The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 4. Of Caveating or Dis-engaging.

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Ma.

My fourth Lesson is of Cveating or Dis∣engaging, with your Adversaries Sword.

Sch.

How am I to do it?

Ma.

You must do it thus, when your Sword is presented within your Adversa∣ries Sword, and you would have it withoutPage  45his Sword, you must (keeping your Nails in Quart,) sloap your Swords point so low, that you may bring it up upon the out∣side, of your Adversaries, this sloaping must be done onlie with the wrest, and not with any motion at all of the Arm.

Sch.

Why so?

Ma.

Because, if you should move your Arm, when you Dis-engade, as some Igno∣rants do, you would discover so much of your Body, in the time of your Dis-engag∣ing, that your Adversary would have a very good time to give in a Thrust, which he would want, had you only moved your wrest, this sloaping of your Point with the wrest, and bringing of it up again on the other side, resembleth somewhat the Motion of the Contre-caveating Parade, and it must be done very quickly.

Sch.

It doth so indeed, but is this all I must do, when I intend to Dis-engage?

Ma.

Yes, for if once you can Dis-engage, and go from the inside of your Adversaries Sword, to the outside, and then back a∣gain to the inside, you will know how to dis-en∣gage, and slip your Adversaries Sword, as oft as you please.

Sch.

Which is your fifth Lessen?