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Author: Stapleton, Philip, Sir, 1603-1647.
Title: A renowned speech spoken to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, May, 28. at the last assembly of the gentry and commonalty of Yorkshire, by that most judicious gentleman Sir Phillip Stapleton,: one of the committees appointed by the honourable House of Commons to attend his Majesties pleasure, and to give information to the members of the said House of all passages that concerne the good of the King and kingdome. Wherein is declared the great uncertainty of his Majesties undertakings, the said undertakings not being seconded with the unite applause and joynt assistance of the whole kingdome. Likewise discribing the manifold and innumerable dangers that attends civill discord, and home-bred contention, shewing by presidents of Yorke and Lancaster, what cruell effects such designes produce both to the King and subject.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A renowned speech spoken to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, May, 28. at the last assembly of the gentry and commonalty of Yorkshire, by that most judicious gentleman Sir Phillip Stapleton,: one of the committees appointed by the honourable House of Commons to attend his Majesties pleasure, and to give information to the members of the said House of all passages that concerne the good of the King and kingdome. Wherein is declared the great uncertainty of his Majesties undertakings, the said undertakings not being seconded with the unite applause and joynt assistance of the whole kingdome. Likewise discribing the manifold and innumerable dangers that attends civill discord, and home-bred contention, shewing by presidents of Yorke and Lancaster, what cruell effects such designes produce both to the King and subject.
Stapleton, Philip, Sir, 1603-1647.

London: Printed for J. Horton, 1642. June 2.
Subject terms:
Speeches, addresses, etc., English
Great Britain -- History
England and Wales, -- 1625-1649 : Charles I, -- Sovereign
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A93802.0001.001

Contents
title page
colophon
A Renowned Speech Spoken to the Kings most Ex∣cellent Maiesty, at the last great As∣sembly of the Gentry and Com∣monalty of Yorkshire, by that most judicious Gentleman Sir Phillip Stapleton.
part