The unlavvfulnesse and danger of limited episcopacie· VVhereunto is subioyned a short reply to the modest advertiser and calme examinator of that treatise. As also the question of episcopacie discussed from Scripture and fathers. / By Robert Bailly pastor of Killwunning in Scotland.

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Title
The unlavvfulnesse and danger of limited episcopacie· VVhereunto is subioyned a short reply to the modest advertiser and calme examinator of that treatise. As also the question of episcopacie discussed from Scripture and fathers. / By Robert Bailly pastor of Killwunning in Scotland.
Author
Baillie, Robert, 1599-1662.
Publication
London :: Printed for Thomas Vnderhill, at the Bible in Woodstreet,
1641.
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Subject terms
Morley, George, 1597-1684. -- Modest advertisement concerning the present controversie about church-government.
Episcopacy -- Early works to 1800.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A77490.0001.001
Cite this Item
"The unlavvfulnesse and danger of limited episcopacie· VVhereunto is subioyned a short reply to the modest advertiser and calme examinator of that treatise. As also the question of episcopacie discussed from Scripture and fathers. / By Robert Bailly pastor of Killwunning in Scotland." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A77490.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 17, 2024.

Pages

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To the equitable Reader.

SOme moneths ago there came out, from a learned and very judicious hand, a small treatise to prove the unlawfulnesse and danger of limited Prela∣cy. Shortly there after, there appeared in an∣swer to this, a modest Advertisement, and calme Examination, which was sent enclo∣sed in a letter, from a Bishop of prime place, to a Stationer for the press, written whether by the Bishop himselfe, or a friend of his acquaintance, a Doctor of good esteeme, I do not know. Some very few days after the

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first appearance of this answer, the reply following was readie, albeit till now it could not get the benefit of a presse. I con∣fesse the Reply is not sutable to the great worth of the first Treatise, but if it do suf∣ficiently retund with cleere reason, all that the Answerer has opposed, it attains its end: of this performance be thou the judge, unto thy discretion I freely permit the pronoun∣cing of the sentence. I could wish from thy hands but one not very unreasonable favour, that thou mightst be pleased to call for, & compare all the three Writs which are al but short, that thou wouldst lay toge∣ther in every passage, first, what the Authour did say, Secondly, what the Bishop or Do∣ctor does answer, and thirdly, what is here replied. This little labour will enable thee from due consideration to make they equi∣table decree in the court of thy conscience, according to which thou mayst cheerfully proceed, first, to thy hearty desires, & there∣after, as thy calling permits, to thy best ende∣vours, either for the holding up or pulling down this much agitate estate of Bishops. Farewell.

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