Villare cantianum, or, Kent surveyed and illustrated being an exact description of all the parishes, burroughs, villages and other respective mannors included in the county of Kent : and the original and intermedial possessors of them ...
Philipot, John, 1589?-1645., Philipot, Thomas, d. 1682.

S. S. S. S.

SAltwood in the Hundred of Hene, hath an open Prospect into the Ocean, which flowed up much nearer, then now it doth, and imparted its Nature to its Name: for in Latin it is written de Bosco Salso. The Arch-bishops of Canterbury, had here formerly a magnificent Castle, which Time hath much dismantled; and a Park well stored with Deere, now vanished and gon. Many Mannors in this Track, are held of it by Knights Service, which justly made it to be counted and called an Honour. It was granted to the Church, in the year 1096, by one Halden, who for Grandeur and opulency, was reckoned one of the Princes of England. The Value and extent of it, are more particularly set forth, in the Records of the Church of Canterbury, in the Conquerour's Time, and they speak thus: In Limwarlaed in Hundred. de Hede, habet Hugo de Montfort de Terra Mouachorum I Manerium Saltwode de Archi∣episcopo, & Comes Godwinus tenuit illud, & tunc se defendebat pro VII Sullings (That was Godwin Earl of Kent, who by a possessory right, held many Towns along this Coast) & nunc sunt V. & tamen non Scottent, nisi pro III. Et in Burgo de Hede sunt CC. & XXV. Burgenses, qui pertinent huic Manerio, de quibus non habet Hugo nisi III. Forisfacta (for it lies in the Franchise of the five Ports, and the King was to have their Serice & est appretiatum XXVIII. lb. & IIII. This was Hugh Mont∣fort, who was one of those powerfull Men, which entered England with William the Conquerour.

In the Time of K. Henry the second, Henry de Essex, Baron of Ralegh in that Coun∣ty, Lord Warden of the Cinque-ports (pro Tempore) and the King's Standard-bearer in right of Inheritance held this Castle of the Arch-bishop, who having in a leight Skirmish against the Welsh in Flintshire, not only cast away his Courage, but his Standard also; was appealed of high Treason, and in a legal Duell or Combate, vanquished by his Challenger, and being possest with regret and shame, contracted from this Defeat, shrouded himself in a Cloister, and put on a Monks Cowle for∣feiting a goodly Patrimony and Lively-hood, which escheated to King Henry the second. But Thomas Beckett acquainting the King, that this Mannor belonged to his Church and Sea; that Prince being beyond the Seas, directed a Writt to K. Henry his Son (the Draught of which is represented to us by Matthew Paris, whither I referre the Reader) for Restitution: But in regard of new emergent Contests, between King Henry the second, and that insolent Prelate, it was not re∣stored unto the Church untill the Time of Richard the second.

The Castle was magnificently inlarged and repaired by William Courtney, Arch∣bishop of Canterbury, in the Time of Richard the second, as his Will doth de∣clare, Page  299and his Arms in Stone-work eminently demonstrate, and remained, after his Decease, annexed to the Archiepiscopal Revenue, untill Thomas Cranmer in the twen∣ty ninth of Henry the eighth, exchanged it with that Prince. And his Son King Edward the sixth, in the fourth year of his Raign, granted it to Edward LorClinton, who not long after conveyed it to Mr. Henry Herdson, whose Grand∣child Mr. Francis Herdson, passed it away, about the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, to Robert Cranmer Esquire, by whose Daughter and Heir, Ann Cranmer, it devol∣ved to Sir Arthur Harris of Crixey in Essex, whose Son Sir Cranmer Harris, not ma∣ny years since, alienated it to Sir William Boteler, Father to Sir Oliver Boteler Baronet, the instant Lord of the Fee.

There is an old vast Mansion House of Stone, at Brochull in this Parish, on the side of a Steep Hill, which was the Seat and ancient Residence of a Family as eminent for Antiquity, as any in this Track, and extracted their Sirname from hence, and were called Brochull, who flourished here in Knights Degree, and in some Parliaments in the Time of Edw. the third, and Edw. the fourth, sate there as Knights of the Shire. Margaret the Wife of William, builded, or caused to be built, an Isle on the Northside the Parish Church. You may rove at the Time by the rudenesse of the Words, which are here transcribed out of the East Window, where they stand engrossed, in an antiquated Character: Margareta La Famma Gillam de Brockhilla fio Fera sata Shapella.

From hence branched forth the Brockhills, or Brockhulls (for anciently they were written so, both ways) both of Cale-hill, and Aldington Septuans in Thurnham: But the Male Line fayling here in Thomas Brockhull, Elizabeth his Sole Daughter and Heir, brought it to be possest by Richard Selling, in which Family, after the Interest of it, stay∣ed untill allmost our Fathers Remembrance, it was by the same Devolution, carried off to acknowledge the Propriety of Tournay.

Sandhurst in the Hundred of Selbrittenden, was, with much other Land granted by King Offa, in the year 791, to Christ-church in Canterbury. But Betherinden was always of temporal Interest; for it afforded both Seat and Sirname, to a Fa∣mily of this Denomination, and John de Bethrinden, dyed seised of it, in the year of Edward the third: But not long, after, did it reside in this Family; for this Name expired in a Female Inheritrix, who was matched to Finch, who united this Seat to his Demeasne; and here it lay untill the Beginning of Queen Eli∣zabeth, and then it was rent off by Sale, and placed in Pelham; and from this Name a Mutation of the same Circumstance, took it away; and, in our Fathers Remembrance annexed it to the Inheritance of Fowl, and remains still with the Des∣cendants of that Family.

Aldrinden is a third place of Account in Sandhurst, had Owners of that Sirname: of whom Roger de Aldrinden, as the private Deeds of this place do inform me, was the last in the Male descent, who left it to his Daughter and Heir Christian Aldrin∣den; and she in the twenty second year of Edward the third, passed it away to John Sellbrittenden; who not long after, alienated it to Thomas Bourne, and he held it as appears by an old Court-roll, in the first year of Richard the second; and from him did it by the Chain of Descent, passe along, untill it arrived at John Bourn, who dying in the fourth year of Edward the fourth, settled it by Will, on Joan his Female Inheritrix, matched to Thomas Allard, and by this Alliance, did it descend to his Son Henry Allard, who had Issue John Allard; who alienated his Right in it by Sale, to John Twisden Gentleman, in the thirtieth year of Henry the eighth; from whom it came down to his Successor Mr. William Twisden; who about the Beginning of King James, sold it to Mr. Thomas Downton Esquire, Father of Mr. Richard Downton of Istleworth Esquire, Justice of the Peace for the County of Middlesex, now Proprietary of it.

Combden is another Mannor in this Parish, which was anciently possest by Fulk de Ballard; that Fulk, who, as appears by the Book called Testa de Nevill, in the Ex∣chequer, paid a respective supply for Land in Sandhurst, at the marriage of Isabell Sister to King Henry the third, in the twentieth year of that Prince: but not long did the Propriety of this place, rest in this Family; for in the reign of Richard the Page  300second, I find it in the Possession of the Whitfields, an ancient Family, descended from Whitfield in Cumberland, of which Stock was Sir Ithan de Whitfield, who in behalf of the Barons, then knit together in an hostile confederacy against their Prince, (as an old French Manuscript informs me) tue Borough-bridge 15. Edwardi secundi, il est oit contre le Roy, defended Borough-bridge against Edward the second. And ever since the Government of that Prince above-mentioned, was this place constantly fastned by the Thread of many Descents to the Patrimony, though not of this Fa∣mily, yet of this Name, until Sir Ralph Whitfield deceasing not many years since, bequeathed it by Will to his Daughter Mrs. Dorothy Whitfield, who hath now brought it by Marriage to be the possession of John Fotherly Esquire.

Here is a place in this Parish, which, however it be now under a cloudy and ob∣scure Character, was in Ages of a higher Gradation, the Inheritance of the Noble Family of Twisden: and certainly here they lived, when they writ, de Denna Fracta, and from them it hath borrowed the Title of Twisden-street or Borough, which it re∣tains to this Day. Indeed Twisden in the Original Saxon, imports no more but the broken Valley, or the Vale distinguished into two peeces,

Shadockherst in the Hundreds of Blackborn, Chart, Longbridge and Ham, was the Inheritance of a Family called Forstall, and sometimes written at Forstall, which were of no contemptible Extraction in this County; for in several Ancient Deeds, I find John at Forstall, and Richard at Forstall to be Witnesses, and it is probable they were Possessors of this Mannor, though the private Deeds reach out to our View, no higher discovery then the reign of Henry the fifth; for in the third year of that Prince's reign, Joan Forstall passes it away by Deed to Stokys, vulgarly called Stokes, and in that Family was the Interest of it many years clasped up, until at last the or∣dinary Vicissitude of Purchase brought it to be the Demeasne of Randolph, who had an Estate likewise about Burham near Maidstone. And from this Name, about the beginning of King Edward the sixth, it went away by Sale to Sir John Taylor, who in the twenty fifth of Queen Elizabeth, passed it away to John Taylor Esquire, Ancestor to Thomas Taylor Esquire, who is now invested in the Possession of it, and from whom I confesse I have received my Intelligence concerning those who were the former Proprietaries of it.

Criols-court in this Parish was one of those Seats which related to the Patrimony of Bertram de Crioll, and he died seised of it, in the twenty third year of Edward the first, and left it to his Son John de Crioll, who deceasing about the beginning of Ed∣ward the third without Issue, it devolved to Joan his Sister and Heir, who was matched to Sir Richard de Rokesley: but he likewise determined in Agnes Rokesley, who was one of his two Female Co-heirs, and she by matching with Thomas de Poynings entituled that Family to the possession of that wide Estate, which devol∣ved to her in Right of her Mother, and from him did it descend to his Successor Sir Edward Poynings, Son of Robert Poynings, a man very eminent in the Government of Henry the seventh. For this Sir Edward, in the first year of his Rule, immedi∣atly after he had triumphed over Richard the third in Bosworth-field, was chosen one of his Privy Councel to manage the publick Interest of the Nation: Afterwards he most vigorusly opposed James Lord Audley, and his Cornish Squadrons being then in Defection to Henry the seventh, in the tenth year of his reign. And this Sir Edward held it at his Death, which was in the twelfth year of Henry the eighth, though his Office was not found until the fourteenth of that Prince, and then it being discove∣red that the whole Stock and Lineage of this Family were extinguished, and that there were none who were legally begotten (for Sir Thomas Poynings was his natural Son) that either in a direct or collateral Line, could pretend a Title to his Estate, it escheated to the Crown. And Henry the eighth afterwards passed it away by Grant to William Taylor, whose Sutcessor Mr. Thomas Taylor passed it away to George Taylor, and he had Issue Mr. John Taylor, who concluding in Anne his Sole Daugh∣ter and Heir, she by a Match with Whitfeild, annexed it to the Demeasne of that Name, from whom again, not many years since, it came over by Sale to More, who very lately hath alienated it to Mr. Thomas Taylor Esquire.

Mincing-court, vnlgarly so called, but Originally, and in Old Records styled Page  301Minikens-court, is likewife circumscribed within the Verge of Shadock herst. It was parcel of that Income which did support in elder Times the Hospital of St. Jacobs in Tanington by Canterbury, which was founded to be a Receptacle of Leprous Women, and confirmed by Hubert Arch-bishop of Canterbury, about the begin∣ning of King John: and to this Covent did it relate, until the reign of King Edward the sixth, and then though it had not been torn off from the Revenue of the above∣said Hospital, by the violent Hand of Henry the eighth; yet it was alienated by that Prince, and in the second year of his Rule it was granted to Robert Tatteshall Esquire, to hold of his Mannor of East-Greenwich, tantum per Fidelitatem Servitii, and from him immediatly after it came over by purchase to Sir Edward Wotton. And when Cardinal Poole visited Kent, in the year 1557. he was found invested in it, and from him did it by paternal Delegation devolve to his Successor Thomas Lord Wotton, who setled it upon his eldest Daughter Katherine, upon her Marriage with Henry Lord Stanhop, Son and Heir to Philip Earl of Chesterfield, and this Lady not long since hath alienated her Interest in it to Mr. Thomas Harfleet of Canterbury.

Stalesfeild in the Hundred of Feversham, was a Limb of that vast Revenue which fell under the Jurisdiction and Signory of the Knights Templers, and is registred under that Notion, in that Book kept in the Exchequer, styled Liber de Terris Tem∣plariorum. And in Mr. Robert Glovers Church-Notes of Kent, there is in this Church represented the Pourtracture of a Chevalier maled in Armour, whose Face is only visible, and that pourtracted with a long Beard, which induces me to believe, that it was the Effigies of some eminent Person of this Order; for in all the Sculpture and Imagery of the Knights Templers, both Ancient and Modern, they are still delivered to Posterity under that Representation. And Peter Auger falling under the Censure of a Knight Templer, in the fourth year of Edward the second, though Valett to that Prince, because he nourished a long and diffused Beard, was absolved and discharged by his Master, by satisfying the publick, that though he wore a long Beard, he was no Knight Templer. But to advance in my Survey; Af∣ter that fatal Tempest, which was conjured up by the Magick of the Court of Rome, and its Emissaries, had, in the second year of Edward the second, shook this Order into a total Dissolution, this Mannor which lay clasped up in their Revenue, was united by Royal Concession to the Demeasne of the Knights of St. John of Jerusa∣lem, and there it dwelt, untill the general suppression, in the reign of Henry the eighth, dislodged it, and threw it into the possession of the Crown, where it lay involved, until King Edward the sixth, in the fourth year of his Government, by Grant planted the Propriety in Sir Anthony St. Leger, and he immediatly after pas∣sed it away to Sir Anthony Aucher, who was afterwards slain bravely disputing the Interest of the English Nation at Calais, against the Assaults of the French: and his Successor, about the beginning of King James alienated it to Salter, from whom it is now come down to Sir Nicholas Salter, who is entituled to the instant Fee-simple of it.

Darbies-court in this Parish gave Seat and Sirname to a Family, which was known to the World by no other Denomination, and certainly was a Family of generous Account in this Track; for in very ancient Registers and Rols of Kentish Gentry; I find this Coat to be borne by this Name, videlicet, Partie per Cheveron embattelled, Or, and Azure, three Eagles counterchanged: And of this Family was John Darby Esquire, who was Sheriff of London, in the year 1445. and built the South-Isle of St. Dionis Back-church near Lime-street, where the Windows represent to our View the above-mentioned Coat, as the best Index to the Memory of so munificent a Benefactor: But to proceed; Before the beginning of Henry the fourth, the Pro∣priety of this Mansion was by Sale conveyed from Darby to St. Leger, where its aboad was of as brief a continuance; for the Male-line failing in Thomas St. Leger Esquire, who bought it, by Joan his Daughter and Co-heir wedded to Henry Au∣cher Esquire, it came over to be the Inheritance of that Family, and in their Re∣venue was constantly fixed, until the Age and Remembrance of our Grand-fathers, and then it was alienated to Sir Michael Sonds of Eastry, from whom by hereditary Right it devolved to Sir Richard Sonds of Throuley, who in his Life-time passed it Page  302away to his Son and Heir Sir George Sonds, now of Leeze-Court in Shelvich, Knight of the Bath, to whom the Possession of this Mannor at this instant is en∣tituled

Stamford in the Hundred of Folkstone, is in it self, a small obscure Village, but made eminent by containing within the Limits of it, Ostenhanger, a Seat of as much Account and Eminence, as any in the County. The Demeasne which rela∣ted to it, was divided between the two noble Families of Crioll and Auberville: Bertram de Crioll, was Sheriff of Kent, in the twenty seventh year of Henry the third, and is written in the Pipe-roll of that year, of Westenhanger, a Name co∣incident with the other. Sir William de Auberville lived at the Borough of Westen∣hanger, when he founded the Abby of West-Langdon, in the Time of Richard the first: he had Hugh de Auberville, who likewise (as appears by the Leiger Book of that Covent, being, a liberal Benefactor to that Cloister) was his Son and Heir, and he had Issue Sir William de Auberville, in whom the Male-Line determined, and he had only a Female Inheritrix, espoused to Nicholas de Crioll, whether of a. Younger House, or else a Younger Son to Bertram de Crioll above-mentioned, I cannot discover: Bertram de Crioll, had Issue Bertram de Crioll, who dyed possest of a great Proportion of Ostenhanger, in the twenty third year of Edward the first, as appears Rot. Esc. Num. 48. And left it to Joan his Daughter, married to Sir Richard de Rokesley, who upon the Decease of her only Brother John de Crioll, without Issue, became his Sole Heir. This Sir Richard de Rokesley, was one of those eminent Kentish Gentlemen, that accompanied King Edward the first into Scotland, and for his signal Service performed at the Siege of Carlaverock, was made a Banneret by that Prince: * but he likewise expired in two Daughters and Coheirs; Agnes one of them, was wedded to Thomas de Poynings; and Joan the other, was matched to Walter de Pateshull. Upon the Partition of the Estate, Rokesley's Interest in Westen∣hanger wholly accrued to Poynings, and he had Issue Nicholas de Poynings, who was summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron, the thirty third year of Edward the third: Michael Poynings, who was likewise summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron, the forty second year of that Prince; and thirdly Lucas de Poynings, who in the year a∣bovesaid, was honored with the same summons. Upon the Devision of the Estate, Westenhanger was annexed to the Demeasne of Michaell de Poynings, and he had Issue Thomas de Poynings, who was summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron, in the sixth year of Henry the fourth, his Son and Heir was Robert Poynings, who in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth, with Iohn Perry, were designed by Authority, to take the Sub∣scriptions of those Kentish Gentlemen, who were summoned in, to renounce the Title of the House of York, which it seems was then in secret Agitation, to be set up against she House of Lancster; and this Robert, was oftentimes summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron in the reign of that Prince. The last time I find him sum∣moned, was in the twenty third year of his Government, and his Son and Heir was Robert Poynings, who was likewise summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron in the reign of the above-mentioned Monarch, and deceased the eighth year of Edward the fourth, and left his Estate here to that worthy Person his Son and Heir Sir Edward Poynings, of whom more hereafter. I shall now discover, how that Division of Ostenhanger, which devolved to Nicholas de Crioll, by the Heir of Auberville, was passed away: Nicholas de Crioll, had Issue John de Crioll, who in the nineteenth year of Edward the third, obtained a Licence, to found a Chantry in the Chappel of St. Johns in Ostenhanger, and endow it with one Messuage, forty five Acres of Glebe, and six Acres of Pasture situated in Limn, as appears Prima Parte Pat. de Anno 19. Edwardi tertii Memb. 4. And before, in the seventeenth year of that Prince, was permitted by Grant from the Crown, to embattle, and make Loop-holes in his Mansion house at Ostenhanger, as is manifest, secunda Parte Pat. de Anno 17. Edwardi tertii Memb. 34. And he left it secured and invested, with these new ac∣quired Franchises, to his Son Sir Nicholas de Crioll, and he dyed seised of it in the third year of Richard the second, Rot. Esc. Num. 40. And from him did it suc∣cessively devolve to Sir Thomas Keriell or Crioll, who was slain at the second Battle of St. Albans, in the thirty eighth of Henry the sixth, whilst he asserted Page  303the Quarrel of the House of Yorke, and dying without Issue-male, Thomas Fogge Esquire, in his Wife's Right, who was one of his Daughters and Co-heirs, ente∣red upon his Estate here at Ostenhanger, and about the latter end of Edward the fourth, passed it away to his eldest Brother Sir John Fogge of Repton, who died possest of it, in the seventeenth year of Henry the seventh, and bequeathed it by Testament to his Son and Heir Sir John Fogge, who about the beginning of Henry the eighth, de∣mised his Concernment here to Sir Edward Poynings; which Edward Poynings was one of the Privy Councel to Henry the seventh, and lived here, when he so vigo∣rously in the tenth year of that Prince, opposed the proceedings of James Lord Audley, who was afterwards defeated at Black-heath, and likewise was Lord De∣puty of Ireland, and Knight of the Garter, and by his Influence on that Nation, was that eminent Statute enacted, which ever since hath been adopted into his Fa∣mily, and called Poynings-Law. He was likewise at the Siege of Terwin, with Hen∣ry the eighth, and was there for his eminent Service created Knight Banneret, and Governour of that Town. He died in the twelfth year of King Henry the eighth, and was found after a serious Inquisition taken after his Death, in the fourteenth year of that Prince, to have neither any Issue lawfully begotten, nor any collate∣ral Alliance, that could by any remote Affinity eptitle themselves to his Estate, and so by Escheat it became invested in the Crown: but King Henry the eighth, out of his indulgent Bounty, by Royal Concession made it the Inheritance of his natural Son Thomas Poynings, who was a Person of excellent and elegant Composure, and eminent Merit, and was made Knight of the Bath, at the Coronation of Queen Anne, in the twenty fourth of that Prince's reign, and afterwards having represen∣ted to the World signal Demonstrations in a publick Joust or Tournament, of a re∣markable Strength and Courage, was in the thirty sixth year of Henry the eighth, called to sit in Parliament, as Baron Poynings of Ostenhanger: but in the thirty se∣venth of that Prince's reign, deceased without Issue, upon whose Exit this Man∣not reverts to the Crown, and there lay couched, until the first year of Edward the sixth, and then it was granted to John Dudley Earl of Warwick, afterwards Duke of Northumberland: upon whose Attainder, in the first year of Queen Mary, it be∣came again parcel of the Royal Patrimony; and afterwards Queen Elizabeth, about the beginning of her reign, passed it away by Grant to her Kinsman Sir Thomas Sack∣ville, and he not long after, alienated it by Sale to Thomas Smith Esquire, vulgar∣ly called Customer Smith, who much enhaunsed the Beauty of the Fabrick, which had been empaired and defaced with Fire, with magnificent Additions: from whom it is now transmitted by paternal Descent to his great Grand-child, the Right Hono∣rable Philip Smith Viscount Strangford, who hath made it his principal Residence.

The Mannor of Heyton, lies likewise in Stamford, which was anciently possest by a Family of deep Antiquity, which was known to the World by that Sirname, and bore for their Cognisance in Ancient Armorials, Gules three Piles Argent. Alanus de Heyton, called in some old Records Alanus Vicecomes, because he was joyned as an Assistant to Ralph de Picot, Sheriff of Kent in the execution of his Office, in the third, fourth, and fifth years of Henry the second, held a whole Knights Fee of Gilbert de Magninot, in the Government of that Prince, but deceased without Issue; so that Elveva his Sister matched to Deringus de Morinis Son of Norman de Morinis, became his Heir, from whom the Mannor of Heyton descended to his Son Deringus de Morinis, who still writ himself in his Dateless Deeds, Dominus de Hey∣ton, and so did *Richard Fitz-Dering his Grand-child, who died possest of it, in the forty second year of King Henry the third, and left it to his Son Peter Dering, who likewise held this Mannor almost all the reign of Edward the first, and from him did it descend to his Son and Heir Richard Dering, who was Brother to Sir Ro∣bert Dering, who was one of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem: and this Richard, about the eighth year of Edward the second, passed it away to William Scot of Smeth, from whom by an uninterrupted and unbroken Clew of many Generations, was the Possession carried down to those Scots, who were Proprietaries of it in that Age, wherein our Grand-fathers flourished, and then it was demised by Sale to Smith, which Family it still confesses for Possessors.

Page  304

Stansted in the Hundred of Wrotham, represents to our Remembrance an Ancient Family called Grapinell, who were once Owners of this place, and flourished here under the Scepter of Henry the third, and Edward the first: but going out in Daugh∣ters and Co-heirs, Margeria one of them, by marching with William de Inge, who was a Judge, in the raign of Edward the second, knit this Mannor to the Inheri∣tance of this Family, and he died seised of it, in the fifteenth year of Edward the second, Rot. Esc. Num. 42. and left it to his only Daughter and Heir, in an old Pedigree called Isolda: but more truely Joan; for in the Inquisition taken after the Death of Eudo la Zouch, to whom she, was matched, which was in the twentieth year of Edward the second, Rot. Esc. Num. 31. it is found that he held this Mannor in Right of his Wise Joan, Sole Heir of William de Inge. And from this Eudo did Thomas la Zouch Baron of Haringworth descend, who died possest of it, in the sixth year of Henry the fourth, Rot. Esc. Num. 17. and so did his Son Henry Lord Zouch, who was the last of this Name who was possest of this place at his Decease, which was in the twenty sixth of Henry the sixth. After the Zouches the Colepepers were by purchase from them entituled to the Possession, and Richard Colepeper was found to hold it at his Death, which was in the second year of Richard the third, and from this Family, about the beginning of Henry the seventh, it passed away to Thomas Leigh, whose Son John Leigh gave it to his natural Son Richard Leigh, in the year 1575. and he not long after alienated it to Bing of Wrotham, from which Family it is very lately carried away to William James of Ightam Esquire, one of the Justices of the Peace of this County, a Person who for his Affection to Learning and Anti∣quity, cannot be mentioned without an Attribute.

Soranks in this Parish, was the Seat of a Family, which borrowed its Sirname from hence, and had the Repute of a Mannor, in the reign of Edward the third. For Roger de Sorancks held this Mannor (as is evident by the Book of Aide kept in the Exchecquer) in the twentieth year of Edward the third, by Knights Service of the Arch-bishop of Canterbury. But after the reign of that Prince, it was not very constant to the Interest of this Name; for about the beginning of Richard the se∣cond, I find it in the possession of Thomas Mortimer, Lord of the Mannor of Mor∣timers in Cowling, and he in the twentieth year of the abovesaid Monarch, passed it away to William Skrene, and when this Name was worn out at this place, the Fa∣mily of Wood was ingrafted in the possession, and rested there until the latter end of Henry the seventh, and then it was by Thomas Wood passed away to Robert Bare∣foot, in which Family the Title was as transient; for Thomas Barefoot this mans Son, in the third and fourth of Philip and Mary, alienated it to Henry Fanshaw, who almost in our Fathers Remembrance conveyed the Fee-simple unto Launce.

Stansted had the Grant of a Fair obtained by William de Inge the Judge, in the ninth year of Edward the second, to be held yearly, for the space of three Dayes, at the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, as appears, Cart. 9. Edwardi secundi Num. 40.

Stapleherst in the Hundred of Twyford, was as appears by Ancient Deeds and In∣quisitions, as to some part of it, folded up in the large Patrimony of Fremingham, whose capital Residence was at Fremingham or Farningham, where I have treated more largely of them: but when the Male-line of this Family determined in John de Fremingham, Joan his only Sister matched to John Isley Esquire, Son of Isley was found to be his Heir, in the second year of Henry the fourth, and in her Right Ro∣ger Isley Son and Heir of this John, entered upon it, and from him the Land here, by a successive Thread of Descent, was wafted down to the Noble, but infortunate Sir Henry Isley, of whom more presently: but another parcel of this Mannor did acknowledge the Signory of Pimpe of Nettlested, and William Pimpe died possest of it, in the year of our Lord 1375. as part of his Knights Fee called Pimps: and in his Line did the Title flow constantly along, until it devolved to Reginald Pimpe Esquire, who about the twelfth year of. Henry the seventh, demised it by private Deed to John Isley Esquire, from whom it came down to his Grand-child Sir Henry Isley, who being entangled too fatally in the ruinous Design of Sir Thomas Wiat, was in Page  305the second year of Queen Mary attainted, and his Interest in this Mannor connsca∣ted to the Crown, which was granted out of it again that present year to Sir John Baker, Ancestor to Sir John Baker Baronet, who is still entituled to the Propriety Isley had formerly in this place.

Boxley Abby was formerly concerned in some Demeasne likewise here at Stapleherst, as appears by an Inquisition taken in the third year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 134. which upon the suppression of that Abby, it was with the Mannor at Boxley relating to that Convent, by Henry the eighth, granted to Sir Thoma. Wiat, who being attainted, in the second year of Queen Mary, it escheated to the Crown, and then it, was by that Princess the same year granted to her Atturney General Sir John Baker, whose Successor Sir John Baker of Sisingherst now enjoyes it, as couched in his Mannor of Stapleherst.

Newsted is a Mannor in this Parish, which was annexed to the free Chappel erect∣ed at this place by Hamon de Crevequer, and invested with ample Privileges, which Donation of his, and all the Franchises united to it, was confirmed (as appears by the first Book of Compositions kept in the Registers Office at Rochester) in the forty first year of Edward the third: But when the Statute in the first year of Edward the sixth, had overturned all Chauntries, this Mannor was swallowed up in the Revenue of the Crown, and then the abovesaid Prince, by his Royal Concession planted it in the Patrimony of Sir Edward Wotton, Ancestor to Thomas Lord Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, who setled it in Marriage on Katharine-Wotton his eldest Daughter and Co-heir espoused to Henry Lord Stanhop, and she by her Feoffees in Trust hath demi∣sed the Fee-simple to Mr. Robert Oliver of Leybourn.

Loveherst is another Mannor in this Parish, was parcel of that Estate, which by its Income supported the Priory of Leeds, and upon the Suppression, was by Henry the eighth granted to Sir John Gage, in the thirty fourth year of his reign, and he in the thirty sixth of that Prince, demised it to Thomas Colepeper Esquire, who not long after alienated it to Thomas Wilford Esquire, from whom about the beginning of Queen Elizabeth, it passed away by Sale to Mr. John Baker, in whose Descendants the Title is yet resident.

Engeherst presents it self next to our View, it is now vulgarly called Henherst, in Ages of an higher Ascent Engeherst, for some old Deeds without Date bounding some Land in this Parish of Stapleherst, make it situated juxta Terras Osberti de Heng∣herst supra Dennam de Engherst, and from this Den or Vally, did that Ancient Fa∣mily, called Engherst or Hengherst, take the first Extraction of its Name, who bore, as appears by several Seals, for their paternal Armory, Barrie of six peeces, and having continued in the possession of this place for many Descents, at last the In∣heritance was transmitted to Henry Hengherst, and he in the twenty third year of Henry the sixth, by his Feoffees in Trust, setles it on his Kinsman John Nash, and in his Family, I find it in the reign of Edward the fourth, and Henry the seventh; and here for want of clearer Intelligence, I must leap to the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and then the Fee-simple was invested in Roberts, and from this Family, about the latter end of that Princess, it went away by purchase to Moodye, who in our Fathers Memory alienated it to Samuel Ovenden, by whose Daughter and Co-heir Elizabeth Ovenden, it is now come to own the Heirs of her late Husband Mr. Partrich Tindall.

Spilsill-court is the last place of Account in this Parish, it was (as appears by very An∣cient Deeds) the Residence of a Family of that Name, which before the end of King Edward the second, was crumbled into Decay, and then the Stangraves suc∣ceeded in the Possession; for Robert de Stangrave at his Decease held some Estate at or in Spilsill, in the twelfth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 52. But a∣bout the latter end of Edward the third, this Family was likewise mouldered away, and then it came to own the Signory of Maynie, descended from Walter de Medua∣na or Maynie, a man of that Repute, as appears by the red Book in the Exchecquer, Fol. 84. that he held twenty Knights Fees in this County: but Mayneys situated in Bredgar, was the Ancient Seat of this Name, who having possest for so many Successions and Descents this Seat, did not many years since transplant their Interest in it by Sale to Sharpeigh, by whose Daughter and Heir it is now become the Inheritance of Mr. George Thompson of London.

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Swalcliff in the Hundred of Blengate, was given by Eadbald King of Kent, as Thorn the Chronicler of St. Augustins informs me, to the Cloister of St. Mildred, at Minster in Thanett; and was, when her body was translated, by King Canutus, to the Abby of St. Augustins in Canterbury, brought over along with it, and knit to the Patrimony of that Cloister: and the Monks of that Covent, granted it away to be held in Fee, by a Family which took its Denomination from thence, and were called Swalclive, and they held it the twentieth year of Henry the third, as Testa de Nevill informs me, and paid an auxiliary Contribution for it, at the Marriage of Isa∣bell that Prince's Sister; but before the end of Edward the first, this Family was expired and then the Family of St. Lawrence was setled in the Possession. Thomas de St. Law∣rence held it, as appears by the Book of Aid, kept in the Exchequer, in the twen∣tieth year of Edward the third, at making the Black Prince Knight, and dyed possest of it, in the twenty second year of that Prince, Rot. Esc. Num. 9. And from him did it descend to his Grandchild Thomas St. Lawrence, who setled it in Marriage with Katharine his Daughter and Heir, matched to Sir William Apulder∣field, who determining in Daughters and Coheirs, Elizabeth one of them, espoused to Sir John Phineux, Lord Chief Justice of the Kings Bench, brought it to confesse the Signory of that Family: but, he deceasing without Issue-male, Jane his only Daughter and Sole Inheritrix, being matched to John Roper Esquire, this Mannor became by this Alliance, inoculated into his Patrimony, and was resident in this Name untill the Beginning of King James; and then it was conveyed to Mr. Benedict Barnham, by one of whose four Daughters and Coheirs, its Right and Title devol∣ved to Soam of Suffolk, who not many years since, alienated his Concernment in it to Perry, who hath lately transmitted it by Sale to Gould.

In the year 946. King Eadred gave Land at Swalclive to Heresigus one of his Ser∣vants, and he again gave it to the Abby of St Augustins conditionally, that a place of Sepulture might be reserved for him within their Cloister.

Snave in the Hundreds of Aloes-Bridge, Ham and Newchurch, was as high as I can discover, a Portion or Member of that Patrimony, which confessed the Sig∣nory of Haut; and so continued, untill Joan Daughter and Coheir of Sir William Haut being made the Wife of the unhappy Sir Thomas Wiatt, a man of an unstained, though an unsuccesseful Virtue, this by Female Right became parcel of his Demeasne: but when he and his Patrimony were demolished by that impetuous Gust of Mis∣fortune, which sunk them both into a heap of Ruines, in the second year of Q. Mary, this upon his Conviction of high Treason, being escheated to the Crown, that Princesse in the third year of her Government, passed it away to Sir Henry Sidney, Knight of the Garter, and Lord Deputy of Ireland, whose Successor the Right Honorable Robert Earl of Leicester not many years since conveyed it to Sir George Stonehouse.

Snavewick in this Parish, was anciently wrapped up in the Demeasn, of the Abby of St. Augustins, but being pared off in the general Suppression, by the rough Hand of Henry the eighth; It was in the thirty fifth year of his reign, granted for Life only, to Sir Walter Henley: but upon his Decease it returned to the Crown, and lay there untill the late King Charls, about the Beginning of his reign, gran∣ted it to Mr. Patrick Black a Scotchman, who not long after, granted it in Lease to Sir Edw. Yates of Barkeshire, and conveyed the Fee-simple in Reversion to Mr. Rob. Austin now of Hall-place in Bexley.

Swanscamp in the Hundred of Acstane, hath contracted an eminent Character of Reputation, since Sueno or Swain fixed here his Camp, when he invaded England, to expiate by a plenary Revenge, that Blood, which in so prodigal an Effusion, was by Etheldred let loose from the Veins of his Danish Subjects, universally in this Nation; and certainly it was this Swain, that erected the Castle here to pre∣serve a Winter Station for his Ships, and though it now lye gasping in its own Rubbish, yet there are yet some Characters and Signatures remaining, which evidence and declare to us, that there was once a Fortresse there, where there is nothing Page  307now but dismantled Ruines. The Tradition of the Country is, that, that Val∣ley which interposes between that Hill, which ascends up to Northfleet, and that which winds up to Swanscamp, was once covered with Water, and being locked in on each side with Hills, made a secure Road for Shipping, which invited the Dane to make it a Winter-Station for his Navy: and the same Report will tell you likewise, of Anchors which have been digged up about the utmost Verge of that Mersh, which is contiguous to the Thames, and certainly if we consider the Position of this Valley, which is nothing but a Chain of Mershland, interlaced with a Stream called Ebbs fleet, which swells and sinks with the Flux and Reflux of the adjacent River, and the Dimension of their Ships, then at that Time in use, which were not of any extraordinary Bulk, this Tradition is not improbable.

Near this place, Stigand the Arch-bishop of Canterbury, and Egelsine Abbot of St. Augustines, assembled the Kentish Men into an Army, pretending it was better to dye like Men in asserting and vindicating their Native Liberties, with. Swords in their Hands, then like Slaves to prostitute themselves to the Insolence of the Con∣querour, by a cheap and tame Submission with Halters about their Necks: which had so great an Influence and Impression upon their Spirits, that they resolved their Fran∣chises and themselves should find one Tomb together, rather then they would give up both, to the Sword and Will of an imperious Victor; and indeed soon after they ma∣naged their Stratagems with that Successe, that William Sirnamed the Conquerour, advancing with his Normans into Kent, to reduce Dover-Castle, which was then made good against him, he and his Army dropped into those Ambushes, which the Kentish Inhabitants had strewed for him, where he had indisputably perished, had he not by Charter fortified and confirmed those Immunities, they then contended and strug∣led for, and which remain unviolated either by any forrain or domestick Eruption even untill this Day.

The Mannor of Swanscamp it self, was, as farre as Record can guide us to disco∣ver, the Inheritance of the Montchensies, called in the Latine, Repertory de Monte-Canisio: and Hubert de Montchensey (as appears by Dooms-day Book) was the first of that Name of any Eminence, who was Lord of the Fee; and after him his Son William de Montchensey, by paternal Right held it, and so dyed in Possession of it, in the year 1287; from whom it descended to Dionis his Daughter and Heir, and in Re∣lation to her, to her Husband, Hugh de Vere, who became by this Addition of Estate, thus accruing, Baron of Swanscamp, and sat, under that Notion, in the Parlia∣ment, which was summoned in the first year of Edward the second: but he dying without Issue, William de Valence Earl of Pembroke, claimed it in Right of his Wife, Daughter and Heir to John de Montchensey, second Brother to William de Montchensey who was Father in Law to Hugh de Vere above-mentioned; from whom it descended to his Son Aymer de Valence, who dying without Issue, in the seventeenth year of Ed∣ward the third, Isabell his Sister matched to Lawrence de Hastings, became his Heir, who in her Right was Earl of Pembroke, and Baron of Swanscamp; and left it to his Grandchild John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, who dying without Issue, in the four∣teenth of Richard the second; in the fifteenth year of that Prince, Reginald Grey, and Richard Talbot in respect of Marriage, were found to be his Heirs, and upon the Partition of the Estate, this was united to the Demeasne of Talbot, in which Family, after it had rested untill the latter end of Henry the sixth, it was conveyed to Sir Thomas Brown of Bechworth Castle, whose Son Sir William Brown, in the twelfth year of Edward the fourth, surrendered them into the hands of Edward the fourth, for the use of his Mother Cicely Dutchesse Dowager of York, upon whose Decease it returned to the Crown, and lay there untill the first year of Q. Elizabeth, and then it was granted to Ralph Weldon Esq; great Grand-father to Colonel Ralph Weldon the in∣stant Lord of the Fee.

Alcharden alias Combes is another place in this Parish, worthy this Survey. It was, many Hundred years since, the Inheritance of a Family called Cumbe or Combe, who continued resident in the Possession, untill the reign of Edward the fourth, and then it went away from them, by Sale to Swan of Hook-House in Southfleet, in which Family it was fixed, untill the Beginning of Queen Elizabeth, and then it was convey∣ed to Lovelace, who not long after, passed it away to Carter, and he alienated it to Page  308Hardres, from whom, about the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, the Vicissitude of Sale carried it off to Fagge, who in the tenth year of King James, transmitted it by Sale to Hudson, whose Descendant not many years fince, demised it by Sale to Mr. Richard Head of Rochester.

Ince-Grice is the last place considerable in Swanscampe. It related before the gene∣ral suppression to the Priory of Dartford: but being torn off by King Henry the eighth, it was by Edward the sixth, in the fifth of his reign, granted in Fee-Farm to Martin Muriell: but the Fee-simple remained in the Crown, until Queen Elizabeth, in the fifth year of her Rule, passed it away to Edward Darbishire and John Bere, who not long after jointly conveyed it to Jones, who in our Fathers Memory alienated it to Holloway, whose Son and Heir Mr. Thomas Holloway hath lately demised his Interest in it to Captain Edward Brent of Southwarke.

Staple in the Hundred of Eastry, hath two places memorable: First, Crixall which was Anciently written Crickleaddshall, when in Ages of a higher Ascent it confessed the Family of Brockhull for its Owners, which were Lords of it but until the twenty eighth of Edward the first, and then it was setled upon a Daughter: but whether she brought it or not by Marriage to Wadham, which Family I find about the latter end of Edward the third, to have been possest of it, I cannot discover; and where the Light of Record is dim, I must acquiesce in silence. William Wadhaem, as I trace out by an old Pedigree of Fogg, lived in the reign of Henry the fourth, Henry the fifth, and Henry the sixth, under the Scepter of which Princes he managed the Office of Justice of the Peace for the County of Somerset, and left his Estate here to his Son and Heir Sir Nicholas Wadham, who determined in a Daughter and Heir, match∣ed to Sir William Fogg, by which Alliance this Mannor came to be ingrafted into the Inheritance of that Family, and rested there until the first year of Henry the eighth, and then it was passed away by Sale from Sir John Fogg Knight, to Ralph Banister. In Times of a lower Descent, that is, about the beginning of Queen Elizabeth, I find it by Court-rols possest by Tucker, who about the latter end of that Princess alienated his Concernment in it to Smith, who in our Fathers Remembrance trans∣planted the Title by Sale into Doctour Fotherbie Dean of Cantorbury, whose Son Mr. Charles Fotherbie continues now Proprietary of it.

Secondly, Grove-place offers it self up to our Notice, as being the Habitation of a Knightly Family, called Grove, who in old Deeds are sometimes written, at-Grove, and sealed, as appears by the Labells-affixed to their Evidences, with three Escollops upon a Cheveron: In the reign of Henry the sixth, I find it devolved by Descent to Sir John Grove, who was a great Benefactor to the Church of St. Peters in Sandwich, where he lies buried with the Arms above-mentioned upon his Shield: but not long after, this Family determined in a Daughter and Heir, who linked this Seat to the Inheritance of St. Nicholas, who about the latter end of Edward the fourth, con∣veyed it to Quilter, in which Name it was resident, until the latter end of Henry the eighth, and then it was passed away to Linch, and hath remained ever since in∣corporated into the Revenue of that Family: so that at present it is come down to Mr. John Linch, a Noble Confessor for the Interest of the Church, and Protestant Religion.

There is a Family in this Parish called Omer, which as appears by old Court-rols, Tombs, Deeds, and other Evidences, have been constantly resident almost four Hundred years.

Seasalter in the Hundred of Whitstaple, did belong to the Priory of Christ-church: but by whom it was given, the Records of that Covent are silent: only I find that it was part of that Revenue which supported their Diet and Table, and likewise I discover that Pope Gregory the ninth, in the tenth year of his Papacy, by his Bull appropriated the Parsonage to the Priory above-mentioned, and likewise was granted for the better improving their Lively-hood and Subsistence. If you will see under what Notion it passed, in the twentieth year of William the Conqueror, Doomesday Book will inform you, that it was valued upon the Terrier at two Carucats of Land, and upon the Appraisment was rated at five pound. This Mannor upon the Resigna∣tion Page  309of that Estate, which related to the Convent abovesaid, into the Hands of Henry the eighth, was setled by that Prince on the newly erected Dean and Chapi∣ter of Christ-church, and there it remained, until these calamitous Times.

Ellenden in this Parish belonged to the Abby of Feversham, and was (as the Lieger Book of that Covent informs me) given to the Monks of that Cloister by John Ellen∣den, and here it was incorporated and fixed, until the publick Dissolution unhinged, and unrooted it, and planted it in the Crown: and afterwards King Henry the eighth, in the thirty fifth year of his Government granted it to Mr. Thomas Arden, misera∣bly afterwards assassinated by his Wife at Feversham; and he the same year conveyed it to John Nedeham, from whom it came over to his Son and Heir John Nedeham Gentleman, and he in the thirty second year of Queen Elizabeth, alienated it to Mr. Michael Beresford of Westerham, who not long after passed it away to Sir George Newman Doctour of the Civil Law, and Knighted in the sixteenth year of King James: and from him by successive Right, it is now descended to his Son and Heir George Newman of Rochester Esquire.

Seale in the Hundred of Codsheath, was a Mannor which belonged to the Crown until the first year of King John, and then it was passed away by Grant to Baldwin de Betun Earl of Albemard; and Hawis his Daughter and Heir, by matching with William Mareschall Earl of Pembroke, incorporated it into his Demeasne: but Gilbert Ma∣reschall this mans Successor deceasing without Issue, Roger de Bigod Earl of Norfolk, in Right of Mawde his Mother, who was Sister and Heir General to the abovesaid Gilbert, was setled in the possession of this Mannor, and he in the eleventh year of Edward the first by Gift or Donation transmits it to Otho Lord Grandison, a man certainly of great power in those Times; for, as it appears, Pat. 4. Edwardi primi, he had a certain Agreement woven. of sundry Articles, and made between Henry the third, and the King of Castile, deposited in his Custody, in the fourth year of Edward the first; And in the fifth year of that Prince, as appears Pat. 5. in seedulâ, he had the Government of Jersey, assigned to his Care during Life; After this Fa∣mily of Grandison went out, which was about the Beginning of Richard the se∣cond (for Thomas de Grandison, dyed possest of Seale, in the forty ninth year of Edward the third, Parte prima Num. 62) the noble Family of Brian of Holoway in Devon, was invested in the Possession, and Sir William Brian or Briene, for so he is styled on his Tomb, dyed possest of it in the year 1395, and lyes buryed in Seale Church, mailed in Armor, with a Huntsmans Horn at his Head: upon which the Conjecture of the Country is, that he was a great Hunter, when the Truth is, it was placed there, to signifie or denote the Tenure of some part of his Land, which was in Cornage. But to return: the next Family which succeeded Brian, in the Inheri∣tance of Seale, was the ancient Family of Fiennes, and this as I find by some Court-rolls, was in the reign of Henry the fourth, and James Fiennes, second Son of William Fiennes Esquire, was, the first of March, in the twenty fifth of Henry the sixth, summoned to the Parliament at Bury, as Baron of Say and Seale: but this place, after this newly atchieved Honor, continued not long in this Name; for William Lord Say, in the second year of Edward the fourth, passed it away to Geffrey Boleyne, Grand-father to Sir Thomas Boleyne, who was made Knight of the Garter, and Treasurer of the Kings House in the fifteenth, created Viscount Roch∣ford in the seventeenth, and lastly raised to the Earldome of Wiltshire, and Ormond in the twenty first of Henry the eighth: but his infortunate Son George Viscount Rochford, being beheaded and leaving no Issue, it devolved to Queen Elizabeth, in Right of Queen Anne her Mother one of the Sisters and Coheirs, and she in the first year of her reign, passes it by Grant to her Kinsman Henry Cary, whose Grandchild Henry Cary Earl of Dover alienated it by Sale to Richard Sackvill Earl of Dorset, who passed it away in our Fathers Memory to Richard Smith, vulgarly called Dog Smith, and he not many years since deceasing without Issue bequeathed the Fee-simple of it to St Thomas Hospital in Southwarke.

Hall-place in Seale is a second place of Account, It was in the thirty sixth year of Edward the third, as an old Rentall discovers to me (and farther none of the an∣cient Evidences do reach) the Patrimony of Thomas Champneys, and he makes it over Page  310in part to Sir William Wroth of Enfield, and he in the second year of Richard the se∣cond, alienated all his Right and Interest in it to Thomas Lovell, but some part remained unsold untill the nineteenth of the abovesaid Prince, and then it was wholly invested by Sale from Robert Champneys, in the aforesaid Thomas Lovell, and he by his Feoffees in Trust, as namely John Osborne, John Arnold, Richard Marshall, and John Atsheath, conveyed it in the eleventh year of Henry the fourth, to Thomas Theobald or Tebald, and Mawde his Wife, and so by this Purchase, did it become the Inheritance of this Family, and made its aboad here, untill the twenty fourth year of Henry the seventh; and then John Theobald alienated it to William Porter, which Family it is probable were concerned in it before: for in the tenth year of Edward the fourth, I find John Alphey releases by Deed his right in Hall, to William Porter Esquire; and from William Porter abovesaid, did the Title slow down in the Chanel of paternal Right, to Mr. Andrew Porter, who concluding in a Daughter and Heir called Elizabeth, it is now by matching with her, become the Patrimony of Mr. Peter Stowell, Register of the Diocesse of Ro∣chester.

Stidulfe is a third Mannor in Seale, which afforded both Seat and Sirname to a Fa∣mily so called. Robert de Stidulfe, is mentioned in Deeds without Date to have held this, and much other Land in Seale. In the thirty sixth year of Edward the third, I find, Reginald Stidulfe of Stidulfe, accounts with Thomas Champneis for Land held of his Mannor of Hall. And lastly I discover, that William Stidulfe, about the ele∣venth year of Henry the sixth, by Sale, conveyed it to William Quintin, whose Son William, changed the Name of Quintin into Oliver, upon what Grounds I have dis∣covered at Leybourn; and in this Name was this Mannor lodged untill the Beginning of Queen Elizabeth; and then it was passed away to Richard Theobald, whose Son John, exchanged it with his Kinsman Stephen Theobald, who dying without Issue-male, left two Coheirs, Katharine matched to Edward Michell, and Mar∣garet wedded to David Polhill, who shared his Inheritance, and this upon the Division of the Estate, augmented the Revenue of Michell, and his Descendant Mr....... Michell, is now the Heir apparent of it.

Sedingbourn in the Hundred of Milton, hath several places in its confines remark∣able, whereof Bayford and Goodneston first claim our Notice, the last of which had a Castle, whose Banks and Ruines are yet visible; it anciently acknowledged the Family of Nottingham, who likewise in elder Times were possest of Bayford for Proprietaries. Robert de Nottingham flourished in the reign of Edward the first, and dates several of his Deeds in the Beginning of that Prince's Rule, apud Ca∣stellum suum de Goodneston. Robert de Nottingham his Successor, was Sheriff of Kent, the forty eighth year of Edward the third, and held his Shriovalty at Bay∣ford in Sedingbourn, in which year he dyed, and was found to have held at his Death, Lands at Sharsted, Pedding in Tenham, a place called Newland, and ano∣ther called la Herst, Higham in Milsted, Bixle in Tong, now called Bex, and last∣ly Goodneston and Babford, now named Bayford in this Parish, all which descended to his only Son John Nottingham; whose only Daughter and Heir Eleanor Not∣tingham, was matched to Simon Cheyney, second Son of Sir Richard Cheyney of Shurland, who brought all this spreading Revenue, to acknowledge the Signory of this Family, and the Coats of Cheyney and Nottingham, viz. Azure six Lions Argent, a Canton Ermin and Gules, two Pales wavee Argent stand empaled in Mil∣sted-church, in coloured Classe. But this Alliance, though it much enhaunsed by ad∣ditional improvement the Patrimony of Cheyney, yet could not so strongly entwine the Interest of Bayford and Goodneston with this Name: but that about the latter end of Henry the sixth, they were conveyed away by Sale to Lovelace; for Richard Lovelace of Queenhith in London, a younger Branch of the Lovelaces of Bethersden, made his Will the first of Aprill 1465, and there ordained that his Feoffees should make an Estate of his Mannors of Bayford and Goodneston in Sedingbourn, which he had purchased of Cheyney, to John Lovelace his Son and Heir, which accordingly was performed, and he invested in the Possession of them; and from him did they by Descent devolve to his Crandchild Thomas Lovelace, of Kingsdown, who in the Page  311tenth year of Queen Elizabeth passed them away to Mr. Ralph Finch; from which Fami∣ly they went away by the same Revolution, almost in our Fathers Memory to Alderman Garret of London, who had Issue Sir John Garret, of the County of Hertford, whose Widow Dowager the Lady ..... Garret by right of Jointure, now enjoys the Profits of both these Mannors.

Chilton is another Mannor in Sedingbourn, which had Owners of this Sirname, who likewise held another Mannor of this Name in Ash, both which places William de Chilton held at his Death, which was in the thirty first of Edward the first: but after his Exit, it did not long confesse the Propriety of this Family; for about the Beginning of Edward the third, it was demised by Sale to Corbie, and Robert Corbie was possest of it at his Decease, which was in the thirty ninth year of that Prince, Rot. Esc. Num. 9. and he had Issue Robert Corbie, whose Sole Daugh∣ter and Heir, Joan Corbie espoused Sir Nicholas Wotton, twice Lord Maior of Lon∣don, by whom this Mannor and much other Land, came by a fruitfull Augmentation, to swell the Inheritance of this Family, yet I find the Interest in Chilton was not solely lodged in Corbie; for by ancient Deeds I discover that an old Family cal∣led Maris was concerned in some part of it likewise. John de Maris held a Knights Fee in Wicheling, and much other Land at Herietsham, the twentieth year of Ed. the third, as likewise the Mannor of Ackmere in St. Mary Crey in Castle-guard of Dover-castle: and his great Grand-child William Maris, was Sheriff of Kent the twenty first year of Henry the sixth, and was Esquire to Henry the fifth, and after∣wards to Cardinall Kemp, and lyes enter'd in Preston Church, with so much of the Inscription left, as may instruct the Reader, that his Ashes slumber beneath the Tomb-stone: yet before his Decease he had alienated his share in this Mannor to Nicholas Wotton Esquire, from whom the united Interest of this place came down to Thomas Lord Wotton, who not many years since setled it in Marriage on Katherine his eldest Daughter, matched to Henry Lord Stanhop, Son and Heir to Philip Earl of Chesterfeild lately deceased, who still enjoyes the propriety of it.

In the year 1232. Henry Bishop of Rochester, as Thomas Rudborne a Monk of St. Swithens in Winchester does relate, came on a Sabbath Day with much exultation out of Sedingbourn Church, and desired the people to express their Joy, because on that Day by the efficacious prayers of the Church, Richard the first, formerly King of England, and many others, were ransomed from the Flame and Torment of Pur∣gatory.

In Sedingbourn Church there was a Monument of Sir Richard Lovelace, inlayed richly with Brasse, who was an eminent Souldier in his Time, and Marshal of Ca∣lais, under Henry the eighth, with his Pourtraiture affixed in Brass, which the In∣juries of Time, and the Impiety of Sacrilegious Mechanicks, have utterly dis∣mantled and defaced.

Selling in the Hundred of Boughton, did in Ages of the highest Discovery, acknow∣ledge the Signory of the Putots, and William de Putot was in Possession of it at his Death, which happened in the thirteenth year of Henry the third. After the Pu∣tots the Lords Badelesmer were invested in the possession. Guncelin de Badelesmer was possest of it, in the twenty ninth year of Edward the first, Rot. Esc. Num. 50. and left it with a spatious Inheritance to his Son Bartholomew Lord Badelesmer, who having involved himself in a ruinous Combination with some others of the mutinous Nobility against Edward the second, lost both his Life and Estate in that unsuccesful Defection, but this Mannor was restored to his Son, in the second year of King Edward the third, and was known by the Name of Bartholomew Lord Badelesmer: but did not long enjoy his new acquired Inheritance; for in the twelfth year of the above-mentioned Prince, he died without Issue, and left his Estate to be shared be∣tween four Sisters and Co-heirs, whereof Margaret the eldest was espoused to Sir John Tiptoft, and he in her Right entered upon the possession of this place, and died possest of it, in the thirty third year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 39. from whom the Title came down to John Tiptoft, created Earl of Worcester, in the year 1450. and invested afterwards with the Office and Dignity of Lord Treasurer and Lord Constable of England: but asserting too eagerly the Cause and Quarrel of the Page  312House of Yorke, he was crushed and overwhelmed with that weight, with which the Partisans of the Lancastrian Faction did endevour to sink and oppresse the Sup∣porters of that Family, and was offered up a Victime to the successful Fury of Richard Earl of Warwick, who being an Apostate of the House of Yorke, was the principal Engine upon whom the Designs and Interess of the Lancastrian Party then moved: Upon the untimely Death and attaint of this Earl, which was in the year 1570. this Mannor was annexed to the Revenue of the Crown, and though Edward Tiptoft this mans Son, was the next year after his Fathers unhappy Exit, restored by Edward the fourth, both in Blood and Dignity; yet I do not discover any Restitution made of Selling; so that it rested in the Crown, until Edward the sixth, in the fourth year of his reign, granted it to Sir Anthony St. Leger, who immediatly after passed it away to Sir Anthony Sonds of Throuley, one of the Justices of the Peace of this County, and Gentleman of the Bed-chamber to this Prince, and his Father Henry the eighth, from whom it is now come down by Paternal efflux of the Title to Sir George Sonds Knight of the Bath, who is entituled to the present possession of it.

Oven-court in this Parish anciently gave both Seat and Sirname to a Family, which was known by that Denomination; but whether they were extracted from the Owens of Wales, and contracted this Name of Oven by vulgar Acceptation, no Record does manifest; certain it is they were, as appears by old Rentals and other Muniments, possessors of this place, as high as the reign of Henry the third.

The next Family which (after this was worn out) did step into the possession, was Drilond of Cookes-ditch in Feversham, a Name of generous Extraction; for in the reign of Edward the third, John the Son of Stephen de Drilond, demises some Land at Crouchfeild in Feversham, by a Deed bearing Date from the twenty fifth year of that Prince, to William de Makenade, and in that Instrument he writes himself Knight. After Drilond was extinguished, which was about the beginning of Edward the fourth, the Foggs became Proprietaries of it, and remained for divers years Lords of the Fee, until at last the alternate Devolution of Purchase brought it to be the Inheritance of Crouch, where it did not long fix, for in the year 1588. Giles Crouch alienated it to Michael Sonds Esquire, afterwards Knighted, from which Family in our Fathers Memory it was conveyed by Sale to Franklin, from whom the same Devolution hath brought it now to Lambe, who holds the instant Signory of it.

Before I passe from Selling, I must inform the Reader, that the greatest Honour which this Town acquired, was, that it was the Cradle of William Selling bred up amongst the Monks of Christ-church, who obtained Licence from the Chapter of that Covent, to travel into Italy, and prosecute his Studies at Bononia, where he arrived to that perfection of Knowledge, that he was advanced to be Prior of Christ∣church, and was after sent by Henry the seventh, in whose Eyes his Worth was very visible, as his Embassador to the Pope. Those incomparable Books, which were placed in the Library, which related to the Covent, by his Care and Munificence, amongst which was Tullies invaluable Tractate de Republica, not long after his Death, by an Accidental Fire, found an unhappy Sepulchre in their own Ashes. He died as full of Fame as of Years, in the year of Grace 1494. And hath his Epitaph re∣gistred by the industrious Pen of Mr. Somner in his Survey of Canterbury.

Smerden in the Hundreds of Calchill, Blackborne, and Barckley, did Anciently relate to the Arch-bishop of Canterbury, and was part of that Revenue which did keep up the Grandeur and Magnificence of that Sea, rescuing it from all cheapness and contempt, which induced John then Arch-bishop of Canterbury, this being so eminent a part of the Spiritual Patrimony, to obtain a Grant of a Market to be observed here weekly on the Monday, as appears, Pat. 6. Edwardi tertii Num. 47. But the principal place, which was alwayes of secular Interess within this Parish, is Romden, which was the Patrimony of an Ancient Family, called Hengherst, and in more modern Times Henherst, who were entituled to large Demeasnes at Wood∣church, Stapleherst, Yalding, and other places in this County; but made no long aboad here at Romden, for William Son of Osbert de Hengherst, so he cals himself in his Deed without Date, demised it to John de Calch, and in this Family it continued until the latter end of Richard the second, and who after Calch succeeded in the In∣heritance, Page  313because I can collect no farther Knowledge from original Evidences; I confess I am ignorant, so that I am forced to leap over divers Kings reigns into that of King Henry the eighth, and then in the twenty fourth year of that Prince, I find that John the Son of Stephen Rogers alienates it by Sale to Stephen Drayner, and it is probable Rogers purchased it of Norton, which Family, as appears by the Feudaries Book, held much Land here at Smerden, and at or near Romden: But to return; In Drayner the Interest of this place was fixed, until the seventeenth of Queen Eliza∣beth, and then William Drayner passed it away by Sale to Sir Roger Manwood, and he in the eighteenth year of that Princess, alienates it again to Martin James Esquire, Remembrancer of the Exchecquer, and from him by the Devolution of successive and paternal Right, it is now come down to acknowledge the Propriety of Mr. .... James.

Snergate in the Hundred of Aloe bridge celebrates the Memory of an Ancient Fa∣mily styled Alarar. Gervas Alarar was Captain and Admiral of the Fleet of Ships set forth and furnished by the Cinque-ports, in the fourteenth year of Edward the first, and Gervas Alarar was his Grand-child, whose Widow Agnes Alarar was in possession of it at her Death, which was in the forty second year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 1. But before the end of Henry the fourth, this Family was shrunk into an Expiration, and then Walter Moile, who was a Judge in the reign of Henry the sixth, succeeded in the Possession, and he by a Fine, levied in the thirtieth year of Henry the sixth, demises it to Hugh Brent, from whom about the latter end of Edward the fourth, it was conveyed to Cheyney, and in this Name it was fixed, until Hen∣ry Lord Cheyney, in the beginning of Queen Elizabeth, alienated it to Henry Nevill Lord Aburgavenny, who in the twenty ninth year of Queen Elizabeth, dying with∣out Issue-male; Mary Nevill was found to be his Sole Inheritrix, and she by match∣ing with Sir Thomas Vane knit this Mannor to his Patrimony: and his Son Francis Vane created Earl of Westmerland, in the twenty second of King James, alienated it in our Fathers Memory to Jackman, who not long after sold it to Sir Edward Hen∣den, one of the Barons of the Exchecquer, who upon his Decease gave it to his Ne∣phew Sir John Henden, whose Son and Heir Edward Henden Esquire, now enjoyes the Signory of it.

Smeth in the Hundred of Bircholt, hath in the Limits of it Scots-hall which is now and hath been for divers Descents the Inheritance of eminent Gentlemen of that Sirname, whom I dare aver, upon probable Grounds were originally called Balioll. William Balioll, second Brother to Alexander de Balioll, frequently writ his Name William de Balioll le Scot, and it is probable, that upon the Tragedy of John Earl of Atholl, who was made prisoner by Edward the first, and barbarously executed, in the year 1307. (whilst he endevoured more nobly then successfully to defend the gasping Liberty of Scotland, against the Eruptions of that Prince;) this Family to decline the Fury of that Mo∣narch, who was a man of violent passions, altered the Name of Balioll, to that of their Extraction and Country, and assumed for the future the Name of Scot. That the Sirname of this Family was originally Balioll, I farther upon these Reasons as∣sert. First, the ancient Arms of Balioll Colledge in Oxford, which was founded by John Balioll, and dedicated to St. Katharine, was a Katharin-Wheele, being still part of the paternal Coat of this Family. Secondly, David de Strabogie, who was Son and Heir to the infortunate Earl abovesaid, astonished with an Example of so much Terror, altered his Name from Balioll to Strabogie, which was a Signory which accrued to him in Right of his Wife, who was Daughter and Heir to John Comin Earl of Badzenoth and Strabogie, and by this Name King Edward the second, omitting that of Balioll, restored Chilham-castle to him for Life, in the fifteenth year of his reign. Thirdly, the Earls of Bucleugh, and the Barons of Burley in Scotland, who derive themselves originally from Balioll, are known at this instant by no other Sir∣name; but Scot, and bear, with some inconsiderable Difference, those very Arms which are at present the paternal Coat of this Family of Scots-hall. Having thus traced out the Name, I shall now represent a Scale of those eminent Persons, who have either directly or collaterally been extracted from Scots-hall. Sir William Scot,Page  314who was knighted the tenth of Edward the third, was Lord Chief Justice, and Knight Marshal of England, in the reign of that Prince. Sir Robert Scot was Lieutenant of the Tower, in the year 1424. Sir John Scot was Comptroller of the House, one of the Privy Councel to Edward the fourth, and Marshal of Calais. Thomas Scot who was first Bishop of Rochester, next of Lincolne, Provost of Beverley, Arch-bishop of York, Lord Chancellor of England, and Privy Councellor to King Edward the fourth, altered his Name from Scot to Rotheram, as being the place of his Education and Na∣tivity; but, it is probable, originally issued out from this Family. Sir William Scot, who was Son to Sir John above-mentioned, was Lord Warden of the Cinque-ports. Sir John Scot his Son, was knighted by the Prince of Castile, for signal Service perfor∣med by him, against the Duke of Gueldres. Sir Reginald Scot was Captain of the Castle of Callis. Sir Thomas Scot was Commander in Chief of the Kentish Forces, who assembled upon the plains by Northbourn, to oppose the Spanish Invasion, in the year 1588. All of which were either directly or collaterally Predecessors (being of the same Family) to Edward Scot, now Proprietary of Scots-hall Esquire, who was Son and Heir of Sir Edward Scot, who was made Knight of the Bath, at the Coro∣nation of K. Charles.

Thevegate is a second Mannor in this Parish, which was in elder Times, the Inheri∣tance of Gentlemen, of no mean Account in this Track. Robert de Passeley or Passelew, (for they are promiscuously so written) was Treasurer of England, under Peter de Rivallis, in the reign of Henry the third, as Mat. Paris in the Life of that Prince does record. Edmund de Passeley, was with Edward the second, at Borough-Bridge in the seventeenth year, as the Pipe-roll of that Time, discovers; and probably was instrumental in the Defeat, given there to the Nobility then in Arms against that Prince; and from him this Mannor did descend to John Passeley Esquire, who in the reign of Edward the fourth, determined in Elizabeth his sole Heir, matched to Reginald Pimp Esquire, who likewise had the Fate to conclude in a Female Inheritrix called Ann, who was wedded to Sir John Scot, of Scots-hall, and Shee united Thevegate, to the Revenue of that Family; and from him is the Right of it by Descent transportted to his Successor Edward Scot of Scots-hall, Esquire.

Smeth had the Grant of a Market procured to it by the Arch-bishop of Canterbury in the tenth year of Edward the third,

Shepebourn in the Hundred of Wrotham, was the Patrimony of an ancient Fa∣mily called Bavent, whose principal Estate lay in Sussex and Surrey. Adam de Ba∣vent, in the twelfth year of Edward the first, obtained a Charter of Free-warren to his Mannor of Shepbourn, and in the thirteenth year of that Prince's reign, had as appears Pat. 13. Edwardi primi, Memb. 28. a Grant of a Market weekly to this place, to be held on the Monday, and a Fair for three Days Space, at the Feast of St. Giles; and this Adam de Bavent or else his Son, was one of those eminent Kentish Gentlemen, who was embarked with Edward the first, in his Expedition into Scotland, and was one of those who were created Bannerets at the Siege of Carlaverock in the twenty eighth year of his reign. Roger de Bavent, was sum∣moned in the fourteenth year of Edward the second, to sit in Parliamennt as Ba∣ron; After whom I find no more mention of this Family, as Possessors of this Man∣nor: for it is probable, the Religion and muffled Perswasion of those Times, had so warped the Piety and Devotion of this Family, that they setled it on the Pri∣ory of Leeds: for by an old Rental of that Covent, I find it wrapped up in their Demeasn, in the reign of Edward the third, and remained parcel of their Income, until the general Shipwrack in the reign of Henry the eighth; and then it was in the thirty sixth year of that Prince, granted to Sir Ralph Vane, and Anthony Tustham Esquire, who not long after having passed away his Interest in it, to Sir Ralph Vane, it hath continued ever since, to acknowledge the absolute Signory of this Family so that the right of it now rests in Sir Henry Vane, Son and Heir to Sir Henry Vane Se∣cretary of Estate to his late Majesty.

Fairlane is an eminent Seat in this Parish, which likewise did confesse the Signory of the Family of Bavent; but before the latter end of Edw. the third, they had abandoned the Page  315Possession of it, and then it came to confesse the Signory of Colepepers, who remained Lords of the Fee, untill the latter end of Henry the fourth; and then it was trans∣mitted by Sale to Chown; in which Family after the Propriety had been constantly resident, untill that Age which almost was circumscribed within the Verge of our Remembrance, Sir George Chown the last of this Name at this place, desiring to con∣tract his Revenue solely within the Confines of Sussex, alienated his Estate here to Sir Henry Vane, Comptroller of his late Majestie's Houshould, and principal Secreta∣ry of Estate, who having much beautified and adorned the ancient Fabrick with new Additions, upon his late Decease, bequeathed it to be enjoyed by his Lady Dowager.

Stelling in the Hundred of Lovingborough, was with Wadenhall (which lyes partly in this Parish, and partly in Petham) parcell of the Inheritance of the illustrious Fa∣mily of Haut; and William de Haut had Stelling and Wadenhall in the first year of Ed. the first, and this above-mentioned VVilliam founded a Chappel at VVadenhall, and de∣dicated it to St. Edmund the Saxon King of the East Angles, and in this Family these Mannors continued untill the latter end of the reign of H. the sixth, and then VVill. Haut, lineally extracted from the above-said VVilliam, conveyed Stelling to Humphrey Stafford Duke of Buckingham: and this being forseited to the Crown, upon the At∣tainder of his Grandchild Edward Stafford Duke of Buckingham in the thirteenth year of Henry the eighth, this lay enwrapped in the royal Revenue, untill Queen Mary, in the first year of her reign, granted it with much other Land to Edward Lord Clin∣ton, who about the last year of that Princesse, alienated it to Mr. Henry Herdson, whose Grandchild Mr. Francis Herdson, about the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, passed it away to Mr. John Herdson his Uncle, who dying without Issue, disposed of it by Will to his Nephew Sir Basill Dixwell of Terlingham in Folkstone; from whom by descendant Devolution, it is now come down to his Heir General Mr. Basill Dixwell of Broom in Barham. But VVadenhall remained in the Name of Haut, untill by the Steps of several Descents, it was wafted along to Sir VVilliam Haut, one of whose two Daughters and Coheirs called Elizabeth, being wedded to Sir Thomas Colepeper of Bedgebury, brought it to acknowledge the Interest of that Fa∣mily; and he having exchanged it with Edward the sixth, it confessed the Signory of the Crown, untill Queen Elizabeth, in the forty second year of her reign, granted it to Sir John Sotherton, Baron of her Exchequer, whose Heir, in the memory of these Times, gave up his Right in it by the Fatality of Sale, to Mr. Benjamin Pere of Canterbury.

The Advowson of the two Parsonages, or Rectories of Stelling and Ʋpper Hardres, were granted to the Priory of Tunbridge, in the twenty sixth year of Edward the third, Pat. 3. part 2. Memb. 3.

Selling in the Hundred of Street, hath several places in it which cannot be declined without some Memorial: Willmington and Somervill, are the first that occurre, and they gave Seat, and one of them Sirname, to a Family of Repute in that Age, be∣cause I find they had Land in other places in the County. Roger de Wilmington, held the Possession of them at his Death, which was in the eleventh year of Edward the third, and left his Estate here and elsewhere, to be shared between his four Daugh∣ters and Coheirs, matched to Ordmere, Bromming, Brockhull and St. Laurence; but upon the Division of the Estate, these accrued to St. Laurence, and in Right of pa∣ternal Devolution, John St. Laurence, Son of Thomas St. Laurence, held these at his Decease, which was in the tenth year of Richard the second, and from him their right devolved to his Son Thomas St. Laurence, whose Sole Daughter and Heir Katharine, brought them to be the Inheritance of Sir William Apulderfield; who about the latter end of Henry the sixth, passed them away to Ashburnham and Till: and the first of those, having wholly setled his Right in them by Sale in Till, they rested in this Family, until the reign of Henry the eighth, and then Peter Heyman Esquire, having wedded the sole Inheritrix of Till, they were transplanted into the Patrimony of that Family; and from him the Propriety descended to his great Grandchild my worthy Friend Sir Henry Heyman Baronet, lately deceased.

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Haringe is a second place of Consideration: it was, as high as any Clew of Record can lead us, the Possession of the Gurneys. Hugh de Gurney, who is in the Register of those who entered England, with William the Norman, held it under his Scepter. In Ages almost of the next Step or Descent, the Sharsteds had it; and Robert de Shar∣sted, who flourished under Edward the first, Edward the second, and dyed in the eighth year of Edward the third, was possest of it at his Decease; but this Name was suddenly worn out, for in the Time subsequent to this, Henry Brockhull of Brockhull in Saltwood enjoyed it, who likewise had some Interest in Wilmington and Somervill, which his Successor sold to Ashburnham; and here the Propriety made its aboad, un∣till the latter end of Henry the sixth, and then it was conveyed to Inglethorp; and to the Demeasne of this Name it was linked, untill the Beginning of Henry the seventh; and then it was wafted over by Sale to Morton; and here the Title lodged untill our Grand-fathers memory; and then it was alienated to Willonghbie; and Sir Francis Willoughbie, sold his Concernment in it to Ralph Heyman Esquire; from whom it came over to his Son and Heir Sir Peter Heyman, who some years since upon the Marriage of his second Son Peter Heyman, setled it on him, whom yet it owns for, Proprietary.

Hodiford is the last place of any Estimate: In elder Times a Family was setled here which borrowed its Sirname, as it did its Residence, from this Mansion; for John Ho∣diford or Hodinorth, was Lord of the Demeasne: but when this Name departed from this place, the Cardens were the next in order, who were Possessors of the Fee; from whom by the Vicissitude of Sale, it was transmitted to Cobbe, where the Title had not long been lodged, but it was by the like Devolution, conveyed by James Cobbe the last of the Name who enjoyed it, to Thomas Godfrey Esquire; a Person to whom by several Engagements both of Learning and Friendship, I stand now ob∣liged.

Shelvich in the Hundred of Feversham, was formerly the Patrimony of Atleeze, a Family of no contemptible Value in this Circuit, who layd the Foundation of a House near the Leas, and from its Situation extracted their Sirname: but the greatest Honor which accrued to this House in elder Times, was, that it was the Cradle of Sir Richard Atleeze, who was Sheriff of Kent in the reign of Edward the third, and several times a Member or Burgesse of those Parliaments, which assembled in that Age: but dying without Issue, Marcellus Atleeze, his only Brother be∣came his Heir, but he not long after made his Exit, in two Daughters and Co∣heirs, whereof Lucy the eldest was matched to John Norton Esquire, and Cicely the youngest, was wedded to Valentine Barret of Perry-court: but Norton upon the Divi∣sion of the Estate, was in his Wifes Right, entituled to this Mannor; and in this Family, after the Title had for many discents resided, it was by an ever Thread of Succession, gui∣ded down to Sir Thomas Norton of Milton; who not many years since, passed it away to Sir Richard Sonds, originally extracted from an ancient Family, which about the reign of Henry the third, had their Habitation at Sonds-place at Darkin in Surrey, whose Son and Heir Sir George Sonds, Knight of the Bath, by Discent from him, claims the Interest and Signory of it, and hath upon the old Foundation of Leeze-Court, erected a Pile so set out with all the cunning and Pomp of Magnificence, that it is scarcely to be out-rivalled by a Fabrick of that Bulk, in any part of the English Nation. Sir Richard Atleeze, lyes entombed in Shelvich Church, under a fair Gravestone, with his Portraicture in Brasse annexed, as likewise that of his Lady, as fairly insculped, with this Epitaph affixed to both their Figures. Hic jacet Dominus Ricardus Atleese Miles, ac Domina Dionisia uxor ejus, qui quidem Ricardus obiit Anno Dom. 1394.

Coperhams-Sole in this Parish, for several Centuries of years, hath confessed the Belks to have been its Proprietaries: who it is probable extracted their Name out of Denmark, where the Name is yet spreading, and the Family noble and numerous. Stephen de Belk is mentioned in Testa de Nevill, a Book kept in the Exchequer, to have paid respective Aid for Land which he held in this Track, at the Marriage of Isabell Sister to Henry the third, in the twentieth year of that Prince's reign, which is enough to justifie the Antiquity of this Family in this Track.

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Shepeards Forstall was for many Descents the possessionof a Family called Ruck, one of whom lies entombed at Rye, and was an eminent Person, in the reign of Henry the eighth, being Bow-bearer to that Prince, and bore for his Coat Armour, as it appears affixed to his Grave-stone, Sables a plain Crosse Argent between four Flower de Lis Or. The last of this Name which held this place, was Nicholas Rucks, who about the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, dying without Issue, gave it to his Nephew Mr. Nicholas Oliver, who hath lately passed it away by Sale to the Colledge of Al∣soules in Oxford.

Lords is the last place of Account in Shelvich: in the reign of Edward the second, and Edward the third, it had Owners of that Sirname: but ever since the latter part of Richard the second, it hath constantly acknowledged the Family of Giles, until this present, to have been its successive proprietaries. One of this Family, called Alexander Giles, was Steward to the Abbot of Lesnes, in the reign of Edward the third, and I have seen a Release under his Hand and Seal, given to one John VValden of Erith, in the twenty fifth of the abovesaid Prince, for some Services due from that Person of the Covent abovesaid.

Sevington in the Hundreds of Chart and Longbridge, was, in Ages of as high as any Record can step to, the Barrie's, a Family of great Antiquity in this Track. Sir Robert de Barrie is in the Register of those, who were engaged in Ireland, under Henry the second, where he was the first, as Mr. Camden reports, which man'd and brought the Hawk to hand; and grew up to that Repute, as he was called by the Irish Barriemore, or the great Barrie. William de Barrie, this mans Successor, was one of the Recognitores Magnae Assisae, for this County, in the Time of King John, and lived at the Moat in this Parish, where many of his Successors, who were Lievtenants of Dover-castle, and Conservators of the Peace in Kent, had their Re∣sidence: the last of whom was Robert Barrie, whose Female Heir brought this Man∣nor to Radcliff, and he not many years since conveyed the Moat to Alcock, by whose Daughter and Heir it is now united to the Demeasne of Bois.

Sevenoke is like a Fountain which streams into several places of Note, which we cannot passe by without some Consideration. The first is Blackhall, which was the pos∣session of a Family called Totihurst: the first whom I find possest of it was William de Totihurst, and he flourished here, as appears by the ancient Court-rols, a great part of the reign of Edward the third, and Richard the second. The next whom I find by the same Evidences setled in the Inheritance, is Thomas Totihurst, and he held it in the reign of Henry the fifth, and Henry the sixth, and had Issue Robert Totihurst, who was, as appears by an Inscription upon his Tomb, Servant to Cardinal Bour∣chier, and died possest of this Mannor, in the year 1512. and transmitted it to his Son Thomas Totihurst Esquire, Justice of Peace of this County, who about the be∣ginning of Queen Elizabeth, alienated it to Sir ...... Boswell Grand-father to Sir Leonard Boswell, who dying without Issue, his Sister the Lady ...... Boswell, Widow of Sir William Boswell, as Heir General to her Brother, is now entered up∣on it.

Brabourne is the second place of Account. The first whom I find possest it, was Baldwin de Betun Earl of Albemarle. Falcatius de Brent, who so vigorously asser∣ted the Cause and Quarrel of King John against his Barons, and afterwards merited very much of his Son Henry the third, at the Battle of Lincolne, where a considera∣ble part of those Forces which Lewis the Dolphin of France had transported into En∣gland, to support the Confederacie of the Seditious Barons, was dissipated and dis∣comfited. But afterwards, all National Animosities being charmed into Slumber by a general Peace, he desiring still to improve the Flame of War since from that he expected both Heat and Light, seised on the Castle of Bedford, which was not wrung from him without the Expence of much Blood and Treasure: to expiate which Crime, his Estate here and else where, was in the fifth year of Henry the third, forfeited to the Crown, as being the Price of so great an Insolence: And then the abovesaid Monarch granted it wholly to Baldwin de Betun Earl of Albemarle: and Hawis his Daughter and Co-heir, brought it to her Husband William Mareschall Earl of Pembroke: but Gilbert Mareschall this mans Successor, dying without Issue, Page  318Roger de Bigod Earl of Norfolk; in Right of Mawde his Mother, who was his Sister and Heir, entered upon it, and he, in the eleventh year of Edward the first, gives it to Otho Lord Grandison. After this Family was worn out, I find by an ancient Court∣roll, one Walter de Pevenley or Pemley, possest of it, in the reign of Edward the third, and he it is possible erected the House, which in old Deeds is written Peven∣ley or Pemley-court. But, before the beginning of Henry the sixth, this Family was extinguished and gone, and then the Ashe's were the succeeding Proprietaries, a Fa∣mily which before were Lords of much Land in this Track, and in ancient Deeds were written de Fraxino, from their Habitation near some place planted with those Trees; and it is probable derived their Descent from Thomas de Esse, who was one of the Recognitores Magnae Assisae, in the fourth year of King John, as appears by the Pipe-rols of that Time: and certainly to this Name did a considerable part of the Fabrick of the House owe its first Original, as appears by the Coat in divers of the Windows, videlicet, Azure three Cheverons Argent. In fine, after this Seat and Mannor had for many years been resident in this Family, it was about the beginning of Queen Elizabeth, alienated to Sir ...... Boswell, whose Grand-child dying without Issue, his Sister the Lady Margaret Boswell, is now become the Heir Ge∣neral of this place.

Rumpsted and in very old Evidences written Rumpshot, was the Inheritance of a Family, which was known by that Sirname. It is superfluous to inform the World how many, by old Deeds, are represented to have been possessors of this place, a∣mongst whom Sir William de Rumpsted is most eminent, who flourished here, in the reign of Edward the third, and, as the constant and successive Tradition of the Inha∣bitants of this Parish is, was Foster-father to William de Sevenoke, who was found a desolate and forlorn Orphan in the hollow Body of an Oake, and received both Reception and Education from the Charity and Benevolence of the above-mentioned Person: In whose Lineage the propriety of this place did not long after settle; for by an old Court-roll, I find it in the reign of Henry the sixth, in the Tenure of Ni∣sell: but this Family not long after determining in a Female Heir, she by matching with Bere, brought it to acknowledge it self to be of the Interest of this Family, but staid not long in the Name; for about the beginning of Henry the eighth, it was made by purchase the possession of Peckham, from whom not many years after, by the same fatality it went away to Bedell. Nicholas Bedell, in the third and fourth of Philip and Mary, demised it to John Stacy of Hollenden, and John Stacy, in the fourth and fifth of Philip and Mary, conveyes it to Richard Lone, and his Successor Mr. Richard Lone hath very lately by Sale transmitted his Interest here to Thomas Lambert, formerly of West-Combe in Greenwich Esquire.

Knoll is the last place of Account in Sevenoke: It had, in Times of elder Inscription, the same Owners with Brabourne, and Seale, not far distant, as namely, Falcatius de brent, Baldwin de Betun Earl of Albemarle, William Mareschall Earl of Pembroke, and Roger de Bigod Earl of Norfolk, who in the eleventh year of Edward the first, granted it with Seale, and much other Land, which devolved to him in Right of Mawde his Mother, who was Sister and Heir to her Brother Gilbert le Mareschall Earl of Pembroke, to Otho de Grandison, and in his Descendants did it continue until the beginning of Richard the second, and then it was conveyed by Sir Thomas Grandison to Geffrey de Say; yet I do not find that the possession of this place was entirely plan∣ted in Grandison, for an Inquisition taken after the Death of Reginald de Cobham, in the thirty fifth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 62. Parte primâ, represents him to have had some share or concernment in it; yet how ever it were thus broken into parcels, the Inheritance of this Mannor, was wholly, after this, placed in Geffrey de Say, as appears by some Court-rols, which commence from the reign of Richard the se∣cond: but he determining in Daughters and Co-heirs, Joan one of them upon the Division of his Estate, brought this as an Addition to the Patrimony of her Husband Sir William Fiennes: and in this Family, when the possession had had a Respite, un∣til the reign of Edward the fourth, it was by Sir William Fiennes passed away by Sale to Thomas Bourchier Arch-bishop of Canterbury, who added much of Pompe and Magnificence, by a new Supplement or Superstructure to the ancient Pile or Fabrick, and dying bequeathed it to the See of Canterbury, as a convenient Pallace for his Page  319Successors: but when William Warham Arch-bishop of Canterbury, in the reign of Henry the eighth, saw that the Grandeur of this Mansion was looked upon both with an Eye of Emulation and Envy, by the Laity of those Times, he to allay that Murmure and Regret, in the twelfth year of the abovesaid Prince, exchanged it with the Crown: and here it rested, until Edward the sixth, in the second year of his reign, granted it to Edward Seymour Duke of Somerset, Protector of the Realm, in the Minority of that Prince. Who being convicted of Felony, in the fourth year of that King, it escheated back to the Crown: and then it was in that year, by a new Grant, setled on John Dudley Duke of Northumberland: but he being intoxi∣cated with the Fumes of Ambition, broke out into such treasonable and seditious practises, against the Right and Title of Queen Mary, that they could not be ex∣plated, but with the Losse of his Life, and Forfeiture of his Estate: and then this Seat upon his unsuccessful Exit, returning to the Crown, it was by the abovesaid Princess granted to her Cousin Reginald Poole Cardinal, for his Life, and a year after, as he should by Testament dispose. After his Death, it reverts again to the Crown, and then Queen Elizabeth, in the third year of her reign, grants it to Robert Dud∣ley Earl of Leiceister, and he the same year resigning it back into the Hands of his Soveraign, it was by Lease made over to John Lennard of Chevening Esquire: but the Fee-simple was by Royal Concession invested, in the seventh year of Queen Elizabeth, in Thomas Sackvill Lord Buckhurst, and his Grand-child Richard Sack∣vill Earl of Dorset, almost in our Remembrance, conveyed the Fee-simple (reser∣ving it yet still in Lease to himself and his Heirs, paying such a Rent-charge, as is there specified, for ninety and nine years) to Mr. Richard Smith, vulgarly called Dog-Smith: who upon his Decease, not many years since, setled the propriety of it for ever upon St. Thomas Hospital in Southwarke.

The Honour of Sevenoke was granted by Queen Elizabeth, to her Kinsman Henry Carey Lord Hunsdon, in the first year of her reign, from whom it devolved to his Grand-child Henry Carey Earl of Dover: he passed it away by Sale to Richard Sackvill Earl of Dorset, who alienated his Interest in it to Mr. Richard Smith, who upon his above-mentioned Decease, gave it with Knoll, which both were exchanged, and so united to the Royal Demeasne by William Warham, to the Hospital of St. Thomas in Southwarke.

Kepington is the last place considerable in this Parish, which was wrapt up in that Demeasne, which owned the Signory of the Lords Cobham of Cobham, as appears by an Inquisition taken, in the thirty fifth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 62. Parte secundâ, and after a Decursion of several Descents, came by the Heir Ge∣neral of this Family, to be possest by Brook, whose Descendant, about the begin∣ning of Queen Elizabeth, conveyed it to Burges, and by his Sister and Heir it came over to Hanger, who alienated it to Cowper, and he not long since to Mr. Thomas Farnaby.

Spelherst in the Hundreds of Somerden, Codsheath, and Watchling stone, hath many places in it of Repute. First, Grome-bridge which is a Chappel of Ease belonging to Spel∣herst, and is dedicated to St. John: it is in old Registers written Gromen-bridge, and Gormen-bridge from some Saxon, who was anciently Owner of it, as Godmanchester in Huntingtonshire, upon the same Account, in old Orthography, bears the Name of Gormonchester, a Saxon having been possessor of it of that Denomination. This Mannor in elder Times confessed the Dominion and Title of the Noble Family of Cobham: Henry de Cobham, and Joan his Wife, obtained a Market to be observed weekly on the Thursday, and a Fair three Dayes yearly, videlicet, the Vigil, the Day of St. John Port-latine, and the Day after, as is manifest from an old Charter, which I have seen, whose Date commences from the fourteenth year of Edward the first, the Market and Fair were kept, where now the new Chappel is erected by the piety and expence of that Worthy Patriot John Packer Esquire, late one of the Clerks of the Privy Seal. After the Cobhams were departed from the possession of this place, the Lords Clinton became, by purchase, Proprietaries of it: and John de Clinton, who was often summoned to fit as Baron in Parliament, in the Time of Richard the second, died possest of it, in the twenty second year of that Prince, Page  320Rot. Esc. Num. 16. from whom the Title flowed in this Family, until the latter end of Henry the fourth, and then it was passed away to Waller of Lamberherst, where, and in Sussex they were before Masters of very ample Possessions; for Thomas Waller, and Katharine his Wife, granted to Thomas Waller of Lamberherst his Father, Richard Brenchley and John Brook, all his Lands, Messuages, and Tenements, in the Villa∣ges and Parishes of Rotherfeild, Witheham, Wadhurst; Lamberhurst, Little Horsted, Alfricheston, and Bucksted, together with the moiety of the Advouson of the Church of Little Horsted, as appears, Claus. 11. Richardi secundi in Dorso Memb. 35. Richard Waller Esquire, was Sheriff of Kent, the sixteenth year of Henry the sixth, and kept his Shrievalty at Grome-bridge, and was before Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, in the twelfth year of that Prince. This is that renowned Souldier, that in the Time of Henry the fifth, took Charles Duke of Orleans, General of the French Army Prisoner at the Battle of Agin-court, brought him over into England, and held him in honora∣ble Restraint or Custody at Grome-bridge, which a Manuscript in the Heralds-Office notes to be twenty four years: in the Time of which his Recess, he newly erected the House at Grome-bridge upon the old Foundation, and was a Benefactor to the re∣pair of Spelherst Church, where his Arms remain in Stone-work over the Church∣porch: but, lest such a signal peece of Service might remain entombed in the Se∣pulchre of unthankful forgetfulness, the Prince to convey the Memory of this glo∣rious Action to Posterity, assigned to this Richard Waller, and his Heirs for ever, an additional Crest, videlicet, the Arms or Escocheon of France, hanging by a Labell on an Oake, with this Motto affixed, Hae Fructus Virtutis. This Richard was great Grand-father to William VValler of Grome-bridge Esquire, Sheriff of Kent, the twen∣ty second of Henry the eighth, and he was Father to Sir VValter VValler, who was Grand-father to Sir VVilliam VValler now possessor of Winchester-castle, and Father of Sir Thomas Waller: which Sir Thomas, almost in our Fathers Memory, passed away Grome-bridge to Thomas Sackville Earl of Donset, whose Grand-child Edward Earl of Dorset, not many years since conveyed it to John Packer Esquire, Father to ...... Packer Esquire, now possessor of this place.

There was a Chauntry founded at Grome-bridge, in the thirty eighth year of Henry the third, by VVilliam Russell, and Hawis his Wife, as appears by the first Book of Compositions in Registro Roffensi.

Hollands in this Parish next cals for a View: It was, in Ages of a very high Date, the Patrimony of a Noble Family of that Sirname, and are in the Chartularies of this Parish, recorded to have been great Benefactors to the Church of Spelherst, and were allied to Thomas Holland Earl of Kent, who matched with Joan Daughter of Edmund of VVoodstock: but, before the beginning of Henry the sixth, this Family was worn out, and vanished, and then the VVallers stepped into the possession, in which Family the Right of it did many years reside, until it was in our Fathers Memory alie∣nated to Thomas Sackville Earl of Dorset, from whose Successor it passed away by Sale to Lindsey, and from him, not many years since, the like Revolution carried it off to Caldicot.

Ferbies is another Seat of no vulgar Consideration in Spelherst, if we consider that it gave Sirname to a Family of important Account in this Track, who had their ancient Residence at this place, and sealed as high as Edward the third, with a Fesse Ermin between three Goats heads erased, in Labells affixed to their Deeds, which was the Paternal Coat-Armour of John de Fereby (for so is the Name written in ancient Muniments) who flourished, in the reign of Edward the second, and Edward the third. But this mans Posterity being desirous to transplant themselves to Pauls Crey, where they had before purchased Lands, called-Hokinden of Dynley, about the latter end of Richard the second, conveyed that Estate they had here, about the beginning of Henry the sixth, to Waller of Grome-bridge, and continued for many years folded up in the Revenue of that Family, until very lately it varied its Possessor, being by pur∣chase made the Inheritance of Alderman Chiverton of London.

Rust-hall in this Parish, had likewise Proprietaries of that Sirname, one of which Family called John Rust, was Maior of Feversham, in the raign of Henry the sixth, and there lyes entombed, and about that Age. this Family surrendered their Concernment here by Sale to Waller, in which Name it resided, untill the forty second Page  321year of Queen Elizabeth; and then it was conveyed by Richard Waller Esquire, to Mr. George Stacy; who not long after passed it away to Bing, in which Family the Possession is at this instant fixed.

Ewherst is the last place which must be mentioned, and indeed it is worth our Re∣cording, because this and Read in Marden, was the ancient Patrimony of Read, many Discents before. Sir Robert Read Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, in the reign of Henry the seventh, transplanted himself to Chiddingstone, by matching with the Coheir of Alphew, yet still remained Possessor of this place, which he transmit∣ted with Katharine one of his four Daughters and Coheirs, matched with Sir Thomas Willoughbie, and after the Title had been knit to this Family, by the Links of some Discents, it was by Sale not long since transferred to Knight.

Siberts-would vulgarly called Shepeards-well, lies in the Hundred of Bewsborough, and hath two places in it worth our Notice. The first is West-court, which was given (as the Records of Christ-church testifie) to Alfric the Abbot, by King Etheldred in the year 944, and conveyed not long after by Scotlandus the Abbot his Successor, to the Arch-bishop of Canterbury, and hath been ever since as a Limbe or Branch of that See.

Upton-court is a second place of Repute. Several old datelesse Deeds discover to us, that it was in elder Times the Patrimony of a Family called Ʋpton: from whom it is probable, that the Ʋptons of Feversham, who for many years have flourished there under a fair Estimate of Antiquity, were originally descended: but before the end of Edward the third, this Family was crumbled away at this place, and then the Golds∣burghs or Goldsboroughs, were invested in the Possession, and remained Masters of this Seat, untill the Beginning of Henry the seventh, and then this Name began to moulder away into Decay and Oblivion, and surrendred their Interest here by Sale to Guldford, in which Name it found an aboad, untill the latter end of Henry the eighth, and then it was conveyed to John Bois Esquire, Ancestor to John Bois of Fredvill Esq; now Lord and Proprietary of it.

Swink-field in the Hundred of Folkstone, was originally, and as high as any Evidence will leave us any Track or Print to walk by to a Discovery, the Possession of the noble Family of Crioll, who held here two little Manors called Bouington alias Bointon, and Northcourt, which were both given by Nicholas Keriell or Crioll, in the third year of Richard the second, to one John Phineux Esquire, for that Protection and Shelter, which he by a Magnanimous and vigorous Assistance supplied him with, even to the saving of his Life, at the Battle of Polcteirs, and being thus fastned to this Family, the Interest of both these places, continued intermingled with their Inheritance, untill they came, by successive Discent, to be possest by John Phineux Esquire, extracted from a Son by a second Wife of Sir Jo. Phineux the Judge, who determined in a Daugh∣ter and Heir, matched to Sir John Smith, who in her right was invested in the Proprie∣ty of both these places, from whom they are now come down to his Grandchild Philip Smith Viscount Strangford.

There was a Praeceptory here at Swingfield, which belonged to the Knights Hospital∣lers, of the Nature, Capacity, and Condition of which I have spoken before at Little-Peckham, which upon the Suppression of their Order here in England, was by Henry the eighth, in the thirty third of his reign, granted to Sir Anthony Aucher; who not long after passed it away to Palmer, descended from an ancient Family of that Sirname in Sussex, so that it is now the Inheritance of Sir Henry Palmer of Wing∣ham Baronet.

In the twentieth year of Edward the third, John Monins held Land here, and paid respective Aid for it, as the Book of Aid informs me, at making the Black Prince Knight. I should not have mentioned this Record, but to shew, that this noble and eminent Family, (I am bold to call them so, since the above-mentioned John Monins, is styled in the former Record, Esquire) can put in its claim to as high and illustrious Descent, as the most of the Families of this County can justly and primi∣tively entitle themselves to.

Page  322

Snodland in the Hundred of Lark-field, was given to the Priory of St. Andrews in Rochester, by Egbert King of the West-Saxons, in the year 838, and is an Appendage to Halling, being setled by Henry the eighth, upon the Suppression of the former Covent, on the Dean and Chapiter of Rochester.

The Courtlodge by the Church, was, as high as I can by the Guide and Direction of Evidence trace out, the Palmers, who, as appears by very ancient Deeds, sealed with a Cheveron between three Palmers Scrips. William le Palmer, who was Owner both of this and Rye-huose in Otford, flourished here in the reign of Edward the third, and stood depicted in the Church-Window, with the above-recited Arms on his Tabard or Surcoat, untill some rude hand defaced the Signature. Another of this Name, lies entombed in Snodland Church, whose Epitaph alluding to his Name, is registred by Weaver, amongst his printed Monuments, of the Diocesse of Rochester; and after this Name was extinguished at this place, the Leeds's were the next Family, who by purchase entituled themselves to the Possession of it and I remember amongst some Church-notes of this County, collected by the eminent Robert Glover Esquire, there is mention of one Will. Leeds, who lyes enter'd in Snodland Church, with his Armes viz, A Fessee between three Eagles, affixed to his Graves-stone: but it seems the Date, Pourtraicture, and Coat, being insculped in Brasse, were by sacrilegious Handstorn off: for now there is no appearance of them, nor of this Family neither, who not ma∣ny years since, dispossessed themselves of their Interest in this place, and by Sale gave it up to Whitfield of Canterbury.

There is a second Seat in Snodland called Holoway-court, and in the Book of Aid, mention is of one Henry de Holoway that held it in elder Times, about the Begin∣ning of Henry the third: but upon a serious perusal of the evidences, and Muniments, which did relate to this Mansion, I found it, as high as they reached, that is, to the reign of Edward the third, to be the Inheritance of the Tilghmans: and seve∣ral very old Panes of Glasse are coloured with that Coat of Arms, which the Tilghmans are entered with, in the last Visitation of Kent, and in this Name was the Possession for many Descents permanent, till some forty years since, or more, it was by Sale conveyed to Clotworthy, extracted from the Clotworthies of Devon, who by Testamentary Donation, transmitted the Interest of it to his Sisters Son Mr. Thomas Williams.

Stone in the Hundred of Feversham, was, when it flourished most, but a Chap∣pel of Ease to Tenham; but it is grown up to some Repute, since Simon de Lang∣ton, Arch-deacon of the Church of Canterbury, Brother to Stephen de Langton, the Arch-bishop, gave to the Monks of Christ-church in Canterbury, in the year 1227, omnes Decimas Majores & Minores, de Copton & Eylwarton, infra Limites Capellae de Stone. Now this Copton and Eylwarton were Mannors, anciently given to the Monks of Canterbury, by Edmund Son of Q. Edgiva, ad victum corum for the supply of Diet in the year of our Lord 980.

Wildemersh in this Village deserves a Remembrance; in that it was part of the Pa∣trimony of the ancient Family of Donett; for it was in the enjoyment of John Donett at his Death, which was in the thirty fifth year of Edward the third. But not long did it fixe there; for Jmes Donet his Successor, dyed without Issue-male, and left only a Daughter and Heir called Margery, who being married to Iohn St. Leger, this in her right went into the Possession of that Family; from whom the ordi∣nary Revolution of Sale, conveyed it to Richard Dryland, from which Name by the like Chanel, the Inheritance slowed into Sir Anthony Aucher, Predecessour to Sir Anthony Aucher of Bourne: and here for ought I yet can collect, is the Fee-simple of it setled.

Stone in the Hundred of Acstane, had formerly a Castle, which acknowledged the Northwoods for its founders, as their Arms insculped in the old Stone-work now dismantled did easily demonstrate. In the twentieth year of Edward the third, Iohn de Northwood, paid respective Aid at making the Black Prince Knight, for his Mannor and Castle, and although it now lye wrapped up in its own Ruines, yet the Shell or Skeleton of it, within which Sir Richard Wiltshire laid the Foundation Page  323of that Frabrick now extant represents to the eye some symptoms of its former strength and magnificence. From Northwood, it passed away by Sale to Butivant corruptly called Bonivant, and from this Family a Fatalitie like the former carried it down to Cholmley: from him by as quick a Current the Fee simple was transported to Chapman, whose Wi∣dow Elizabeth Chapman, being re-married to Jo. Preston, he in her Right as I find by some Court-rolls was possest of it; but her Son Thomas Chapman about the latter end of Henry the eighth concluded in Anne his Sole Heir who by matching with Mr. William Carew devolved the right on his Family; from whom, in right of that Alliance it is now descended to his Successor Mr. Henry Carew.

Littlebroke in this Parish did first own a Family of that Sirname, as is evident from ancient Dateless Deeds, wherein Laurence at Broke is re-presented to have been Possessor of it; but this Family before the end of Edward the third, had deserred the Possession, and transplanted it by Sale into Northword; and John Northwood about the latter end of Richard the second, passed it away to Roger Apylton; which Roger lies buried (as the Date on his Tomb informs us) in Crayford Church, in the year 1400. And from him does Sir Henry Apylton Knight and Baronet, not onely claim his Descent, but his Interest in this Mannor also.

The Mannor of Cotton is embraced within the Precincts of Stone likewise: It was, as high as any private or publick Record can conduct us on to a Discovery, the Possession of Killingworth of Hackstaple, at Sutton at Hone, and in this Family was the Title by a successive Derivation of several Descents preserved, until the entrance of Henry the eighth, and then it was conveyed by George Killingworth Esquire, to Sir Richard Wiltshire; from which Family not long after, the Propriety of this place was, by a Fate proportionate to this, planted in Apylton, Ancestor to Sir Henry Apylton Knight and Baronet, now Lord of the Fee.

Stoke in the Hundred of Hoo, was given to the Priory of St. Andrews in Rochester, by Eadbert K. of Kent, in the year 762. And upon the suppression being surrendred to the Crown, it was by Henry the eighth setled on his newly erected Dean and Cha∣piter of Rochester. But here are two places which are of secular Interest. The first is Malmains, which yielded both Seat and Sirname to a Family which fell under that Denomination; for I find John de Malmains Son of Henry died possest of it, in the tenth year of Edward the second, and in this Family it remained until the latter end of Richard the second, and then it was conveyed to Iden, a Family of generous Rank in elder Times about Rolvenden, and here it lay couched in the Demeasn of this Family until the latter end of Henry the eighth, and then it was passed away to Jo. Park, who dying without Issue Male, setled it on Elizabeth his Sole Heir matched to John Roper Esquire; from whom by paternal succession the Inheritance is come down to his Descendant Christopher Roper Baron of Tenham. Tuders is the second, which anciently confessed a Family of that Appellation to be its original Possessors, whose Name was in all probability primitively Theodore; for I have seen an ancient Roll of Kentish Arms, wherein Tuder of Stoke bears the same Coat with Owen Theodore vulgarly called Tuder, viz. Azure a Cheveron between three Helmets Argent: But to proceed: When this Family dislodged from this place, for want of Intelligence I con∣fess I know not, onely in the Reign of Henry the eighth I find it possest by Woodward, in which Family the Title remained invested until the entrance of Q. Elizabeth, and then it was conveyed to Wilkins, from whom by a quick Alienation it went away, and resigned up its Interest by Sale to Bright, and in the Revenue of his Descendant is the Proprietie of it yet wrapped up.

Stourmouth in the Hundred of Blengate, was a piece of that large Revenue, which owned the Signory of Hussey. In the fifty fifth year of Henry the third, Henry le Hussey obtained a Charter of Free-Warren, to his Mannor of Stourmouth, and his Grand∣child Henry le Hussey died possest of it in the sixth year of Edward the third, but, alass, neither the Nobleness of the Name, nor wideness of the Franchise, could keep this Family from departing from this place; for about the latter end of Henry the fourth, I find it in the Tenure of the eminent Family of Apulderfield; but setled not long here; for Sir William Apulderfield about the middle of Edward the fourth concluded Page  324in Elizabeth Apulderfield, who was his Sole Daughter and Heir, who by matching with Sir Jo. Phineux Lord Chief Justice of the Kings Bench, in the Reign of Henry the seventh made it his Demeasn: but the Title of this place did not long fix here; for, he dying without Issue Male, Jane his only Daughter, became his only Heir, who by espou∣sing of Jo. Roper Esq; of St. Dunstans in Canterbury, linked it to the Demeasn of this Fa∣mily; from whom in a continued Current of descent the Proprietie of it is now flowed down to William Roper, a Cadet or younger Branch of this Stem.

Shorne in the Hundred of Shamell, was, as high as the Reign of K. John, the Patrimony of the Noble Family of Nevil. Jordanus and in some old Deeds written Jollanus de Nevil held the Mannor of Shorne as appears by the Pipe-Roll of that year, and John de Nevil was his Son and Heir, who held this Mannor in the thirtieth year of Henry the third, but after him I can track no farther Mention of this Family at this place; for in the fifty fourth of Henry the third, as appears by the Pipe-roll of that year, I discover Roger de Norwood to be Lord of the Fee, this was that Roger de Norwood, who disdaining to have his Lands held in that Lazy and sluggish Tenure of Gavelkind, changed it into the more active one of Knights Service in the fourteenth year of Henry the third, still reserving to himself by that Licence by which he ob∣tained a Grant of the first, to reserve the ancient Rent whereby his Lands held even in the Time of the Conquerour: and he in the thirteenth year of Edward the first, died possest of this Mannor and all its Perquisites at Oisterland in Cliff and other places, and left it to his Son and Heir Sir John de Norwood, who together with his eldest Son Sir John de Norwood accompanied that triumphant Prince Edward the first in his Victorious Design undertaken against the Scots in the twenty eighth of his Reign. The Mannor of Shorn holding by this Tenure, viz. to carry a White Banner forty Dayes together at their own Charges, whensoever the King should commence a War in Scotland, as appears by an Inquisition taken after the Death of Roger de Norwood in the thirty fifth year of Edward the third; Rot. Esc. Num. 23. Parte secundâ. And this was customary not onely in England, but elsewhere; for Mr. Selden in his Titles of Honour observes out of Prelusius's his Discourses upon the State of Poland, in the year 1530, Albert Marquess of Brandenburg and Mr. of the Teutonick or Dutch Or∣der in Prussia, receives his Investiture into that Dutchy, per Vexilli Traditionem, by the Delivery of a Banner from the Hands of Sigismund K. of Poland, and his Brother. George at his being enstated in that Signory by this Ceremony, was suo & Fratrum No∣mine Vexillum contingere, in his own, and the Name of his Brother, to place his Hands upon the Banner: and when the above-mentioned Banner was delivered to an Heir who had not his Title and Right free from the Claim of an ambiguous and perplexed Competition, he was onely admitted ad Contactum Extremitatum Vexilli ejusdem to touch the utmost or extream parts of this Banner. The Tenure which was annexed to this Investiture was this, to assist the K. of Poland with an hundred Horse, whenso∣ever he should personally advance into the Field against an enemie.

But to return: John de Norwood was the last of this Name whom I find setled in the Inheritance of Shorne and he enjoyed it at his Decease, which was in the second year of Richard the second, Rot. Esc. Num. 35. But before the latter end of the Reign of that Prince, it was removed from the possession of Norwood, and by Sale plac'd in the Noble and ancient Family of Savage of Bobbing Court; but not long after Sir Arnold Savage determining in Eleanor his Sole Inheritrix, who was first wedded to Sir Reginald Cobham, by whom she had no Issue; and after to William Clifford Es∣quire, she by this Alliance united it to the patrimony of this last Family, and here it lay involved until the beginning of Q. Elizabeth, and then it was passed away by George Clifford to Nicholas Lewson Esquire, Grand-father to Sir Richard Lewson of the County of Stafford, who desiring to circumscribe and collect his scattered Interest which lay dispersed in several parcels in this County, into the closer circumference of Staffordshire; alienated this Mannor, almost in our Remembrance with all its Adjuncts, at Oisterland in Cliff and other perquisites and out-Skirts to Mr. Woodier of Rochester, in whose Lineage and Name the Title of it at this instant lies treasured up.

Page  325

Ockington in this Parish was a Limb that made up the Body of that Revenue which anciently did swell into so vast a Bulk and Dimension in this Track, and acknowledged for proprietaries the Noble Family of Cobham, as appears by an Inquisition taken in the sixth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 45. where Stephen de Cobham was then found to have been possest of it at his Death; and from him was the Title in a suc∣cessive stream of Descent wasted down to the Reign of Hen. the seventh, and then it was by Sale transplanted into Sir Henry Wiat, where it flourished being supported with the Sap and Verdure of so Noble a Family, until the fourth year of Edward the sixth, and at that Time it was by Sale torn off from this Name, for then Sir Thomas Wiat alienated it to Sir Anthony St. Leger, and he passed it away to George Brooke Lord Cobham about the seventh year of Edward the si•••, whose great Grand-child Sir William brooke Knight of the Bath, dying in the year 1643, without Issue Male it ce∣scended to Sir John Brooke restored to the Barony of Cobham by the last King in the year 1644, as being Reversioner in entail.

Roundal though now shrunk into neglected Ruines, was in elder Times the first Seat of the noble Family of Cobham, from whence upon its Decay they were trans∣planted to Cobham Hall, and was the Cradle of Men very eminent in their respective Generations of whom take this brief prospect. *Henry de Cobham is enrolled in the List of those Kentish Gentlemen who were concerned with Richard the first at the Siege of Acon. * Reginald de Cobham accompanied Henry the third in his expedition against the Welch in the forty second year of his Reign. Sir Henry, Sir Reginald, Sir Stephen, and Sir Henry de Cobham who lies buried here at Shorne, are in the Catalogue of those Kentish Knights, who supported the Cause and Quarrel of Edward the first, at the Siege of Carlaverock in Scotland, in the twenty eighth year of his Reign. Jo. de Cobham was frequently summoned to sit in Parliament as Baron, in the Reign of Edw. the third. Richard de Cobham was made Knight Banneret by Edward the third, for his exemplary Service performed against the Scots, as appears Pat. Edw. tertii Parte secunda Memb. 22. This Mannor escheating to the Crown upon the Attainder of Henry Lord Cobham in the second year of K. James, it was by that Prince granted to Lodowick Duke of Lenox, who upon his Decease bequeathed it to his Nephew James Duke of Lenox, who being lately dead, Esme Duke of Lenox his onely Son is now heir apparent of it.

Stowting lies in a Hundred which borrows its Name from this place. In the reign of K. Iohn, sundry ancient Records which have an Aspect upon that Prince's Time inform us that Stephen de Haringod was Lord of this Mannor, and had the Grant of a Market to be held weekly at this place on the Tuesday, and a Fair to be observed yearly for the space of two dayes, viz. the Vigil and Day of Assumption of the Virgin Mary, as is manifest, Cart. 16. Joan. Num. 43. and died possest of it in the forty first of Henry the third. But after this mans exit, I can track no more of this Stem or Stock, to have been proprietaries of it. The next Family which was successively entituled to the possession was the noble Family of Burghurst or Burwash, the first of which, whom by some old Deeds I discover to have held this place, was Bartholomew de Burwash, who received the Order of Knighthood by Edward the first; for his Noble and generous Assistance given to that Prince at the Seige of Carlaverock in the twenty eighth of his Reign, and he had Issue Stephen de Burwash, who obtained a Charter of Free-Warren to his Mannors Stowting, Sifleston, Ditton, and Burwash in Chiddington, in the first year of Edward the third, and died possest of this Mannor and Hundred in the third year of that Prince's Government, as appears, Rot. Esc. Num. 41. and from him did it descend to his Grand-child Bartholomew Lord Burwash who in the forty third of the abovesaid Monarch conveyed this Mannor with much other Land to Sir Walter de Paveley Knight of the Garter, in which Family the possession was constant, but until the beginnning of Richard the second, and then it was passed away by Sale to Trivet; from whom the same Fatalitie about the fifteenth year of that Prince brought it over to Sir Lewis Clifford, and by Descent this devolving to his Successor Lewis Clifford, he in the twelfth year of Hen. the sixth, conveyed it by a Fine then levied to William Wenlock, who not long after alienated his Right in it to Richard beauchampe Baron of Aburgavenny, who had Issue Richard Beauchampe in whom the Male Line Page  326determined, so that Elizabeth his onely Daughter and Heir being matched to Edward Nevill, brought this Mannor and the Barony of Aburgavenny to be united to that Family, and continued linked to the Demeasn of this Name, until it was by De∣scent brought down to Henry Nevill, Baron Aburgavenny, who about the latter end of Henry the eighth, passed it away to Sir Thomas Moile, whose Daughter and Co∣heir Amy Moile united it to the Inheritance of her Husband Sir Thomas Kempe, whose Son Sir Thomas Kempe setled it on his Brother Reginald Kempe, and from him it de∣scended to his onely Son Mr. Thomas Kempe, who dying without Issue, it came to be shared by his two Sisters and Co heirs matched to Denny and Clerk, and they not many years since by mutual Concurrence and Assent, alienated their joynt Interest here to Jenkins of Aythorne.

Stockbery in the Hundred of Milton celebrates the Memory of the illustrious Family of Crioll, who lived here in Reputation amongst the eminent Gentry of this County, and in the Recital of their Possessions in this Parish, their Mansion was called a Castle, and divers of their old Deeds bore Teste at their Castle of Stockbery. Sir Ni∣cholas de Crioll was the first that brought this Family into Repute and Eminence; for he was one of those who accompanied Edward the first in the twenty eighth year of his Reign in his fortunate Attempt upon Scotland, when after a pertinacious Siege he reduced the Castle of Carlaverock, a piece in the repute of those Times, held almost inexpugnable; and for his signal Service in that Expedition, was created Knight Ban∣neret, and died possest of this place in the thirty first of Edward the first: and in this Name and Family did the Title of this place by an uninterrupted Current of De∣scent, stream down to Sir Thomas Crioll Knight of the Garter, eminent for several Services performed under the Scepter of Henry the sixth, who being infortunately beheaded at the second battle of St. Albans, whilst he endeavoured to support the Title of the House of York in the thirty eighth year of Henry the sixth determined in Daughters and Co-heirs, one of which was wedded to Edward Bourchier who cast this Mannor into his possession, and he in her Right died seised of it in the fourteenth year of Henry the seventh; but after this it was not long constant to the Interest of this Family; for in the twenty third year of the abovesaid Prince, Robert Tate died seised of it, by right of purchase. And in the Descendants of this Name was the Possession involved, by a long Series of years, until those Times which almost fell under our Cognizance, and then this Mannor was conveyed to Sir Edward Duke of Cosington in Alre sord; whose Lady Dowager, in Right of Joynture, hath now the enjoyment of it.

The Mannor of Gillested in this Parish, did formerly relate to the noble Family of Savage, and was wrapped up in those Lands to which John de Savage Grand-child to Rafe de Savage, who was with Richard the first at the Siege of Acon, obtained a Charter of Free-Warren in the twenty third year of Edward the first: and Arnold Savage Son of Sir Thomas Savage died possest of it in the forty ninth year of Edward the third, and left it to his Son Sir Arnold Savage, whose Daughter and Heir Elizabeth Savage was first matched to Reginald Cobham, by whom she had no Issue, and after to William Clifford Esquire, second Brother to Robert Clifford, who was often Knight of the Shire in the Reign of Henry the fourth, whose Posterity in Right of this Alliance were possest of this place, until the latter end of Hen. the eighth, and then it was altenated to Knight, Ancestor to Mr. William Knight, upon whose Decease his sole Daughter and Heir Mrs. Frances Buck, Widow of Mr. Peter Buck of Rochester lately deceased, is now entred upon the Possession of it.

Cowsted is another place of Account in Stockbery: It was in Times of an elder In∣scription written Godsted, as giving Seat, and yielding a Sirname to a Family so called. William de Codested alias Godsted held it at his Death, which was in the twenty seventh year of Edward the first, and had Issue William de Codested, who was likewise in posses∣sion of it at his Death, which was in the Enjoyment of it in the ninteenth year of Issue Richard de Codested, who was in the Enjoyment of it in the ninteenth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 43. which was the time of his Decease: and from him it descended to John de Codested styled by the vulgar John de Cowsted, who bare for his Arms Gules three Leopards heads Argent, which was assumed by Higham,Page  327who about the beginning of Richard the second, matched with the Sole Heir of this Family, and in this Name it remained, until the beginning of Henry the sixth, and then it was partly by Sale, partly by marching with a Daughter of this Family en∣stated upon Petit, in which Family the Title of this place was fixed and permanent, until those Times which came within the precincts of our Grandfathers Remem∣brance devolved it to O borne: but Edward O borne, not many years since, determining in Mary his Sole Heir, she by espousing of William Fagge, hath knit it to that Revenue, which now confesses his Descendants for proprietaries.

Stodmersh in the Hundred of Downhamford, was innobled anciently, by being parcel of the Revenue of the Saxon Kings of Kent, and rested in their Demeasne until Lotharius, one of the Kentish Kings, made Godd his Heir, and as Thorne re∣cords in his Annals, setled it on the Abby of St. Augustins, and remained succes∣sively interwoven with the Patrimony of that Convent, until the publick Suppression, in the reign of Henry the eighth, rent it away: and then that Prince, in the thirty seventh year of his reign, granted it to John Masters, and he upon his Decease set∣led it on his Son Mr. Thomas Masters, and he dying without Issue-male, left it to his Daughter and Co-heir Elizabeth Masters, who by matching with Mr. William Courthop knit the propriety of it to his Inneritance, and he had Issue Mr. Thomas Courthop, who, in Right of this Alliance, is now entituled to the instant possession of it.

Stroude in the Hundred of Shamell, was granted in the eleventh year of Henry the third, by the same Prince, Magistro & Fratribus Militiae Templi Solomonis, that is, to the Knights Temples, who had here an eminent Mansion, which from its being of their possession, hath ever since acquired the Name of the Mannor of Tem∣ple. After the suppression of this rich and magnificent Order, in the second year of Edward the second, upon what pretences, and colourable Insinuations, I have dis∣covered in my Description of Temple Ewell, this Mannor was united to the Crown. And though a principal part of the Lands, which related to this Order in this Coun∣ty, before their Dissolution, was by that Act of Parliament, called, Statutum de Terris Templariorum, setled on the Knights Hospilaters; yet this was lodged in the Royal Revenue, until the twelfth year of Edward the third, and then he conferred it by Grant on Mary Countess of Pembroke, who about six years after bestowed it on the Abbess and Sisters Minorites of the profession of St. Clare, at the Abby of Denney in Cambridgeshire, to which place she had removed them from Waterbeach, where they were first planted by her. And here did this Mannor reside, until ano∣ther Tempest, more fatal and ruinous then the former, arose in the reign of Henry the eight, which like a Whirl-winde ravished it away from the Revenue of the Church, and then that Monarch in the thirty second year of his reign, made it the propriety of Edward Elrington Esquire. But it seems the Title of Church-Land is stuck so thick with the Curses of the first Donors, that it becomes like a Moath re∣ceived into a Garment, which like an ingrateful Guest, commonly destroyes the House which entertained it, and so it was here; for, in the same year it was granted, the abovesaid Person alienated it to George Brook Lord Cobham, whose infortunate Grandchild Henry Lord Cobham, was enwrapped in that obscure and mysterious De∣sign of Sir Walter Rawleigh, which was muffled up in such a complicated Veile of that magical Mist called Reason of State, and other Intrigues of wrested policy, that it remains dark and perplexed, until this Day; indeed the Crimes of this un∣happy Gentleman, were by the mercenary Tongues of some Lawyers, who were in pension to the Interest of those, who then steared the Helm of State, and who like some Trumpeters, knew how to sell their Breath to the best advantage, aggra∣vated and multiplied to that Bulk and Dimension, that he was convicted of high Treason, in the beginning of King James, and though he lost not his Life, he did that of his Estate, here at Stroude, which was by the abovesaid Prince conferred by Grant on Robert Cecill Earl of Salisbury, principal Secretary of Estate, in Respect he had matched with Elizabeth Brook, Sister to this infortunate Lord, from whom it descended to his Son, the Right Honorable William Cecill, Captain of the Band Page  328of Pensioners to his late Majesty, and Earl of Salisbury, who in our Fathers Memo∣ry, passed it away to Mr. Bernard Hide Esquire, one of the Commissioners of the Custome-houes, to the late King Charles, and he upon his Decease gave it to his third Son Mr. John Hide, who not many years since alienated it to James Duke of Lenox, from whom after some brief possession, it was conveyed to Mr. Blague, whose Son Mr. Izaack Blague by Descendant Right is now entituled to the Propriety of it.

The Chappel of St. Nicholas in Stroud, was by Gilbert Glanvill Bishop of Rochester, with the Consent of the Prior of Rochestor, William Arch-deacon of the same See, and likewise of the Parish Priest of Frendsbury (within the Precincts of whose Vil∣lage, Church, and Congregation, it was in elder Times circumscribed) erected, and improved into a Mother-church, and that for these two Reasons. First, it was divided by too great Distance from the Church of Frendsbury: And secondly, the Inhabitants began to multiply to that Number, that it was probable that in Decur∣sion of Time, the above recited Church would be in no Capacity for the Reception of so great a Conflux: and therefore it was judged convenient by the Authority of that Age, to establish Stroud into a Parish, independent to Frendsbury, and assign to it not only a Church-yard, for the Sepulture of their Dead, but likewise a Com∣petency of Tiths (exceptâ solummodo Decimatione Bladi, that is, I conjecture, the Tithery of Grasse only excepted) for the Support of the Incumbent for the Time being, as the Records of the Church of Rochester inform us.

Shorham in the Hundred of Cods-heath, hath several places within the Verge of it, which may deserve our Notice. The first is Preston, which was the Seat of an emi∣nent Family, called Buckland, who bore for their Cognisance Argent an Eagle Sa∣bles beaked and ungued, Or. Alan de Buckland, was a noted Person in the Time of King John, and being Lievtenant of Dover-castle, that Prince directs a Command to him, and William de Brewer, who was joyned in Commission with him, to surrender Dover-castle to Hubert de Burgh for his Service. Sir Thomas de Buck∣land of this place had Buckland in Maidstone, and Buckland likewise in Ludsdown, and flourished in the reign of Edward the third, and in several Deeds, to which he was witness, subscribes himself Miles. In brief, after this Family had continued pos∣sessors of this Mansion, until the latter end of Henry the sixth, it devolved to Thomas Buckland, who dying without Issue-male, Alice his only Daughter and Heir, by matching with Thomas Polhill of Polhill-street in Detling, cast it into the Inheritance of that Family, from whom it came down to Mr. ...... Polhill, who being not many years since deceased, his Widow Mrs. ...... Polhill, is now in the enjoy∣ment of it.

Palstres alias Planars and Sepham, are two ancient Seats, likewise situated within the Confines of Shoreham, and had both Owners of that Sirname. William de Pla∣nar, as appears by Deeds without Date held the first, and so did John de Planar, in the reign of Edward the first, and died possest of it, in the forty seventh year of that Prince's reign, and in this Family did it continue, until the beginning of Henry the sixth, and then it was conveyed to Sepham of Sepham, an eminent Family in this Parish, who bore for their Coat-Armour, Argent three Cinque Foils pierced Sables, and were descended from William de Sepham, who died possest of this place, in the fifteen year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 12. and having continued Lords of both these Mannors, of one by Descent, and of the other by purchase, until the lat∣ter end of Henry the seventh, Mr. John Sepham, who had in the fifth year of that Prince, made an acknowledgment for them to the then Arch-bishop of Canterbury, of whom it seems they both held, passed away Sepham to William Martin, and Palstres to Cobbe, in which Families after they had remained, until the latter end of Henry the eighth, they were both demised to Mr. Francis Sandbach, by whose Sole Heir Alice Sandbach, they came to be the possession of David Polhill, Ancestor to Mr. David Polhill, who upon the late Death of his Grand-father Mr. David Polhill is invested in the Tenure of them.

Vielston now by vulgar Acceptation of the Name, called Vilson, is another Seat of eminent Account in Shoreham. It primitively gave Seat and Sirname to a Fami∣ly Page  329which radically was as deeply planted in Antiquity, as any Family which then flou∣rished on this part of the County, some of the old Evidences, now in the Hands of my Cozen Mr. Thomas Petley, reach as high as the Government of the reign of Henry the third, and then Hamon de Vielston, demises several parcels of Land to Sepham of Sep∣ham, Timberden of Timberden Farm in this Parish likewise, and several others of obscu∣rer Account, whose names are too tedious to recite, by Deeds not circumscribed with any Date, which argues him to be a Man in that Age illustrious, both for Descent and Demeasn. In Times which approached neerer to ours, John de Vielston, who paid respective Aid at making the Black Prince Knight, for his Mannor of Vielston, was eminent and was Sheriff of Kent, in the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, nine∣teenth, and twentieth years of Edward the third; and he left Issue John Vielston, who deceasing without Issue, John Ross his Sisters Son, about the latter end of Richard the second, became his Heir, and he had Issue John Ross, who dyed about the latter end of Henry the sixth, without any Posterity, so that he bequeathed it to his Kins∣man John Berd; who in the fourteenth year of Edward the fourth, sold it to John Pal∣mer; from whom it went away by Sale in the eighteenth year of the above-mentioned Prince, to Richard Page, where it made its aboad, till the nineteenth year of H. the se∣venth; and then Edmund Page this Mans Son, cast it by Sale into the Inheritance of Richard Wood, who in the fourth yeer of Henry the Eighth, alienates the Fee-simple to Robert Blague, and he in the sixth yeer of that Prince demises it to William Petley of Halsted, and he upon his decease bequeaths it to his second Son Mr. Thomas Petley, from whom in a direct Line is my Cosin Mr. Thomas Petley descended, in whom (by original derivation from him) the Interess and Right of this ancient Seat is at this instant invested.

The Castle of Shorham, was, if not built by, yet certainly very anciently in the Possession of the Family of Aldham, of Aldham St. Cleres in Kemsing, one of which Name was Castellan of this place, in the eighth year of Henry the third, and was Ancestor to Sir Thomas de Aldham, who flourished in the reign of Edward the second, and Edward the third, in whom the Male-line ended, so that his three Daughters matched to Francis St. Clere, Martin de Peckham, and John de Novoburgo or Newborough of Newborough in the County of Dorset, became his Coheirs, and this Castle upon the Distinction of his Estate into parcels, was annexed to the Demeasn of Newbo∣rough; in which Family, after the Title had as in a constant Chanel flowed untill the reign of Henry the eighth, it was diverted by Sale into Polhill, in which Family and Name, the Propriety hath ever since, untill this instant, been fixed and per∣manent.

Southfleet in the Hundred of Axstone, did belong to the Priory of St. Andrews in Rochester, and was given to that Covent by Hamo de Heath, in the year of our Lord 1346, which was not long before his Decease, and I find by an old Manuscript which represents to us the Liberties and Franchises which were setled upon this Cloister, that the Prior had by Prescription a Charter of Free-warren, to his Mannor of Southsleer: yet though it were fortified with this Priviledge, * it could not be secure from that Tempest which arose in the reign of Heury the eighth; which like a Whirlwind ravished it a∣way from the Patrimony of the Church, and lodged it in the Revenue of the Crown, where it dwelt untill the thirty seventh year of Queen Elizabeth; and then it was by Concession from that Princesse, passed away to William Peter of Writtle Esquire, who was Son to Sir William Peter, Secretary of Estate to King Edward the sixth, Q. Mary, and Q. Elizabeth; and he immediately after alienated it to Alderman Garret of London, whose Successor in our Fathers Remembrance, conveyed it by Sale to Sir William Sid∣ley of Scadbery, from whom it is now come down by a Chain of Descent to his Grand-child Sir Charles Sydley Baronet, the present Lord of the Fee.

Pole vulgarly called Poole, is another Mannor in Southfleet, And was in elder Times the Inheritance of a Family called Berese, for I find by a fine levyed in the thirty seventh year of Henry the third, that Richard de Berese, fells this Mannor under the Notion of a Carucate of Land to Reginald de Cobham of Roundall in Shorne; and from him did it by a continued Thread of Succession, devolve to John Cobham Esquire, in whom the Male-line of that Name ended, and he dyed seised of it in the ninth year of Page  330Henry the fourth, Rot. Esc. Num. 10. And lett it to Joan his Sole Inheritrix, who, by Reginald Braybrook her third and last Husband, had Issue Joan her only Daughter and Heir, who brought this Mannor and a liberal Revenue besides, to her Husband Thomas Brook of the County of Somerset Esquire, Grand-father to Thomas Lord Brook, who about the Beginning of Henry the seventh, passed it away to Sir Henry Wiat, one of the Privy Councel to that Monarch; from whom it descended to his noble but infor∣tunate Grandchild Sir Tho. Wiat; who in the second year of Q. Mary, forfeited this and his Life together; so that from thenceforth, it was clasped up in the Income of the Crown, untill Queen Elizabeth, in the twenty fifth year of her reign, restored it to his Widow the Lady Joan Wiatt, and George Wiat Esquire his Son and Heir, father to Sir Francis Wiat, who upon his Decease, left it to his Widow Dowager the Lady ..... Wiatt, who is now in possession of it.

Scadbery in Southfleet hath been for some Centuries of years, the possession of the Family of Sidleys, who were in Times of very high Ascent, seated in Romney Mersh; for there are some Lands there, which at this Day they call by the Name of Sidleys, and Sidleys Mersh. In this Mansion there is a Room, whose sides are covered with Wain∣scot, and on one of the Plates or Pains, which appears to be exceeding ancient, the Arms of Sidley are carved in embost-work, viz, A Fesse wavee between three Goats heads erased, and these Letters underneath, W. and S. with the year of our Lord affixed in Figures, whose Date commences from 1337. And although the Structure of this House, hath like a Snail shifted its ancient Shell, yet in all its Mutations, and Vicissi∣tudes, which must certainly have very much disordered the Fabrick, when it was cast into a new mould and frame, and ravelled and discomposed the Materials: yet this Panel of Wainscot, hath been, like a Relique, religiously preserved, to justifie not only the Antiquity of this Seat, but of the Family of Sydley also, which is presumed to have been resident at this place, before the above-mentioned Calculation: from whom Sir Charles Sidley Baronet, claims the Original of his Title to this Mansion, and his Extraction or pedigree likewise, untwisted, into many Descents, and now at last wound up in him.

Shouldon in the Hundred of Deal, hath two remarkable places which are situated within the Limits of it. First, Hull presents it self to our View, it was formerly un∣der the Signory of the illustrious-Family of Ratling or Retling in Nonington. Thomas de Retling paid respective Aid for this, and divers other Lands of ancient Inhe∣ritance in the twentieth year of Edward the third, at the making the Black Prince Knight, and left it to his Son Sir Richard de Retling, whose Widow the Lady Sarah Retling, and afterwards Wife of John de St. Laurence, died possest of it in the tenth year of Richard the second, and left it to John Spicer who had married Joan Daughter and Heir to her first Husband: but he concluding in a Daughter and Heir, by this his first Wife called Cicely, who was Heir to her mother Joan Spicer, shee by matching with Iohn Isaack, knit it to the Propriety of that Family. But before the twenty first of Henry the sixth, he had fixed the Inheritance in Iohn Bresland, in whom it was not long resident; for he suddenly after altered his right, and about the Beginning of Edward the fourth, put it over by Sale to Phineux of Swink-field, whose Successor Ro∣bert Phineux, by as quick and early a Vicissitude, placed the possession about the Be∣ginning of Henry the eighth, in George Monins Esquire; whose Successor in that Age which was circumscribed within the Pale of our Fathers Remembrance, passed it away to Crayford of Great Mongeham.

Secondly, Cotmanton puts in its Claim for some memorial likewise, even in this respect, that it was the Demeasne of the noble Family of Crioll or Keriell, who were of some considerable Repute in this Track, as appearsby by the Book styled Testa de Ne∣vill kept in the Exchequer, where they are represented in the twentieth year of Henry the third, to have held Land in this Skirt of the County, and in Ages of a modern Aspect, that is, in the twentieth year of Edward the third, I find Iohn de Criol, gave a pecuniary supply at the making the Black Prince Knight: but before the end of Edward the third, he was departed from the possession of this place, which by Sale was resigned up to Roger Digge, and he dyed in the possession of it in the third year of Ric. the second, Rot. Esc. Num 19. And in this Family it continued, untill the reign of Page  331Henry the seventh, and then it was alienated to Barton, descended from the ancient Family of Barton, of Barton-hall, in the County of Lancaster; from whom the like Mutation about the latter end of H. the eighth carried it off, to the Family of Brown; and from them it passed away by Sale into the Possession of Richardson, upon whose go∣ing out, the Family of Smith, by a Devolution like the former, not many years since, stept into the Inheritance of it.

Sundrich in the Hundred of Codsheath, was the Possession (as high as any Light, collected from Antiquity, can waft us to a Discovery) of an Ancient Family called in Latine-Records de Insula, and in English Isley. Iohn de Insula, obtained a Charter of Free-warren to his Lands at Sundrich, in the eleventh year of Edward the second, and he had Issue Iohn Isley, who married Joan, Daughter to Sir Ralph de Fremingham, and by her had Issue Roger Isley Esquire, who in Right of his mother, be∣came Heir to his Uncle Iohn Fremingham Esquire, who deceased without Issue, in the twelfth year of Henry the fourth, and this Roger Isley, had Issue William Isley Esquire, who was Sheriff of Kent, in the twenty fifth year of Henry the sixth, and he had Issue John Isley Esquire, who was Justice of the Peace, and Sheriff of Kent, in the fourteenth year of Edward the fourth, and deceased in the year 1484, as appears by an Inscription affixed to his Monument, yet extant (notwithstanding the late general Shipwrack of the Remains of Antiquity) in Sundrich-church, and he had Issue Thomas Isley Esquire, Father of Sir Henry Isley, who was Sheriff of Kent, in the thir∣ty fourth year of Henry the eighth, and again in the fifth year of Edward the sixth: but being unhappily entangled, in the dysastrous Attempt of Sir Thomas Wiat, was upon the frustrating of that Designe and the Dissipation, and Discomfiture of those Forces who were to support it; in the second year of Queen Mary, convicted and attainted of high Treason, and executed at Sevenoke; upon whose Tragedy this Mannor with all its Appendages escheated to the Crown: but was the same year restored to his Son William Isley Esquire, who was Sheriff of Kent, part of the seventh year of Queen Elizabeth; after whose decease, the Title of this place, which had so many Centuries of years like an Inmate dwelt in this Name and Family, ebbed a∣way to another Proprietary; for in our Fathers Memory it was alienated by Sale to Brooker, who not many years since, passed it away to Mr. John Hide, second Son to Mr. Bernard Hide, one of the Commissioners of the Custome-house to his late Majestie.

Brook-place in Sundrich, so called from its contiguous Situation neer some Drill of Water, did acknowledge for many discents, the Signory of Isley, the last of whom who dyed possest of it, was William Isley Esquire, who held it at his Decease, which was in the fourth year of Edward the fourth, Rot. Esc. Num. 34. After whose Exit, it came to John Isley Esquire, who not long after, passed it away to John Alphew, and he determinig in two Daughters and Coheirs, one of them by matching with Sir Ro∣bert Read Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, in the reign of Henry the seventh, linked it to his Patrimony: but he likewise went out in four Daughters and Coheirs, Katharine one of which, was matched to Sir Thomas Willoughbie, Lord Chief Justice likewise, of the Common Pleas, and so he in her right was possest of this place; from whom it came down to his Successor, Thomas Willoughbie Esquire, who about the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, conveyed it by Sale, to Mr. Hoskins of Oxted in Surrey, descended from an ancient Family of that Name in Hereford-shire, whose Successor Mr. Charles Hoskins, being lately deceased, the Fee-simple rests now in his Son and Heir.

Hethenden or Henden is another Mannor in Sundrich, which was folded up in the De∣measn of the powerful and illustrious Family of the Clares, who were Earls of Gloucester and Lords of Tunbridge by whose Heir general it devolved to Audley: and this Family by the same Fatality, languishing into a Female Inheritrix, she by matching with Stafford, cast this Mannor into his Revenue, and in this Name was the Propriety resi∣dent, untill, Edward Stafford Duke of Buckingham, was infortunately attainted, in the thirteenth year of Henry the eighth, it was by escheat, annexed to the Demeasn of the Crown, and made its aboad there, untill King Henry the eighth, in the thirty fifth year of his reign, granted it to Sir John Gresham, and he dyed possest of it, in the first Page  332year of Queen Elizabeth, after whose Decease it remained constant to the Interess of this Family, until the latter end of Queen Elizabeth, and then it was alienated to Sir Thomas Hoskins of Oxsted in Surrey, in the Descendants of which Family the Signory and Propriety is at this instant remaining.

The Roman Fosse or Way which extended or stretched out it self from Oldborough in Igtham to Baston in Heys, and afterwards to Woodcot in Surrey, did cut thorough this Parish; for not many years since, in digging near Come-banke, a Seat so called, which did formerly relate to the Isleys, and is situated in Sundrich, were discovered many Roman Urns of an antick Shape and Figure, from whence we may probably collect thus much, that there was formerly erected some Fortresse, at or near Combe-banke (its Situation being fitted for such a Design) by the Roman Generals, to secure their forces in their March to Noviomagum or Woodcot, against any Impression or Eruption of the Britons.

Sturrey in the Hundred of Blengate, was a Mannor by a Prescription of many Ge∣nerations wrapt up in the Patrimony of Apulderfeild, a Family whom we shall have occasion often to mention thoroughout the Body of this Survey, and here it conti∣nued till this Name met with its Tomb in a Daughter and Heir, known by the Name of Elizabeth, who was wedded to Sir John Phineux: and although he likewise con∣cluded in a Female Heir, matched to John Roper Esquire, who drew along with her a great portion of the Estate, yet this still remained fixt in this Name and Fami∣ly, even till our Fathers Memory; and then John Phineux Esquire died, and left this, and other vast possessions to his Daughter and Sole Heir Elizabeth Phineux, who brought them over to her Husband Sir John Smith, eldest Son of Sir Thomas Smith, and Grand-father to Philip Smith Viscount Strangford, who by Right planted in him by so worthy a Predecessor, does entitle himself to the Interess and possession of it.

Mayton in this Parish, though now of no great Importance, yet formerly gave both Seat and Sirname to a Family that passed under that Appellation, from whom by Sale the Inheritance was transplanted into Diggs, where for some Descents, without any Interval it made its abode, till it was by Leonard Diggs Grand-father to Sir Dudley Diggs, sold to Goodhugh, by whose Daughter and Heir it became the Demeasne of Baggs, which Name likewise going out here into a Daughter and Heir, she by matching not long since to Farmer, has made it to own him for its in∣stant proprietary.

Sutton by Walmer lies in the Hundred of Cornilo, and was the Inheritance of a good old Family, called Stroude. Peradventure it assumed its Denomination from the Shore not far distant, and was sometimes, in the Saxon Denomination, cal∣led Strond, and as often Stroude; John de Stroude held it, as the Book of Aide denotes, in the reign of Edward the first, and when this Family was worn out, the next who were invested in the possession, were the Criols, and Nicholas Criol or Ke∣riel, held it at his death, which was in the third year of Richard the second, whose Grand-child Sir Thomas Keriel being an active Champion of the Cause and Quarrel of Edward the fourth, against the House of Lancaster, was slain in the second Battle of St. Albans, where the Title of both Parties was put to the bloody decision of a Field, who leaving only two Daughters and Co-heirs, one matching with John Fogge Esquire, incorporated this into his Revenue, from whom by purchase, the Right was setled in Whitlock, where it tarried not long, but was by the like devolution trans∣planted into Maycot, from which Name the same Fate of Sale carried it into the possession of Stokes, who in our memory by the like alienation, transmitted his In∣teress here to Meryweather.

Sutton, commonly called East-Sutton, lies in the Hundted of Eyhorne, and was formerly the Braybrookes; Henry de Braybrooke, one of the Lord Wardens of the Cinque Ports, had Lands here; and in this Track (as the Book of Aide, and the Book called Feoda Militum, in the Exchequer, do both inform us) his Son was Gerard Braybrooke, and his Grand-child was Reginald Braybrooke, whose Heir Joan Page  333Braybrooke married to Thomas Brooke of the County of Somerset: but whether this Reginald Braybrooke gave this Mannor to pious Uses, or not, and principally to the Abby of Leeds adjacent, I cannot positively determine, upon the Suppression it was granted (as being parcel of the Demeasne of the Convent of Leeds) by Henry the eighth, in the thirty seventh year of his reign to John Tufton Esquire, who pas∣sed it away by Sale to Mr. Richard Argall, whose Heir Elizabeth Argall, being mar∣ried to Edward Filmer Esquire, made it the possession of that Family, and by a com∣municative Right from him, does his Grand-child Sir Edward Filmer, Son to Sir Robert Filmer lately deceased, now hold the possession and propriety of it.

Sutton Valence, and Chart by Sutton, both lie in the Hundred of Eyhorne: the last of which contracted the Appellation, from formerly owning William de Valence Earl of Pembroke, to be Lord of the Fee, who certainly instituted that Castle, that now even in its Reliques and Fragments with much of venerable Magnificence overlooks the Plain: And when Aymer de Valence his Son concluded in a Female Heir Isabell, she was wedded to Lawrence Lord Hastings, who in relation to her became not only Earl of Pembroke, but Lord of Sutton-Valence also, and from him did it des∣cend to his Grand-child John Hastings Earl of Fembroke, the last Earl there of that Name, who transmitted his Title of that place to Reginald Grey, and Richard Talbot, who flourished here about the reign of Henry the fourth, and they had this Man∣nor by Testamentary Donation, in the fourteenth year of Richard the second. In the next Age subsequent to this, I find the Cliffords of Bobbing-court, to be the Pro∣prietaries, and to this Family was the Inheritance in a constant Union fastned, till Nicholas Clifford Esquire, deceased without Issue-male, and left only one Daugh∣ter and Heir, called Mildred, who was first married to Harper; secondly, to More; thirdly, to Warren; and lastly, to Blount: but she had only Issue by Har∣per and More; for in her Right Edward Lord More of Mellifont in Ireland, and Sir Edward Harper divided the Possession: but the first desiring to contract his whole Revenue into Ireland, and the other to make this adjacent to his principal Seat of Ruspar-hall in the County of Derby, Sir Edward Harper alienated this to Sir Ed∣ward Hales Knight and Baronet, and the Lord More, Chart by Sutton to the same worthy Person, Grand-father to Sir Edward Hales Baronet, who not only enjoyes the Title of his Ancestors Dignity, but that of the Possession in these places like∣wise.

Cheyneys-court in this Parish hath been adopted into that Name, since it for many Descents acknowledged the Jurisdiction and propriety of that Family: and I could unravel a Successive Series of many of that Name (but that it is superfluous) who were Lords of the Fee; it is enough, that Sir Thomas Cheyney sold it to Iden, which Name suddenly after resolving into two Daughters and Co-heirs, one matching with Brown, and the other with Barton, the last made it parcel of the Patrimony of that Family, and when some years it had been continued in the possession of Barton, it was in our Memory by Sale brought over to be the Demeasne of Wollett, and it is now (but whether by Purchase, or by the Right of a Female Heir or not, I cannot ascertain my self) the propriety of Jordan.

Sutton at Hone lies in the Hundred of Acstane, and gives Denomination to the whole Lath wherein it is situated. It was long since a Mannor relating to the Re∣venue of the Knights Hospitallers, who had here a Mansion-house, called St. Johns, where they often made their Retreat, when they visited their other Demeasne Land, which lay circumscribed within the Verge of this County: but their Estate here was much inforced and improved by the Addition of the Mannor of Grandison, which whether it came to them by Purchase or Donation from Thomas Lord Grandison, who died the forty ninth year of Edward the third, is incertain. Upon the Sup∣pression of the Alberge of these Knights of St. John of Jerusalem here in England, their Revenue was assumed into the possession of the Crown: and King Henry the eighth, bestowed by Grant on Sir Maurice Dennis St. John's; and to him does that magnificent and elegant Pile, where now the Countess of Leicester makes her Resi∣dence, owe the first Institution of its Shape and Beauty, though it has been since Page  334extreamly inlarged by the Additions both of Bulk and Ornament by Sir Thomas Smith. But to proceed, St. Johns was conveyed from Sir Maurice Dennis by his Co∣heir to Thomas Cranfeild, whose Grand-child Vincent Cranfeild, has lately alienated his Right to Mr. Hollis of London Merchant.

Haly Sawters is another Mannor in Sutton in Hone: a place though now obscure in it self, and not re-presented to our Remembrance but by Annals and Record, yet in elder Times it was raised up to a higher degree of Estimate, when it had Proprietaries, whose Nobility and Title added both Value and Lustre unto it. The first of which Register whom I trace in Record to be entituled to the Possession was Laurence de Hastings Earl of Pembroke, and he died seised of it in the twenty second year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 47. from whom the Title came down to his Son John de Hastings, and he likewise was in the enjoyment of it at his Decease, which was in the forty ninth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 70. After this Family, had deserted the Inheritance, I find Richard Fitz Allen Earl of Arundel to be invested in the Possession, and he died in the Tenure of it in the one and twentieth year of Richard the second, Rot. Esc. Num. 2. From whom it devolved to Joan his Daughter and Co-heir matched to William Beauchamp Baron of Aburgavenny, whose Son Richard Lord Beauchamp dying without Issue Male, Elizabeth his Sole Daughter, espoused to Edward Nevill Baron of Aburgavenny in her Right be came his Heir, and he in the sixteenth year of Edward the fourth died possest of this Mannor of Sawters. And here for want of Light both from publick or private Record; I cannot discover to my Reader or my self whether or not it passed away immediately from Nevill to Maio, whom I find about the beginning of Q. Elizabeth to be planted in the Possession, though the Affirmation of some old people of this Parish, who derived that Know∣ledge they have of it from the Tradition of their Ancestors that assert it did. Thomas Maio in the twenty eighth of Q. Elizabeth passed it away to Rich. Paramour, and he presently after disposed of it by Sale to Sir Henry Brooke, who conveyed it to Robert Wroth Esquire, and he to Edmund Hunt Esquire, who alienated Haly and Sawters to Mr. William Hewson in the thirty fourth year of Q. Elizabeth, whose Son Mr. William Hewson of London transmitted Haly with Sawters by Sale, some few years since, to Mr. Edward Badbie.

Grandisons is the last place remarkable in this Parish: It was the ancient Inheritance of the noble and illustrious Family of Grandison; before Otho de Grandison, who was Governour of Jersey for life by Grant from Edw. the first in the fifth year of his Reign, did transplant himself to Seale, which he had purchased in the thirteenth year of that Prince. William de Grandison this mans Son was likewise Lord of this place, to whom K. Edward the second assigned the Value of 44 lb. yearly Rent out of his Mannor of Dartford, in Exchange for the Mannor of Iden and other Lands in Sussex, and from this Man did the Signory of this Mannor accrue by Descent to his Grand-child Sir Thomas Grandison, who dying without Issue in the forty ninth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 62. left it partly to John de Northwood, who had married Agnes his Sister and Co-heir, and partly to Margaret his Lady Dowager, who died possest of it in the eighteenth year of Richard the second: but after her Exit, the Title was not long permanent in Northwood; for in the twenty first year of the Prince abovesaid, Richard Fitz Allen Earl of Arundel held it, and died that year possest of it: And here I confess for want of Light and just intelligence I must make a Leap to the Reign of Henry the sixth, and then I find it in the Tenure of Richard Nevill Earl of Warwick, and it is probable it devolved to him by the Heir of Beauchampe. After his Decease it became the Possession of George Duke of Clarence, who had matched with Isabel his Daughter and Co-heir, by whom he had Issue Edward Plantagenet Earl of Warwick, who was offered up on an early Scaffold, to the waking suspitions, and weary Jea∣lousies, of those two politick Princes, Henry the seventh, and Ferdinand of Castile, being invited to an escape, from his long Duress in the Tower, by the Arts and Stra∣tagems of that eminent Impostor, Perkin Warbeck: But indeed those who have cal∣culated this Action, and surveyed the whole Scene of this Tragedy, have discovered that his nearness to the Crown, as being the last Relick of the Male-Line of Plantagenet, was the cheiefest Ingredient in the severe Sentence, of this infortunate Gentleman. After his expiration, this Mannor came over to be the Patrimony of his Page  335Sister, Margaret Countess of Salisbury, who was matched to Sir Richard Poole, by which marriage this Mannor was annexed to his Demeasn, and he had Issue by her Henry Poole, who with his Mother was attainted in the Reign of Henry the eighth, upon whose fatal Shipwrack, Grandisons was in the thirty fifth of that Prince placed by Grant in his Brother Geffrey Poole, who not long after passed it away to Sir Thomas Moile, by whose Daughter and Co-heir it came to be the Inheritance of Sir Thomas Kempe, and he about the tenth year of Q. Elizabeth conveyed it to Mr. Jo. Mabbe, who not long after transmitted it by Sale to Sir Christopher Heron, who about the be∣ginning of K. James alienated his concernment here to Cole, by whom not long after it was demised to Sir Thomas Smith, second Son of Customer Smith of Westenhanger; in the Heirs and Descendants of which Name and Family, the Possession is still resi∣dent.

Hackstaple is likewise within the Bounds of this Parish: and was, as high as the reach either of private or publick Evidence can bring down any light to our know∣ledge the Killingworth's; and here, for an indivisible succession of Ages, did the Pos∣session fix, and reside, until at last the common Fate of Families, brought this Name here at Hackstaple to find its interment or Grave in a Daughter and Heir; for George Killingworth had an onely She-Inheritrix whose name was Elizabeth, and she was matched with Christopher Eglesfield Gentleman, so that Hackstaple in her right, was intermingled with the Demeash of this Family: and here some years did it by this Conjugall Knot appear fastned, till lately the Possession received an alienation; for Francis Eglesfield of London, Son to Christopher Eglesfield some few years since sold it to Mr Christopher Searle.