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Author: Smith, Nathaniel, d. 1668?
Title: The Quakers spiritual court proclaim'd. Being an exact narrative of two several tryals had before that new-high-court of justice, at the Peele in St. John's Street; together with the names of the judges that sate in judgment, and of the parties concern'd in the said tryals: also sundry errors and corruptions, in principle and practice among the Quakers, which were never till now made known to the world. Also a direction to attain to be a Quaker, and profit by it. All which, with many new matters and things of remark among those men, are faithfully declared and testified. By Nathaniel Smith student in physick, who was himself a Quaker, and conversant among them for the space of about XIV. years.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The Quakers spiritual court proclaim'd. Being an exact narrative of two several tryals had before that new-high-court of justice, at the Peele in St. John's Street; together with the names of the judges that sate in judgment, and of the parties concern'd in the said tryals: also sundry errors and corruptions, in principle and practice among the Quakers, which were never till now made known to the world. Also a direction to attain to be a Quaker, and profit by it. All which, with many new matters and things of remark among those men, are faithfully declared and testified. By Nathaniel Smith student in physick, who was himself a Quaker, and conversant among them for the space of about XIV. years.
Smith, Nathaniel, d. 1668?, Yearwood, Randolph, d. 1689,

London: printed for L.C. and are to be sold by the book-sellors of London, [1669]
Alternate titles: Wherein are discovered my inducements, to follow this sect of people called Quakers.
Notes:
Editor's dedication signed: London. Feb. 13 1668. Randolph Yearwood.
Caption title on p. 1: Wherein are discovered my inducements, to follow this sect of people called Quakers.
Reproduction of the original in the Sion College Library, London.
Subject terms:
Freedom of religion -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Society of Friends -- Controversial literature -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A60506.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Right Honourable GEORGE, LORD DELAMER OF Dunbam-Massey, In the County Palatine of Chester.
The Epistle to the Reader.
CHAP. I. Wherein are Discovered my Inducements, to follow this Sect of People called QUAKERS.
Of the Quakers Self-contradictions, Abuses, Back∣bitings, and false Accusing one another; as also of their Active Persecution.
The first Cause of my dislike, as to the Quakers; and chiefly, of certain Principles holdn by George Fox, and others.
CHAP. II.
Now I must come to speak of these my New Friends in this City of London: First, of their Abuses and Carriage towards me; And then of the Tryal in their High Court of Justice; how they first cast me out from amongst them; and after that, from the Society of Men; and also, the Proceedings amongst themselves.
Then John Boulton, which was that Day Judge, said, That if I did so, they had something against me.
A Description of the Quakers Court, the manner of it, and how they confess their Sinners, and of their Pardon.
Of George Fo's coming to Town, and my Address to Him, with his Answer.
October 22. 1668. Concerning the second Tryal before George Fox, Hil∣kiah Bedford, and John Boulton, which being my first Judge, and both present to make their Plea a∣gainst me, and what was brought against me, which I knew not of.
A few Words of Instruction, to all those that are d∣sirous to come into the Society of the Quakers; and to be Received of them: I mean not them only that comes out of Conscience, but all Sorts, whether it be them or not, they shall all be Received, although it be only for Preferment, and in time be taken for the Faith∣ful; therefore I desire you to come near, and Understand what I shall Write to you.
What they are to Observe; and how to carry them∣selves before the rest of their Brethren.
Of their Buying or Selling; and of the Carriage that may be used in either Buying or Selling.