A lamentable new ditty, made vpon the death of a worthy gentleman, named George Stoole, dwelling sometime on Gate-side Moore, and sometime at New-castle in Northumberland: with his penitent end. To a delicate Scottish tune.

The second part,

To the same tune.

[illustration]

[illustration]

ANd sie on all such cruell Carles,
whose crueltie's so fickle:
To cast away a Gentleman
in hatred for so little.
Heigh-ho heigh-ho, my bonny Loue,
heigh-ho, &c.
I would I were on yonder Hill,
where I haue beene full merry:
My sword and buckeler by my side
to fight till I be weary.
Heigh-ho &c.
They well, should know that tooke mee first
though whoops be now forsaken:
Had I but freedome, armes, and health,
I'de dye, are I'de be taken.
Heigh-ho, &c.
But Law comdemns me to my graue,
they haue me in their power:
Ther's none but Christ that can mee saue,
at this my dying houre.
Heigh-ho. &c.
He call'd his dearest loue to him,
when as his heart wae sorry:
And speaking thus with manly heart,
Deare sweeting, pray for Georgie.
Heigh-ho, &c.
He gaue to her a piece of gold,
and bade her giue't her Barnes:
And oft he kist her rosie lips,
and laid him into her armes.
Heigh-ho, &c.
And comming to the place of death,
he neuer changed colour.
The more they thought he would looks pale▪
the more his veines were fuller.
Heigh-ho, &c.
And with a cheerefull countenance,
(being at that time entreated
For to confesse his former life)
these-words he straight repeated.
Heigh-ho &c.
I neuer stole no Oxe nor Cow,
nor neuer murdered any:
But fifty Horse I did receiue
of a Merchants man of Gory.
Heigh-ho, &c.
For which I am condemn'd to dye,
though guiltlesse I stand dying:
Deare gracious God, my soule receiue
for now my life is flying.
Heigh-ho, &c.
The man of death a part did act,
which grieues mee tell the story.
God comfort all are comfortlesse,
and did so well as Georgie.
Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho, my bonny Loue,
heigh-ho heigh-my bonny,
Heigh-ho, heigh-ho, mine owne true lou
sweet Christ receiue my Georgie.