The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.
Page  57

Lesson 8. Of the Double Feint at the Head.

Ma.

My Contrary to the first Parade,* is called the Double Feint, at the Head, and is done thus, when you are within distance, make your first Motion or Feint at the face as in the foregoing Lesson, then make your second Motion low towards your Adversa∣ries Belly without his Sword, and with the Third Motion give in the Thrust without and above your Adversaries Sword with the Nails of your Hand in Quart, and let your Head, Hand, and Foot, mark every Motion: also when you make your second Motion towards your Adversaries Belly, you must hold your Left-Hand as I told you when you was shewn to play the single Feint at the Head see Plate 5. figure 2. when you give in your Thrust above the Sword, you must Quart your Head well, because you are to give it in with your Nails in Quart.

Sch.

Why am I in this Lesson to give in my Thrust without, and above my Adversaries Sword with my Nails in Quart, whereas in all other Thrusts without and above the Sword, I am to give in my Thrust, with my Nails in Terce?

Page  58
Ma.

The reason is this, that after you have made your second Motion, towards your Adversaries Belly, it lyeth more na∣turally to your Hand, to give in the Thrust with your Nails in Quart, then in Terce, and besides, you can give in your Thrust quicker this way then if you should Aim at the turning of your Nails in Terce, which if you did, your Body would be open to your Adversary within your Sword, if he should offer to Disengage and give you a Contre-temps, but when you give in your thrust with your Nails in Quart, your Body within your Sword is keept secure, especially if you Quart your Head well, and make use of your Left Hand as in Plate 5. Figure 2.

Sch.

I perceive so indeed, but must I not when I am without distance, or my Sword presented within my Adversaries, and intends to play this Lesson, observe your Directions given me in play∣ing the single Feint, at the Head, without di∣stance?

Ma.

Yes, and approach with your first Motion. *

Sch.

How is this Contrary to be Paried?

Ma.

Either with the Contre caveating Pa∣rade, or by answering every Motion, and so you will fall to Parie him with the first Parade, in Terce, see Plate 4 figure 2.

Page  59
Sch.

Which is your Contrary to the second Pa∣rade of the Single Feint at the Head?