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Author: Cook, John, d. 1660.
Title: Unum necessarium: or, The poore mans case: being an expedient to make provision of all poore people in the Kingdome. Humbly presented to the higher powers : begging some angelicall ordinance, for the speedy abating of the prises of corne, without which, the ruine of many thousands (in humane judgment) is inevitable. In all humility propounding, that the readiest way is a suppression or regulation of innes and ale-houses, where halfe the barley is wasted in excesse : proving them by law to be all in a præmunire, and the grand concernment, that none which have been notoriously disaffected, and enemies to common honesty and civility, should sell any wine, strong ale, or beere, but others to be licensed by a committee in every county, upon recommendation of the minister, and such of the inhabitants in every parish, where need requires, that have been faithfull to the publike. Wherein there is a hue-and-cry against drunkards, as the most dangerous antinomians : and against ingrossers, to make a dearth, and cruell misers, which are the caterpillars and bane of this kingdome. / By John Cooke, of Graies Inne, barrester.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) :: Text Creation Partnership,
2014-11 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
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Print source: Unum necessarium: or, The poore mans case: being an expedient to make provision of all poore people in the Kingdome. Humbly presented to the higher powers : begging some angelicall ordinance, for the speedy abating of the prises of corne, without which, the ruine of many thousands (in humane judgment) is inevitable. In all humility propounding, that the readiest way is a suppression or regulation of innes and ale-houses, where halfe the barley is wasted in excesse : proving them by law to be all in a præmunire, and the grand concernment, that none which have been notoriously disaffected, and enemies to common honesty and civility, should sell any wine, strong ale, or beere, but others to be licensed by a committee in every county, upon recommendation of the minister, and such of the inhabitants in every parish, where need requires, that have been faithfull to the publike. Wherein there is a hue-and-cry against drunkards, as the most dangerous antinomians : and against ingrossers, to make a dearth, and cruell misers, which are the caterpillars and bane of this kingdome. / By John Cooke, of Graies Inne, barrester.
Cook, John, d. 1660.

London: Printed for Matthew Walbancke at Grayes Inne Gate, 1648.
Subject terms:
Grain trade -- England -- Prices -- Early works to 1800.
Poor -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Taverns (Inns) -- Law and legislation -- Great Britain -- Early works to 1800.
Bars (Drinking establishments) -- Law and legislation -- Great Britain -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A80410.0001.001

Contents
title page
The Matters briefly touched are,
Twelve Propositions and Intreaties for the Poore.
The Poor Mans Plea: BEING An expedient to make provision for all poor People in the Kingdome.