The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 20. Of Redoubling of Thrusts.

Ma.

It is of Redoubling of Thrusts, and Gathering up of your left Foot, which is to be done thus, after you have let in your Thrust, and that your Adversarie hath broken your Measure,* and you at your Elonge, keeping your right Foot closs, draw your left so near to it, that you can either ap∣proach, or make another Elonge, just as you please, and when you Redouble or give in another Thrust, First Bind, for it is the securest way, and then give in your Thrust, it you can play this Lesson well, you may pursue your Adversarie, by this Redoubling, (although he should break your Measure) half a paire or more according to your strength, and when you Redouble, remember as a general rule, alwayes either Page  99to Beat, or Bind your Adversaries sword, before you offer to give the Thrust, for it will preserve you from a great many Contre∣temps.

Sch.

I think this a very useful Lesson, for I per∣ceive it is just the contrary to retireing, or break∣ing of measure, which is a great preventer of all thrusts.

Ma.

It is so, and if you learn not to do this Redoubling exactly, your Adversary may many a time shun your thrust, which (had you known how to Redouble) he might certainly have gotten.

Sch.

I perceive so indeed, but shew me your next Lesson?