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Author: Penington, Isaac, 1616-1679.
Title: An examination of the grounds or causes, which are said to induce the court of Boston in New-England to make that order or law of banishment upon pain of death against the Quakers;: as also of the grounds and considerations by them produced to manifest the warrantableness and justness both of their making and executing the same, which they now stand deeply engaged to defend, having already thereupon put two of them to death. As also of some further grounds for justifying of the same, in an appendix to John Norton's book ... whereto he is said to be appointed by the General Court. And likewise of the arguments briefly hinted in that which is called, A true relation of the proceedings against the Quakers, &c. Whereunto somewhat is added about the authority and government which Christ excluded out of his Church ... By Isaac Penington, the younger.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: An examination of the grounds or causes, which are said to induce the court of Boston in New-England to make that order or law of banishment upon pain of death against the Quakers;: as also of the grounds and considerations by them produced to manifest the warrantableness and justness both of their making and executing the same, which they now stand deeply engaged to defend, having already thereupon put two of them to death. As also of some further grounds for justifying of the same, in an appendix to John Norton's book ... whereto he is said to be appointed by the General Court. And likewise of the arguments briefly hinted in that which is called, A true relation of the proceedings against the Quakers, &c. Whereunto somewhat is added about the authority and government which Christ excluded out of his Church ... By Isaac Penington, the younger.
Penington, Isaac, 1616-1679.

London: printed for L. Lloyd, next to the sign of the Castle in Cornhill, 1660.
Subject terms:
Society of Friends -- Massachusetts
Massachusetts -- History
Norton, John, -- 1606-1663. -- Heart of N-England rent at the blasphemies of the present generation.
Massachusetts. -- General Court.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A90391.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Rulers, Teachers, and People of NEW-ENGLAND.
AN EXAMINATION OF THE Grounds or Causes which are said to induce the Court of Boston in New-England, to make that Order or Law of Banishment upon pain of death against the Quakers; As also of the Grounds and Considerations by them produced to manifest the war∣rantableness and justness, &c.
Since my waiting on the Lord for the presence and gui∣dance of his Spirit, in the examining the foregoing Grounds and Considerations, there came forth an Ap∣pendix to John Norton's Book, wherein are laid down some further Grounds by way of justifying of their proceedings, which for their sakes, and likewise on the behalf of the truth and people of God, I may also say somewhat to.
There remains yet an other Paper (printed here in Eng∣land) called, A true Relation of the proceedings against cer∣tain Quakers, at the general Courts of the Massathusets, holden at Boston in New-England, October 18. 1659.
THE Authority and Government which Christ excluded out of his Church, &c.
Some Considerations concerning the State of Things, relating to what hath been, now is, and shortly is to come to pass, warning all Peo∣ple to look about them, and to wait on the Lord for the unerring light of his Spirit, that they may know the times and seasons, and the work which God is now a∣bout in the world, which is great and wonderful, and so may not be found fighters against God, his Truths, and the Witnesses of this Age and Generation, more particularly lamenting over and exhorting England. With a faithful Testimony concerning the Quakers.