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Author: Palmer, John, 1612-1679.
Title: The catholique planisphaer which Mr. Blagrave calleth the mathematical jewel briefly and plainly discribed in five books : the first shewing the making of the instrument, the rest shewing the manifold vse of it, 1. for representing several projections of the sphere, 2. for resolving all problemes of the sphere, astronomical, astrological, and geographical, 4. for making all sorts of dials both without doors and within upon any walls, cielings, or floores, be they never so irregular, where-so-ever the direct or reflected beams of the sun may come : all which are to be done by this instrument with wonderous ease and delight : a treatise very usefull for marriners and for all ingenious men who love the arts mathematical / by John Palmer ... ; hereunto is added a brief description of the cros-staf and a catalogue of eclipses observed by the same I.P.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The catholique planisphaer which Mr. Blagrave calleth the mathematical jewel briefly and plainly discribed in five books : the first shewing the making of the instrument, the rest shewing the manifold vse of it, 1. for representing several projections of the sphere, 2. for resolving all problemes of the sphere, astronomical, astrological, and geographical, 4. for making all sorts of dials both without doors and within upon any walls, cielings, or floores, be they never so irregular, where-so-ever the direct or reflected beams of the sun may come : all which are to be done by this instrument with wonderous ease and delight : a treatise very usefull for marriners and for all ingenious men who love the arts mathematical / by John Palmer ... ; hereunto is added a brief description of the cros-staf and a catalogue of eclipses observed by the same I.P.
Palmer, John, 1612-1679.

London: Printed by Joseph Moxon ..., 1658.
Notes:
Added engraved t.p.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Planispheres -- Early works to 1800.
Eclipses -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A55065.0001.001

Contents
engraved title page
title page
To my Honoured Friend, JOHN TWYSDEN Doctour of Physick.
The first book of the Catholique Planisphear.
CHAP. I. Of the parts of the Planisphear. And of the Mater, his matter and Lineaments.
CHAP. II. Of the reason of this Declination.
CHAP. III. How to find the centers of the Meridians five several wayes.
CHAP. IIII. To find the Centers of the Parallels, six several wayes.
CHAP. V, How to draw the straighter Meridians and Parallels, whose Semidiameters are very long.
CHAP. VI. How to draw the Tropiques, and Polar Circles, and to finish the Mater.
CHAP. VII. Of the Reet, or Nets
CHAP. VIII. Of the Ring, or Limb of the Mater.
CHAP. IX. Of the Ephemeris or Calender, on the Ring.
CHAP. X. Of the Label and Sights.
CHAP. XI. Of the perpetual Calender, on the back-side.
CHAP. XII. Some cautions to be Observed in the making of the Instrument.
The second Book. Of the several Projections of the SPHEAR; which are represented by this PLANISPHEAR.
The Preface.
CHAP. I. Of the Planisphear in the Meridional Projection, repre∣senting the Eastern or Western Hemisphears: And of his three Modes or postures.
1 The first mode of the Meridional Projection.
2 The second Mode of the Meridional Projection.
3 The third Mode of the Meridional Projection.
CHAP. II: Of the Equinoctial Projection: shewing the Northern or Southern Hemisphears.
CHAP. III. Of the Nonagesimal Projection, shewing the Eastern and Western parts of the Sphear, being divided by the Azimuth of the Nonagesimus gradus.
CHAP. IIII. Of the Horizontal Projection, representing the upper and lower Hemisphears.
The Third Book. Of the Resolution of all Spherical Triangles, by the PLANISPHEAR.
CHAP, I, Of the kinds and parts of Spherical Triangles.
CHAP. II. Of the 16 Cases of Rectangled Triangles. And how they may be reduced to five Problemes.
CHAP. III. PROBL. I. The Legs given, to find the rest.
CHAP. IIII. PROBL. II. A Leg and the Hypotenusa given to find the rest.
CHAP. V. PROBL. III. The Hypotenusa and an Angle given, to find the rest.
CHAP. VI. PROBL. IIII. A Leg and an Angle given to find the rest.
CHAP. VII. PROBL. V. The Angles given to find the Sides.
CHAP. VIII. How to represent and resolve the Cases of the four first Problemes of Spherical Triangles, divers other wayes.
CHAP. IX. The first Variety.
CHAP. X. The second and third Varieties.
CHAP. XI. The fourth Variety.
CHAP. XII. The fifth Variety.
CHAP. XIII. The sixth Variety.
CHAP. XIV. Of the Solution of Oblique angled Spherical Triangles: And generally of all Spherical Triangles.
CHAP. XV. PROB. 2. Two Sides and an Angle comprehended given, to find the rest.
CHAP. XVI. PROB. 3. Two Sides and an Angle opposite to one of them given, to find the rest.
CHAP. XVII PROB. 4. Two Angles and the Side comprehended between them being given, to find the rest.
CHAP. XVIII PROB. 5. Two Angles and a Side opposite to one of them given, to find the rest.
CHAP. XIX PROB. 6. Three Angles given to find the Sides.
CHAP. XX. How to reduce an Oblique angled Triangle to two Rect∣angled Triangles, by letting fall a Perpendicular.
The fourth Book. Shewing the Solution of the SPHERICAL PROBLEMES, Both Astronomical, Astrological, and Geographical, by the PLANISPHEAR.
CHAP. I. The Preface.
CHAP. II. How to find the Altitude of the Sun or Stars, by Obser∣vation, with the Planisphear. Also what fashion is best for Sighst.
CHAP. III. To finde a Meridian line.
CHAP. IIII. To Observe the Azimuth of the Sun or Stars.
CAAP. V. To find the Suns Longitude.
CHAP. VI. The Suns Longitude, Declination, Right Ascension, any one of them given, to find the rest in the first Projection.
CHAP. VII. To do the same in the second Projection, more easily.
CHAP. VIII. To find the Angle at the Sun, made between the Ecliptick and Meridian.
CHAP. IX. To find the said angle of the Ecliptick, with the Meridi∣an, by the Longitude, Declination, or Right Ascension, divers other wayes.
CHAP. X. To find the point of the Ecliptick in which the Longitude and Right Ascension have greatest difference.
CHAP. II. To find the Latitude of your Place, or the Elevation of the Pole above your Horizon, by the Meridional Altitude, and Declination of the Sun. Meridional Projection.
CHAP. XII. To do the same by the Meridian Altitudes of the Stars about the Poles.
CHAP. XIII. To find the Declination of the Sun or Stars, by their Me∣ridian Altitude, and the Elevation of the Pole.
CHAP. XIV. To find the Oblique Asoension and Descension, and the As∣censional difference of the Sun or any Star: by his Declina∣tion, and the Latitude of the Place, Two several wayes, in the Horizontal Triangle.
CHAP. XV. The Ascensional difference, Declination, and Amplitude, of the Sun or a Star, and the Latitude of the Place, any two of them given, to find the rest.
CHAP. XVI. To do the same in the Equinoctial Projection.
CHAP. XVII. To find the Semi-diurnal and Semi-nocturnal Arches of the Sun or Stars: the time of their Rising and Set∣ting: and the length of their Day and Night: by Declination, and the Latitude of the Place.
CHAP. XVIII. To find the same, in the Equinoctial Projection.
CHAP. XIX. To find the beginning and end of Twilight, by the Suns Declination, and the Latitude of the Place.
CHAP. XX. To find the time of the Cosmical Rising and Setting of the Stars, by their Declination and Right As∣cension, and the Latitude of the Place.
CHAP. XXI. To find the time when any Star riseth or setteth Acro∣nycally, by his Declination, and Right Ascension, and the Latitude of the Place.
CHAP. XXII. To find when a Star riseth or setteth Heliacally.
CHAP. XXIII. To find the Age when any Astrologer lived, and what time of the Solar year the Seasons hapned in his Country, by knowing his Latitude, and the Rising of any Star in his time.
CHAP. XXIV. The Latitude of your Place, the Declination, Alti∣tude, Azimuth, and Hour of the Sun or Stars, any three of these being given, so find the other two.
CHAP. XXV. To find the Altitude and Azimuth of the Sun or Stars, at a∣ny time proposed; the Latitude and Declination being known.
CHAP. XXVI. The Latitude, Altitude, and Azimuth given, to find the Declination, and the Hour.
CHAP. XXVII. The Latitude, Declination, and Altitude, given, to find the Hour, and Azimuth.
CHAP. XXVIII. The Declination, Altitude, and Azimuth of the Sun given, to find the Hour, and Latitude.
CHAP. XXIX. To find the Hour of the Night, by the Northing, or Southing, Rising or Setting of any Star.
CHAP. XXX. The time of Day or Night given, to find in what Coast any Star is: and how much he is distant from the Horizon, or Meridian.
CHAP. XXXI. The Time, and Latitude given, to find the Altitude, and Azimuth of any Star: and thereby to get the know∣ledge of the Stars.
CHAP. XXXII. The Latitude of the Place, the Declination of a Star, with his Altitude, or Azimuth given, to find both the Hour of the Star, and the Hour of the Night.
CHAP. XXXIII. Your Latitude known, and the Altitude, and Azimuth, of any Star, Planet, or Comet, observed, and the time of Night: how to find his Right Ascension, and Declination.
CHAP. XXXIIII. The Declination, and Right Ascension of any Star given, to find his Longitude, and Latitude.
CHAP. XXXV. The Longitude, and Latitude, of any Star given, to find his Right Ascension, and Declination; and to place the Stars in the Mater.
CHAP. XXXVI. The Latitude, and Declination of a Star given, to find his Longitude, and Right Ascension.
CHAP. XXXVII. The Longitude, and Latitude of two Stars given, to find their Distance.
CHAP. XXXVIII. The Declination, and Right Ascension of any two Stars given, to find their distance.
CHAP. XXXIX. The Declination of a Star or Planet, and his distance from a known Star given, to find his Right Ascension.
CHAP. XL. The Latitude of a Star or Planet, and his distance from a known Star given, to find his Longitude.
CHAP. XLI. To find the distance of two Stars by their Altitudes, and their difference of Azimuth observed at the same time.
CHAP. XLII. To find the Angles of Station which any two Stars make with the Pole, by their Right Ascension and Decli∣nation: or with the Pole of the Ecliptique, by their Longitude and Latitude: or with the Zenith, by their Altitude and Azimuth.
CHAP. XLIII. To find whether three Stars be in one great Circle, by ha∣ving their Longitude and Latitude, or their Right Ascension and Declination, or their Azimuth and Altitude known.
CHAP. XLIV. If a Comet or Star unknown be seen in a straight line with two other known Stars, and his distance from one of the known Stars be observed; how to find the true place of the Comet or Star unknown.
CHAP. XLV. The distance of a Planet from two known Stars being Observed, to find his Longitude and Latitude.
CHAP. XLVI. To find the Culmen Caeli, and the Altitude thereof, at any time proposed.
CHAP. XLVII. To find the Ascendent or Horoscope, and the other three Principal Houses, for any time proposed.
CHAP. XLVIII. To find the beginnings of the other eight Houses.
CHAP. XLIX. To know what degree of the Ecliptique is in the begin∣ing of every House.
CHAP. L. Another way to find what degree of the Ecliptique is in the beginning of every House, and thereby to set a Fi∣gure more easily then by the former Chapter.
CHAP. LI. A third way to set a Figure with less labour.
CHAP. LII. How to place any Star or Planet in his proper House.
CHAP. LIII. To find the division of the Houses, according to Campanus.
CHAP. LIIII. How to Direct a Figure.
Appendix, Concerning Judiciarie Astrologers.
CHAP. LV. To find the Angles of the Ascendent, or the Angle of the Ecliptique with the Horizon, and the Altitude of the Nonagesimus gradus, at any time.
CHAP. LVI. The Ascendent and his Amplitude, and the Altitude of Culmen Caeli given; so to represent the Ecliptique, that you may presently find not onely the Altitude of the Nonagesimus gradus, but the Altitude and Azimuth of every degree of the Eclip∣tique at one view.
CHAP. LVII. To do the same another way, by the Horizontal Pro∣jection, very plainly.
CHAP. LVIII. To do the same by the Nonagesimal Projection, if the Altitude of Nonagesimus gradus be first given in∣stead of the Altitude of Culmen Caeli.
CHAP. LIX. The Nonagesimus gradus, and his Altitude and Azi∣muth given, as in the former Chapter. How in the same Projection to get the Altitude and Azimuth of any Planet or Star, by his Longitude and Latitude.
CHAP. LX. The Altitude and Azimuth of any Star taken, and ei∣ther the Ascendent, Nonagesimus gradus, or Culmen Caeli known: How by the same Nonagesimal Projection to find the Stars Longitude and Latitude.
CHAP. LXI. The Latitude and Azimuth of a Star, and either the As∣cendent, Nonagesimus gradus, or the Culmination given, to find his Longitude.
CHAP. LXII. To find the Parallactical Angle; that is, what Angle the Azimuth maketh with any point of the Ecliptique, by the Altitude of that point, and of the Nonage∣simus gradus.
CHAP. LXIII. To find the Parallax of Altitude of the Sun, or Moon.
CHAP. LXIV. The Parallactique Angle, and the Parallax of Altitude given, to find the Parallax of Longitude and Latitude.
CHAP. LXV. To find the Moons Latitude, by her distance from either of the Nodi, called Caput, and Caudi Draconis.
CHAP. LXVI. To find the Dominical Letter, the Prime, Epact, Easter day, and the rest of the moveable Feasts for ever, by the Calender, discribed Book 1. 11.
CHAP. LXVII. To find the age of the Moon, by the Epact.
CHAP. LXVIII. To find in what Parallel and Climate a Place is, by the Latitude given.
CHAP. LXIX. The Longitude and Latitude of two Places given, to find their Distance.
CHAP. LXX. The Latitude and distance of two Places given, to find the difference of Longitude.
CHAP. LXXI. To find what degree of the Ecliptique Culminates in an∣other Country, at any time proposed, if the difference of Longitude be known.
CHAP. LXXII. To find what a Clock it is in another Country, by know∣ing the hour at Home, and the difference of Longitude.
CHAP. LXXIII. The Longitude and Latitude of one Place known, and the Rumb and distance of a second Place, to find both the Longitude and Latitude of the second Place.
CHAP. LXXIV. The Latitudes and Distance of two Places given, to find the Rumb, and the difference of Longitude.
The Fifth Book.
CHAP. I. The Preface.
CHAP. II. Theorems premised.
CHAP. III. How to draw an Horizontal or Vertical line, upon any plain.
CHAP. IV. How to make the Polar Dyal, and how to place it.
CHAP. V. How to make the South Equinoctial Dyal, or Pa∣rallelognomonical Dyal direct.
CHAP. VI. How to make the East Equinoctial Dyal, or the West.
CHAP. VII. How to make the Declining Equinoctial Dyal.
CHAP. VIII. Of the kinds of Oblique Dyals.
CHAP. IX. How to make the Vertical Dyal.
CHAP. X. How to make the South and North Horizontal Dyal.
CHAP. XI. How to Observe the Declination of any Declining Plain.
CHAP. XII. How to make a Declining Horizontal Dyal.
CHAP. XIII. How to Observe the Reclination or Inclination or any Plain.
CHAP. XIV. How to make a South and North Reclining Dyal.
CHAP. XV. How to make an East or West Reclining Dyal.
CHAP. XVI. How to find the Arches and Angles that are requisite for the making of the Reclining Declining Dyal.
CHAP. XVII. How to find the Horary distances of a Reclining Decli∣ning Dyal.
CHAP. XVIII. How to draw the Reclining Declining Dyal.
CHAP. XIX. How to know at what Reclination any Declination Plain shall become a Declining Equinoctial Dyal-Plain, to be delineated after Chapter 7. And how to find the Oblique Ascension of his Meridian or Substyle, and the difference of Longitude, which are requisite for his Delineation.
CHAP. XX. An Admonition concerning the five several Cases of De∣clining Recliners.
CHAP. XXI. How to make the Declining Horizontal Dyal, another way then was shewed Chapter 12.
CHAP. XXII. To make the Reclining Declining Dyal, another way.
CHAP. XXIII. To draw the proper Hours of any Declining Dyal.
CHAP. XXIV. To know in what Country any Declining Dyal shall serve for a Vertical Dyal.
CHAP. XXV. To set a Plain Parallel to the Horizon of any Country pro∣posed.
CHAP. XXVI. How other Circles of the Sphear besides the Meridians may be Projected upon Dyals.
CHAP. XXVII. How to describe on any Dyal the proper Azimuths and Al∣micantars of the Plain.
CHAP. XXVIII. How by help of the proper Azimuths and Almicantars of the Plain to describe the Equator and his Parallels, on the Polar or Orthognomonical Dyal.
CHAP. XXIX. How to inscribe the Equator and his Parallels, in the Equi∣noctial or Parallelognomonical Dyal.
CHAP. XXX. How to inscribe the Equator and his Parallels, in an Ob∣lique or Scalenognomonical Dyal.
CHAP. XXXI. To do the same by the Hour-lines of the Place, although the Plain Decline or Recline.
CHAP. XXXII. How to inscribe the Horizon of the Place, with his Azi∣muths and Almicantars, in the Horizontal Dyal.
CHAP. XXXIII. How by the help of this Furniture to place any moveable Dyal-Plain in his true Situation, and consequently to find the Meridian-line of the Place, without any other Instrument then the Dyal it self.
CHAP. XXXIV. How to make a Vertical Dyal upon the Ceeling of a Floor within Dores, where the Direct Beams of the Sun never come.
A breif Description Of a CROSS-STAFF.
A Catalogue of Eclipses, Observed since the Year of our Lord 1637.
The Rudiments of Astronomy, Put into plain Rhythmes.
The Constellations of the Fixed Stars.
The Planets.
The Circles of the Sphear.
Errata.
table of contents
A Catalogue of Books and Instruments, Made and sold by Joseph Moxon, at his shop on Corn-hil, at the Signe of Atlas.