The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.
Page  54

Lesson 7. Of the Single Feint at the Head.

Ma.

My seventh Lesson is the Single Feint, a la Teste, or single Feint at the Head.

Sch.

How am I to play it?

Ma.

When you are within distance play it after this manner, * you may either present your Sword within or without your Adver∣saries Sword, if your Sword be presented without, make a Motion or Feint, at your Adversaries Face, by stretching out of your right Arm a little, and turning your nails upwards towards your Adversarie, when you make the Motion give a beat with your Right Foot, and if you perceive him answer your Feint, then instantlie give in your Thrust at your Adversaries Arm-pitt with your Head under your Right Arm, as I shew you in the second Parade in Terce, Page 30, and for the same reasons there gi∣ven, the Motion at the Face, stretching of your Arm, turning of your Nails, and beat with your Right Foot, must be all done together, your Thrust must be gi∣ven with your Nails in Terce, and you must hold your left Hand before you, with the palm of it, looking towards your Right Page  [unnumbered]Page  [unnumbered]

[illustration]
Plat 5

For pag: 54
[illustration]
Fig i

One Pareing his Adversaries thrust give•• without & below his sword with the second para in quart see pag: 28
[illustration]
Fig 2

One giving in a thrust without & below the sword after his making a feint at the head see pag: 54
Page  55side, and that part of your Arm from your elbow to the points of your Fingers, must stand in a manner streight upwards, this you are alwayes to do when you give in this thrust, to preserve you from a Con∣tre-temps. see Plate 5 fig. 2.

Sch.

Why must I stretch out my Arm, and make my Nails look upwards from my self to∣wards my Adversary.

Ma.

Because the doing of it defends you from your Adversaries thrust, if he should Thrust without and above your sword, at the same time you are making the Motion at his Face.

Sch.

Would I not also if I keept my Nails in Quart, when I make that Motion, Parie his Thrust, if he should Thrust at the same time I am making it?

Ma.

Not at all, for do you not see, that if you made your Feint with your nails in Quart, your Body would be quite open without and above your sword, which mak∣ing your Feint with your Nails in Terce, is quite Guarded.

Sch.

I see so indeed, but how must I play this Lesson, if at the first I had presented my Sword, within my Adversaries?

Ma.

Just as I have been shewing you, but you must Disengage with the first Motion.

Page  56
Sch.

And how am I to play it being without distance?

Ma.

Also just as I have been shewing you, only you must approach with your Feint.

Sch.

Which is your Contrary to this single Feint at the Head?

Ma.

When I perceive my Adversary make use of this Lesson against me, * then I either give him the Thrust upon time, which is just as he is making his Feint at my Face, then I give him the Thrust at that same very time, and that same way he should have given it me, or otherwise I Parie him with the second Parade in Terce, or with the Contre-caveating Parade, by making half a Circle with it, from my Right to my left side, which at last, will end in the second Parade in Quart. see Plate 5. fig. 1.

Sch.

I understand you very well, but is their no contraries whereby a Man may win at his Adver∣sary although he make use of these Parades, when this Lesson is played upon him?

Ma.

Yes, for each of these Parades, have a contrary, which you may make use of, when you perceive your Adversary, make use of any of those two foregoing Parades a∣gainst this Lesson.

Sch.

I pray you shew me them?