buns.

TAKE two Pounds of fine Flour, a Pint of Ale-yeast; put a little Sack in the Yeast, and three Eggs beaten; knead all these together with a little warm Milk, a little Nutmeg, and a little Salt; then lay it before the Fire till it rise very light; then knead in a Pound of fresh But|ter, and a Pound of round Carraway-comsits; and bake them in a quick Oven, on floured Papers, in what Shape you please.

Page  76

To make French Bread.

TAKE half a Peck of fine Flour; put to it fix Yolks of Eggs, and four whites, a little Salt, a Pint of good Ale-yeast, and as much new Milk made a little warm, as will make it a thin light Paste; stir it about with your Hand, but by no Means knead it; then have ready fix wooden Quart Dishes, and fill them with Dough; let them stand a quarter of an Hour to heave, and then turn them out into the Oven; and when they are baked, rasp them. The Oven must be quick.

To make Wigs.

TAKE three Pounds and a half of Flour, and three quarters of a Pound of Butter, and rub it into the Flour till none of it be seen; then take a Pint or more of new Milk, and make it very warm, and half a Pint of new Ale yeast; then make it into a light Paste. Put in Carraway seeds, and what Spice you please; then make it up, and lay it before the Fire to rise; then work in three quarters of a Pound of Sugar, and then roll them into what Form you please pretty thin, and put them on Tin-plates, and hold them before the Oven to rise again. Before you set them in, your Oven must be pretty quick.

To make Ginger-bread.

TAKE three Pounds of fine Flour, and the Rind of a Lemon dried and beaten to Powder, half a Pound of Sugar, or more, as you like it, and an Ounce and a half of beaten Ginger: Mix all these well together, and wet it pretty stiff with nothing but Treacle; make it into long Rolls, or Cakes, as you please. You may put can|••ed Orange-peel and Citron in it. Butter your Paper you take it on, and let it be baked hard.

Page  77

To make Shrewsbury-Cakes.

TAKE to one Pound of Sugar, three Pounds of the finest Flour, a Nutmeg grated, some beaten Cina|mon; the Sugar and Spice must be sifted into the Flour, and wet it with three Eggs, and as much melted Butter as will make it of a good Thickness to roll into a Paste; mould it well and roll it, and cut it into what Shape you please. Persume them, and prick them before they go into the Oven.

To make Almond Cakes.

TAKE a Pound of Almonds, blanch and beat them exceeding fine with a little Rose or Orange flower Water; then beat three Eggs, but two Whites, and put to them a Pound of Sugar sifted, and then put in your Al|monds, and beat all together very well; butter Sheets of white Paper, and lay the Cakes in what Form you please, and bake them. You may persume them, if you like it; bake them in a cool Oven.

To make Drop Bisket.

TAKE eight Eggs, and one Pound of double-refin'd Sugar beaten fine, and twelve Ounces of fine Flour well dried. Beat your Eggs very well; then put in your Sugar and beat it, and then your Flour by Degrees, and beat it all very well together for an Hour without ceasing. Your Oven must be as hot as for half-penny Bread; then flour some Sheets of Tin, and drop your Bisket what Big|ness you please, and put them in the Oven as fast as you can; and when you see them rise, watch them, and if they begin to colour take them out again and put in more, and if the first is not enough, put them in again; if they are right done they will have a white Ice on them. You may put in Carraway seeds if you please; when they are all baked, put them all in the Oven again till they are very 〈◊〉, and keep them in your Stove.

Page  78

To make little Cracknels.

TAKE three Pounds of Flour finely dried, three Ounces of Lemon and Orange peel dried and beaten to a Powder, and an Ounce of Coriander seeds beaten and fearced, and three Pounds of double refin'd Sugar beaten fine and fearced; mix these together with fifteen Eggs, half of the Whites taken out, a quarter of a Pint of Rose-water, as much Orange flower Water. Beat the Eggs and Water well together; then put in your Orange-peel and Coriander-seeds, and beat it again very well with two Spoons, one in each Hand; then beat your Sugar in by a little and little, then your Flour by a little at a Time, so beat with both Spoons an Hour longer; then strew Sugar on Papers, and drop them the Bigness of a Walnut, and set them in the Oven; the Oven must be hotter than when Pyes are drawn. Do not touch them with your Fingers before they are baked. Let the Oven be ready for them against they are done; be careful the Oven does not colour them.

To make the thin Dutch Bisket.

TAKE five Pounds of Flour, and two Ounces of Carraway seeds, half a Pound of Sugar, and some|thing more than a Pint of Milk. Warm the Milk, and put into it three quarters of a Pound of Butter; then make a Hole in the middle of your Flour, and put in a full Pint of good Ale yeast; then pour in the Butter and Milk, and make these into a Paste, and let it stand a quarter of an Hour by the Fire to rise; then mould it, and roll it in Cakes pretty thin; prick them all over pret|ty much, or they will blister; so bake them a quarter of an Hour.

To make an ordinary Seed-Cake.

TAKE six Pounds of fine Flour, rub into it a Thim|blef Caraway-seeds finely beaten, and a Nut|megs grated, and Mace beaten; then heat a Quart of Page  79 Cream, hot enough to melt a Pound of Butter in it, and when 'tis no more than Blood-warm, mix your Cream and Butter with a Pint of good Ale yeast▪ and then wet your Flour with it; make it pretty thin; just before it goes into the Oven, put in a Pound of rough Carraways, and some Citron sliced thin. Three quarters of an Hour, in a quick Oven, will bake it.

To make ordinary Wigs.

TAKE three Pounds and an half of fine Flour, and three quarters of a Pound of Butter, rub it into the Flour 'til none of it be seen; then take a Pint or more of new Milk, and make it very warm, and three quar|ters of a Pint of Ale-yeast; and with these make it into a light Paste; and put in Carraway-seeds, or what Spice you please; then set it before the Fire to rise; then mix in it three quarters of a Pound of Sugar; then roll them out pretty thin, and then put on Tin-plates and hold them before the Fire to rise again, or before the Oven. Let your Oven be pretty quick, and they will soon be baked.

A good Seed-cake.

TAKE two Pounds of the finest Flour well dried, two Pounds of fresh Butter rubbed well in; ten Eggs, leave out five Whites; three Spoonfuls of Cream, four Spoonfuls of good Yeast; mix all well together, and set it to the Fire, not too near; when 'tis well risen, put in a Pound of Carraway-comfits. An Hour and a quar|ter will bake it.

To make the Marlborough Cake.

TAKE eight Eggs, Yolks and Whites, beat and strain them, and put to them a Pound of Sugar beaten and sifted; beat it three Quarters of an Hour to|gether; then put in three Quarters of a Pound of Flour well dried, and two Ounces of Carraway seeds; beat it all well together, and bake it in a quick Oven in 〈◊〉 Tin Pans.

Page  80

Another Sort of little Cakes.

TAKE a Pound of Flour and a Pound of Butter. Rub the Butter into the Flour, two Spoonfuls of Yeast, and two Eggs. Make it into a Paste, slick white Paper, roll your Paste out the Thickness of a Crown, cut them out with the Top of a Tin Canister; sift fine Sugar over them, and lay them on the flicked Paper. Bake them after Tarts an Hour.

To make the White Cake.

TAKE three Quarts of the finest Flour, a Pound and half of Butter, a Pint of thick Cream, half a Pint of Ale yeast, half a quarter of a Pint of Rose water and Sack together, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, nine Eggs, abating four Whites. beat them well; five Ounces of dou|ble-refin'd Sugar; mix the Sugar and Spice, and a very little Salt with your dry Flour, and keep out half a Pint of the Flour to strew over the Cake; when 'tis all mix'd, melt the Butter in the Cream when 'tis a little cool, strain the Eggs into it, Yeast, &c. Make a Hole in the midst of the Flour, and pour all the Wetting in, stirring it round with your Hand all one Way, 'til well mixed. Strew on the Flour that was saved out, and set it before the Fire to rise, covered over with a Cloth; let it stand so a quarter of an Hour. You must have in Readiness three Pounds and half of Currants walled and picked, and well dried in a Cloth; mingle them in the Paste without kneading; put it in a Tin hoop; set it in a quick Oven, or it will not rise; it must stand an Hour and half in the Oven.

To make another Sort of Gingerbread.

TAKE a Pound and half of London Treacle, 2 Eggs beaten, a Pound of Butter melted, half a Pound of brown Sugar, an Ounce of beaten Ginger; and of cloves, Mace, Corian••r seeds, and Carraway seeds, of each half an Ounce; mix all these together, with as much Flour as Page  81 will knead it into a Paste; roll it out, and cut it into what Form you please. Bake it in a quick Oven on Tin-plates; a little Time will bake it.

To make Biskets.

TO a Quart of Flour, take a quarter of a Pound of Butter, and a quarter of a Pound of Sugar, 1 Egg, and what Carraway seeds you please, wet the Milk as stiff as you can; then roll them out very thin; cut them with a Glass Bake them on Tin plates, your Oven must be slick. Prick them very well just as you set them in, and keep them dry when baked.

To make brown French Loaves.

TAKE a Peck of coarse Flour, and as much of the Raspings of Bread, beaten and sifted, as will make it look brown; then wet it with a Pint of good Yeast, and as much Milk and Water warm as will wet it pretty stiff; mix it well, and set it before the Fire to rise; make it into six Loaves; make it up as light as you can, and bake it well in a quick Oven.

To make the hard Bisket.

TAKE half a Peck of fine Flour, one Ounce of Car|raway-seeds, the Whites of two Eggs, a quarter of a Pint of Ale-yeast, and as much warm Water as will make it into a stiff Paste; then make it in long Rolls Bake it an Hour; the next Day pare it round; then slice it in thin Slices about an Inch thick; dry it in the Oven; then draw it and turn it, and dry the other Side; they will keep the whole Year.

To make Whetstone Cakes.

TAKE half a Pound of fine Flour, and half a Pound of Loaf-sugar searced, a Spoonful of Carraway-seeds dried, the Yolk of one Egg, the Whites of three, a little Page  82 Rose-water, with Ambergrease dissolved in it; mix it to|gether, and roll it out as thin as a Wafer; cut them with a Glass; lay on them flour'd Paper, and bake them in a slow Oven.

To make a good Plumb-cake.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, put to it half a Pound of Loaf sugar beaten and sifted, of Mace and Nut|megs half an Ounce beaten fine, a little Salt. Beat the Yolk of thirty Eggs, the Whites of fifteen, a Pint and half of Ale-yeast, three Quarters of a Pint of Sack, with two Grains of Ambergrease, and two of Musk steeped in it 5 or 6 Hours; then take a large Pint of thick Cream, set it on the Fire, and put in two Pounds of Butter to melt, but not boil; then put your Flour in a Bowl, make a Hole in the midst, and pour in your Yeast, Sack, Cream, and Eggs. Mix it well with your Hands, make it up, not too stiff, set it to the Fire a quarter of an Hour to rise; then put in seven Pounds of Currants picked and washed in warm Water, then dried in a coarse Cloth, and kept warm 'til you put them into your Cake, which mix in as fast as you can, and put candied Lemon, Orange, and Citron in it; put it in your Hoop, which must be ready buttered and fixed; set it in a quick Oven; bake it two Hours or more, when 'tis near cold, ice it.

Another Plumb-cake.

TAKE four Pounds of Flour, four Pounds of Cur|rants, and twelve Eggs, half the Whites taken out, near a Pint of Yeast, a Pound and half of Butter, a good half Pint of Cream; three quarters of a Pound of Loaf-sugar, beaten Mace, Nutmegs, and Cinamon, half an Ounce beaten fine; mingle the Spices and Sugar with the Flour; beat the Eggs well, and put to them a quarter of a Pint of Rose-water, that had a little Musk and Amber|grease dissolved in it; put the Butter and Cream into a Jug, and put it in a Pot of boiling Water to melt; when you have mixed the Cake, strew a little Flour over it. Page  83 Cover it with a very hot Napkin, and set it before the Fire to rise; butter and Flour your Hoop, and just as your Oven is ready, put your Currants into boiling Water to plump. Dry them in a hot Cloth, and mix them in your Cake. You may put in half a Pound of candied Orange, Lemon, and •••ron; let not your Oven be too hot, two Hours will take it, three it 'tis double the Quan|tity. Mix it with a broad Pudding-stick, not with your Hands; when your Cake is just drawn, pour all over it a Gill of Brandy or Sack; then ice it.

Another Plumb-cake with Almonds.

TAKE four Pounds of fine Flour dried well, five Pounds of Currants well picked and rubbed, but not washed; five Pounds of Butter washed and beaten in O|range flower Water and Sack; two Pounds of Almonds beaten very fine four Pounds of Eggs weighed, half the Whites taken out; three Pounds of double refin'd Sugar, three Nutmegs grated, a little Ginger, a quarter of an Ounce of Mace, as much Cloves finely beaten, a quarter of a Pint of the best Brandy: The Butter must be beaten to Cream; then put in your Flour, and all the rest of your Things, beating it 'til you put it in the Oven; 4 Hours will bake it, the Oven must be very quick; put in Orange, Lemon-peel candied, and Citron, as you like.

A rich Seed-cake, called the Nun's Cake,

TAKE four Pounds of your first Flour, and three Pounds of double-refin'd Sugar beaten and sifted; mix them together, and dry them by the Fire 'till you prepare your other Materials.

Take four Pounds of Butter, beat it in your Hands till 'tis very soft like Cream; then beat thirty five Eggs, leave out sixteen Whites, and strain out the Trd••els of the rest, and heat them and the Butter together till all appears like Butter, put in four or five Spoonfuls of Rose or Orange-flower Water, and beat it again; then take your Flour and Sugar, with six Ounces of Carraway-seeds, and strew Page  84 it in by Degrees, beating it up all the Time for 2 Hours together; you may put in as much Tincture of Cinamon or Ambergrease as you please; butter your Hoop, and let it stand three Hours in a moderate Oven.

To ice a great Cake.

TAKE two Pounds of the finest double-refin'd Sugar, beat and sift it very fine, and likewise beat and sift a little Starch and mix with it; then beat six Whites of Eggs to a Froth, and put to it some Gum-water, the Gum must be steeped in Orange-flower Water; then mix and beat all these together two Hours, and put it on your Cake; when 'tis baked, set it in the Oven a quarter of an Hour.

Another Seed-cake.

TAKE a Pound of Flour, dry it by the Fire, add to it a Pound of fine Sugar beaten and sifted; then take a Pound and a Quarter of Butter and work it in your Hand till 'tis like Cream; beat the Yolks of ten Eggs, the Whites of six; mix all these together with an Ounce and half of Carraway-seeds, and a quarter of a Pint of Brandy; it must not stand to rise.