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Author: Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.
Title: The resolved mans resolution,: to maintain with the last drop of his heart blood, his civill liberties and freedomes, granted unto him by the good, just, and honest declared lawes of England, (his native country) and never to sit still, so long as he hath a tongue to speake, or a hand to write, til he hath either necessitated his adversaries, the house of Lords, and their arbitrary associates in the house of Commons, either to doe him justice and right, by delivering him from his causelesse and illegall imprisonment, and out unto him, legall and ample reparations, for all his unjust sufferings or else send him to Tyburne: of which he is not afraid, and doubteth not if they doe it, but at and by his death, to doe them (Sampson like) more mischief, then he did them all his life. All which is expressed and declared in the following epistle, written by Lieut. Coll. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, to a true friend of his, a citizen thereof, Aprill 1647.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The resolved mans resolution,: to maintain with the last drop of his heart blood, his civill liberties and freedomes, granted unto him by the good, just, and honest declared lawes of England, (his native country) and never to sit still, so long as he hath a tongue to speake, or a hand to write, til he hath either necessitated his adversaries, the house of Lords, and their arbitrary associates in the house of Commons, either to doe him justice and right, by delivering him from his causelesse and illegall imprisonment, and out unto him, legall and ample reparations, for all his unjust sufferings or else send him to Tyburne: of which he is not afraid, and doubteth not if they doe it, but at and by his death, to doe them (Sampson like) more mischief, then he did them all his life. All which is expressed and declared in the following epistle, written by Lieut. Coll. John Lilburne, prerogative prisoner in the Tower of London, to a true friend of his, a citizen thereof, Aprill 1647.
Lilburne, John, 1614?-1657.

[London: s.n., 1647]
Subject terms:
Civil rights -- England
Detention of persons -- England
Lilburne, John, -- 1614?-1657 -- Imprisonment
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A88246.0001.001

Contents
The resolved mans Resolution, to maintain with the last drop of his heart blood, his civill Liberties, and freedomes, granted unto him by the good just, and honest declared lawes of England, (his native Country) and never to sit still, so long as he hath a tongue to speake, or a hand to write, til he hath either necessitated his Adversaries, the house of Lords, and their Arbitrary Associates in the house of Commons, either to doe him ju∣stice and right, by delivering him from his causelesse and illegall imprison∣ment, and handing out unto him, legall and ample reparations for all his un∣just sufferings or else send him to Tyburns: of which he is not afraid, and doubteth not if they doe it, but at and by his death, to doe them (Sampson like) more mischiefe, then he did them all his life.